Page 1



~EVOuU1l1ION

NO. XI.

"ONE REVOLUTION PER ANNUM."

PUBuISHED BY JIlHE SJIlUDENJIlS OF THE

HOBOI\EN, N. J.

AP~Iu, 188~.


..

.. For 'I.ym 'Was levert "ave at Twenty bookes, clad it, blakor reed, Titan robes riche or

'iltlte/~

or gay sautrie."

\\'[ITTE, RTOKES, & ALLEN, Publishers, 102 FIFTH ArE""ÂŁ, NEW YORK


BOARD OF ~DlfORSj

CRAS. F. P ArumR, Chai1'man.

J. H. STEWART.

Jos. S. MCCOY.


SAl.-Uf AfORY , LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: But little more than one hundred years have elapsed since James Watt so perfected the steam-engine that it might be used economically, and by so doing made for himself an immortal name. From that time the age of the steam-engine may be said to have begun, and today, as we look about us, we see it driving the machinery of thousands of om' factories; by means of it we are drawn over the ground at a rate never dreamed of a century ago, and with its aid, voyages which formerly took several months to perform are now finished in as many days. But while the steam-engine does so much for us, like almost all servants it requires to be continually watched, and unless constant vigilance is exercised, it becomes a source of danger. That great engine called the Stevens Institute of Technology is no exception to this rule, and so once every year all work is stopped and each part critically examined. If anything is found in a dangerous condition, it is repaired or replaced, and if any improvement can be suggested which will make the machine work more advantageously, it is added. This examination of the various parts of this engine is conducted, however, in a very methodical way ; each one is assigned his part in it, and to us has been given THE E CCENTRIC. Just one year has passed away since it made its last revolution, and many things, some serious, others comical, have taken place during that time. While the engine has stopped and the others are busy with their parts, let us glance over these pages and see for ourselves those things which have adhered, as it were, to THE ECCENTRIC during the past year. 'Ve hope that out of all the matter herein contained our readers may finel a little that is amusing, if not instructive, and we shall feel more than repaid if the perusal of THE ECCENTRIC for 1884 brings back to our alumni pleasant memories of their College life, or causes om' undergraduates to forget for the moment their severe routine of studies. And now we are ready to begin. Bll t stay-we had almost forgotten


8

THE ECCENTRIC.

the dedication; and no work would be complete without that. Mark Twain says that whenever a book is dedicated to anyone, that person is sure to buy at least one copy. Therefore we dedicate tbis bookFinl-To John Smith, and we promise that if every John Smith in this world buys a copy, we will present the Athletic Association with as handsome a gymnasium as any in the country. Second-To the Faculty, and we hope that with their consummate wisdom they may devise some method of making our study hours a minimum, our leisure hours a maximum, and turning us out as good engineers at the same time. Third-To our lady friends, warning them at the beginning not to believe all they may read in the follmving pages. FOllrth-andlast, but assuredly not least-To Olu' fellow-students, with the sincere wish that they may never, like us, be put in a position where they must write something humorous for THE ECCENTRIC, with the consoling thought that they are going to "flunk" next day on account of it.


MRS. E.

A.

STEVENS,

'VILLI AlII W.

RE\,. S .UIDEL SmPFEN, ESQ.

B.

DOD,


FACUL..iY HE...~RY

AND INSiRUCiORS_

}\fORTON, PH.D .............. .4 River Street, Hoboken. President.

ALFRED M. MAYER, PH.D ....... . ..... South Orange, N. J. Professor of Physics. RoBERT H. THURSTON, A.M., C.E ...... 324 Hudson Street, Hoboken Professor of lIIechanical Enginem-ing. Director of the JJIechanical Laboratol'Y. DE VOLSON WOOD, A.M., C.E ......... Boonton, N. J. Professol' of lIfathematics and 1I1echanics. CHARLES W. MACCORD, A.M .......... 6 Tenth Street, Hoboken. Professol' of Mechanical Dmwing. ALBERT R. LEEDS, PH.D.............. "The Trenton," Hoboken. Professol' oj Chmnistry. CHARLES F. KROEH, A.1\! .... ......... Orange, N. J. SeCl'etary of the Faculty and Profess01' of Model'n Languages. REV. EDWARD WALT", A.M ............ 12 Ninth Street, Hoboken. P1'Ojessor ~/ Belles-Lettres. JA;\1ES E. DENTON, M.E .......•...... 253 Garden Street, Hoboken. Projessol' of Experimental jJIechanics and Instructor in Shop-work. CLARENCE A. CARR, Ass'T ENG'n, U.S.N., .170 Hudson Street, Hoboken. Professol' of l1fm'in e Engineering and Instrudor in lIfathematics. 'YILLIAlII E. GEYER, PH.D ....... , ... .4 River Street, Hoboken. P7'ojesi;or of Applied Electricity. ADAM RIESENBERGER, M.E ............ Union Hill, N. J. Instructor in lIIechanical Dmwil1g. EDGAR EVERHAR'l', PH.D ............. , 170 Fourth Street, Jersey City. Instructor in Chemistry. THo~1As

B. STILLMAN, PH.D ........... "The Trenton," Hoboken. IIlStI'Uct01' in Chemistry.


1 911TH

the appearance of our monthly college paper, The Indica~'t tor, during the past year, THE ECCE~Tmc, in its annual revolution, finds its legitimate province somewhat curtailed; and the discussion of current Institute topics and comments on matters pertaining to the course anel discipline would now properly come within the range of The Indicator, thus necessitating a slight change in this permanent feature of THE EccE~Tmc. At the risk, however, of repeating what has already found expression through other channels, we venture to submit a few observations upon the current topics which interest the College community. First of all, let us welcome The Indicat01' as the most important enterprise of the students which has characterized the past year. Now that we have a monthly paper, it is only surprising that Stevens could do without one so long. Judging from the very flattering reception which was accorded to it by all connected with the Institute, and the manner in which it has since been supported, it is quite evident that The Indicat01', like THE ECCENTRIC, is certain to become one of the important and recognized permanent institutions of Stevens. We note with pleasure the accession of the Uu Chapter of the Chi Phi Fraternity to the already large circle of College Fraternities which constitute so important a feature of undergraduate life here. We regard the new Chapter as a decided acquisition, and bid it welcome to a prosperous career. We further note with satisfaction the marked revival which has occurred during the past year in the athletic interests. With the impetus given by an unusually successful foot-ball season, and a prospective base-ball season which promises good results, there is no reason why Stevens should not be able to hold its own against other small Colleges in general athletics. The leading articles which f01-


12

THE EOOENTRIO.

low give a-good 1'ei;ume of what has been accomplished in the various branches of athletics, and will, we think, merit perusal. Nothing, perhaps, on the social side of student life here has been so much appreciated as the very enjoyable receptions which Dr. and lVII's. Leeds and Prof. and Mrs. Thurston have held during the past year; and although the acknowledgments of these social favors are properly matters of individual concern with the students, we feel that THE ECCE~TRIC would be an unfaithful exponent of the sentiment of all, if some acknowledgment of the courtesy and kindness of Dr. and Mrs. Leeds and Prof. and 1\1rs. ThUl'ston were not made here. Tmning now to matters more directly connected with the Institute itself, we desire to express our appreciation of the excellent work which is being accomplished in the newly formed Department of Applied Electricity. 'Ye cannot more than inadequately express the thanks of the students to President Morton for his munificence in providing the means for inaugurating and conducting this youngeat, though by no means least important, department; and we think that the interest which is being shown on all sides in this department is an ample justification of the ,,-isdom ,,-hich prompted him in his liberal act. "Where are we to haye our Commencement this year?" is a question which is frequently asked by the members of the. Senior Class. For the past three years the Commencements haye been held in the hall of the German Club, but owing to the large size of this year's graduating class, we fear that its friends cannot be accommodated there. We trust that the Committee appointed will secure a suitable place.


CL.-ASS OF

'84,

(J)ttt.c'cl;S.

E. B.

RE~WICK ................. PI"I'sidelit.

KE~;;;ETII TORnA~CE .............

Vi('e-Prel3iilent. C. L. G.\TELY .................. Rre. 8eCl·elary. ,Yo O. B.Ul~ES ........ . ........ ('0)". 8ecreta1·Y· VI'. H. BRIHTOL ..... , .......... . Tl"easlll'er.

C. F. P I11KEll

• . • . . • • • • • • • • . . • • . IIi~I01·iall.

D. S. J .\conrs ..... , ............ Fool-ball Captain. H. R. REA ................ , ... . ]]ase-ball Captain, H, DE B, P .mSOXH ...... , , . , .. , .. Chaplain.

'YILLI...,\[ SLEEPER ALDRICH .. , . , , , .. , . , .. , , .. ,Burlington, N. J, JA)IES STnO~G ALDEX, , ... , .. , ... , .......... Passaic, N. J. WILLI.nI OLIn:R B.UlxE:'l, B.0.rr .............. Paterson, N. J. J£\IES BEATTY, JR., B.0.II............... . .... Baltimore, l\Id. JOHX ~l)EnSO~ BE~SEL, .l.T.A ......... , ..... New York City . .ALLEN WJNG Bn.UXARD................. . .... Brooklyn, N. Y. WILLIAM HENRY BRISTOL . . . . ............ , ... 'Yaterbury, Ct. SA..\lUEL PREscoT'r BCSII, A. T. A ........... , ... Staten Island. L,U'AYETTE DALY CARHOLL, iI>.K. W .. , . , ...... , • Ashland, Va. W.-ILTER C.umoLL, :$. X .. . .................... Now Orleans, La. Emv.uID LIXTHWL':II DEN'r, x.iI> .... , .. , ........ Washington, D. C. ADOLPH FABER DU FAUR, J H............ , . . . ' . Newark, X J. RICHAllD LEE J!"E.UlX, B.0. II .. , .. . ............ ~lobile, Ala. ER~EST HOW.ffiD FOSTER, .l.T . .l.. . . . . . . .. . ... Engle\\"oocl, N. J.


14

THE ECCENTRIC.

FRANK WEBSTER FOSTER .......... , .......... Brooklyn, N. Y. CHARLES LINCOL.'< GATELY, 0.E ................ Newtown, Ct. HAnRY LAURENCE GANTT, B.0.II............... Baltimore, Md. DAVID SCHE~CK JACOBUS .................... Ridgefield, N. J. ALVIN PAUL KLETZSCH....................... Milwaukee, ,Vis. WILLIAM LOlill LYALL, A.T.A .................. New York City. VICTOR MACKIEWICZ ......................... New York City. DABNEY HERNDON MAURY, K.A ................ Richmond, Va. HENRY JACQUES MILLER ...................... Elizabeth, N. J. HARVEY FORREST MITCHELL, B.0.II ..... , ...... Brooklyn, N. Y. ANTHONY SAUNDERS MORRIS, 0.E .............. ,Vynnewood, Pa. CHARLES FRANCIS PARKER, A. T.A .............. New York City. HARRY DE BERKELEY PARSONS, A.w...... , ...... New York City. WILLIAM HENRY PIERCE, l.X ................. Baltimore, Md. HENRY S)lI'l'H PRE..'<TISS...................... New York City. HENRY ROBINSON REA, 0.E ................... Pittsburg, Pa. EDWAlill BREVOORT RENWICK .............•.... l\fillburn, N. J. GEORGE RoBERTS, X. <1> ••••••••••••••••••••••• Richmond, Va. GEORGE FLEMMING SANDTS, B.0.II............. Easton, Pa. GEORGE MARSHALL SINCLAlR .................. Philadelphia, Pa. CHARLES 'VALTER TUOMAS, X. '11.••.•.....•..••• West Hoboken, N. J. KENNETH TORRI...'<CE, A. T. A. . . . . . . . . . . . . .• .,. Tenafly, N. J. BENJAMIN 'VHITEHEAD TUCKER, X.W ............ Newark, N. J. WILLARD STEW.un TUTTLE ................... Brooklyn, N. Y. FRA...'<K VA...'< VLECK, X.W ................•..... Kingston, N. Y. JOHN FALCONER VAN VLECK .........•........ Kingston, N. Y. CHARLES WILCOX WHITING, A.T.A .............. Pottsville, Pa. ALEXANDER WURTS, 0.E ...................... New Haven, Ct.


Q' OMETThlES,

when I have almost reached the end of an interesting novel, I stop and turn back to the beginning, to read the descriptions of the characters again, scarcely believing that they can be the same ones I ;starterl with. And now, as I take up my pen to write the history of the Class of '84, I think how much it really is like a novel, and find it hard to believe that we are the same beings tlJat started as Freshmen four years ago. Some of the characters in this novel have dropped out, and new ones have been introduced in the middle of the story; at one minute we are laughing at some of their odd sayings or doings, and at the next we are mouming over their mishaps. Tum back with me four years, and let us go through the story together. It opens in one of the recitation rooms of the Institute, in which are seated a number of young men. None of them appear to know each other, and each one seems to be deeply engaged in sCllltinizing the various parts of the room, or wondering what kind of a fellow the one seated next to him is. All at once the door opens and the Professor enters the room. He arranges the books on his desk, and then begins to call the roll. During the roll-call one of the students turns to his companion and remarks that the Professor 1001rs like a very smart man, whereupon the one spoken to replies in a rather contemptuous tone, "Well, he may look it but he ain't. Why, I stuck him myself on one of the questions he gave me on examination." The one who spoke first thinks from this that his companion must be one of the smartest men in the class, an illusion which is banished shortly afterward when the aforesaid companion commences a straight run of "flunks," which he keeps up till the end of the term, when something else-this time not an illusion-is banished. And so our novel loses one of its first characters. Little by little the students become acquainted 'with each other, and the usual rushes with the Sophomores follow. And so the year passes away and we become Sophomores. Then how we delight in stanuing before the door of Professor ,yooel's room and looking at the scared faces of the would-be Freshmen. Lessons were rather hard that year, but we cheered each other up by saying that they

JJ


16

THE ECCENTRIC.

would be easier next year. Nothing of much importance happened, and we pursued" the even tenor of om' way" till we became Juniors. Again we found our studies pretty hard, and again we consoled ourselves with the thought that we would have a "regular snap" in the Senior year. Snap? 0 heavens! did I say snap? Yes, we thought we had a snap when we struck turbines, didn't we? And the regulating apparatus-I have no doubt that that caused more profanity than any other thing ever could, excepting, perhaps, when you can't find any ink mixed and you have to mix a whole dishful to ink in one line. But there was one in the Olass who revelled in drawing turbines. He drew turbines from morning till night, and when he wasn't drawing them he was dreaming of them. One design followed another with marvellous rapidity, and he colored them in red, brown, old gold, green, yellow, and crushed raspberry. But the height of his ambition was reached when he drew a wheel which was so simple that" it might be taken apart and carried across the Desert of Sahara without any difficulty." When this was shown to one of the Faculty, he remarked, with a far-away look in his eyes which betokened extreme pleasure and admiration, that he didn't think any one would want that design unless he did live in the Desert of Sahara. And then our class-room. How my hand trembles as I wTite those words-not that I feel any emotion, but because I am afraid some one will chastise me for calling it a class-room. Let us sit heTe and talk to the fellows a while. Who is this just entering the door? That, sir, is Jim Beecher, the Oampanini of the Olass. Some one makes a request-" Sing us a song, Jim." For an instant he looks rather doubtfully at the speaker, and then starts forth on his song. Just before he began we could hear the words spoken to the Olass below, "This governor, you see, is not isochro-," but as soon as that song reaches the room the lecture ceases. Louder, clearer, that pm'e young voice sounds, now trilling high up on the scale and then coming down as gently as one does in his first attempt at roller-skating. Everyone forgets his cares and sits there listening breathlessly. The pictlU'e of Mary Anderson seems to look out upon him with admiration. He has almost finished-a few trills and he is done. We are back again to om' cares and troubles. The voice down-stairs is heard to resume, ÂŤ This governor, you see, is not isochronous-" We sit there for a time andloo'k at him without speaking a word, and then some one says; "Thank goodness, we have heard you once more before we graduate." And everyone looks up and says" Amen."


THE ECCENTRIC.

17

I must stop now, though I could write dO"lYn many more of the doings of '84. But what is the use? They will remain bere as traditions long after we are gone, and while they do remain we will not be forgotten. We ar(now about to cross that line which divides boyhood from manhoocl, and to leave our old associations for new ones. Everyone realizes how much depends on starting aright, and though we feel regret at leaving here, we also feel pleasure in the anticipation of what the future may bring us. And so '84 makes bel' farewell bow and leaves you.


CL.ASS OF

'85,

<Dtti cc\.!,s. PAUL '''ILLIS .... , ............. P1路esident. C. A. PRATT .................. ECe-P1路esident. B. H. COFFEy ..... ............ Secretm路y. A. W. BURCHARD ............... T1路eaSIITer.

sr.

S. DILWORTII ............... Foot-ball Captain. J. 8. McCoy................... Historian.

~tcm.oc\.!'s.

HEXRY ABBEY.............. ................ Cleveland, O. 'YILLLm ALLEl< ADRIANCE, O~CAR

e.=: ............... Poughkeepsie, N. Y.

How.\RD B.\LDWIX, B.0.1I. ............. Newark, N. J.

CHARLES DOUGLAS BODiTOX, A. T. n ............ Sycamore, m. 'V ALTER JOSEPII BRO.\D~m.\Do\\' . . ............... Shrewsbury, N. J. Eml'Il< Bl"RHORX.............. . ............. Hoboken, N. J. ANSOX ',"OOD BencH.um, X. 'ii ................. Hoosac Falls, N. Y. ''"ILLLnI TnQ)IPSOl< CLERK ..... ........... ... Jersey City, X. J. B\RTOX HAX\LL COFFEY, X.'ii . ................ ~ew York City. "'ILLL\;\! HElnI.\N CORwrx .................... X ewark, N. J. "-ILLIAlII DILWORTH, B.e.II ............ ...... Hoboken, N. J. ERNEST DREYSPRING ................ .. . . ..... l\It. J\Ieigs, Ala. FUEDElUCK FISCHER .......................... Pittsburg, Pa. JOB ROCKFIELD FURMAN .............. . ....... New York City. ARTHUR GH,\HA)I GLASGOII', D..T. ~ ............. Richmond, Va. LEON GREEXEBADI, X. 'ii. . . . . . . . . . .. . ....... 8all Fl'UllCisco, Cal. MELLEN STAl<WOOD ILARLOw, A. T.n ............ "'est Aubul'll, Me.


THE ECCENTRIC.

19

PAUL GORDON HUSSEY ....................... Brooklyn, N. Y. LEWIS NEYINS LUKENS .................... , .. Elizabeth, N. J. NORTH MoLEAN, X.'l1 ...................... . Hoboken, N. J. CHARLES E~IMETT l\l~CHOLD, A.T.A ... , .. , ..... Hoboken, N. J. SIMEON l\l~RTrnEZ, X. 'l1 ............•......... Guanajuato, l\Iexico. JOSEPH SYLYESTER McCoy. ................... 'Washington, D. C. EDWARD HER)I.h'i l\1UNRWITZ, A. T.n ............ l\1ihmukee, ·Wis. WILLIA~I HERMAN l\!UNRWITZ .................. Milwaukee, ·Wis. ROLLIN NORRIS, B.e.II....................... lichester, l\Id. OTTO FERDINAND PFORD'l'E ........ , ........... Hoboken, K. J. CLAYTON ALLEN PRATT, 'l1. Y .................. ,Chicago, m. JosE CHARLES RENDON ....................... Guayaquil, Ecuador. WILLIAM WIIITTEN RENWICK. " .............. Millburn, N. J. RIOH.IllD HENllY RICE, A.T.A ................. Hoboken, N. J . JOHN MORRELL RUSBY ....................... Franklin, N. J. ALBER'f ANTON AUGUST SILBER ................ Hoboken, N. J. TrrO)IAS GA1lD~'ER SlUTH, JR., B.e.II .......... . Cincinnati, O. 'WrLLLnI NORTON STEVENS, X.I}!.... . ......... Montclair, N. J. JOHN HENDERSON STEWART, e.s .......... . .. ,Pittsburg, Pa. EDGAR F. R. VARIeR .......... , .. , .......... Jersey City, N. J. WILLIAM HARVIE ,VADE, K.~.K .............. Richmond, Va. CHARLES LUDLOW WETMORE, e.s . ...... . ...... New York City. JOHN FRANOIS WILKES, A. T.n ................. Charlotte, N. C. HAnny DANIEL 'YILLIAMS .................... Johnstown, Pa. PI 1, WILLIS ............. , ................ , Orange, X. J.


