Indigenous Energy Summit Agenda

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INDIGENOUS ENERGY SUMMIT GREY EAGLE EVENT CENTRE

January 16-17, 2019

2019


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TABLE OF

CONTENTS

Message from the President

4-5

Agenda

6-9

Bios

10-23

Sponsors

24-25

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A MESSAGE FROM THE

PRESIDENT On behalf of our National Board of Directors, I extend a warm welcome and thank you for your attendance and participation at this event. I acknowledge and thank the Federal Department of Indigenous Relations and the Government of Alberta as well as industry exhibitors for their financial support of this event. In addition to the regular Annual General meeting of our First Nations members where we provide a report card of our activities, we decided to convene this one day conference - an Indigenous Energy Summit - prior to the AGM to discuss the important pressing and timely issue that is on all of our radar screen – energy development, pipelines, and indigenous consultation and involvement in these projects. There are many, many moving parts on this topic as we know, and everyone - indigenous people, industry, Governments - all of us - are getting really impatient, restless and angry. There are demonstrations all over the country, both for and against pipelines and other linear projects. There is no shortage of blames and finger pointing. The people of Alberta are livid, and rightly so, as they see the industry that has been their bread and butter for decades wither in front of their own eyes. The amount of revenues Alberta is losing daily – over $80M – due to the pipeline gridlock and price differentials is staggering. The environmentalists and their supporters celebrate each time the Courts put a kibosh on pipelines such as what happened with the Court of Appeal decision on TMX. In the meantime, our Liberal Government appears clueless on a way forward. Sure, they have put together some sort of plan to address the two important issues raised by the court on TMX – indigenous consultation and marine impact considerations – but they have failed to provide a coherent plan on how they will build the pipeline that they now own.

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Our organization – the Indian Resource Council (IRC) – advocates on behalf of over 130 First Nations across Canada that have oil and gas rights and interests on their reserve lands as well on traditional lands. Many of these First Nations rely on their oil and gas resources as additional source of revenues, employment and other benefits. Some have developed successful and very productive business relationships with main stream industry. So, when the oil and gas industry experiences these terrible head winds, many of these First Nations feel the effect first hand. As Chief Roy Fox of Kainai Nation recently stated in his letter to the Prime Minister, the differential-related cuts and lack of pipeline capacity and proposed restrictive legislation such as Bill C-69 will cost every family on his Nation approx. $1,400 per year, a huge loss for a Nation that is already battling poverty and other challenges. Other producing FNs are experiencing similar problems. So, the IRC has decided to lend its voice to this important discourse. We have published several op-eds in the National newspapers and given many interviews to the media. Our message is simple: We support responsible energy development including pipelines that involve and provide significant benefits to Indigenous people. We obviously care about the environment perhaps more so than the professional environmentalists who claim to speak for us. THEY DO NOT. We want to be an equal and respected partner in this industry, so meaningful consultations are absolutely essential. Finally, we want the opportunity to own the pipeline on our own or in partnership with others. It is important that we have a voice of reason, one that provides credence to these ideas. I am hoping this conference will offer a realistic road map and strategy that will benefit all of us.

Thank you.

Stephen Buffalo, President/CEO, IRC

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AGENDA JANUARY 16

2019

7:00 am

Pipe Ceremony

7:30 am

Breakfast and Registration

8:00 am

Welcome Message Wallace Fox Chairman Indian Resource Council Chief Lee Crowchild Tsuut’ina Nation Honourable Richard Feehan Minister of Indigenous Relations Government of Alberta Stephen Buffalo President/CEO Indian Resource Council

9:00 am

Government/Regulatory Bodies Facilitator: Dr. Ken Coates Canada Research Chair in Regional Innovation Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy University of Saskatchewan Speakers to be announced

10:15 am

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Health Break


10:30 am

Industry Panel Facilitator: Bill Whitelaw CEO JWN Brian Schmidt President Tamarack Energy Ian Anderson President and CEO Trans Mountain Corporation Michael Binnion President Modern Miracle Network Chris Bloomer President and CEO Canadian Energy Pipeline Association

11:30 am

Chief Roy Fox Blood Tribe Indian Resource Council Board Member Christopher Slubicki President & CEO Modern Resources Inc.