HIStORY OF

'85,

ELL, here I have entered Stevens as a Juniol'. The Junior Class is called the Class of '85. This does not mean that there are eighty-five students in the Class, but in order to be precise and mathematical, at the same time being uncommon, the multiplication sign is understood between the 8 and the 5. Therefore the correct name "'ould be the Class of forty. Why, there is a fellow in the Class who is so enthusiastic that he has even adopted the name of forty, or Pfordte, as he spells it, in order not to be considered plebeian. Our class is a very good one: in fact, it is the perfection-the very beau ideal of a class. I have heard at least forty others echo these sentiments. The other clay I heard our Class called a happy family. The reason of this must be that in it are grouped representatives from all parts of the hemisphere, living in perfect amity and friendship, and all knowing one another personally. This, I have heard, is one of the marked characteristics of our Class. Since I have been here I have not had time to get homesick; I have hardly time in which to eat; and if I had three times as much time as I now have, I still would not have time to conscientiously prepare my lessons. Judging from our treatlllent by a certain Professor at one of our examinationfJ, our Class must consist of about half a dozen honest men, the remainder being wicked, wicked sons of deceit, who should, in accordance with all justice, be summarily expelled. I was laboring under this impression, taking wearisome care of my person and property, in order to prevent them being stolen by a classmate, when I was agreeably surprised to find, according to all the other Professors, that we were gentlemen and worthy of being treated as such. Since I have been here I have had very little practical work, ex-

W


THE ECCENTRIC.

21

cept in the chemical laboratory; and there it is very practical indeed. Some very peculiar experiments are also tried there, and they have the advantage of being as original as peculiar. For example, the commonest is to combine Hand 0 by lighting a mixture of the gases, at the same time not making any noise. I do not think that this has been successfully accomplished yet. Another experiment I saw a few weeks ago was to entirely cover the face with a small porcelain crucible. I believe that this experiment ,..-as successful, with the exception of the eyes. Our Class has an attenuated little room, where we are kindly allowed to haug Oill' coats and hats, and "'here we can congregate so as to be out of everyone's way but our own. This room is dignified by the term "Junior Class-room," but it is really a terrible struggle for the Juniors to preserve its sanctity against the lower classmen. Indeed, I bave heard classmates-and I blush for their lack of esp?'it de C011)S-who, apparently in their right minds, argue that our room should be free to all, without restriction. It seems strange to me that '85 cannot do as it pleases in regard to this room, while certain parties cau. In fact, certain individuals persist in sports-forbidden by the Class-forgetting all the pressing legitimate duties imposed by the Class and by the Faculty. It seems to me that the Class is mnch indebted to Professor and 1\1rs. Leeds for some very enjoyable evenings. I think that a little social ilitercourse engenders a more perfect and friendly under路 standing between the students and the Faculty than would otherwise e:-tist. We haye finally been rewarded for our interest tlml hard work in foot-ball by having the captain chosen from our Class; aml this, too, without r. single person being able to say that a better choice could have been made. 'iYe expect much of him. Our Class, true to its principles, has again, for the secoml year, started, and successfully carried tln'ough the project of having a gymnasium. 'iYe also gained laurels ill tennis, through one of our number winning the singles, and helping to " 'in the doubles, in the tennis tournament of last fall. The meetings of our Class for the past year have been something unique and curious in their line. I should very much like to read the minutes of some of these meetings, as I think they would compare favorably with some of :\1ark Twain's best efforts. I thought at the time, however, that it would necessitate an improved


THE ECCENTRIC.

22

phonograph to take these minutes. This one peculiarity of every one saying whatever he has to say or think, immediately and simultaneously, greatly shortens our meetings. One day, not long ago, after about a week of steady rainfall, as I entered the class-room I noticed that everyone wore a look of subdued mystery, and that there was a great amount of whispering going on. Everyone appeared uneasy, as if some very important, very remarkable incident was about to take place, 01' else had just happened. I immediately began to make inquiries, but was answere(l evasively, or at the best, very vaguely. The excitement spread like wila-fire. Soon the whole Class was broken up into small groups, all eagerly discussing some wonderful theme, 01' else eal'l1estly endeavoring to solve the mystery. Before long the classroom became too confined to hold so much intense excitement, so it literally boiled over, and soon the whole College was enveloped in a ferment of nel'YOUS expectancy. All thought of lessons, and ~ven sports were throwll asi Ie, and chaos reigned supreme. Soon the Professors caught the contagion, and to Fmch an extent that they were utterly unable to distinguish between a rush and a flunk, while the students had succeeded in getting the lessons for the day so inextricably complicated and mixed that they could not say whether they were reciting in chemistry 01' kinematics. In less than an hour all Hoboken was agitated to its very centre by these dread and mysterious forebodings. Students that had never before been known to hurry 01' get flurried were rushing hither and thither in a phrenzy of mental tension. Rumors of great national calamities were rife. The very ail' seemed on fire, and bUl'l1ing with tremors of excitement. Finally, such a pitch ,vas reached that either something must happen to relieve the strain 01' all Hoboken and the College would go wild. Soon the key was found, and the last that was ever heard of the matter was, What is it? It is going to rain to-day.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

In passing through the halls of Stevens some time ago, I happened to stumble over a note-book belonging to one of the newel' members of our Class. On retul'l1ing it to him, he asked me to read certain parts of it and tell him what I thought of it. On complying with his request, I found that it was a sort of diary


THE EOCENTRIC'.

23

or jOUl'nal of his impressions, which he had jotted down from time to time. As I had but little time in which to prepnre this very important document, I succeeded in obtaining his consent for the use of his work, and have presented it to :you in the foregoing.

PAIRON f~

0

r_SAINT

"8 ~-


Q):ttic.c~.5.

EDWARD P. l\IOWTOX .......... President. EDWARD F. "-HITE ........... Vice-President. EDWARD T. BIRDSALL......... . SeC1·etal·V. JAMES S. MERRITT ........... Tl·easw·el·. HENRY K l\'[ORRISON. . . . .. '" Hi;;t01'ian -and n. B. Cap. JOHX l\'[,I.,.,\,AHAN............... Foot-ball Captain.

ANTHONY AGCILERA ..................... Puerto Principia, Cuba. GEORGE ALBEHT ALDRICH,

~. X ............ San

EmYARD TR.\CEY BIRDSALL,

~. K.E

Francisco, Cal.

......... New York City.

CORNELIUS DEYERE BLWYELT............. Oradell, N. J. FUAl,\,K REYNOLDS BRODHEAD .............. Kingston, N. Y. EDWARD DIXON C.\RNAGHAN ............... Hoboken, N. J. JOHN CIIATELLIEH, B.0.II ................ New York City. "-ILLL\;\{ SIDELL CUESTER,

~.T.~

......... Englewood, N. J.

ERNEST SEY1roUU CLAYTON ............. , .New York City. CHARLES RUSSELL COLLINS ....•........... Philadelphia, Pa. EDWARD JAY COOK, ~.X..•............... Springfield, O. EMILE MAURICE COTIART, 0.:: ............. Hayana, Cuba. fuNRY B,I.,.,\"NEH EYERHART, E.0.II ......... Montgomery, Ala. COHNELIUS J .UfES FIELD, B. 0. II ........... Brooklyn, N. Y. JOHN TlEYOR GIBSON......... " ....... , .Hoboken, N. J. 'VILLIAJIl l\I.UTLAXD GIBSON .............. Hoboken, N. J. CHARLES ALLEN HEALY, A. T.n ............ Atlanta, Ga.


THE ECCENTRIC.

25

JOHN HEISKELL ........................ Memphis, Tenn. ALBERT BLEDSOE HERRICK ................ Bergen Point, N. J. FRl...'iCIS EDWARD JACKSON............ " ... East Orange, N. J. WILLIAM ROBERTS KIlW . . • . . . . . . . . . . . • . . Lambertville, N. J. l\lulTIN GR.-INT LILLY, };.X ............... York, Pa. FR\..."\"CIS L.\ POn"fE ... , .....•........... Hoboken, N. J. JOHN ~k'!AHAN ......................... 'Vest Hoboken, N. J. JOHN AUSTIN lUCCGLLOCR, X.,y .. .......... Glencoe, Md. JAMES SlIIlTii l\1ERRITT, e.:: .............. Philadelphia, Pa. GEORGE RICIDlmm METCALF.............. Brooklyn, N. Y. FREDERICK NAsrr MORTON ................ Morristown, N. J. EDWARD PE,\RSALL UOWTON, ~.T.~ ........ New York City. HENRY RENT MORRISON.................. South Orange, N. J. WILL1A1II CNUB POST, B.e.TI .............. Jersey City Heights, N. J. FREDERICK RAHT, };.X ................•.. Cleveland, Tenn. WILLLW RANDOLPH, <I>.K.,y......••....... Hempstead P.O., Ya. EDWARD DA...'!FORTH SELF ................. South Orange, N. J. LEm'EL WILLIAM SERRELL, ~. T.~ ......... Plainfield, N. J. 'WILLIAM 'WHELPLEY THO)HS, JR., A. T.~ .... Summit, N. J. EDWARD FRANCIS WHITE, B.e.n .......... Bergen Point, N. J. 'WILLIAM FREDERICK 'VHITE .............. Mexico, Mexico.


Q UR renowued Class had so distinguished itself during the pre\] liminary term, that we resolved to further increase our fame by inventing a machine. It was to be for the special pUll)ose of making a noise and worrying the inmates of Stevens Institute. The dreadful thing was nothing more than twenty fish-borns, to he supplied ,yith wind from the blower. It seemed extremely simple, and we wondered that no one had ever thought of it before. You will all be surprised, no doubt, to hear it did not succeed. The wind was then sought in another quarter-the lungs of twenty who ,yished to distinguish themselves in some way. Even then its success was of short duration. Do you ask why? Perhaps because we were gently (?) informed that" this is not an Institute for teaching music." 'Ve wondered how anyone could take such noises for music, after some of the delightful free concerts given by us. But 'we have advanced another round on our way to the mechanical engineer, and are now full-fledged Sophomores, no more thinking of failme, but of the glorious future, not only of the Class of '86, but as mechanical engineers, when some of us expect to do great things. The first event to be recorded in our history as Sophomores is the rush. A Tuesday morning about the middle of October, 1883, was fixed by the Freshmen for the great eyent. It was supposed to be a secret, but somehow the Juniors knew it, and of course we. The Freshmen being first dismissed from their recitation, formed about the middle of the hall leading from Professor Wood's room, where we were deep in the maze of calculus. They were assisted in forming and preparing by the Juniors, who, it seems, were anxious to see the fun. Putting the large men in front, compelling all to enter, they, impatient and confident of victory, awaited the opening of the door and the rush of the dreaded Sophs. We did leave the room in a little hurry, 'tis true, but we did not have time to get all our men out before they were on us. They thus had all the at1vantage of choosing the position and of numbers. Professor Carr, fearing that we should completely annihilate the


THE ECCKYTRIC.

27

poor Freshies, kindly tried to interfere, but after spraining a thumb and otherwise injuring a wrist in pulling our men out, he saw it was useless and abandoned them to their fate. We pushed, the Freshies pushed, and the Juniors yelled to encourage them, but all in vain. Our handful, outnumbered two to one, coulc1 not be budged; and it ,YaS only when faces began to pale for want of air that the rush ceased, and our Class passed on its way triumphant. One would hlwe thought t11at that was enough for one day; but at the en(l of the next 110ur the positions were changed, and the Freshmen, after having rushed half the length of the hall, were saved from being pushed to the other end by the timely appearance of Professor Wood. He soon stopped it. Xot satiRfied with the result of the rnshing, some of the J nniors resolved to see a cane-rush between the two Classes. They set the day and kindly furnished a cane made to order for the occasion. It was thought out of place in our College to start such a custom, and therefore the Class refused to enter into the affair, especially as it was arranged by members of another Class without consulting either the Freshmen or ourselves. So the matter dropped. Foot-ball comes next, and it proved by far the most important event in our history. ,Ye can talk this year after the failure of last. Our team was carefully selected, and the men well placed, presenting a very heary rush-line. We had not met together on the field before for practice, but it was not a team to he despised. The day was cold and bracillg, and during the game there were several snowtlunies, driven diagonally across the field by a strong wind. The lot fell to us and we chose the wind, of course. The game was soon in progress, and from the very beginning it was about as one-sided a game as could possibly be. It seemed that the Freshies were afraid to come near the half-backs, except when they could not well help themselves, and then only to be carefully (?) laid out on the ground. Goal after goal was scored, and at the end of the firlit half we were credited with over thirty points. Near the of the half, one of our half-backs was hurt and had to leave, lmt appeared again at the beginning of the second and continued to play till the end of the game. During the second half we had to take our tum against the wind, but even this did not stop us. Our .en seemeu determined to carry the ball against all Freshmen, JulIiors, and Seniors, and plant it behind the goal-posts. At the close score stood nine goals and two touchdo"'ns (58 points) to nothBut what else could be expected?


28

THE ECCKYTRIC.

The distinguishing characteristic of the Class is that it does not propose to be sat down on, either by the other Classes or by its own members. It rather fancies having its own way, as was illustrated in one of its own meetings, held on January 14, 18840, for the transaction of important business. The first thing on the programme was the election of Historian. It did not take long to decide upon one of the three proposed, and he was soon Historian. In vnin his most vigorous protest, for he ,\"as literally held down by his neighbors, who would not even allow him the privilege of thanking (?) the Class in a fine speech. Then, in the middle of an animat ed discussion of matters relating to one of om路 Professors (talk of angels and you heal' their wings), lo! who should appeal' but himself? Adjournment was in order then. Our meetings with our respecteLl Professors are growing more and more interesting and profitable as we ach"ance ; and it is our sincere wish that what we do, whether in their presence or out of it, may never cause them to thiuk of us otherwiRe than pleasantly.


(i)tti.c.cx,S. I'i'. F. D. CRAXE .............. P1·esident. )I. C. BEARD ................. l·ice-P1"e.~ident.

C. L. BRO\\,~EIL .............. SeCJ"etaTY. J. A. )lcELROl' ............... TreaSW·eT. P. F. FERREn ................ Hist01'ian and Chaplain.

RoBERT )lmSH.\LL AXDERSO:;r ................... Circleyille, O. GEOIWE ALEX.IXDEn RU.L.IXTr.\E, X. <I> ....••••..•. ~ ewal'k, N. J. JOHS HeRBERT B\LL.\~TIXE, X,cP .... ............ :Newark, N. J. POXCE DE LEo:;r Rl:i'mRET ......... . ........... Hoboken, N. J. HE.,(HY ArGes'r BANG ........................ New York City. RoBEIlT NELSON RIYLES. . . . . . . .. . ............ Englewood, N. J. lliXDIILI.\..'( COn~ELlr;S BEARD, ,X. <1>. . . . . . .•.•..• New Orleans, La. CL.UU::..'iCE LeDLOw BROWXELL, .1. T. ~ ............ Hartford, Ct. LAz.UlJ C,IH:-i ................................ :New York City. Jl:Uf'S T.r~CH .............................. Hoboken, N. J. AaCIlllJ.ILD C.nIPBEIL, ~.X ..... . ............... :New York City. :SOIDI.IX ST. GEORGE CAMPBELL ................. Hoboken, N. J. ALBERT LAS.IK CH.IUVET .......... , .. .. ......... Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. JOHN WILLIA.:II CLARK, x.<I> ..•..•••...•••..•••. Newark, N. J. EDwAlUl GEORGE COLDEWEY .................... Louisville, Ky. GEORGE EDWARD COOK, B.0.n ................. Canton, O. JOHN Lrmx Cox ............................ Orange, N. J. WILLLm FOSTER DAY CR.\''1E ................... Brick Church, N. J. JAKES ALFRED PEARCE CRISFIELD, 0.E ........... Chester, l\Id.


30

THE ECCENTRIC.

JULIEN CU~mING ........ " ............•..... Rome, Ga. WALTER SmTH DIX .......................... Morristown, N. J. HER:UAXN FHED. THEODOHE EUBEX ........... . ... New York City. PIERRE FERRER FERREn ........... . ........... New York City. JACOB DAY FLACK, };.X ....................... Baltimore, l\Id. BE~JA"II~ . FR..\..'H<LIN H.illT ..................... Hoboken, N. J. BICKNELL HALL .............................. Englewood, N. J. CHAHLES ANDREWS HALL, E.0.II ................ i\Iobile, Ala. CHAnLEs 'Y EBEH HEX SON, <1>. K. \If ..........•.•.. Chicago, TIL MATTHEW CO)ISTOCK JENKINS ................... Jersey City. N. J. EUGENE HENHY KIERNA;.I ....................... Hoboken, X. J. HENHY WATKINS LOCKETT ..................... Jersey City, N. J. CARLOS AUGUSTO Loz,ulO. : .................... Lishon, Portugal. LORTON COMBS JUcDER1IOn .................... East Orange, N. J. GEORGE NICHOLAS l\lcKIBBI~ ................... New York City. JOSEPH ALLUTIUS 1\ICELROY .................... Bridgeport, Ct. THmBs 'VILLIAlIr JUIL;.IOR ...................... Burlington, N. J. SA:uITEL WYLIE JUILLER ......... , ......... '" .New York City. FR.~'{KL:rn MOELLER .......................... New York City. W ASHIXGTO~ EYEHETT PAHSONS ................. Salisbury, "Jld. CARTER fuNRY PAGE, X.<l> .................... Cobham, Va. JOHX V A...,{ LIEW PIERSOX ....................... Bloomfieltl, N. J. L.illD PLmlLEY .............................. Eng-lewoocl, N. J. WILLIA1I EmRETT QumBEY .................... Orange, N. J. ROBERT READING, };.X ........................ "Williamsport, Pa. BENJAMIN SPE.UnIAN .......................... Sharon, Pa. ALFRED HENRY SCHLESI~GER, ~.X ............... College Point, L. I. ROBERT GA.STEN SmTH ........................ Jersey City, N. J. WILLLur ER~EST SCHOENBOR~ .................. 'Vashiugton, D. C. THEODORE ER~EST TIIEBEIUTH .......... , ....... Newark, N. J. FRITZ UHLE~H.\t:T ............................ New York City. HERBERT A.PPLETO~ \\TAG~ER ................ , .. New York City. DRUID ALEXANDER 'YALTON, B. 0. IT ............. Louisville, Ky. 'VILLI.\1r HARRIS CR.\WFOUD \\rHEWLEY .......... Americus, Ga. GEOUGE DARICS 'YILLITfl, X. \If ..........•...... Adrian, Mich.


HISfORY OF

'81,

'aFTER having passe 1 through that mill which "grinds exceediug small," on "\Veduesday, September 26, 1883-1 like to be particular in c1ates-fifty-four students, the remnants of some hundred 01' more applicants, passed into Stevens Institute through the side cloor as the Class of '87-the front entrance being used only after examinations; not because it is nearer our President's office, but on account of its greater dimensions. It is needless to say that we at first strayed all over the building. We finally gathered, however, in Professor Kroeh's room, and he immediately initiated us into the intricacies of the French language. It was here, for the first time, that we gathered in a body, and a formidable body it was; not like the Freshmen Classes of years gOlle by, which were composed of youngsters, but a Class of mell. As yet, comparatively little time has elapsed since we crossed the rubicon of College life, and became the Class of '87. The star of om genius has not had sufficient opportunity to shine with such lustre as to make itself knmm to aliens and eclipse the lesser lights of om College contemporaries; we have no doubt, however, that a year hence we will rank foremost among those Classes which htwe made themselves prominent by reason of unusual natural abilities (?). The worthy deeds of the Class of '87 are so numerous, that in the limited space allotted to the Class, I cannot (hyell upon them as fully as their merits deserve; neither can I speak of all our doings, the space being barely sufficient for the most important ones. The first event of importance which occurred after our entrance was the rush. What is a rush? This question was asked by many but answereu only by a few. The day, however, was not far ofl:' when we would become only too 'well acquainted with its full collegiate meaning, and the lectures on the subject which invariably follow. The Class had just finished an hour's murdering of the French language, and was slowly wending their way to Professor Carr's room, inwardly praying that they might be called up to the board (?). As the Sophomore Class was yet occupying the room, the Freshmen

t.l


32

THE ECCENTRIC.

patiently awaited their depru:tme, when a confused sound issuing from the room was heard. But few seconds had elapsed, when a member of the Sophomore Class was seen to leave the room with a panic-stricken expression on his face. He rushed toward us as if on a hundred-yard clash, with outstretched arms, begging our protection, which, by the way, was generously granted by Capt., who embraced him in such a loving manner that stars appeared before his eyes. One sheep following another, the hallway soon became blocked. lUen gasped for breath and pressed each other, and at last, inch by inch, the SOjJhs yield the disputed hallway. And now arises a shout of yictory which shakes the Institute to its yery foundation. The Sophs are overpowered; shall they yield? No! Arise, ye Sophs, and glut :rom ire! Onward they pre. 's with renewed ,igor, but, alas! their energy cannot overcome onr resistance. Again they yield, and by the kind aid of a strong Professor they return to their senses, and with downcast looks slowly descend the stairway which they should have taken at first. Thus ended the rush, and since then no Freshman has been known to ask, ""' hat is a rush? " Next in oreler of importance was the organization of our Class, which took place after due time had been given to the study of Cushing's l\Ianual. The meeting was all that could be desired. In spite of its being lunch-time, a full attendance was obtained, our officers were elected, and important business tmnsac:tec1. Since thell quite a number of meetings have taken place, all of which have l)een mo(lels of what class-meetings should be. In foot-ball our record is not such as to be pointed out with pride; we haying played but two games and in each case being defeated. lYe have, llOwe,er, given evidence that there is good material from which to pick a class eleven such as is rarely seen on a fieltl. So far we have filled but two positions in the Institute team, but we hope by next season to occupy at least four. Now that I have spoken of the principal events of our College life, I shall devote the remaining space to the description of the Class as a body. That we are a most intelligent body of students there can be no doubt. If anyone is disposed to doubt the above assertion, I refer him, with pleasure, to our recon1. The first and so-much-dreaded examination is n. thing of the past. We went forward with stout hearts prepared for the worst, and were agreeably surprised by the ease with which we carried the day. The onl:v fear the students felt was when a special invitation came to see Professor Wood in his little office. The kindness of


THE B(,CENTR IC.

33

his reception, however, was such as to calm our fears and make us reprOfwh ourselves for having entertained any. That '87 is a musical Class no one will deny after passing a day with us. The only "\Yonder is that Colonel :\1apleson :\IacCorc1 01' Charles Abbey Riesenberger has not removed from our midst some of the musicians. The selections offered are taken all the way from grand opera down to "Cordelia's Aspirations." That the Professors enjoy these airs there can be no doubt, judging by the way in which they Rurprise us in the midst of the most difficult passages by requesting an eIlC01'e, which the blushing student generapy refuses. That the Class is constitutionally strong can be proved by the facility with which we digest the 7rS flung at us daily, both in Professor Carr's room a])(l the bakery; no student haying complained, as yet, of dyspepsia. That our brains are capacious ('l'iLs wherein we stowaway the knowledge imparted to us, and not in our pockets, can be proved by the fact that as yet no pony has been discovered on which to travel through the realms of mathematics. It is my pleasure to note the way in which the Class supports all the enterprises of the Institute. 'Ye have almost in unison made olU'selves members of the Athletic Association; and in the latest enterprise have gone with a liberal hand to our Editol' and helped to push The Indicator into the path of success by om hearty support. And in short, I may close by saying that we are a most remarkable Class, having as yet only lost one member, and him t.hrough sickness. His place, howeve1', we are pleased to note, has been taken by another student, so ,ye retain our original number. ,\1 ay we long continue to do so. In the Class we haye a veritable giant-a regular Chang-and also a Tom Thumb, who is the pet of the Class. These two form the long and short of it.


HOBOK~N DIR~OfORY OF 6fUD~Nf5,

ABBEY, H ............ , ................. 284 Washington Street. AGUILER\, A. . . . . . . . . . .. . ............... 34 Seventh Street. ALDRICH, W. f:> .......................... 194 Hudson Street. ALDRICH, G. A........................... 145 Hudson Street. ADRIANCE, W. A ......................... 12 Eighth Street. ANDERSON, R. M ......................... 28 Hudson Street. BANDARET, P ............................ 58 Adams Street. BEARD, M. O. .. . .. . .................... 12 Eighth Street. BEATTY, J .............................. 284 Washington Street. BOYNTON, O. D ..... . .................... 297 Bloomfield Street. BRAINARD, A. ,,' ......................... 372 Washington Street. BRISTOL, ,V. H ......................... . 19'* Hudson f:>treet. BRODHEAD, F. R ......................... 213 Hudson Street. BROWNELL, O. L .. . ...................... 213 Hudson Street. BURCHARD, A. W ......................... 125 Hudson Street. BURHORN, E. ........................... 310 Washington Street. BUSH, S. P ............................. 427 Garden Street. OALIseH, J .............................. 213 Bloomfield Street. OAMPBELL, A. .. . ........................ 145 Hudson Street. OAlIIPBELL, N . . .......................... 320 Willow Street. OARNAGHAN, E. D ........................ 382 Bloomfield Street. OARROLL, L .... . ............ . .. . ........ 213 Hudson Street. OARROLL, ,V ........... " ...... .......... 213 Hudson Street. OHAUYET, A. L . . . . . . . .. . ................ 192 Hudson Street. OOFFEY, B. H ............................ 254 Bloomfield Street. COLDEWEY, E. G ......... . ............... 284 II udson Street. COLLINS, C. R ............... . .. " ...... 14 Eighth f:>treet. COOK, E. J. " ........................... 142 Hudson Street. COOK, G. E ............................. 411 Garden Street. COTIART, E. 1\1. ......................... 143 Hudson Street. CRISFIELD, J. A. ......................... 427 Garc1en Street.


THE ECOENTRIC.

35

CUmIlSG, J ............................. 127 Hudson Street. DE~T, E. L ............................. 12 Eighth Street. DILWORTH, \V ............................ 302 ,Yashington Street. Drx, \V. S ......... , ................. , .170 Hudson Street. DREYSPRIfG, E .......................... 212 Hudson Street. EnnES, H .......... " ................... 12 Eighth Street. E'i'ERHART, H. B. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . ..... 251 'Yashington Street. FEARN, R. L ............................ 284 'Yashington Street. FL~OHER, F .............................. 142 Hudson Street. FLAOK, J. D ............................ 286 Bloomfield Street. G\'l'ELY, C. L ........................... 427 Garden Street. GAN'l"r, H. L ........................... 19'* Hudson Street. Gmso~, J ................ .. .. ...... ..... '* River Street. GmsoN, lY ............................. 4, River Street. GLAHGOW, A. G .......................... 119 Hudson Street. GREENEBAUM, L .......................... 125 Hudson Street. Hm" C ............................... . 28! Washington Street. HARLOW, )1 So,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. 3!0 Garden Street. HARt, B. F ................. . ........... 378 Bloomfield Street. HEALY, C. A.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4, 16 Bloomfield Street. HEISKELL, J. :U ......... .. ............... 251 Y\'ushington Street. llE~8oN, C. W .......................... 212 Hudson Street. KIERXAN, E. H. . . . . . . . . . . .. . ........... 114 N e'l'urk Street. KrXG, \V. R. ...... , .................... 320 ,Yashington Street. KLETZSCH, A. P .................. ... ..... 300 'Yushington Street. L.\ POISTE, F ........................... 184 Park Avenue. LuLY, 11. G ............................ 145 Hudson Street. Lol_\XO, L. C .......................... .416 Bloomfielll Street. }1\CHOLD, C. E .......................... 330 Hudson Street. M.illTl.CF..z, S ............................ 25,* Bloomfield Street. ~hCRY, D. H ........................... ;3!.l2 Bloomfield Street. McCoy, J. S ............................ 411 Garden Street. MCCULLOCH, J. A. . . . . .. ......... . ...... 251 ,Yashingtoll f:itreet. Mcmoy, J. A .......................... 213 Hudson Street. MERRITT, J. S ........................... 14 Eighth Street. MILLER, H. J ........................... 213 Hudson Street. Mrr...>;OH, T. W....................... .. .. 194 IIudson Street. MITCIfELL, H. F ......................... 19! Hudson Street. MOHRIS, A. S ........ ... ............... 12 Eighth Street. MOHTOS, F ................. ....... ..... 6 River Street. }lm;KwITz, E ............................ 403 Chnlell Street.


THE ECCENTRIC.

36

,y ........................... 403 Garden Street. N ORRIfl, R .............................. 284 Washington Street. PAGE, C. H ............................. 192 Hudson Street. PFORDTE, O. F .... . ..................... 197 Bloomfield Street. PRATT, C. A. . .. . ...................... 196 River Street. RAHT, F. . .. . . .. .., . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. 382 Washington Street. RANDOLPH, W. W ............ . ........... 382 Washington Street. REA, H. R .......... , ... . .............. 12 Eighth Street. READING, R .......... . .............. . ... 145 Hudflon Street. RE~moN, J. C. .... . . .. . ................ 192 Hudson Street. RICE, R H ............................. 392 Bloomfield Street. ROBERTS, G ..... . ... . ... . ... . ........... 119 Hudson Street. SANDT, G. F ............................ 127 Hudson Street. SEmmrJL, L. ,v. ................. ........ 427 Garden Street. SILll}:R, A. . . . . . . . . . . .. . ....... . ........ 57 Garden Street. SCHLESlNGEU, A . ................ " ....... 146 Hudson Street.' SINCLAIR, G. l\I .......................... 190 Hudson Street. SCHOENBORN, W. E. .............. . ....... 232 Washington Street. ~hrrrH, '1'. G ............................. 284 Washington Street. S'l'EWART, J. H .... 143 Hudson Street. SPEARMAN, B ............................ 372 Washington Street. VAN VLECK, F ........................... 340 Gftrden Street. VAN VLECK, J ............. . .... . ......... 340 Garden Street. WADE, W. H ............................ :382 Washington Stl·eet. WALTON, D. A ........................... 284 Washington Street. WILKES, J. F ........................... :372 Washington Street. WII"LIA~IS, H. D. . . . . . . .. .... . . .. . ...... 194 Hudson Street. WILLIT~, G. D ............. , .... . ........ 213 Bloomfield Street. ,VHI'fING, C. W ......................... ,127 Garden Street. 'YHITE, W ......... . .. , ................. 170 Hudson Street. MUXKII'[TZ,

00

•••••••••••

00

••••••••


IN THE

37


'~ GAMMA 'W'>"" ~"" "U,<I

OF

:~:"~ TH ""U@'

"*' ETA*XI ~""

'@)'";""

I 38


fu:;RY JOHX

R.

H.

CHARLES

A.

CH,illLES

HEA.

L.

,yET)IOllE.

ALEXAli'DEU

SAUXDERS l\IOllRIS.

WILLWJ

A.

L.

GATELY.

EmLE ~I. COTIAR'r.

STEWAUT.

AnRL\;I1CE,

3D

W URTS.

JAMES

A. P.

J.nIES

S.

CHISFIELD

l\LEHHITT.


OF 'I'llI':

40


OJ<' 1'1IE

J.UlES

E.

FR.L','R

E.

LoUIS

J.

DENTON, IDELL,

M,E.

P.

AI.FIIED

1\1 E.

HENm'

T.

Lol'I); A.

Bm'cR,

TH.\l'TWEIN, BHu(,K,

M.E.

filE.

:\l\THEY.

'atllclcrgl:mluatc5. JOliN

A.

BENSEL.

CLARENCE

L.

CIl.\IlLEK

EDw,n(D P.

BROWNELL.

PnESCOT'r Br:m.

WILLI.m EmrEtiT

S.

H.

CHE~'l'EH. FOSTEn.

L.

1\l\('IlOLD. l\ImI"TON.

CUAHLEK

F.

P .\uKEH.

RH' lI.IIW

H.

RICE.

LDIl'EL "'. SERnELL

AnTHOR G. Gr.AS(lOW. WILLIAM

E.

",YII.LIA)I

LYALL.

",V.

THOMAS.

KE)''NETH TORHANC'E. CIIAUr.ES

",V.

41

",VIll'l'IN(l.


OF TilE

{ndtl'UHIll

~t ~dlll ~hdlll ~i. 1 8 79.

FOUN])ED AS

GAMMA CHAPTER OF

~

alpha + $igma + <!hi ~ 1875 .

42


OF TIlE

Sfrctfcrni{~

EDGAR EVERHART,

Of

~efa ~hefa ~i.

AnA~I RmSENBERGER, M.E.

Ph.D.

JOHX H. LOXGSTREET,

WILLIAM H. SHELDON, M.E.

HENRY

F.

OGDEN.

CLASS OF '84. WILLIA)I

JAMES

O.

L.

BAR.'IES.

HARRY

JR.

HARVEY

BEA'l"l'Y,

GA.,.'\T'.r.

F. GEORGE F.

RICHARD L. FEARN.

iHITCHELL. SANDT.

CLASS OF '85. OSCAR

H.

ROLLIN NORRIS.

BALDWIN.

TII0:lUS

WILLIAM S. DILWORTH.

G.

SMl'l'H, JR.

CLASS OF '86. WlLLL :\I C.

J.

COR~ELIUS

JOHN CHATELLIER.

EDWARD

POST. HENRY

B.

F.

FIELD.

WHITE.

EVERHART.

CLASS OF '87. DRUID

GEORGE E. COOK. CHARLES

A.

HALL.

A.

WALTON.

M.E.


OF 'I 'll"

1881.

1865.

44


OJ<'

:3frafernif~

TII~;

Of ~lphn ~a.u @tnega.. CLASS OF '85.

CHARLES

D.

BODITON.

EmVAIlD

H.

MCNKWITZ.

:UELLEN JOH"N

CLA SS OF '86. CHARLES

A.

45

HEALY.

F.

S.

H .-illLOw.

,VILJ<ER.


OF TllE

1841

1883 .

46


OF T il E

Of

5f~afe~nif!l

Glhi ?J>zi.

CLASS OF '84. C HARLES

W.

TH011AS.

Fll.\XK BENJAMIN

, Yo

YU\"

V LECK.

T CCKEH.

CLASS OF '85. B ARTOX

H.

COFFEY.

NOHTH l\l c L EAx.

S IMEON MARTINEZ. W ILLIA!d

N.

L EON GREENEBAUM.

STEVEN~ .

AXSON

CLASS OF '86. J OHN MCCULLOCH.

CLASS OF '87. GEORGE

D.

47

" 'ILLITS.

, Yo

BURCHARD.


OF TIlB

4H


OF 'rIlE

Sfrafernif~

of

~ig1TIa

Glhi.

CLASS OF '84. ,VILLrA~f

W ALTER CARROLL.

H.

PIEllCE.

CLASS OF '86. l\'[AIrrrx G. LILLY.

FREDERIOK RAH'I'.

G EORGE

A.

EDWARD

ALDRICH.

J.

COOR.

CLA SS OF '87. D . FIdCK .

ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL.

JACOB

ROBERT R EADING.

ALFRED

49

H.

SCHLESIXGER.


OF 1' IlE

~

1883 l\K-

50


catllde~gt,t(tuatC5. GEORGE BALLA..'lTIXE.

J. 'V.

CURK.

J. H.

E. L.

DEXT.

C. H.

P.\(lF.

~I.

C.

BALLA.,.'lTINE. BEARD.

GEORGE ROBERTS.

151


JI'1'Eil!J'IJERS OF FRATER, 'lT1ES NOT CITAP'rERED A'l' TIJE

PHI KAPPA PSI. LAF.IYETl'E D. GillROI.L, '85 ............... Randolph-Macon College. "-ILLlAM RANDOLPH, '86 ............ ' ..... University of Virginia. CHARLES IV. HEN.·ON, '87 ............. , ... Univenlity of Chicago.

DELTA PSI. ALFRED IV. AlmSTRONG, '85 ..... , ....... , . Yale College. HAHHY DE B. PARSONS, '8,1 ......... , .. " .. Columbia College.

KAPPA ALPHA. DABNEY H. :U,\VRl', 'H,1.. , ................ Virginia Milit. Institute.

DELTA KAPPA EPSILON. EmHRD T. BmDs,ILL, '86., . , ... . ......... New York College.

PSI UPSILON. CLAYTON A. PRITT, '85., ' , ............... UniverHity of Chicago.

KAPPA SIGMA KAPPA. "'Ill-WI

[r. 'YADE, '85 .................. Yirginia Milit. Iustitute.

THETA XI ............ ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DELTA TAU DELTA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. BETA THE'l'.\ PI..... ' ....... , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ALPHA TAU OMEGA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ............ CHI PSI ....... ' .. , ........ , ............ ' .......

10 members. 15 18 5 10 " SIG~I.\ CIlI . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . , . 10 " Cm PilI.......... , .. .... ... . ... . .. .. .... .... .... 7 "

52


--------~ ~c.c.ox.(l.

-.of the

~l.l.cnt5

J.:rf 1883..,84.

April Hth, 1883.-Base路ball at Brooklyn: Stevens 1:S. Polytechnics. Won by Stevens, 18 to 7. April19th.-Base-ball at Hoboken : ~lontclair vs. Stevens. Won by Stevens, 7 to 3. April 21st.-Base-ball at Hoboken: Staten Island vs. Stevens Won by Stevens, 7 to 6. April30th.-Base-ball at Hoboken: Lafayette es. Stevens. Won by Stevens, G to 1. :\lay 2d.-Base-ball at Staten Island: Staten Island l"/;. Stevens. Won by Stevens, 10 to 9. May 7th. -Base-ball at Hoboken: Elizabeth Atbletic Club vs. Stevens. Won by Stevens, 14 to 8. May 12th.--Base-ball at Williamstown: Williams vs. Stevens. Won by Williams, 12 to 7. May 15tb.-Base-ball at Hoboken: Manhattan Athletic Club vs. Stevens. Won by Stevens, 24 to 7. l\Iay 18th.-Base-ball at Easton: Lafayette vs. Stevens. Won by Lafayette, 11 to 9. lIlay 18th.-Appearance of THE EcCENTRIC for 1883. May 19th.-Base-ball at Philadelphia : Young America vs. Stevens. Won by Young America, 7 to 10. :May 21st.-Base-ball at Hoboken: Staten Island vs. Stevens. Won by Stevens, 4 to 3. May 22d.-Base-ball at Hoboken: Rose Hills vs. Stevens. Won by Rose Hills, 5 to 1. June lIth.-Close of regular term. June 13th.-Reception to Graduating Class by Professor and 1.h's. Leeds. June 13th.-Quinquennial reunion of the Class of '78, at the St. Denis Hotel, New York.


54

THE ECCENTRIC.