12:00 pm

Lunch

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AGENDA JANUARY 16

2019

12:30 pm

Keynote Honourable Rachel Notley Premier Government of Alberta

1:00 pm

Dr. Vivian Krause Fair Questions

1:30 pm

Indigenous Panel Wallace Fox IRC Chairmam Stephen Buffalo President/CEO Indian Resource Council Additional speakers to be announced

2:15 pm

Health Break

2:30 pm

Consultation update on TMX

3:15 pm

Financing Models Facilitator: Clayton Norris VP Aboriginal Markets MNP LLP Indigenous Ownership – Model 1 Delbert Wapass TMX Ownership Indigenous Ownership – Model 2 Richard Betsalel Managing Director Crosbie and Company

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Indigenous Ownership – Model 3 Greg McLean Managing Dorector Criterium Group Indigenous Ownership – Model 4 Jason Calla Temixw Planning Ltd. First Nations Major Projects Coalition Strawman 2.0 Analysis and Structure 5:00 pm

Chief to Chief Networking Event Grey Eagle Event Centre

7:00 am

Pipe Ceremony

7:30 am

Breakfast and Registration

8:30 am

IRC Annual General Meeting

JANUARY 17

2019

12:00 pm

Lunch Canapux Presentation Wapahki Energy/Heart Lake First Nation/CN Rail/Sproule

2:30 pm

Roger Fragua Cota Holdings LLC/NDN Energy LLC

3:15 pm

Pipeline Monitoring and Saftey - RFID Technology Scott Higgins Co-Founder and Managing Partner Bear Claw Industries

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2019 IRC AGM

BIOS

RACHEL NOTLEY

RICHARD FEEHAN

Government of Alberta

Government of Alberta

CLAYTON NORRIS

BRIAN SCHMIDT

CHIEF ROY FOX

Indigenous Services MNP LLP

Tamarack Valley Energy Ltd

Kainai - Blood Tribe

Premier

Vice President

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Minister of Indigenous Relations

President & CEO

CHIEF LEE CROWCHILD Tsuut’ina Nation

Indian Resource Council Board Member


MICHEAL BINNION

JASON CALLA

VIVIAN KRAUSE

Questerre Energy

First Nations Health Authority

@FairQuestions

STRATER CROWFOOT

CHRIS SLUBICKI

Indian Oil and Gas Canada

Modern Resources Inc

President & Chief Executive Officer

CEO and Executive Director

Board of Directors Member

President, Chief Executive Officer & Director

Journalist & Author

ROGER B. FRAGUA

President

Cota Holdings, LLC & NDN Energy, LLC

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BIOS

RACHEL NOTLEY Premier

Government of Alberta

Rachel Notley leads Alberta’s first New Democratic government, with a strong majority and a diverse caucus including the highest percentage of women of any government in Canada. She was sworn in as Alberta’s 17th Premier on May 24, 2015. Rachel was born in Edmonton, Alberta and raised in Fairview, Alberta. This area was part of a constituency now named after her father, Grant Notley, a long-time and well-respected MLA who served as the leader of the province’s first NDP Opposition. Her mother, Sandy, also had a strong political influence, taking Rachel to protest marches before her tenth birthday and shaping a social conscience that continues to guide her. Rachel completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science at the University of Alberta, and earned a law degree at Osgoode Hall Law School. Her legal career focused on labour law, workers’ compensation advocacy, and workplace health and safety issues. She has served as an advisor to BC’s Attorney General. Rachel was first elected as an NDP MLA in 2008, serving the constituency of Edmonton – Strathcona. She was re-elected in 2012 with the highest share of the vote of any MLA in the province. She became party leader on October 18, 2014 and on May 5, 2015, led the party to a historic win that swept the Progressive Conservative party from office after almost 44 years. Rachel Notley’s New Democrat party ran on a platform that promised to support economic diversification and job growth, restore honest and open government, preserve and build the health care and education systems, and rebalance government revenues to make them more fair. This vision that offered a balance between a strong economy, environmental responsibility and social justice, was welcomed by Albertans who elected NDP candidates in 54 of Alberta’s 87 ridings. Rachel and her husband, Lou Arab, live with their 2 teenage children in Edmonton.