June 14th.-Seventh Annuall\Ieeting of the Alumni Association, at 2 o'clock P . M. June 14th.-Reception by President and :l\1rs. Morton, at five o'clock. June 14th. -Commencement exercises of the Class of '83 at the German Club House, Hoboken, at eight o'clock. June 14th.-Converzatione of the Alumni Association in the Physical Laboratory, at ten o'clock. June Hth.-Class supper of '83 at Uartinelli's, New York, at half-past eleven o'clock. June 15th.-Beginning of preliminary term for the Class of '86. July l!th.-Close of preliminary term for the Class of '8G. September 3d.-Beginning of the preliminary term for Classes '84 and '85. September 19th.-Examinations for admission. September 2Gth.-Beginning of regular term. September 29th.-Foot-ball at Hoboken: Brooklyn Polytechnic vs. Stevens. Won by Stevens, 59 to O. September 30th.-Death of J\1ax Haring, '83, at Columbus, O. October 3d.-Regular meeting of the Athletic Association for the election of officers. October Gth.-Foot-ball at New Haven: Yale vs. Stevens. Won by Yale, 48 to O. October 20th. -Foot-ball at Hoboken: Harmrc1 1:S. Stevens. Won by Hal'Yal'll, H to 4. October 24th.-Foot-ball at Hoboken: Princeton vs. Stevens. Won by Princeton, H to O. October 27th.-Foot-ball at Hoboken: Columbia vs. Stevens. Won by Stevens, 19 to O. October 30th.-l\Ieeting of the non-fraternity men for the election of ECCEXTIUC editor. Joseph S. McCoy elected. November Ist.-Formal organization of the Boal'll of Editors of the ECCEi'i'.rnrc for 1884. November 3c1.-Foot-ball at Easton: Lafayette vs. Stevens. Won by Stevens, H to O. November Gth.-Foot-ball at Cambridge: Harvard vs. Stevens. Won b.,- Harvn,nl, 11 to 2. Noyember 20th.-Foot-ball at Hoboken: Seton Hall 1:8. Stevens. Won by Stevens, GO to O. November 20tb.-:'\leeting of the College for the organization of The IneZicaLm路.


THE ECCENTRIC.

55

November 24th.-Foot-ball at Hoboken: Lafayette 11S. Stevens. Won by Stevens, 14 to 11. November 27th.-F'oot-ball at Hoboken: University of Michigan V8. Stevens. Won by Stevens, 5 to l. November 29tb.-Foot-ball at Hoboken: University of Pennsylvania us. Stevens. Tie game, 6 to 6. December Inh.-Close of first regular term. January 3, I88J.-Beginning of the second regula.r term. January Inh.-Regular meeting of the Athletic Association for the election of officers. Ja.nuary 28tb. - Appearancc of the first number of the Tndieat01".


(!;leucnth

~nnltal

Qtomm,encemeni.

Tuesday, June 14, 1883, at 8 o'clock P. M. GER:M:.AN OL UE HOUSE_

.

O\"'ERTVRE,

" Bm'bier de Seville,"

ROSSINI

Prayer by the Rev. S. B. DOD. ~IUSIC,

. .

'

Prayer from "J[arlha,"

. .

. .

.

FLOTOW

Address by President MORTON.

SELECTION,

" Hp(t1'f and Hand,"

LECOCQ

Remarks by Professor WOOD.

VALSE,

"Folle [IJrel'-se," .

.

•.

W ALDTEUFEL

Conferring of Degrees and Announcement of Prize.

VALEDICTORY ADDRESS, MEDLEY, . .

, ...

EmlEST

N, WRIGHT DILLER


~lte

(Glass of

lS8~: .

.Jo~ B. ADGER, A.~I. (Uniy. of Ya.) ........... , ... . South Carolina. :'IIoRG.I~ BuooKs, Ph. B. (Brown Uniy.) . ........... . :'IIassaclmsetts. LEWIS O. DAWES. . . . .............. . . ........ • . Xew Jersey. E. DCQTJE ESTILID.I .............................. Cuba. FIlEDERICK O. FRAEXTZEL . . . . . .................. New Jersey. :'lIn H.IRIXG . • , . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . ... .• ..•. ... Indiana. A.RTHl'R P. Hl,XDERSOX ...... . ..... ... .... ....... . New York. H. ADDISOX HICKOK .... . ....... . ... . .. .. , .... ... New J ersey. FR\XKLIX K. InWIX .............................. Alabama. FRA.~ :'IIAGEE .... ... ' .... " .... , . . . .... ...... , .New Jersey. :'IIALcoM l\IcNAl'GHTOX ..................... , . .... New York. HAROLD M. PLAISTED, B,:'II.E. pIe. State 0011.) . ..... :'IIaine. L. STIlOTHER RIXDOLPH ., ...... .. ................ :'IIaryland. ALBERT B. ROPES ............................... New Jersey. JAMES E. KIOUE ... .... .. .... ' .. " .. . ..... .. .... . New York. JOSEPH E. S'rEWAHD ............................. Xew Jersey. FUEDElUCK ·W. TAYLOH . ' ......... ' ............... Peunsylvania. JAMES N. 'W .IRlm\GTO~ ... . ... .. .. ... .......... .. . Illiuois. ER:>'EST N. WRIGHT ............................. P ennsylvania.

~tc(.cpti.on.

(I1'.ommitt.c.c. KE~~ETR TORRA~CE.

ORAS. L. GATELY. E. H. FOSTER.

H. R. REA. ALYIX P. KLETZSCII.


T H E ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE

'ttecbnolog~.

Stevens llnstitute of

IXl<TI'lTTED Jl'LY 1, JS7G.

Pl'c,idCIII,

ROLAND

S.

KummEEDT, M.E.,

'SO.

rite- PI'18i(i( Ill,

Avmsox A.

RIGHTEH, J\1.E.,

'S2.

CUl'rt8]lOllllill[j Sl'rl'filll'Y,

THEODOHE F. KOEZLY, }I.E.,

'75.

:)(j0 East 7Dth 8t., X cw York City. HI'I'Ol'dill[j "'feN/{fI'Y,

Fll.INli: E. IDELL, }I.E.,

'77.

1'J'('(fS1f1'U',

AD.\M RIEfSE~13EHGEH, l\I.E.,

'7G.

Ste,-ens Institute of Technology.

:gnCltti\lC (G ~'Jlnn\ittcc. ROLA"D .. S. KUHSHEEDT, Pawl', }I.E., '7,1. THEODOllE F. KOEZLY, }I.I~ , '75. AoA~I HIESEXDEllGEH, }I.E, '7G. FHAXK E. IDELL, l\I.E., '77.

HEXHY'V.

'SO, ChaiI'1JlClt!. H. SHELDOX, M.E., '78. GEOIWE 1'11. Bmm, J\I.E., 'SO. Anmsox A. HIGH'rEH,'J\I.E., '82. OJJ.IHLES 'I'. SCHr13XEH, l\l.E., '82.

J\I.E.,

'YILLL\:.\[


A Ff-W T.ITTLE

WORDS FROM ,He: AL-UMNI,

of any yulue can be addcd to ,yhat has been said on this Jj page in THE ECCEXTflW of former years; aUlI 1ll acceptIng the very kind imitation (If its editorH to place a few " 'oreIs on recon1 in behalf of the aluJllni, it is done mainly to express a feeling of satisfaction that the Institute continues to lllaintain, with such signal success, its well-earned reputation as the leading school of its class in this country. Few technical schools were ushered into existonce under more promising auspiceH than our Alma ~l[at(')', and few have so amply borno out in fact, aml, il1llectl, hayo so far transcended the rather high anticipations of its friends, than the institution in ,yhose progress ,,"e fill are so tlecply concerned. The writer graduated from its halls suffieiently long ago to ensure that much of his youthful and thoughtless enthusiasm ,yhich might unduly exaggerate his good opinion of his Alma .1[a/l'}, has long ,Yarn off; and he is free to testify that it has since been replaced by a deep and sincere appreciation of the many merits of tlw Institute, and the high character ana value of its work-the result of sober refleetion. Regardecl from the stand-point of one who has at least a fairly intimate knowledge of tho mothods of the seyoral technical schools which are popu1'1rly regarded as the rivals of the Institute, the latter is certainly accomplishing the purposes for which it was designed more thoroughly thau uny other school of its class; this result eau be directly trace(l to the ""isc1om, so early displayed by the Institute"s management, which conl1ned its energies to the one chanuel ill which it was bouna to achievo an immediate ana signal success. Xo one is better prepared than an alumnus to intelligently testify to either the success or failure of an institution, and sentiment only might stand in tho way of a public expression of an opinion adyerse to his Alma Jlfatel路. It is peculiarly gratifying, then, ,yhon the alulllni can conscientiously endorse the metllOds of their college, and this. the writer feels certain, eyery gT[(.(lllate of tlle Institute is willing to do. We fully realize that our COllrHe at Steycns has been of Yast, indeed of incalculable benefit to us, aUtI that any success which ,,"e


60

THE ECCEXTBIC.

may ha,e achieved in our profession is primarily clue to the excellent fotmc1ation, as it ,,路ere, upon which the superstructure has been built. Of course there is ample room for improvement both in its methods and its means of instruction, and it is sincerely to be hoped that those who so clearly have the destinies of the Institute in their hands, will fully realize the nature of the trust which has been committed to their care. It is needless to say that the alumni will always continue to take a kindly interest in all of the various enterprises in which the undergraduates are engaged. They are especially concerned in the lIIdicato]路, which has so auspiciously started out on what is hopeu will prove a successful career. '1'0 them the Indica/or, in newspaper parlance, indeed supplies a long felt want, and it is only surprising that the step had not long ago been taken, the same agencies which finally called it into existence being active years ago. The writer looks for a renewed interest of the aiumni in the affairs of the Institute, and hopes that the Alumni Association, as such, will give the enterprise that moral and, if necessary, financial support as well, which it so justly desenes. It is not anticipating the plans of the Alumni A. sociation a great mallY sears to say that the time is not far distant when it should follow the example so recently set by the School of ~lines Alumni of Columbia College, and establish an employment bureau which will enable the older alumni to avail themselves of the services of the recent graduates. Many of the fonner now have, or will soon have, occasion to employ assistants in various capacities. They would naturally regard the technical education which the Institute affords as a prerequisite for these positions, and would look to its recent graduates as candidates for the same. The classes at the present time are unprecedentedly large, and promise to remain so for some time to come; some difficulty may be experienced in promptly and properly placing so large a supply of young engineers. By means of some such plan as briefly hinted at in this connection, the alumni can testify, better perhaps than by any other at the present time, to their interest in their Alma ;fater.


STEVENS INSTITUTE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. Q)tfLco:s. SECOND TERM.

FIRST TERM.

Pl'e8ident, H. R.

REA,

KEXXETH TORRA~CE,

'84.

T'ice-P1'esidell t, '84. W. A.

KE~"'ETH TORRANCE,

H.

OSCAR

D.

H.

BALDWIN,

MAURY,

'84.

AnRLL'i'CE,

Recording Secretary, '85. ,VALTER

'84.

'85.

CARROLL,

'84.

Corr('sponding SeCl'etm'y, D. H. MArRY, '84. TI'eaSUl'el',

J. H.

STEWART,

A. P.

KLETZSCII,

J. H.

'85.

'85.

STEWART,

CalJlain Foot路 ball,

'84.

OSCAR

H.

BALDWIN,

'85.

Captain Base-ball, S.

P.

BUSH,

'84.

C.

~.l.)<W(t

L.

GA'rELY,

'84.

.of .mix.cct.oxS.

FIRST TERM.

H. R.

S. P.

BUSH,

A. P.

KLETZ CH,

REA,

'84, Chail路ntan.

W. S. DILWORTH, '85. C. L. GATELY, '84.

'84. '84.

SECOND TERM.

KE~ETH TonnA~CE, C.

L.

OSCAR

GATELY.

H.

BALDWIN.

Chainnan. A. P. KLETZSCH.

,v. S. DILWORTH.


AfHL..~fIOSj QTEVENS has not, for the past year, been at all active in the "Various athletic games, aside from base-ball and foot-ball. It woulJ seem from this that the Athletic Association must have degenerated very much. This, however, is by no means the case, as there here exists a peculiar method by which all base-ball and football matters are conducted by the Athletic Association, which elects annually both a base-ball and a foot-ball captain, who have the personal supervision of their respective teams, while they are advised as to the initial choice of their teams and the number of games to be played, and receive appropriations from the Board of Directors of the Athletic Association, of which Board they are members; all money matters and correspondence being conducted by the officers of the Association. This system has many advantages in a college ,There the number of students is limited and where time is valuable, as it necessitates fewer organizations, anu consequently, fewer meetings, and tends to make that single organization a lively body, and one which is recognized as commanding a certain protective right. This same Association governed rowing, until that interest was discontinued at tltevens. There is no provision for cricket, although appropriations for crirket-balls and bats have been made, and private teams have been gottell up which have played under SLovens' name, and done creditably. We had our last field meeting in the spring of 1880, and dUl"ing the following winter "lYe lost our gymnasium. Since then we have made no attempt at any sports until the past winter, when it was decided to hold a field meeting in the spring, and a list of events has been posted. When we were deprived of om gymnasium in the winter of 1880, we received a letter from the President stating that" as soon as the weather would permit" the Trustees would erect a new building for use as a gymnasium. 'Ye have seen a great many pleasant days since then but no gymnasium. A number of students, on the verge ~


64

THE ECCE"SI'RIC.

of despair, lllwe hired a small local gymnasium in Hoboken, paying a high price and only being able to secure it for two hours on certain (lays. This, hon-e,er, is better than nothing and shows enthusiasm. ,Yhat we 11eed is a well-equipped g~'nmasium, and a competent inslntct01路. An instructor is needed in a gymnasium just as much as in an.'" branch of mental training. ::'IIost men are entirely ignorant of what particular development they need or how to obtain it, while others do not realize the importance of being regular in certain needed exercise, but go to the gYlllnasinm simply to practise feats of daring, or strain themselYes by lleav)' lifts, nn(l thereby do themseh'es more harm than good. How much would a class learn if it were informed that the mathematical lecture-room would be open, and plenty of ebalk, paper, n11(l pencils placed at its disposal during certain bours of the <In:', but no instructor ,,-ere pro'ided for it? How regular wouhl the attendance be? It is doubtful if more than a few of the students ,YOuM even huy text-books. The most careful training of a lllan's brain cannot add one year to his life if his ph~-sienl development is entirely neglected. At an institution in which the mind receiYes such It thorough training as at ours, and ,,-here men are expeded to go right out into the worll1, often to positions requiring physical ability and health, it seems all the more important that much attention sboul(l be paid to the training of tLe body. Rather than neglect such an importallt part of our education, time should be taken from something else, which ill tmn ,wuld awaken the 01<1 expedient of lengthening the course or requiring more at entrance. But to return to the subject, we will say that we hope to see many entries at the spring games and witness many agreeable SUl'prises. "Cnless we senl1 someone over to enter the Intercollegiate games this year, we ,,"ill lose our place i11 the Association, according to its rules, as "'e have m[t(le no entries for the past two years, and consequently active preparations are being made to organize a tugof-war team, and if our spring games bring out any goodmen, they will also be entered there. Om track is not in a fit condition to run on. As it was used so little, tbree years ago it was partly sodded m'er. There is, however, an excellent foundation left, and although it can be sufficiently repaired for us to use, yet our records must, at best, be yery poor. Arrangements have been made with the Manhattan Athletic Club by which we can use their track on which to train for the Intercollegiate g"ames. Since the Polo grounds took so many of the large matches from


THE ECCENTRIC.

65

us, we have not had as much money in the treasury, and feeling the need of a new grand-stand and dressing-room, a committee was appointed in January last to arrange for an entertainment to be given by the students this spring, in order to raise money to build them. The erection of a grand-stand will be very beneficial, and will adu greatly to the grounds. The old part of the fence on the east side of the grounds is sadly in need of repairs. ,Thy not let the Sophomores and Freshmen take hold and fix this up? Three years ago the Classes of 'S3 and'S.! built the fence around the west and south sides, and surely there shouhl be sufficient interest taken in the matter now to apply the needed stitch, whicD in time might save nine.


5b~) ~ }b~ll_

L~\ • • 0-

~~: ~.

'"

:1!'.

t~ .-::......"'"r ,.~ V "

..'

i

BASE ~ BA~~ SEASON OF

1883,

.!Hsti tnt c ) Un l'. II. R. HE.\, 'S4, (/(/plaill, 1st ]jaSt'. S. P. IkHH, '84, 3rli]ja,·". E. N. WRIGHT, 'S0, ('(/lr·It!')·. C. L. ChrELY, 'S4, L . Field. JUALC01I l\Ic:N.lrcm'l·ox, 't-;:l, '2d lJa.~('. H. K ~\[()J:IlIHOX, '86, S. Stop. F. R. KDWfOX, 'S6, C. Pit'hl. E. H. :\Ir'XKWI'l'Z, 'S:5, R. Field, Suu.'li/llle: A. H. JOIIXSOX, '!-lB. PETER HERDIC',

'S3, Pitch!')'.

RECORD OF GAMES . Opp. Sier.

April H.-At Brooklyn. POI.T'l'ECfIXH' l'S. f:\TE\·EXS . . . . . . . . April 1U.-At Hoboken. l\IoXTCL.IIR A. A. t'.~. Sn:mxs .. .. . April 21.-At Hoboken. ST.ITEX I HL.lxD l'':. STE\'EX~. . . . . . . .\.pril 3Q.-At Hoboken. LlFAYE'l"l'E r.'. f:iTEYEXS . . . . . . . . . . May 2.-At Staten Isla11l1. STOCK EX('H.IX(;J~ l"~. f:iTE\,EXS .. .

7 18 3

7

G 7 1 G 9 10


THE EC'C'EXTRIC.

()7

O)IJI. 81a.

May ?-At Hoboken. ELIZ.illETH A. C. /'.'. STE\'E:>'S . . . . . . . 8 May 12.-At Williamstuwn. ,YILLLI:IIS l:.~. STEYENS . . . . . . . . 12 May 15.-At Hoboken. 1\L\xH.\:r'~A~ A. A. l'~. S'rEYENS . . . . . 7 lUay IS.-At Easton. LAFAYETTE us. STEYENf.:. . . . . • • . . . • . . 11 May la.-At Stenton. YOLNG A~IERIC"\ w. STEYENS....... . 10 :JIny 21.-At Hoboken. STOCK EXClLL'WE '(.'.'. STEYENS . • . . . 3 :JIay 22.-At Hoboken. ROSE HILLS u.s. STEYE:>'S . • . . . . • • . 5

14 7 2-1 D 7 -1 1

FIELDING AVERAGE. (imnes

PLA \'EH~.

pl<tyell.

Cl,ances accepted.

150 101 32 73 67

12 11 12 12

Rea ............ " " ..... ' Wright . . . .... . .. . . . ...... Gately .............. . ... Herdic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Bush ................... . , Munkwitz ... " . . ...... . .. . M('Xaughton ... . ...... ... . Kempton ................. Morrison .. . . . .. . ..........

ClIrlllces offered.

12

11

9 12 12 9

53 15 32

AYerage.

139 91 29

.026 .909 .90G .822 .821 .818 .7:').) .7i1:'3 .719

60 55 9 40 11 23

]i'iuM average. , .. . . ....

.823

BATTING AVERAGE. PLAYERS.

TimC'o

Base

l'>t bat.

hits.

- -

-

U€fl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

G8 5D 5D

:Jlullkwitz ................ . lI·right .. ...... . . .... ... .. Bush ............. .. .. ... Gately ..... ......... .. .... :Jlol1'isou .................. Kempton ... ... ..... . ... , ..

45 56 57 57 40 57

Herdic ..... . ............. :JlcXaugLton . . .... .. ......

'

Finnl average ......... .

Bases on llits.

23 20 19 12 18 12

28 27 22 17

11

14

7

7

5

6

. -I

14 18

I I

Average.