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RICHARD FEEHAN

Minister of Indigenous Relations Government of Alberta

Richard Feehan was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta, representing the constituency of EdmontonRutherford, on May 5, 2015. On February 2, 2016, Mr. Feehan was appointed Minister of Indigenous Relations. Prior to his service with the Legislative Assembly he dedicated over a decade to teaching for the Edmonton division of the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Social Work. Previous to this he was program director of the Edmonton Social Planning Council and vice-president of Edmonton’s Catholic Social Services. He also spent more than a decade in private social work practice. Community minded, he has served on the Clinical Advisory Team for the Association of Alberta Sexual Assault Services and as the U of Calgary Faculty of Social Work representative on the board for the Canadian Research Institute for Law and the Family. Over the years he has also worked closely with the Glenrose hospital, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Edmonton and the Edmonton Community Adult Learning Association. His extensive community involvement also includes volunteering with arts, sports and school programs and with numerous community organizations. Born and raised in Edmonton, he lives on Edmonton’s south side with his wife, Kathaleen, and their three children, Antoine, Kate and Brenndan. He has a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Alberta, a bachelor of social work from the University of Calgary and a masters of social work from Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario.

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BIOS

CHIEF LEE CROWCHILD Tsuut’ina Nation

Xakiji Lee Crowchild is the third generation Xakiji following in the footsteps of his father, former Xakiji Gordon Crowchild and his grandfather, former Xakiji David Crowchild whom Crowchild Trail is named after. Having an extensive and varied educational background, Xakiji Crowchild has graduated from Washington State University ‘82 B.Sc.P.E with a focus on biomechanics and Exercise Physiology, the University of British Columbia ’99 Dipl. EDST, Diploma in Film at The Vancouver Film School ‘02, He started at Mount Royal (College) University, where he was asked to return as an instructor. His achievements extend over many different disciplines and endeavors including and not limited to “The Tom Longboat Award – Canada’s Athlete of the year 1982” “Entrepreneur of the Year 89” from the Calgary Chamber of Commerce and the Khot-La-Cha Award from the University of British Columbia ‘99. He also successfully led a Dance company known as “Red Thunder Native Dance Theatre” for 13 years He has worked in many capacities and positions within Tsuut’ina. This includes, Manager of Infrastructure, Director of Public Works, and Emergency Management for the Nation. Outside the Nation he has also held a wide-range of positions for various boards including APTN Board of Directors and currently is the Chairman of Making Treaty 7 Cultural Society Board of Directors. Chief Lee Crowchild is a man of the people and knows that, “Serving the people – our people – requires diligence, sacrifice, and great earnestness”.