.36,5 .340 .320 .293 .2::32 .210 .193 .175 .087 .246


llASE-BALL at Stevens in the season of 1882 began to show signs .fj of marked improvement over that of former years. As regards results, comparing the games won with those lost, it was not a success. This was due, however, to the fact that the nines played with were much stronger than any Stevens had ever played with before. It was for this reason that tl;e interest in the game was so greatly increased; for anyone who knows anything about the game will apl)reciate the fact that a great deal more credit is due a nine when they playa close game with a nine stronger than itself, even should it lose, than when it plays with a weak nine and wins. Base-ball at the close of the season of 1882 had, as you see, taken an entirely new stand with us, and, of course, very great things were expected of the coming nine of '83. Having lost but one man from the nine of '82, we naturally looked forward to a very successful season, and I am sure the Fates did not go back on us this time. The success of onr nine last year was due to several causes, one or two of which we will mention, hoping that even greater attention may be paid to them in the future. Particular attention was paid to the practising of the members of the nine together, and it is absolutely necessary, if success is desired, that each man should be practised in his position. Individually each one may be a good player, and yet, if they have not practised faithfully together, they will be almost sure to play an exceedingly poor game. Another point which we must not pass over without noticing, is the necessity of quietness en the field, and prompt obedience to the captain's orders. These were particularly noticeable in last yeal路's nine, but can still be improved upon. Our success was also due not a little to the great interest taken in our games by the whole col路 lege. This is a greater help than anyone imagines-come to our games regularly, show your interest in this way, and you may be sure you are playing no little part in the game. CAPTAIN.


"DOWN!!'"

FOOf .. 13 At..L..

SE:ASON OF

18 8 3 ,

7nstitntc ).!lCU L'll. RUSHERS. A. REXXETH TORRAXCE, ,

S. P. BrsH, '81.

4.

P.

KLEl'ZSCH, '84, Co})/aill. II'. A. ADlU.\XCE, '8:). IY. S. DILWORTIf, 路S5. J. S. :;\IcCoy, '85. E)IILE COTIART, ' 6.

QD'_ IR TER n.1 CK.

Osc.\R

B .\LJ)WIN,

'85.

IltlLP B..: l C'[{FI. A. H.

A. IVl'H'rs, '8.J.. FD'LL BA C'J{. NomIAx C.nIPBELL,

'87

JOHXSOX,

'86.


70

THE EOOENTRIO. RECORD OF GAMES.

September 29th.-At Hoboken. BROOKLYN POLYTECHNIC Won by STE\'E~S: 59 to O. October Gth.-At New Haven. 48 to O. October 20th.-At Hoboken. Y.\RD: 14 to 4.

Y\LE tis. STEVENS. HAR\'ARD

October 24th.-At Hoboken. PRI~CETO~ TON: 14 to O. October 27th.-At Hoboken. \,ENfol: 19 to O.

COLlJ)IBIA

November 3d.-At Easton. L,IF.IYE1"l'E YENS: 14 to 4. November Gth.-At Cmllbrillge. 11.m\,.IHD: 11 to 2. November 20th.-At Hohoken. S'l'EVE~S: GO to O.

VS. STEVE~S.

,Von by y'U,E:

STEVENS.

,Yon by HAR-

VS. S·l'l'VE~S.

\'iT on by PR~CE­

VS.

VS.

DTEYENS.

Won by 81'£-

1:8.

STEVENS.

,Von by Sn-

HAH\,.\HD n;. SETOX HALL

November 24th.-At Hohoken. L .IT.\YETTE STEVENS: 14 to 11. NO"ember 27th.-At Hobokell. Vxn'ERsr!'y ,VOll by STEVENS: 5 to 1.

1:.'.

l'S.

01'

S'l'EVE~S.

Won by

STEVENS.

,Yon by

STEVENS.

Won by

;)lICIIIG.\X

VS.

STEVENS.

November 29th.-At Hoboken. UXIVEHSITY OF PE~NSYLVANIA YENS. Tie game: G to G.

VS.

STE-


U OH the first time since the introduction of the Hugby game in f 6 this couutry, Stevens may be said to have scored a successful year at foot-ball. In past years '1'0 have had our ups and downs, but not until last year can 'we be said to have made any real progress in the game. This progress has oilly been gained by hard pel'severance, by faithful practice, and by paying more attention to personal training than formerly. The experience of last year decisively proves that it pays to train for foot-ball. The members of our team, last year, each received special notice asking them to abstain from smoking and spirits, aml prescribing a diet which they must follow, or else forfeit their place on the team. They reaped their full reward, in almost every match played, when they found that they were generally more long-winded than their opponents, and even when their antagonists surpassed them in weight and strength, our men seemed to be fresher at the end of the game We have played more games with larger colleges than ever before, aud have only been beaten by three colleges, with whom we have made fail' scores, ,yhile we have succeeded in defeating most of OUT olel-time rivals. We appreciate the courtesy shown us by Harvard, while we much condemn the action of Rutgers. As they have won more games from us, in past years, than we have from them, we consider it only just that they should play us whell our team was probably the stronger. They well c1esene to have us refuRe to meet them again. After having done so well this year, many entertained the belief that we ought to apply for a place in the Intercollegiate Foot-ball Association, while others thought that there was danger of our being too self-confident over one year's success, and reco=ended that we enter a new Association, to be formed between Lafayette, University of Pennsylvania, Rutgers, and Stevens, wmch we have been invited by Lafayette to help organize. This latter would, undoubtedly, be


72

THE ECCENTRIC.

far the wiser course to pursue, but here a question might be raised as to whether we have time for either. Whatever may be decided upon, let us hope that Steyens may not fall back from achievements already attained, but that her progress in foot-ball may be ever" Onward and upward ." It is proper that we should here express our thanks to those gentlemen of the faculty who have contributed to the success of the team by exercising so much leniency ,yith regard to absence from recitations :mc1 afternoon ,,路ork.


-

-,-'

j'

'I,

_. ;l_

I

g

0j

Q

1

/ .I

庐fficcrs. 路S.5 .............. Presidellt. H. K. :\IORRISOX, '86 .......... . j"ice-Presidellt. KENNETH TORR\NCE, '801 ........ Secretary. J. H. STEII路.illT, 'S5 .... . ... . ... Tl'easllrel' . P.\UL "\YILLIS,

.members. S. P.

BUSH,

'801.

PAUL "\YILLIS,

'S5.

H. R. HE.\, 'So!. J. H. STEW \RT, 'S5. KENXETII TORR\XCE,

'Sol.

EDWIN BL'RHORX, 'S5. E. B. RENWICK, 'S4. C. L. BROWXELL, 'S7. Nomr,\x C .nIPBELL, 'S7. H. K l\IoRRIl'lox, 'SG.


f..,AWN IE:NNIS. m nE success of a slllall college in any intercollegiate sport, can only 1" be found in instances which depend mainly on individual efforts. J

N a better example of this class can be found than lawn tennis. Although it is true that lal'ger colleges have more men from whom to pick good playels, and consequently, the probability of their getting a good team is better, yet at most they can only select two men, and, owing to this fact, the possibilities of a small college are greatly increaBec1. It would certainly be rash for Stevens to enter a Football 01' Base-ball Association with Yale, Harvard, 01' Princeton, but the oc1lls would be much reduced, and Steyens would stand on a much 1110re even footing with these colleges, in a Tennis Association. Such an association was organized last year, and doubtless, had Stevens applied at that time, she would have been admitted. As we did not do so, however, it is hoped. that we will not fail to make application this year; for it certainly would be a great advantage to belong to such an association. The growing' interest taken in tennis has manifested itself dID'illg' the past year, by the forming of a class club in '85, and by a tournament which was played last fall at the direction of the Athletic Association. Although the tournament dragged through two 01' three weeks, being repeatedly postponed on account of bad weather, it showed that we had some excellent players among us, and emphatically demonstrated the fact that this element at Stevens should be carefully cultivated. And where, indeed, can we find a better place to cultivate this branch of athletics? ,Ve were deprived of our fine gymnasium, but our beautiful athletic grounds still remain in OLU' possession, and we are sure that there are few in the country better fitted than these for tennis.


(Dfficw:;.

J. H. f:ln:wAllT, 'H.) ....... , .... . Pl'f'.,idellf . .J. R. FUIDUX, 'H;)............... l'ice-Presidcllf, E. )1.

COTL\H'i',

'H(). , . . . . .. . .... .....'f'cl'e/ory.

O"('\H

B\LlllI"!X,

'Ii.) .......•..... 'l'1'I'{/Sw'el',

illembers . E. p. ~IoWT()x, '86. 'V. X STEI"EXS, ·H,). C. F. P,\H1(Ell, ·Sl. E. )1. COTl.IR'i', 'S6,

H. P. Bl'srr, 'Sl. J. R. FUmL\N, 'S5. E. T. Bnms.ILL, '86, .T. H. f:ll'EW.\ln', '85.

Osc.\U

" '. it

B\LOW!X,

·H.).

ADHlA:-.'CE,

'85.


[By permi,,510 11 of Mc~~r". L . PIl.l~{T &. CO.J

5, '- f,

ORCHE:SfRA. QJ)ffim:s.

C. W.

W HITING,

'84 . . .. ... .. .. .. Pn~ident .

H. J . MILLER, '84 .. .. .. .... . . . . Vice-President. R H. RICE, '85 . . . .. ..... . .... . Secretary. L. W. SERREL, '86 . .. .. .. . . .. . .. Treasure?'.

~lcmb e rs.

H. J .

'84, Violin . C. ' Y. WHITING, '84, Clarinet. L. ' V. SERREL, '86, Piano. R. H. RrcE, '85, Flute.

MILLER,

ALEX. ' YURTS,

A.

G.

'84, Cornet. GLASGOW, '85, Octorena.


PHOfOGOSMOS, 庐fficcrs . 'V. H. BRISTOL, '84 . .. . ........ P?路esident. A. S. MORRIS, '84 .............. Vice- PTesident. E. T. BIRDSALL, '86 ... . ......... SecretaTY. H. S. PRENTISS, '84 ..... . ... . ' ... TreasuTer.

tllcmbct's. W. A. ADRIANCE, '85. E. H. FOSTER, '84.

E. T.

'86. '84. H. DEB. PARSONS, '84. R. L. FEARN, '84.

:F'.

BIRDSALL,

VAN VLECK,

W. H. BRIS'roL, '84. J. H. STEwAR'r, '85. H. S. PRENTISS, '84. EMILE COTIART, '86. A. S. MORRIS, '84. L W. SERREL, '86.


~

\

,

I

~_I

--


5, L I,

SKE:fCH Ct.-UB.

®fficcts. 'S.! .. . ........... . l'?·e"idel/I. D. H. l\Lnn:, 'S.! .. . . , . ........ ]-ice-Pl'e'''iilellt. E. T. BIllDS.U,L, '86 .......... . .. Treas//rer. C. L. " 'ET)WnE, 'S 6. . ........... /)·,'c)'r:tary. J. A.

BEXSEL,

ilhmbers. L. ,Yo SEHHEL, '1:56. D. H. ~hnn:-, ·S'!. C. L. WE'l';I[OHE, ·So. n. M. A:\DERSOX, 'S7. J. VAX VLECT>, 'I).!. H. D. WrLLI.mfl, ·Sf). J. A. BE:\SET., 'S4.. E. T.

F.

BUlDS,UJL,

VAX VLECK,

'SU.

'S.!.

l\I. S.

HAHLOI\',

A. P.

IhETZSCH,

"T."T.

·H.).

REXI\'ICK,

'83.

'S.!. J. A. P. CRISFIELD, 'S7. A. G. Gu.sGmr, '1-;4 . C. F. P .mE..EH, 'S4.

J. f-:. McCoy, '1)5. H. H. REA, 'S.!. E. L. DENT, 'S4-.


S,

I,

I, YACHi

CL..U13,

'!1n.cTtts. " REX "-::'\IOWTO~.

"ECHO "-ADRl.\NCE.

" IDLER ., -REA.

"FEARLESS "-TORRA..'1CE.

"GRECIA~ l\IoxARcH "-FOSTER.

" DEvmlIA "-RICE.

" SWITZElUul.ND "-BALDWIN.

(Dfficcrs. P. l\IOWTO~, 'S6 ...... . .. .. ... . ..... . ....... Head ~AIan. REA, 'S4 . . . .......................... . . Next. KENNETH TORR.-\)!CE, 'S-1-. . . . . . . . . . .. . ......•.... Thinl. E. H. FOSTER, 'S4....................... . ..... Thi?'d plus one. W. A. ADRIA~CE, '85 . ......... . .. . ... . ...... .. . Fifth minus one. O. H. BALDW~, 'S5 ... . . ...................... [n order. R. H. RICE, '85. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . ... Last, not least. E .

H. R.

!U cmb cr. E.

T.

BIRDS.I.l.L,

'S6.


<DfficcrG A. \'iT. E. 1'11.

'S4 ... . ...... .... .. .. President. 'SG ..... ... ....... .. .. T)'(;asure)·.

Bn.U:>".illD, COTIART,

ilhmbcrs. Fi1'st Tenors. E. M. COTIAR'l', 'SG. J. A. McELROY, 'S7.

Second Teno1·S. F. MITCHELL, 'S4. FUEDEHICK N. 1'II0R'l'O;';, 'SG.

Fint Bassos. C. W. Trro:IL\S, 'S4. EDWIN BURHOR:>", 'S5.

Second Ba.,sos. ,Yo H. BRISTOL, 'S4. N OHTH l\IcLEA." 'S5.

H .·\R\"EY

WalNe?'.

A. ,Yo

BRAI;.;.I.lW,

'S4.

'84 QUARTETTE, First Teno)·. A. W. Bn.UNAHD. Fi1'St Basso. W. H.

BRISTOL.

Second Te)107·. H. F. 1IrTCHELL. Second Basso. C. W.

THOUAS.


S, I, f, 0 H RON 0 t.. 0 GY,

W

HEN I was young my Guv'nor sought To settle what he'd have me taughtSome business, art, or 'ology. He went to Morton, had a "chin," Alld settled on the Stevens InStitute of Technology.

So when I'd scrambled through the prep, Each Prof, one early day in SepTember, did acknowledge he Had passec1me, and I'd therefore been Admitted to the Stevens InStitute of Technology.

In Freshman year as fresh was I As dew-drops from the evening sky, For which I make apologyThat everyone commits that sin In Freshman year at Stevens InStitute of Technology.

And wben a " Soph " I swallowed more Of beer than scientific lore, But still I was quite "lmowledgy ; " For I had learned the art of skinNing when a " Soph " at Stevens InStitute of Technology.


THE ECCENTRIC.

83

By Junior year the Faculty Had variously tackled me. The Prof who taught limnology Had crammec1me ,vith his book of kinEmatics, writ for Stevens InSt.itute of Technology.

But free from toil and moil at last, "Exams" in Senior year I passed. I'm clone with all my college eGotisms, and my course have finIshec1 at the famous Stevens InStitute of Technology.

I now embark in my career As a mechanical engineer, And this is my doxologyAll praises go, for what I win, To Alma J1Iate7", Stevens InStitute of Technology.

X.

PREP.


f HE:

MODE:RN PIl..GRIM'S PROGRE:SS,

7JSI walked through the wildel'lless of this world, I lighted on a 1.1 certain place where there was a den; and I laid me down in that place to sleep; and as I slept I dreamed a dream. I dreamed, and behold, I saw a man clothed in rags, standing in a certain place, with his face from his own house, a book in his hand, and a great burden upon his back. I looked and saw him open the book, and read therein; and, as he read, he wept and trembled; and not being able longer to contain, he brake out with a lamentable cry, saying: "What shall I do ? " And behold, as I looked, one named Engineer, who happened to be passing that way, gave unto him a parchment, wherein were full directions. The man, whose narue was Student, in the observance of these directions, repaired to the ancient town of N ekoboh, which is in the classical land of Yesrejwen. In this town was a gate, which opened into a narrow and rough road that, according to Engineer, wonld lead to perfect felicity. On entering the tOWIl, Student was joined by a band of pilgrims, who, seeing the fickleness and uncertainty of life in this world of vanity, had followed the directions of that godly man, Engineer. They walked along, joyously conversing of the sweet felicity in store for them, after their weary pilgrimage should be consummated; when suddenly they found themselves plunged headlong into a deep and miry slough. And now began a weary time of groaning anel gnashing of teeth. Student, among others, struggled nobly, and after a number of prodigious efforts, succeeded in fighting his way through this dangerous mire, which is known as the Slough of Desponc1. Others, with less determination, withdrew, after wallowing around for a short time, on the same side as they had entered from; and so retreated early from the struggle. Those that succeeded in passing through this ordeal, founel themselves directly in front of the gate which they had seen in their dreams. Over this gate were inscribed three peculiar characters, which blazed forth with a wondrous light, reaching to the four corners of the world. As near as I could make them out, they appeared to be these, T. S. 1. The porters at this gate, who had 1yitnessed


THE ECCENTRIC. the heroic struggles of the pilgrims in the Slough of Despond, gave to the successful passports, and allowed them to enter. This joyous band set out gl::ttl1y, and found the difficulties of the path as nothing compared with the ideas which they had formed of them. True, they were constantlya\vare of a large number of winged imps of darkness that "ere continuaily hoyering about them, necessitating extreme vigilance, and a burdensome amount of toil to prevent themselves from being oyer"helmecl irredeemably. They were at the same time being tempted into forgetfulness and neglect by a number of shouting, laughing, riotous bacchanals. To yield was death; to listen eyen to their bright promises, extreme danger. One day, I saw a number of these demons completely block up the road, expecting to prevent the further progress of the pilgrims. It seemed to be a war to the death. The pilgrims, being the weaker party, were compelled to depend considerably on strategy, and many were the flank movements successfully executed. Some pilgrims retreated precipitately to their former haunts, while others, after a heroic struggle, broke through the opposing ranks and sank, weary and exhausted, into a heayen of refuge which had been prepared for just such occasions by the lords of this road. After a short period of rest the pilgrims again started on their weary way, only to be stopped, time after time, by determined onslaughts on the part of the demons. After a couple of these struggles, which took place in the land of Shemfren, Student and his companions came near unto the borders of Eromohpos, a land which lay beyond Shemfl'en. Here took place the most sanguinary struggle yet. Many were severely wounded, while quite a number were forced to give up the pilgrimage and return to their own homes. Poor Student, in a desperate encounter with a grisly clem on named Nidrouc, 1ms severely wounded. Before the effects of this encounter bad time to weal' off, the tired pilgrims were plunged into a very pandemonium resonant with noise and confusion, where any carelessness would be attended with great risk. Just within the land of Eromohpos was a pleasant yailey, filled "ith quiet nooks and babbling brooks, whe1'e the songs of birds resounded from morn till night. This yalley was impenetrable to all demons, thus offering a secure retreat to the ,yeary and footsore. After a brief sojourn, the pilgrims started anew. No sooner had they started, however, than demons, larger andlllore numerous than ever, beset their ,yay. New ones had been put in the places of those that had failed in conquering the pilgrims. In the next encoIDltel', among the most aggressive and persistent, ,yere the clemons Evitpirc, Simehc, and Suluclac ; great were the ravages committed by them, and


THE ECCENTRlC.