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MICHEAL BINNION

President and Chief Executive Officer Questerre Energy

Michael Binnion is the President and CEO and founding shareholder of Questerre Energy, founded in November 2000. Questerre is a public oil and gas production company with operations in Alberta, Quebec, Saskatchewan and Jordan. Mr. Binnion is a seasoned entrepreneur with a history of starting, financing and managing companies and not-for-profits. He has extensive experience as a board member for several high tech companies in Canada. He is the Executive Director of Rupert’s Crossing Ltd., a private merchant banking firm. He was a minority shareholder and manager of a private company that held interests in retail, commercial real estate and golf course developments. Mr. Binnion is the Chair of the Board of High Arctic Energy Services, a drilling and rig service company. He chaired the restructuring committee that turned High Arctic around after the 2008 financial crisis. A fifth-generation Albertan born in Calgary, Mr.Binnion is not only passionate about entrepreneurship but also a community-minded individual concerned with the prospects for future generations of Canadians. He is the founder and chairman of the Lesley Binnion Foundation for Disabled Sports, helping hundreds of kids and families make the extraordinary achievement of learning to ski a reality. Mr. Binnion is also the Chair of the Quebec Oil and Gas Association leading the debate on social license for hydrocarbons in that province. He is on the Board of Governors of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers and a Manning Foundation board member. He is a past chair of The Canadian Taxpayers Federation. Most recently, he founded the Modern Miracle Network to inform the public about the incredible benefits of hydrocarbons for people around the globe. In 2012 Mr. Binnion was honoured with the Queen’s Jubilee Medal, He was also named to the Fellowship of Chartered Accountants in 2015. Mr. Binnion published a peer-reviewed paper on shale gas in 2011 in Marine and Petroleum Geology, the international magazine for geologists. The piece is also listed on Research Gate. He is a Chartered Accountant and holds a Bachelor of Commerce with a major in Finance from the University of Alberta. The combination of his education, his experience and his passion for his community continue to drive his efforts today.

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BIOS

JASON CALLA

Board of Directors Member First Nations Health Authority

Jason has worked for First Nations at the local, regional and national level for the last twenty years. His experience includes: comprehensive community planning, including financial analysis of a First Nation government’s fiscal position in different planning, infrastructure finance and development scenarios; −

conducting financial analysis for First Nations in negotiations to purchase services like water, wastewater, police and fire protection, and transportation;

advising on financial components of self-government, impact benefit agreement and Reconciliation Agreement negotiations;

advising on options for meaningful economic participation in proposed major resource projects for First Nations participating in the First Nation Major Projects Coalition; and,

research, planning and policy development for First Nation-led institutions established by the First Nations Fiscal Management Act including the First Nations Financial Management Board, the First Nations Tax Commission and now the proposed First Nation Infrastructure Institution.

Jason completed a Bachelor of Commerce at the University of British Columbia in 1994. In 1998, Jason completed an M.Sc. at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Jason is currently serving his third term on the Board of Directors of the First Nations Health Authority as the Treasurer and Chair of the Finance and Risk Management Committee. Jason is also a member of the Squamish Nation.

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VIVIAN KRAUSE

Journalist and Author @FairQuestions

At The Financial Post, they call me the girl who played with tax data and uncovered the foreign funding of Canadian green groups. But it wasn’t always this way... Born in Vancouver, I am a B.C. girl at heart. As a child I lived in Kitimat. My father taught at Kildala Elementary School. Our family eventually moved to Kamloops where I finished high school at Westsyde Secondary (a proud Westsyde Whunda!). After a few years at community college and U.B.C., I went back east for a B.Sc. from McGill University. My major was Nutrition. I also have a Masters of Science from l’Université of Montréal. During the 1990s, I worked for the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) on programs for maternal and infant nutrition in Guatemala (1990-1995) and Indonesia (1996-2000). I also did some food aid planning for the U.N. High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR). Before that, I had worked with Algonquin people to prevent diabetes in their communities in the north part of Quebec. During 2002 and 2003, I was Corporate Development Manager for North America for NUTRECO, one of the world’s largest producers of farmed salmon and fish feed. In 2006, I prepared a submission to the Special Committee on Sustainable Aquaculture of the B.C. Government. While preparing that submission, I unexpectedly came across a grant for an “antifarming camapign” with “science messages” and “earned media.” When I raised questions about this grant from the Gordon & Betty Moore Foundation, four grants for a multi-million dollar campaign against salmon farming were quietly re-written by the Moore foundation. While going through the tax returns of American charitable foundations to try and figure out who was funding the campaign against salmon farming, I happened to notice many grants for a “Tar Sands Campaign” (see here also). That’s when I started to write about the campaign against Alberta oil. As I tried to take a look at the salmon farming controversy from a marketing perspective - a point of view that I missed when I worked in the industry - I wrote two papers about the so-called ‘science’ about PCBs in farmed salmon, and sea lice - and the money behind it. Since the fall of 2010, I have been writing a series of articles published in The Financial Post.

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BIOS

CLAYTON NORRIS Vice President

Indigenous Services MNP LLP

Clayton Norris, CAFM, MBA, CPA, CMA, is the Vice-President of Indigenous Services for MNP. He has been the team leader for a variety of management and financial advisory projects with Indigenous Nations, businesses and individuals. Clayton has extensive experience in advisory services working with Indigenous communities providing accounting, tax and consulting services. With nearly 300 members, Clayton’s team has become one of the largest in North America serving First Nation, MÊtis and Inuit communities and businesses. Clayton is on the Board of Directors at MNP and is on the Board of the Alberta Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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BRIAN SCHMIDT President & CEO

Tamarack Valley Energy Ltd

Mr. Schmidt is a professional engineer with over 35 years of oil and gas experience. He is currently President and CEO of Tamarack Valley Energy Ltd., a TSX public company focused on developing repeatable, predictable plays in Western Canada. Mr. Schmidt founded the company along with a handful of respected oil entrepreneurs, with $2.5 million of seed capital in 2009. Tamarack Valley has grown substantially since 2009 to over 10,000 BOEPD, and a market capitalization of over $450 million. Tamarack is focused on repeatable, producible drilling targets like the Cardium and its primary producing area is Wilson Creek, in West Central Alberta. Tamarack’s culture is one based on being nimble to industry volatility, value focused, cost conscious and fiscal prudence. Measuring success on a full cycle rate of return and delivering on per share targets is core to Tamarack’s culture. Prior to Tamarack, Brian was a founder of Spearpoint Energy Corp. (“Spearpoint”), a successful private company. Previously, he was the President of Apache Canada, where his team assembled large blocks of undeveloped land with material drilling upside that contributed to significant growth during his tenure, to a peak of 110,000 BOEPD. He began his career at Shell Canada, spending 19 years there prior to joining Apache Canada. In addition to his duties at Tamarack, Mr. Schmidt is an advisor to the boards of Indian Oil & Gas Co-Management, and a board governor at the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, and Former Chairperson of CAPP. He is also currently director of Aspenleaf Energy, a private Oil & Gas company based in Calgary and a former director at Tusk Energy and Avant Garde Energy.

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BIOS

CHIEF ROY FOX

Indian Resource Council Board Member Kainai - Blood Tribe

Chief of the Blood Tribe from 1980 until his retirement in 1996. Previous to that, he served on Council from 1974 to 1980. After his retirement, Roy joined the Indian Resource Council (IRC) as President/CEO from 1996 to 2013. After a 3 year hiatus, Roy was asked by his Elders to run as Chief again which he did. He was re-elected in 2016 for a 4 year term. Chief Fox attended the University of Lethbridge and Lethbridge Community College. He is a recipient of the Aboriginal Achievement Award (Energy) Roy, a member of the Fisheater Clan, is the great grandson of Chief Crop Eared Wolf who was a successor to Chief Red Crow. Crop Eared Wolf in his last will and testament passed the chieftainship to his son Shot Both Sides who in turn passed it to his son Jim Shot Both Sides who held the position until 1980 when he asked Roy to assume the responsibility of Chief of the Blood Tribe. As Chief of the 2nd largest First Nation in Canada, Roy holds several portfolios in economic development including oil and gas, renewable energy, the Blood Tribe Agricultural Project (BTAP), a multi-million dollar irrigation Project and is the lead negotiator of outstanding Blood Tribe specific and comprehensive land claims.