87

great was the dread in which they were held. Again and again was pOOl' Student wounded. Finally, the weary band came into the land of Roinuj. Here, Student, in seeking to avoid an encounter with the demon ChanemBci-the most invulnerable and implacable of them all-sought refuge in a castle situated just off from the main road. This proyed to be Doubting Castle, ovmed by Giant Despair. Before Student was aware of it, he had been securely bound in one of the deepest duugeons. Giant Despair, after hearing his story, said that what Engineer had told him was utterly untrue, a11(l that the road led to a land called Penury; and that his book of instructions was simply the machination of a diseased brain. He s[l.id that the only road to Felicity passed through the land of illammon, and could only be reached through gates called Ignorance, Luck, and Cheek; unless the pilgrim happened to possess a paHs c[l.llecl Influence, 01' owned property in the land of Lucre. Despair also advised Student to return to his own land, and threatened, if his advice was not followed, to imprison him for life. Despair then left him to his own thoughts. Poor Student was much incline(l to comply with the demands of Giant Despair, when suJdenly he bethought him of directions which had been giyen him by a yenerable lXltriarch 路whom he hall lately met. So he eh'ew from his bosom this parchment roll, and therein found a key which opened his dungeoll <1001'. He soon rejoined his fellows allll took part in a terrible struggle with a youthful herculean demon, called ~citamerick, in which he was again sorely "ounded. Finally the land of Roines was reached. The road now became straighter ancl smoother, and pmlsed oyer a high ridge called the Delectable Mountains, from the highest peaks of which, it was rumored, the gates of Felicity l"I"ere yisible. The demons, by this time, were becoming a little more cautious a11(l circumspect in their attacks, learning by experience that they could not oyercome the pilgrims. There was one demon, howe"er, who was new to the business, and who still plagued thelU. The nalUe of this troublef;ome demon was Enibrut. Finally the light irradiated by the flag of Felicity began to be noticed, and soon became so strong that it lit up the countenances of the pilgrims, until they fairly shone with brightness, as if the light of genius had been tranf;plantecl from its abolle with the Gods, in order to crown their brows. Although weary, footsore, and covered with scars, a more noble, distinguished baml than this, when each, with his banner in his hand, passed through the goal of hif; ambition, was neyer seen. I awoke, and behold, it was a tlream.


"TH ERE'S MAN Y A SLlP~ 1.


"THER E~S MA NY A SLl p~ 2


It

f

H~ l3~sf,1,AID PL..ANS 0' MIG~ AND : M~N/'

I

T is the -th of June 188-, aUll the hall in which is being held the commencement of the S. 1. T. presents an animated appearance. A stream of visitors is pouring into the hall, while about the entrance is gathered a crowd of students, engaged in conversation and in admiring the ladies who enter. From their midst arises the hum of voices, in which the strong, manly voice of the Senior mingles in striking contrast to the shrill chirp of the newly made Sophomore. Within all is light and gayety. Here is concentrated the beauty and aile of Hoboken and its suburbs, and fifl the gas-light streams over the brilliantly dressed throng, the beholder must acknowledge that for C. P. gorgeousness it can't be beat. The crowd increases to a perfect jam, for every graduate has brought every living representative of hiH family to "itness his stepping off. The conversation deepens, ,,路hile occasionally may be heard the squeaking fidlUe aUll the grunting bass engaged in skirmishing under the footlights. Gradually settles clown the silence of expectation, and all eyes are directed towanl the platform. Finally, the sic1edoors open, and em'eloped in a halo of light, and showering gracious smiles on everything as, to the sound of ethereal music, be trips down the platform, beholll the finished product-the graduate! WOl'dsfail to express the depth and intensity of his all-pervading and subduing majesty and graciousness. In this warm, melting, rapturous presence, his sublimity is the only element which prevents the enchanted beholder from fusion. Seating himself, he surveys the audience with an air of benignity, calmness, and self-satisfaction which would make a bronze statue envious, and would give a Roman god the colic. And now begin the exercises, and during the performance of the music and the prayer, the spectaJor has an opportunity to glance over the programme and read up the list of theses. The first is " A Consideration of the Uorpuscular and 'Yayc Theories of Light."


THE EOOENTRIO.

91

This subject has been wrestled with by John 'Yilliam l\IacQuorne Rankine Smith to the extent of about three hundred pages, and doubtless disposes of the question perfectly. Next on the list is the name of Justus Liebig Leiunitz Leber, of Hoboken. His earthly mission is a search for the most efficient form of boiler flue, and the results of his labors are expressed in about two hunch'ed pages of matter, having for its nucleus an equation of the seventeenth degree. And so they go on, the reader feeling on reaching the end of the Jist, that if they are all satisfactorily disposed of, there is ,-ery little more to be done in science. Next comes the address, an Engineer, one of the chief lights of the profession, having been imported from New York to deliver it. His capacity for the production of tafty is a maximum, and as he pictures the rosy future awaiting the happy graduate, the latter, intoxicated at once by the homage of the multitude, the I1form;aid taffy, and the beer preyioufily imbibed, floats away in a dream compared to which the rosiest opium vision is a mince-pie nightmare. And now it is the valedictorian's turn, aUll with an airiness of grace which would make a cat dizzy, he trips forward and delivers his effusion, and finishing, retires with the air of one who feels that there are no more ,yorlds to conquer. The affair draws to a close; the last of the programme has taken place and the audience breaks up. The band of gradunJes, after shaking hands, prepare to follow, and as each one tucks the n,rm of his lady love ulHler his own the worW does indeed seem nIl glucose.

*

*

*

*

*

It is a cLilly evening in l\ovember, 189-, and under the cloudy sky ChatLalll Square and the Bowery look even less pleasant than usual. The ,vind whistles aroulltl corner,' and do'wn streets, imparting a melancholy and reflective expression to the face of the scantily clad wooc1en Il1llian, and causing the spectator of the previous article to draw his coat more closely around him, growl at the weather, and wish it was summer. Suddenly, Ufi an approaching' figure meetfi his eye, he pauses. There is nothing unusual in the appearance of the pas er-by; he is only a patent-medicine missionary, but the former still gazes at him. Great Heayens! Can it be? No, it cannot; Yes, it is-John 'William :JIacQuorne Rankine Smith! Yes, it is no other, but it is not the Smith of yore. ~o, those herculean shoulders which were once heW so erect are now bent and stooping, aUll have


92

THE ECCE.XTRlC.

been desecrated with a sandwich sign which annonnces to a groaning "'orlel that" Soloman's Aunihilation " is a specific for corns. The apparition with its load of disappointment, SOlTOW and sign, fades slowly into the darkness, and the first party has partly recovered from his shock when there passes an attenuated imli,ic1ual carrying It huge bag o~er his shoulder and singing a song ha\ing for its text "Rags." A something about the ballad strikes him as familiar; it is not the ,,"onIs, 1101' yet the tune, but at last it dawns on him; it is the voice of him \\'ho delivered the valetlictor,Y. These revelations are too much for him, and inwardly COllllucllting on the .ups and clowns of life, he pursues his way.


.... ./~ ~~.,-:: :':L:-J~ ~ ,""

,.

.' I

' .\' \

"

"'- ~

GOODNE:SS' SAKE: DON'f SAY f OL-D You," 'ill going to whisper some won1s in yom' ear, But for goodness' sake don't say I tolll you; Anc1 what eyer I say 01' whateyer you hear, For goodness' sake don't say I toM you. I thiuk you'll aclmowledge, when rYe had my say, That 1\'e mentioned some eyilB we Bee eyer.)" clay, And so I'll proceed without further dclayBut for goodness' sake don't say I told you.

I

In the college, no smoking's allowed, you're a\Yare, But for goodness' sake don't say I told you; And, of conrse, none's indulged in, for no one would c1areFor goollness' sake don't say I tohl YOLl.

I


94

THE ECCENTRIC. There's no law against drinking as much as you please, And on this one point every fellow agreesThat this is the cause of our janitor's spreesBut for goodness' sake don't say I told you. Each professor declares that we've too much to do, But for goodness' sake don't say I told you; And they say it's a wonder we ever get throughFor goodness' sake don't say I told you. But, you know, each one thinks his department's the best, We in that must excel, though we fail in the rest, So they pile lessons on us with beautiful zestBut for goodness' sake don't say I told you. The fame of our shop-course has spread far and wide, But for goodness' sake don't say I told you; And our forge-work above all's an object of prideFor goodness' sake don't say I told you. This forge is arranged on a beautiful plan, There's no chimney about, which is it la Queen Anne, The smoke gets out the windows the best way it canBut for goodness' sake don't say I told you. In the chemical "lab" the air's not over pure, But for goodness' sake don't say I told you; But we don't want it remedied, that's very sureFor goodness' sake don't say I told you. For 'tis here that the average student first gets In the ,yay of avoiding contracting bad debts, For the smoke is so thick he don't need cigarettesBut for goodness' sake don't say I told you. Now I guess I must stop, for I'm tiring you, But for goodness' sake don't say I told you; But I know you'll acknowledge that what I've said's trueFor goodness' sake don't say I told you. There are dozens of evils of which I could speak, And if I got started could talk such a streak That Prof. Thurston's lectures themselves would seem weakBut for goodness' sake don't say I told you.


"Waiting for' a Good Chance. ' "

" A Good Chance

I "


SCRAPS FROM A DIARY,

Q' EPTEl\IBER 28th.-Am going to hegin my Freshman year at Stevens to-morrow, andlUa wants me to keep a diary and show it to her when I come home for the Christmas holidays, so here goes. September 29th.-Arrived in Hoboken and engaged board at 1\'Irs. Schmmilpunnicks. ::'IIade a mash on ::\Iiss S. before I had been there fifteen minutes. lYe Stevens men cannot be resisted. September 30th.-Went up to the Institute. As soon as I got inside the door a fellow rushed up to me and dragged me into a cornel'. He asked me if I was a Freshman, :mcl I said I was. He then said he wanted me to join his Fraternity; that it was the best one in College, and that Congressman Flunkey and Senator Bangup belonged to it. He said I must join right awa:r though, because they were only going to take in one more man. He told me that it would only cost me three dollars a11(l a half, and I'd have lots of fun. I got rid of him and then another fellow spoke to me. He said his was the first Society in the country, and if their candidate hadn't been defeated they would have had the President of the United States. It would cost me five dollars to join his. I told him the other fello"w's Society only charged three and a half, and then be put his price down to two and a half. Five more Societies tackled me before I had walked half way down the hall, and I told them nIl I'd join to-morrow. I ,yonder ,,路hat the dal'l1ec1 things are, anyhow. October Ist.-Went into recitations to-day. Made a dead flunk in Physics, and got a O. After class I went up and told the Professor that I was from Rochester, aUll used to go fishing with Seth Green. Then he put a 1 in front of the O. October 2d.-Had a rush with the" Sophs" to-day. The Professor of Mathematics while trying to stop it stepped on one mun's foot. Poor fellow, how I pity him.

}J


THE ECCENTRIC.

97

October 3d.-Saw a notice on the bulletin board saying that Freshmen bad better select subjects for their theses and keep taking notes on them. A good idea. October 4th.-Tolcl Professor of Dlmving that I was going to Jersey City to sketch a machine and then went to the foot路 ball game. October 5th.-Class petitioned the President for hot lunches and an elevator to the drawing-rooms. October 6th.-Class thought the French lesson was too long anel agreed to flunk. First ten flunked all right, but the next fellow knew his question and answered, so the first ones got left. I was among them. That's a mean trick. October 7th.-Called itIr. Lacklallll "Professor," anu got off from shop路work. October 8th.-The petition for hot lunches didn't work, so I and two others were appointed a committee to wait on the President. I sha.n't go on another committee. Great Scott! how he sat on us. October 9th.-Hear I'm going to be chopped for flunking so much. Guess I'll have to write to the old man and get him to come and talk to the President. October lOth.-Don't think ~Ia will \\"ant to see this diary. Am going to stop.


A FAGUl"fY 11 FACULTY

M££fING,

meeting. What a world of meaning there is to a , 1. college student in those words. That is, to some college students, especially the ones who have been shaky on examinations, or have been caught brealdng some of the rules. I remember, when a Freshman, how it was announced to us one day that there was to be a Faculty meeting that afternoon, aud how it almost drove me crazy all day to think of what they might say and do when my name was brought up. I remember, too, how I hung around outside of the door, and wondered what was going on inside; for though I could hear the confused hum of voices, I could not distinguish a single word that was said. I also remember how, when I passed into a higher Class, my desire to know how a Faculty meeting was conducted increased, although my dread of them had somewhat diminished; and having borne with my curiosity as long as I was able, I climbed up outside of the building, and looked in through a window where a blind concealed me, and witnessed the whole meeting. I know that there are some of the students now-yes, and some of the alumni, too-who would be interested in what I saw that day, and it is for them that I write this. The meeting was held in the reception-room, a place remarkable for nothing but its furniture, ,,-hich consisted of two chairs, a table, a writing-desk, and a sofa with three legs. Owing to the scarcity of chairs the average visitor would generally attempt to sit on the sofa, and if he did not sit on the propel' place, he invariably arose from the floor a sadder and wiser man. But to resume my story. Four o'clock was the hour set for the meeting, and fifteen minutes before that time the President stepped out of his office and entered the reception-l·oom. Drawing his chair up to the table he called to George, and when that worthy entered, bade him go into the shop and tell 1\11'. Lack-


THE ECCENTRIC.

99

land to have the large Sturtevant fan ready to turn on the receptionroom at a moment's notice, as one of his esteemed colle agnes would very likely attempt to tell of some wonderful shots he made last Summer, and it was well to have something that would outdo him. Having given this order he smiled calmly, and then leaned back in his chair and awaited the coming of the other members of the Faculty. They began to arrive in quick succession, and at the end of fifteen minutes all but Professors Gray and Timber were present. Punctually at the time set for the meeting, the door opened and Professor Gray entered. He bowed courteously to each of the assembled Professors, and noticing that the two chairs, the table, and the steam-heater were already occupied, essayed to sit on the sofa. The sofa evidently recognized his ability to "sit down" on things, and retaliated by giving way, thereby scraping his face against the rough wall. When he arose he looked as though he had been trying to stand before John L. Sullivan for one round. His hail' was mussed too, a condition which it had never been known to be ill before. Of course he made some ullcomplimenta,ry remarks about the sofa, and then glared at Professor Hayer because he told him he looked funny. "I wish that Professor Timber would come," remarked the President, looking at his watch; "he is already fifteen minutes late." The words were harc1ly uttered when a door upstairs slammed, and then Professor Timber's footsteps were heard in the hall above. Then they heard him coming down four steps at a time. He reached the bottom of the stairs and was walking rapidly toward the door of the reception-room. The President was just about to call the meeting to order when-crash! the door suddenly flew open and Professor Timber shot in head foremost, at the rate of about sixty miles an hour. His clothes were dripping wet, and his feet appeared to be making extraordinary exertions to free themselves from a tin wash-basin in which they were encased. There was a general stampede for the farther side of the room as Professor Timber picked himself up and with fury in his eyes remarked: "Who, in the name of the University of Michigan, left that basin full of water out there? " "I might have known you'd fall over that," answered Professor Hayer with an agonized countenance; "I left it out there to give my dog a drink. But," he added as his face brightened up, "he's a mighty good little dog. Why, I hunted that dog for a week and he


100

THE ECCENTRIC.

only had a bone to eat in all that time, and "'hen I took it away from him he hunted three days more to Âąina that." ProfeKsor Timber did not appear to be deeply interested in these remarks, but bUKied himself in wiping the water from his clothes. Having done this he was about to take a seat on the sofa, when he was wamed by a cry from Professor Gray, and On leaming of the dangerous cOlHlition it was in, he requeKted Professor :'IIacString to give him It " boost" awl took a seat on the mantelpiece. The meeting ,,-as then called to order, anel after having transacted the preliminary business the Presitlent saitl he had received a petition from the stUtlcuts asking for a new gymnasium_ He also said he would like to 11l1\"e the opinion of the Faculty in regard to granting it_ ProfesKor l\IacString was the first to Hpeak on thiH subject, ana said he was opposed to granting any requeHt that came in the form of II. written petition. If they had appointed II cOlllmittee and asked it, he might have cOll!;idered the matter, but since they had sent a written petition-never. Professor Thursday then arose and said: -"If we build them a gymnasium so-called, it will cost us in the neighborhood of sixty thousand dollars. This is, 1st, enormous; 2d, preposterous; 3d, outrageous_ TOW I have a plan which, if carried out carefully and without blundering, ,,-ill more than perform the work of a gymnasium. The New York Health Food Company is now selling ,,-hat is known as Universal Food at fifty cents per package. Now my idea is, to purchase a package of this each month alul oiIer it to the student who most distinguishes himself in his studies. I'll warrant that it will make him much stronger than a gymnasium would." A mm-mur of approbation went up as Professor Thursday sat do\V1l, and on motion the Secretary was instructed to enter this speech in full in the minutes, and also to send a copy of it to the Stevens Institute Athletic Association, by whom, they had no doubt, the proposition would be approved of unanimously. Professor Dentine then arose and said: "I think the thanks of the Faculty are due Professor Timber for the prompt manner in which he followed up my suggestion about instructing the Seniors in the method of least squares. Now, in looking over some of Professor Rankine's papers, I find that once in his experience he had to use that branch of mathematics called Fluxions, and I therefore think it would be advisable to make the students pass an examination in that subject before graduation. I would like to have [the opinion of the Faculty on that."


THE ECCENTRIC.

101

All present, with the exception of Professor Hayer, seemed to think that this was a good idea and should be put in operation at once. Professor Hayer was heard to remark: "If you want 'em to do anything more, you had better have 'em attend recitation on Sunday and be done with it." These words would probably have called forth a storm of indignation, but just at that moment Professor Timber looked at his watch and then slid off the mantel, remarking that he had just fom minutes in which to c拢'ttch the train, and moved the meeting be adjourned. This was seconded by Professor Hayer, who said he had locked his dog up in the physical laboratory, and that he had knocked the cathetometer off the table and tried to chink some mercm路y before he had been there fifteen minutes. He didn't know what damage he had done since he left Lim, and didn't care much, but thought the meeting had better adjourn if they wanted to avoid expepse. The Faculty were evidently shuck by the force of this remark, and adjourned the meeting, whereupon I slid down the lightning rod and escaped.


I

LOVE those waltzes that surge and beat, Floating and falling, now loud, now low, Trilling in time to the gay, glad feet That trip and turn to the ebb, the flow.

How sad are those days that sepamte J1[e from that time of youth and }oy ,. When Nell was near it was not too late,She was a gi1"l and I was a boy.

To-night I opened a desk of old, A re~t for ,路ibbons, f01路 roses pTessed, Tu路o OT three locks with thei1路 gleam of gold, And notes that he/" halUl had penned and blest.


103

THE ECCENTRIC. Laale at this jan, with the flowers b)'ight,. Yes, even yet are those colors gay,. And her handkerchiif, with its peliume light That it held when I took it unseen away.

I catch a gleam of he)' sn'eet, sad jace, The crown ~f hail' with its ?-ippled jl'inge, The eyes oj aZUI'e, the sCa/'let tmce Of musing mouth with its ternpting tinge.

I see the signs of the sweet, soft ,<pring,Birds in the garden, bi?'ds on the trees,And I mm'k Nell's voice as its glad notes l'ing And rise in those old-time melodies,

And I hear that waltz with surge and beat, And I moue with Nell to its ebb and flow, Suiting my step to he)' gay, glad jeet, With the mt'sic jalling, now loud, now low.

Crosses come, and the crown unseen Waits,. while we toil and try for gain Gal'dens m'e gay, and gmves m'e greell,There is grief and gladness, pleasure and pain,

But oh.' to turn j1'01n the To live and laue in that I would give ten years, if If Nell wel'e a girl and

toil, the strife, youth and joy j I might, from life, 1 were a boy. l1f.

1~

B.


A

I..-~GfUR~ ON

f URI3IN~Sj

" D RO",VN, Greenleaf, Jones, Robinson--" f'J "lUI'. Robinson will be in in a minute, sir." " All right; thank you--Smith, Turner, ",Yheeler. " I have on the desk before me some models of the latest forms of turbines, which I will explain this morning. It is absolutely necessary that you should understand the working of these, as it is highly probable that they ,,,ill entirely supersede the steamengine as soon as the coal fields are exhausted. I do not expect that event to take place for some months yet, but it is always well to be prepared for any such emergency. " The first turbine of \yhich we have any record was made by Hero of Alexandria. It was not, however, of a very high efficiency, as he ignored entirely the size of the angle beta. Had he paid due attention to the size of this angle, he would probably have made a wheel which it would have been hard to beta, even with the improved machinery of the l)l'esent time. "The turbine passed through various changes, and at the end of the last century Clarke invented his turbine, which you see on the table before me. This is a very good type of the ordinary turbine of fifty years ago, and was used vel'Y extensively until this form of turbine which we have here came into use. " This was invented oy an Englishman named Whatercrank, who died a violent death shortly afterward. "The next form of turbine which I intended to show you I do not see before me, and I think I must have left it in my office. :Mr. Someone, will you please step into my office and ask Mr. Comeoff to give you that turbine which he will find on the left-hand side of my desk? "In this turbine the water enters through an annular opening, and so you see the whirl is continuous. Hence it is very suitable for blowing church organs, as the congregation has before it a living example of 'whirled without end.'


t

THE EOOENTRIO.