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STRATER CROWFOOT

CEO and Executive Director Indian Oil and Gas Canada

Strater Crowfoot, who previously served as IOGC’s CEO and Executive Director from 1998-2003, rejoined IOGC on April 28, 2008. Mr. Crowfoot had left IOGC in 2003 to accept the position of Chairman of the Indian Taxation Advisory Board, which he held from 2003-2006. As well, he was elected by his community to serve as Head Chief of the Siksika Nation on two separate occasions, first from 1988-1995 and then again in 2004-2005. Beginning in August 2006 until the resumption of his duties at IOGC, he was a board member with the National Energy Board of Canada. Mr. Crowfoot holds a Master of Business Administration degree from Brigham Young University of Provo-Utah.

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CHRIS SLUBICKI

President, Chief Executive Officer & Director Modern Resources Inc

From 2009 to 2011, Chris was Chief Executive Officer of OPTI Canada, where he was brought into a distressed situation, stabilized the company and sold it to CNOOC for $2.1 billion in late 2011. Chris is the former Vice-Chairman of Scotia Waterous and was one of the four original founders of Waterous and Co., a private global oil and gas mergers and acquisitions firm, starting the firm in Calgary in 1989. Prior to selling the firm to Bank of Nova Scotia in 2005, the firm expanded to offices in five countries with a staff of 88 and completed hundreds of oil and gas transactions over its 17-year tenure. Chris has held operations management and engineering positions within the oil and gas industry at Placer CEGO Petroleum Ltd. and Chevron Canada Resources Ltd. Chris graduated with a B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering from Queen’s University and an MBA from the University of Calgary. He is a Professional Engineer in Alberta, and a member of APEGA. Chris is currently on the boards of Bonavista Energy Corporation and the Emily Brydon Youth Foundation. Chris served on the board of Alpine Canada Alpin for seven years, the last two as Chair. Chris coached young ski racers with the Fernie Alpine Ski Team for 14 years, and served as President of the club for three years.

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ROGER B. FRAGUA President

Cota Holdings, LLC & NDN Energy, LLC

Roger Fragua (Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico) has dedicated his professional career to the advancement and development of American Indian communities. Roger is currently the President of Cota Holdings, LLC, and NDN Energy, LLC, whose mission is to support Tribal community and economic development in the energy sector. Cota is currently engaged with several Tribal development projects as well as supporting energy companies’ efforts within Indian Country. Roger served the Tribes as the Deputy Director of the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT), based in Denver, Colorado. Under the direction of the elected leadership of the 47 federally recognized Tribes and four Canadian First Nations, CERT has dramatically restructured the federal-Indian relationship with respect to minerals, mining, taxation, and Tribal jurisdiction over environmental regulations on Indian lands. Prior to joining CERT, Roger worked as a manager for Enron Corporation in Houston, Texas where he was instrumental in creating innovative business concepts and promoting partnerships between Tribes and Enron. Enron, the most innovative Fortune 500 Corporation in the U.S. over the last several years, developed a genuine interest in seeking partnerships with Tribes in many areas of energy development, not limited to but to include; gas, electricity, wind and water. Roger has also worked with the Western Governors’ Association and the National Tribal Environmental Council on State and Tribal relations as it relates to environmental issues. The basis for Roger’s commitment to Indian Country is steeped in his long tenured background as the Tribal Administrator for his own Pueblo. Roger served as the Tribal political and business resource of the Pueblo of Jemez for several years. Roger is married to Clarice of San Felipe Pueblo, New Mexico and has three sons and one daughter.

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IES

SPONSORS THE INDIGENOUS ENERGY SUMMIT IS SPONSORED BY: The Government of Alberta

GOLD SPONSOR Trans Mountain Corporation

MEDIA PARTNERS Alberta Native News

Daily Oil Bulletin

First Nations Drum

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INDIAN RESOURCE COUNCIL OF CANADA 235, 9911 CHIILA BOULEVARD TSUU T’INA NATION, ALBERTA T2W 6H6 T:403-281-8308 F:403-281-8351

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