105

"Great care should be exercised in the setting up of turbines, as it is upon this that most of their efficiency depends. This setting up is done in several ways, and is good, bad, or indifferent, as the case may be. "One of the best methods, and one which is now being extensively practised in New England, is to hang the wheel by its shaft, so that it can swing about on a horizontal axis, and so can be turned upside down and used as a windmill when water gets scarce. " I haven't seen any arrangement like that in this section of the country yet, but I reckon it ",ill be adopted as soon as its advantages are recognized. "You " 'ill find the yarious methods of setting up turbines described in detail in the following works, which I would advise you to get. They are Stewart on a 'New l\Iethod of Setting up Turbines;' Thomson on a 'Regulating Form of Sluiceway,' and Rankine on ' A Bust.' "The last-mention ed book will be found a little difficult to understand, particularly toward the last, where the author gets fuller and more copious; but with a little patience I haye no doubt you will succeed in mastering it. " So much for the way of setting up turbines. The next things to be considered are the causes which affect their working. The principal ones are mud, rocks, and snapping-turtles. "The first-mentioned occm's, as you can readily see, chiefly where the water is naturally muddy. The only way of getting oyer this difficulty is to conduct the water through a narrow passage filled with charcoal, and so filter it. "I once had occasion to filter some of this muddy water, and I fOlmc1 that the sediment made a very excellent lubricant. You'll find some of it, I think, in one of those bottles in that case just under the ice-machine. I should advise you to look at it as you leave the room. "The second thing I mentioned does not give as much trouble as mud does, because the rocks are not so liable to float down with the water. " The third, however, is an every-day occurrence in some places, and must be guarded against. I remember one time at Lowell, before any precautions were taken in the matter, how a snapping-turtle got into the ,,路heel and caused a sudden stoppage of the machinery. Of course the animal was vicious, and no one dared to touch it, and the consequence was that the mill had to shut down until the turtle


106

:LDE ECCENTRIC.

starved to death, thus throwing hundreds out of employment. So you see--Mr. Sunbeam, as soon as you get through reading that book I'll go OD. Oh! are you following me? I beg your pardon. So you see it becomes a matter of vital importance to the engineer to guard against those things. "One of the best remedies is the decapitator, so-called, which consists of two lmives forced together by a spring. Of course the turtle comes down the stream head first, and as its neck comes between the knives they are forced together, thus severing the head from the body. This would be a very efficient protection but for one reason, and that is that immediately nfter the knives come together there is a decided loss of head, which, as you all know, is detrimental to the working of the turbine. " If this could be avoided, and I presume it could, it would be a great improvement. I should think some man in the Class would take that up as the subject of his thesis. I should suppose he could work up a very good thing from it. He could begin, you know, on the different kinds of turtles-the fast-swimming and the slow-swimming; tell their habits and tenacity of grip, and the best method of exterminating them, and this would probably bring him to the fastrunning turbine of to-day. It would be highly interesting and something which has not been written on before. If you should write a good thesis on this subject, and I don't see why you shouldn't, it would create a sensation in the scientific world. "I shall expect you to design a turbine before the end of this term [groans jmm the back seats]. I think it very likely that you will have to draw a great many turbines, boilers, and bank-checks before you get through the Institute. That will do for this morning."


IN

OrH~R R~sP~GrS,

E have been here at College for almost four years: Till we struck kinematics we had no grave fears, But now we'll be stuck, for so I hear teil, Though in other respects we are doing quite wellThough in other respects we are doing quite well.

W

Our practical knowledge has greatly increased: We've drawn turbines and boilers for six months at least; If they're put on the market I don't think they'll sell, Though in other respects they will do very wellThough in other respects they will do very well. We all thank our stars that we're through with Prof. Shaw, And he can't mark us late, as he useLl to before, When we came in just after the sound of the bell, Though in other respects he did pretty wellThough in other respects he did pretty well. Applied electricity now's the great boom; So on each Tuesday morning, in Prof. Geyer's room, We are all put to sleep as if by some spell, Though in other respects we get on very wellThough in other respects we get on very well. But those nine o'clock mornings are what" yank the bun: " To leave home without breakfast cannot be called fun,A desire to swear seems each one to impel, Though in other respects we get on very wellThough in other respects we get on very well.


108

THE ECCENTRIC. And then "hen we thought that" exams" were all o'er, And we saw a note posted up on the shop door, It seemed, as we read it, to sound our death-knell, Though in other respects we were feeling quite wellThough in other respects we were feeling quite ,yell. And see how our dignity's sat on each day By allowing those" Preps " in the College to stay; O! there's nothing on earth their cheek don't excel, Though in other reRpects they will do very wellThough in other respects they will do yery well. But we'll get our rc\'enge when we go on our trip; And unless something happens ,,-hich causes a slip, Why, poor Mr. D. ,,-ill think he's in-ahem! 'l'hough in other respects he will feel very wellThough in other respects he will feel yery well.


~CCE:NfRIClflE:S, Fms'r FRESHU,L,,\. "Say, what do they burn in those electric lights? " SECOND FRESmIAX. "Electricity, of course."

h doesn't speak very well for the Senior Cl(tss when one of its members is seen blowing on a pyrometer with the idea that it will make the hand go round. PROF. (meditativel!J). "I see that I have forgotten some of the data in this problem, and therefore we shall have to wait--" STUDE:\T (fl'om a back; seat). "Till the clouds roll by, Jenny." FIRST SE:\IOR. "I feel a dmught in this room; I wonder where it's from." SECOND SEXIOR. "Oh, that's only Professor Blank talking." Pnm'. "The boiler of this locomotive exploded, and the engineer's body was found in a tree half a mile away. The fireman afterward told me that he coullln't see any reason for the explosion, as the ste(tm ,yas blowing oft' freely from the safety-valve." TUDENT. "Professor, if the engineer was blown so far, how did the fireman get oft路? " PROF. (thinking). "I guess it was the brakeman that told me." STUDENT. "Look at the ice dropping oft路 that telegraph wire. guess a message must be passing."

I


VAt..E:DICfORY, ~HE

end. How many different ideas those two words call up;! To the school-boy they convey the thought of freedom from his books, and he looks forward to his future life and sees none of the troubles or difficulties which must ineyitably beset his path. As he grows up and passes through college, he hears those words, the end, uttered again, antl they conjure up to him the last of his boyish days, and the beginning of that fight for life which we a.ll must pass through. But in later years, when he hears the end spoken of again, he realizes what it indeed means, and he looks back at his past life and asks, "Have I done my duty? am I ready for the end? " And so it has been 'with THE ECCEXTRIC. \Vhen we started we saw none of the difficulties which we would have to contend with. As we got farther along, we realized these more readily; and now we tum and look back at our work, and ask with some trepidation, "Have we done what was expected of us? Is it a success? Will they like it ? " As we take a last look till:ough these pages, we involuntarily compare this ECCEXTRIC with those which ha.ve gone before, and then wonder if the student of fifty years hence will say, as he looks at this number, "What a crude thing THE ECCENTRIC for 1884 was. I wish the fellows who got it up could have seen the one for 1934." And now as the time approaches to say good-bye, we feel almost as if we were parting from some old friend, and were unwilling to let him go. But the engine has all'eady been stopped too long. This is no place for iclleness; everyone must be busy here. The examination of the other parts of the engine has been finished long


111

THE ECCENTRIC.

So

since, and here we are still lingering over THE E CCENTRIC. now we reluctantly pronounce that finished, and with a sigh hear the order to start given. The order is no sooner given than obeyed; the steam hisses sharply into the cylinder; the piston moves slowly forward, and THE E CCL'lTRIC starts on its next revolution.


ADV~RfIS~M~NfS,


T :a::E

Steyens Institute ofTechnology A SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. Founded

by

the

Late

EDVVIN

A.

STEVENS,

Esq.,

at

HOBOKEN, N. .T .

...

P1路esident. P1路of. Physics. P?"().f MeclL. Engineering. ROBERT H. THURSTON, A.M., C.E., P1路of. Matll. and lIIechanics. DE VOLSON 'WOOD, C.E., P1'of MeclL. Drawing. C. W. l\iACCORD, D.S., P1'of Chemistry. ALBERT R. LEEDS, Ph.D., Prof Languages. CHARLES F. KROEll, A.M., Prof Belles-Lett1'es. REV. EDWARD 'VALL, A.M., j Prof of Experimental J. E. DENTON, M.E., 111Iechanics and Shop lVorks, Inst1'uctor in .lIfecltctnical D1'awing, A. RIESEN BERGER, l\LE., j P1'of of Mal,ine Engineering C. A. CARU, U. S. N" 1and Inst1'twtor in lIIathematics, Prof of Applied Electricity. W. E. GEYER, Ph.D., HENRY MORTON, Ph.D.,

ALFRED

M.

MAYEU, Ph.D.,

The course of the Stevens Institute is of four years' duration, and covers all that appertnins to the profession of a Mechanical Engineer. By means of 'Vorkshops provided with excellent machinery, Physical Laboratories whose appointments are without an equal, and with the finest Cabinets of Instruments, every opportunity for the acquisition of thorough and practical knowledge is afforded.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. Candidates for admission to the first year of the course must be at least 17 years of age, and mnst be prepared to pass a satillfactm'y examination in all the Elementary branches of English Studies, also the whole of Algebra, Plane and Solid Geometry, and Plane Trigonometry. Candidates for admission to the higher classes must be prepared to pass a satisfactory examination in all the studies previously pursued by the classes which they propose to enter. Advanced stndents and men of science desiring to avail themselves of the appliances of the laboratories of the Stevens Institute, to carryon special investigations, may apply to the President. For further particulars, address the President, H. MORTON, Hoboken, N. J.


$c€v€n$ BIGB· $(?BOOL, -

THE -

Academic Department of Stevens Institute -

OF -

TECHNOLOGY,

OPENS SEPTEMBER 17TH, 1884. Examinations for Admission, during Sept. 15th and 16th.

INSTRUCTION GIVEN - I N THE -

JJINCIENT AND ]iODERN ~ANGUAGES In Free-Hand and Mechanical Drawing.

Junior DepartITlent,

$60 per Annum.

S e nior DepartITlent, $150 per Annum.

These terms include all the studies. For catalogues apply to the Librarian of Stevens Institute.


MECHANICAL

LAEORATO?Y

Pro:E_ R_ :a::_ T:a::URSTON" Director_

Trials made of Steam EngillcEI and Boilers, materials of con~[ructjon t('sted, and their strength, elMticity, ductility. and resilience, detcrmined ano. nntomatically recorded oy the autogloplric Teat/1l0 Machin e. Lubricants tested, the CaJoric Value ot Fuel cleterminc<l, and the Dynamometer attached to machinery to determine power. Machines for testing Lubricants and Special Constructions mlldc to order. Autographic Recording Testing IHnchines and Machines for Testing Lubricnnts ill stock and ma\.lc to orLlCT. Terms c8sh. Address the Director for Circulars and. l">rices.


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Mechanical and Ohemical Tests of all Kinds of Materials. Materials for Structures. VVILLIAM KENT, VVM. F. ZIMMERMAN, HeclwtlicaZ Engineer,.

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+

INSTRUMENT + MAKER TO TIlE

Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, N. J. , lIas on hand or mnde to order, the following:

BLOWPIPE APPARATtrS, SPECTROSCOPES, MAGIC LANTERNS k ATTACHMENTS And AI,pnratu8 in connection with Prof. A. ltf. Mayer's Experimental Science Scric~ for Beginners.

The combination Spectroscope, $100; the Pocket Spectroscope, $15; the College Lantern, $200; the Experimenter's Lalltern, $75; the Megascope, to show solid objects on a large scale, $50; Vertical attachment for Experimenter's Lantern, $75. Attachments for Lanterns as follows :-Glass Chadni-p\ate and Clamp, $15; Circular Glass Tank, $3; Elliptical Brass Ring, $1; Air Drum, for Waves, $4.50; Oil and Pipettes. $2.50; Iron Filings, Sieve and Magnet, $1; Watch Glass, for Water Lenses, 25 eta.; Vertical Tank, for Chemical Experiments, $4; Ditto, for Decomposition of Water, $6. :30; Ditto, for Solar Prominences, Frost Crystal Solution, 25 cts. ; Eclipse Slide (Prof. Morton's), $7.50; Electric Light Hand Regulator, with Rotating Table, $73; Adjustable Slot, $9 ; Wheel of Diaphragms, $6; Pair of Hollow Prisms, $15; Adapter, $3; Triple Tank, $6; Sodium Bank Experiment, $3.50; Qualitative Blowpipe Set, complete, in Polished Mahogany Box, $35. Students can obtain the necessary supp l ies mentioned on page 37 of t h e 1 88 I Catalogue.

~tehfns ~nstitutf ~ rass c1nunhr~+ HAWK RIDGE

& DONALDSON,

MANUFACTURERS OF

FINE BRASS ANn COMPOSITION CASTINGS. Orders thankfully received and promptly attended to.


BUSCH'S HOTEL, Nortn-w8st Cer. Third and Hudson Sk. THE FINEST

In Hoboken, containing the best Callender Tables.

CLASS SUPPERS A SPECIALTY. Fifty First-C/ass Rooms for Transient VISI'/ors.

19'1 Washington StTeet, Hoboken, N. J.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, STRINGS, etc., '

Di:31WWg 11Jl5ltgum.~ntSJ ~1Jldl Mate~imls~ BLANK BOOKS,

NOTE BOOKS, SCRATCH PADS A~]) WRITING PAPER OF ALL KINDS •••

TEXT BOOKS SUPPLIED AT SHORT NOTICE. DISCOUNT OFF ON ALL BOOKS.


'I':a: E

"DVnltmI(£" RO(£K DRILL

UneQualled in Drillin[ Power Del' Weight of Machine, UneQualled in Convenience of ODeratin[, UneQualled in Durability and CheaDnBss of RBDairs, GRAYDON & DENTON MANUF'G CO., Cor. Bay and Green Sts., Jersey City, N. J., U. S. A. ORDERS FOR SPECIAL MACHINERY EXECUTED, AND .DESIGNS AND ESTIMATES FURNISHED .


C.

JOSEPH LLOTT·S STEEL PENS. THE FAVORITE NUMBERS, 303,404, 332,351, 170. AND HIS OTHER STYLES

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.

·*MILLE R'S+:4

Oyster and Ice Cream Saloon, -AND -

ll2

"VV ashi:::r:l..gto:::r:l..

St_:>

::E[oboke:n_

CHAS. F. I<AiGEBEHN,

Wines and Brandies, IMPORTED HAVANA CIGARS, Etc. 314 &

316 Wm:;hington St., I-Iobokcn, N. J.

J_ &

Vv' _ OBREITER=, MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN

1B4 "WASHINGTON ST .

• Eo::x:

Cu..sto=ers

a.

Spec:i.a.J.ty_


-

FIN'"E-

mEN'S FU~NISHING

GOODS,

SOLE AGENT FOR

6 FOR $9. THE VERY BEST, MADE TO ORDER.

KEEP'~

PlilFENlF P7i~lFli¥·~7iDE D~E~~ ~Jn~lF~, 6

FOR $6_00_

An eleg.nt set or gold plated collar and sleeve studs will be enclosed with the abo,-e.

KEEP'S SILK UMBRELLAS, BEST QUALITY, $3.00. Kid Gloves, Collars, Cuffs, Ilandkerehiefs, Hosiery, Neckwear, Suspenders, Jc,velry, Underwear, &e. ALL COODS WARRANTED.

219 Washington Street, near Sixth Street, Hoboken, N. J.

WILLIAM FL1EDNER'S

:r.... Sffie;AN STe)Nffi C>"VV

134 WASHINGTON ST., HOBOKEN, N. J.

• FINEST BRANDS OF IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC SEGARS.

PARK HOTEL, 150 & 152 HUDSON STREET, Corner of Fourth Street,

Hoboken, N. J.

F. BRUCKBAUER, PROPRIETOR.


NE\N BC::>C::>KS NOW READY, OR TO BE ISSUED SHORTLY, by

......- - -

---

HUDSON, J. R. TABLES FOR CALCULATING THE CUBIC CONTENTS OF EXCAVATIONS AND EMBANKMENTS BY AN IMPROVED METHOD OF DIAGONALS AND SIDE TRIANGLES. Svo, cloth ......... '" ..... , .... . .................................. " .. .. . $0 75

THE WIND-MILL AS A PRIME MOVER. Comprehending everything of Value relating to Wind-Mills: their Use, Design, Construction, etc., etc. By A. R. 'VOLFF, M.E. Plates, 8vo .......................... ... ....... . THE SCHOOL OF MINES QUARTERLY. Published for the ALU>IXI ASSOCIATION, TilE E~G!NEEHING and TilE CnEMICA!' SOCIETIES OF TnE BenOOL OF MINES OF COLli~fllIA COI.LEGE. Subscription price, per year, 2 00 Pel' No., 8vo, 50 PERMANENT FORTIFICATIONS. Being Part I. of TEXT-BoOK OF MILITAUY ENGl~EEmNG. By Prof. J . B. WIlEELEH, of U. 8. Military Academy, 'V cst Point. 8vo, cloth .. . . , ...... " . . . •....... , . . . . . ... . . 2 00

MARINE ENGINES AND DREDGING MACHINERY.

Showing the latest and best English and American Practice. By WM. H. MAW. Illustrated by over 150 fine steel plates (mostly two-page illustrations of the Engines of the leading Screw Steamships of England and other nations, and numerous fine wood engravings. :3 vols., folio, cloth ..........•............ 15 00

THE MODERN HIGH EXPLOSIVES - NITRO-GLYCER INE AND DYNAMITE. 'fheir Manufacture, their Usc, and their Application to Mining and Military Engineering; Pyroxyline or Gun Cotton, the Fulminates, Pic rates and Chlorates; also, the Chemistry and Analysis of the Elementary Bodies which enter into the Manufacture of the principal NitroCompounds. By MAN1.'EL EISSLEU, Mimng Engineer. With many illustrative plates. Svo, cloth ................................ . . . ...... . ' " . .. 4 00

THE ARCHITECT AND BUILDERS' HAND-BOOK. ContainingOriginal Tables and Y"luable Information for Architects, Builders, Engineers and Contractors, fully illustrated with plates. By F. E. KIDDER. Put up in pocket-book form. Morocco flaps .... . ...... . . , ........... . . .. ... . " . . 3 50 TOOTHED GEARING. Showing the Economical Arrangement of Material, also Strength Required for various Parts, and Methods of Design. A Practical Work for Practical M.en. 'Vith many plates. By J. How.um CllO)!WELL. 12mo, cloth ... , . . . .. . ............................... . ...... . .... 2 00

PRACTICAL MINE VENTILATION. For the use Ot Mining Engineers, Students and Practical Men, with plates. By EUGE:<E B. 'VILSON, M.E. Himo, cloth .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • 1 25

BURR'S ELASTICITY AND RESISTANCE OF THE MA T ER IALS OF ENGINEERING. 8vo, cloth .. .. .................................. 500 WEISBACH 'S MECHANICS, Vo l. III . j KI NEMATICS AND THE MACHINERY OF TRANSMISSION. TranRlated by Prof. J. F . KLEIN.

8vo, cloth.... . ....... .. .. . . . .•. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ... . .. . . . . . . .. .• 5 00

MAHAN 'S KRANTZ 'S RESERVOIR WALLS.

With many plates. Svo, cloth .............. . ............................... . ................. 200

NICHOLS ' WATER SUPPLY, FROM A CHEMICAL AND SAN I' TARY STANDPOINT. Plates, 8vo, cloth ............................ :3 50 DUBOIS' STRAINS IN FRAMED STRUCTU RES. Plates and Wo,king Dlawings.

<!to, cloth ........... . .............. . ........ . ... . ........ 10 00


RELIABLE

G I

AND

STANDARD

MANUFACTURED BY

·VZM. S. KIMBALL & 00., The connoissenri; nnd rionccrR or Ametlca in Fine Goods.

Established, 1846.

Peerless To!)acco VVorks.

A N D f

G FRflGRANT VAN.1TY FA.1R, A NEW VAN.1TY FA.1R, R THREE .1{.1NGS, CLOTH OF GOLD a E: a f A C fC C 5 a (STHAIGHT MESH).

SWEET, DELICA1'E, .AND ltIILD.

"

The Cloth of Gold Cigarette is made from the finest and most costly leaf from that region of Virginia particularly adapted for growing tobacco for Cigarettes. Our long experience in manufacturing enables us to secure the most suitable kinds of tobacco and thus present this superior article, with the full assurance THAT ITS EQUAl. liAS NEVER Bj·:FORE BEEN OFFF.HED. A higher grade Cigarette cannot be produced. 'Ve call particular attention-the superior quality of our old brands of Cigarettes. They cannot be surpassed.

,--------------------SOLD IN ALL PARTS OF THE VVORLD.

PRIZE

FIRST

MEDALS_

C. ZE:E:]).L[ANN, - - DEALER

BltVAnA

Jl:nD

I~-

DOm€$'CI(l (lIGltR$,

Cigarettes, Pipes, and All Kinds of Tobacco. 322 Washington St., bet. 8fh nltd 9th Sts., Hoboken, N. J.

Dr.

A.

M.

HEDGE S,

DENTIST, ~28

a:n..d 300 V\Tashi:n..gto:n.. Street, HOBOI(EN, N. J.

Gas Admini tered for the Paiuless Extraction of' Teeth.


PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY.

ALive, Indepenaent Sixteell-pa[e Weekly Illustrated Journal of Practical Mechanics and En[ineerin[. Has the largest paid circulation

o.f

any strictly

i/lfeclzanical Newspaper in the 'world. Its columns contain contributions from leading mechanical writers

0/ the

day, on the most important

topics belonging to Practical Mechanics, including all branches

0/

Steam and Locomoti,}e Engineering- and

Foundry Practice.

A Iso correspondence on mechani-

cal topics from, a large number

0/

p1'actical men in

the shops, tog-ether 'With early ion /ormation about the establz"shment or erection, la1'gement ~ ~o

0/ old paid

0/

new shops and the en-

shops.

~otices

of any kind go into its Reading Columns.

Subscription Price, U. S. and Canada, $2.50 a Year (postage included).

Single Copies, 5 Cents. Order of any Newsdealer, or send subscription to

American Machinist Publishing Co., 96 FULTON STREET, NEW YORE:.


A. RIEMANN, (S1Iccessor to A. & E. ASMUS.)

~tc FLORISTJt~ 207 Washington 8t., Hoboken. N. J. ~ Bouquets. Baskets, Floral Decorations for Parties. Weddings and Churches. Also Emblematic Designs for Funerals.

APOTHECARY, 1 S4

~ ashington

Street~

HOBOKEN, N. J.

HENRY N. PETERS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN

¢ttt1l, :¢nmtt~1 .$~it(1l1 4ittt ~rnttrit1l, WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS,

No. 228 Washing/on, Garner Sixth Street.

-

MANUFACTURER OF -

FINE BANJO STRINGS A SPECIALTY.

No. :NS FQPsytID Near Houston Street, I

Stp~~t~ N""EVV YORK.


!i\. HO~ & co. PRINTING PRESS,

Macnil 8 ano ~a\V Manufacturers) Orand, S h eriff, Broome and Columbia Streets, 29

«(;

31 GOLD STREE7'.

Principal Office, 504 Grand St., Corner Sheriff, NE \I\I

YORK_

HENRY G. MORRIS,

ENGINEER AND MACHINIST 209 South Third St., Philadelphia, -MANUFACTURER OF -

CANE MILLS, VACUUM PANS, DOUBLE OR TRIPLE EFFECT APPARATUS,

Defecators, Clarifiers, Engines and Boilers, BaO'asse Furnaces, GENTRIFUGALS AND MIXERS, LEVATORS AND CONVEYORS. SOLE M .i.NU FACTURER OF THE

AMERICAN CANE-SHREDDING MACHINE.


OFFICE,

JOJ

CJI7IJdBE~~ ~JF. ,

M4NUFACTORY,

j\I. Y.

P7IJFE~~€)j\I ,

j\I. J.

We m,ake ((, fllll-lI;eight, nutChine-Cl&t File-besides the various shapes of regular l<iles. We make a full line of Stubs, Cuts and Shapes. Illnstrrded Catalogne of Files 7)utilecZ on receipt of Tu:eZve cents in Three-Cent Postage Stamps. The following gLtar(tntee is printecl on every package of Files sent out by ItS: "ShOll,Ld a file be clefeclive, by taking it to the par ties f rom wh07n pu,l'chased, a perfect one will be given in exchange, f l'ee of cha7:r;·e ."

J.

T . 1\1. ABELL.

R. WIGGINS.

WIGGINS & ABELL,

~06

"W"ashi:n..gto:n.. St_:> HOBOKE~

N. J.

SPRINGS, SPOKES, BARROWS, Carpenters' and Machinists ' Tools.


HOW TO BUY

~)

~ (is ) 1

/'

---

I

-

BOYS' CLOTHES. C\i~t.: (~~. ~0./\ ~~~\~} -;::...

:0:{n := • • -" \,1,' • r ~ People ar~ apt t o thmk tha~ If .they ~ " . ( ..... ~~ ~) / I \( /.;"'1~ \.} were only ncli enough to be lDdIfl'e r - r \.... .!,:, '/l en t a bout t he C08~ of ~ t hing it would '-YI~ './J,or LIC)~ J;)Er- :"'-)1-1 U~ be ea.! II t o obtulD Jlt.~t what they ~ 1\ \JlLI\'f want in t h e matter of clothing. If 1/ ( FIND you've ever tried it you know th is to \.'-\ ~,C OM PAN-/' .~./ l) be a fallacy-not h ing is easier t han ~ .\ _ L"? _, to spend a lot of mone.lI in d res,, . , ~ ~J ing yonr bO.II. but the difficulty is in ~ the choosing. --One mother con sid era the ben!lt.1I of the new .qal'ment, another scrutinizes the 7Tlak£ng, while a third estimates how i t willloo/C after a month's IDeal". We are watchful of till thes 1 detnils, and our experience ell" bles 118 to determ ine wlUtt will wear britel' than anyone not an expert. We give Jlou the benefit of 0111' .. kia and lnbol', and it is safe to be guided by 0111' jUdgment as to good" while exercising your o\\'n taste aR to pottern., and styles of [ja?"1nent. Tha t we are honest in our desire t) serve you efficiently, our readiness to take back goods and ,·pfund money is the be,t test.

-=

r

cT

«. ,,-'

P :y

ROGERS, PEET & CO. ~IEN'S A ND BOYS' O U:J.PITTE RS, 569-575 B road-w-ay, 0 pp . M e t ro p o li tan H o tel.

L. H. BATES, -DEALER I N -

LADIES', MIS SES' AND CIIILDREN'S

-ALSO A FULL LINE OF-

Gont's Hann-Sowon Button ann Gon[ross Gaitors IN THE LATEST STYLES.

202

WASHINGTON STREET, HOBOKEN,

N. J.


ESTA.BLLI!JTlED 1851.

EIMER & AMEND, MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF

Chemicals, Chemical Apparatus, #lSS~FEBB~ &OOf)8~ 206, 207, 209

&

211

N""E"W"

THIRD

A VEN UE,

YORK_

Sole Agents for C. Schleicher & Schull's Celebrated Filter Papers, Dr. C. Scheibler's Polariscopes, Dr. Jolly's Spiral Balances, &c. SPECIALTIES: Strictly Pure Chemicals for Scientific Purposes, Best Hammered Platinum Ware , Reliable Volumetric Apparatus, Genuine Royal Berlin Porcelain and Bohemian Glassware, &c., &c. Complete Blow Pipe Outfits .

.SUPFH~IOI~ FlfICIJd'1lIF1;:; '1l0 HPWU'fH ;:;PF:GIfIJ( Ol~DEI~;:;. APPLY FOR DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE.

PHILII~ HEX~4AfE'R' /)S

HOBOK~N

RIDING

AOAD~MY

-.t\.ND-

l' .1

~r 8WElBlJE /.~ .1

703,'H05, 707, 709 & 777 Huds?n St., Hoboken, N. J. Only two blocks rrom the Hobuken Ferries, und Morris and Essex Railroad Depot.


PHOTOGRAPHY MADE EASY By the new DRY PLA.TE PR()CE . ~o Stain~. No Trouhle. A.mateur Outfit. in great variety, from $10 upward . ~end for IUustrated Cata\ogue, or ca\l and examine, a. we take pleasllre in showing our goods. \ Ve are sole pl"OprietorB of

THE DETECTIVE CAMERA.

J #(l t ~ nt e (l .fall. 2tl. The lightCRt, n('ntf"~t. nnd mORt c(lmpncL Camera l'yer IlladÂŁ'. It iR design4?(l to be carried in the hlltHl, and Hied without cith(>f' tripod or focuRsing cloth. DCRcrilltH'C circular mailed on llllillicntion.

F Jrty years established in this line of busi ness .

E. & H. T. ANTHONY & CO., o f) l B)'o(ul11"ay, S ew YQ1'k.

JYLEINERS~

Watchmakaf, Optician and Jawalaf, 130 Washington Street.

R~PAI RING A

OF

FIN~

WAfCH~6

SPECIALTY.

Bangles and Badges Made to Order.

-

~

--- -

-


.. For hym ..~.hLS tevere lIu.ve at Ius flt!ddes /;eed Twenty book..路s, dad in blakor reed , Than rohps -iclu orJiltluil' or gay sautr;'e:'

WHITE, STOK ES, & ALLEN) Publz'slters , Importers, Booksellers a1ld Stat拢oners,

I82

F ifth Avenue,

NEW YORK CITY, display a large collection 0/ riclt OBJETS D'ART ZIt Bronzes, Pottery, Plaques, Illkstands, AlbulIls, etc., etc., in great variet)', from tlte 1IIost celebrated foreign manufacturers. TileY make

Weddzlzg and Bzrtltday Presents A

srECIALTY.

Tiley Ilave opmed a depart1llmt wllere tlte latest pictllres alld original designs in frames call be SUIl . TileY are constantl), uceiving

Sets o.f Books and Single Volumes, in new and tasteful styles of binding, in calf, 1IIorocco, sealskin, cruslted lez'ant and tree calf, as well as all tile J1t1i1 novels f71ld books of tlu day. They offer A DISCOUNT OF TWENTY PER CENTUM from tlte publislled prices of all books, and lake pains to procure promptly allY books 1(,lltiell may be desired. In flleir stationery depart1llmt t!tey give especial attmtion to

Weddz7zg hl'lfitatiolzs, ('At Holltes," Visiting Cards, Monograms and Crests, M enus a7ld Dinner Fazlors, in all of wltiell tlleir work is 1tItsltrpassed. An examination of tlteir valuable stock can be made by visitor s wlto need feel under 710 obligation to lIlalte purchases. Orders receiz'ed by mail will be giz'e1l tlte personal attellliolt oj one of the members oj tlte firm .


RICHARDS & CO. , IMPORTERS AND )IANUFACTURERS OF

No. 398 BOWERY, opposite Sixth Street, NE\N YORK_

... ) MORGAN CRUCIBLE CO" Battersea Works, London.

AGENCY OF . HENRY CROUCH, Microscopes, London.

I SCHMIDT & HAENCH,

In strument Makers, Berlin.

G. W. P ACH & BROS., B4~

BROAD"'" A Y:J

Corner 13th Street,

NEW YORK.

jphotographers - - F OR - COLU~IBIA, CLASS

'78, '79, '80, '81, '82, '83, '84. HAUYAIlD, CLASS '78, '79, '82, '88, '84. YALE, CLASS '78, '79, '80, '81, S. S. '82, '83, '84. VAS8AU, CLASS '77, '78, '7D. U. S. M. A., '75, '76, '77, '78, '79, '80, '81, '82, '83. DAUTMOU'l'II, '7D, '82, '83, '84. 'VILLIA~I S, '79, '80, '81, '82, '83, '84. PUINCETOK, '79, '80, '81, '82, '83, '84. WESLEYAN, '7D, '80, '81, '82, '84. LA~'AYE'l'TE, '80, '81, '82, '83, '84. WELLESI"E Y, '81, '82, '83, '84. A)lIIEHST, '81, '':;2, '88, '84. S)IITJf, '82. UNION, '82. HoI, YOKE, '81, '82, '83, '84 S'l'EVENS, '83, '84.


423

Si~th

.A..-v-s_;, NEW YORK.

Between 25th and 2Gth Sts.

JJIanufactltre)'s of

BASE AND FOOT BALL, ATI-ILETIC, ROWING, LAWN TENNIS AND

LACROSSE GOODS. ALSO

CRICKET & GYMNASIUM OUTFITS! Send lor Price List.


KEUFFEL & ESSER, 127 Fulton St. and 44 Ann St., New York, IMPOl~TERS

AND MANUFACTURERS OF

DRAWING PAPERS, TRACING CLOTH, DRAWING MATERIALS,

Surveying Instruments, Chains, Rods, Etc. EXCELSIOR MEASURING TAPES,

ANEROID AND MERCURIAL BAROMETERS. Se:o....d :for III-ustrated Oatalogu...s_

NAEGELI'S

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT, Oor. Hudson

&,

3d Sts.

HOBOKEN, N. J. Travellers and Guests will find in this new and elegant Hotel the very best accommodation in Hoboken. The Billiard Room adjoining the Bar-room contains two new Collender Carambols, and one new Collender Pool Table j has good light, and is nicely ventilated. The Dining Room, with plenty of space for at least seventy-five seats, is always kept in First-cla8s Style_ Facilitie~ for Festive Entertainments, such as Dinners, Suppers, etc. , for Societies, Clubs and Classes, unsurpassed. Students of the Stevens Institute can be accommodated with Board and Lodging in First-class Style at very moderate prices. R. NAEGELI, Proprietor.


'VATCRES.

TIFF ANY & Union Square,

CO., New TOI¡k.

Include in tbeir large alul comprchensivc stock of 'Vatcbes, Chronographs. Chronogral))ls, with split second. Chronogral)hs and Repealers. Repcaterji, Striking hours and quart ers.

Rel)Nlters, Striking hours and five minutes.

Rel)CalcrS, Striking bours, quarters, a nd minutes.

Repealers, ,vith calendar. Their Timing \Vatehcs, both simple cl1ronograllil and 'vith split second, Itave received thc llighest commcndation as time-keepers an{1 markers b)' Inany pronlinent o,vners of running and troUln" horscs, to ,,,110m, by permission, purchascrs " ' ill be rcferred. In addition to the stalulard and other high-In-iced wntches, Tiffany & Co. ))resent this sea!!ou a ne,v line at lo,,,er prices, rceonnncndc{l) as the best yct produced for the money. Lan:e size for gentlcnlcn, $15 6;; Mcdium" " 60 Large "Iadics, â&#x20AC;˘ SO Slnall " " Thcse ,,,atelles ha\O e sound, stem,,,indln;;,, anchor InO\' elllCnts, cascd in IS-kt. gold, In "arlcty of styles, and each is stampe{1 the name of the house, thereby carrying its guarantee.

,,,it..


rHOS. J. POPE & BRO. ~rpIG"'路iR_?':~J~

r路路 ........ _, ............"""'.~ .. . . . .

. ......... --1

AND

tlVLETA-.L S ,l [

.

..

...

"H~",,-

.....

""

....... ]

29 2 Pearl Street, NEW

YORK.

BOEHM BROS.

PR I NT E RS, 37 Hudson Street, Hcboken. N. J., Having recently added to their facilities, put 11p new machinery, and secured a large number of new type faces, are prepared to do any work in their line neatly and rapidly, and at most reasonable rates.

MENU CARDS, PROGRAMMES, Etc. 7.'IIE GENUINE AND LEGITHIATE

FRANK B. CONVERSE BANJO

Manufactured only by JOHN F. STRAT'rON & CO., 49 Maiden Lane. New York, under the personal supervision of Mr. FHA ~K B. C,'NVEH E, the Autocratic Banjoist of the World, Profes.ional Performer and Manufacturer of over 2.; year" standing, and the unn'ersally acknowledged authority on ehiOt Inbtrument.


BECKER & SONS, MANUFACTURERS OF

Balanc8s &W8ights of Pr8cision -

FOR-

Chemists, Assayers, JeYlelers, Drugoists, AM in general for Every Use where AccuraCY is ReUlliretl, No. (3 MURRAY STREET, NEW YORK . â&#x20AC;˘ Every Balance and Set of Weights leaving this establishment is guaranteed to be accurately adjusted, as represented in our price list. For some time we have beeu :1ware that imitations of our Balances and Weights have been placed on the market, represented as being manufactured by us, and we would caution our customers that only the goods made by us bear our firm name.

OUIt ILLUSTRATED PRICE LIST MAILED ON APPLICATION.


~HE §£WEVENS ,rNDIGAfl10~, PUBLISHED ON THE

15TH OF EAC H MONT H DURING THE COLLEG E BY THE STUDENTS OF

Stevens institute of uecbnolog\? - .- fI @J mJ~NAu DEV0111ED 1110 111HE IN111E~ESJIlS Of1 1J1HE S 111UDEN111S AND fIuUMNI.

:lEbttors. EDITO R-.lN CHIEF, C. W. WHITING, '84. BUSINESS EDITOR, A. P. KLETZSCH, '84. EXCHANGE EDITOR, JOHN Jf. RUSB Y, '8 5.

j[,ocal :lENton3. ROLLIN NORRIS, '85· E. P. .AIO WTO~~~ '86.

C. R. COLLI./rs, '86.

LADD PLUMLEY, '87 .

T E RMS: - $i .50 PER YEAR IN ADVANCE. S I NGLE COPY, ;20 CENTS.


Esta ul'ish ed 1 823.

" IS THE BEST IN THE WORLD." The Chickerings have always led in the march of improvement in Piano making. Hence their various styles of

GRAND, SQUARE, and UPRIGHT Pianos have rapidly grown in public est imation, as is evinced by the number of Chickering

Pianos sold since the foundation of the house, which already exceeds

SIXTY-EIGHT THOUSAND. The highest musical authorities i n all land s indorse the Chickering Piano. W rit e for their new lllustrated Ca t a log u e .

CHICKERING & SONS, WAlt1~ROOMB:

130 Fifth Avenue, N E'N YORK.

1 IB2 Tremont St., BOSTON.

167 New Bond Street, 1 197 Champs E l ysees, L O N D ON. PARIS . Menlion lhiIJ papt1".

Over

6 S,O()O Pianos Mad e

and

Sold.


The Van Winkle Direct Acting Rotary Transmitting :OYN"..A.l\,£<>~ElTER.. PATENTS PENDING.

F. VAN WINKLE. M.E .• 22 Cortlandt St .• New York. Indicator Stationary. Indicates Horse Power at any Speed.

H. H. H ./-IN 1<C!lVS, DEALER IN ALL )(1 t. OS OF

LUMBER

AND TIMBER,

HARDWARE. NAILS AND SASH WEIGHTS. BRASS, GALVANIZED AND SHIP CHANDLERY HARDWARE. HEMP. JUTE AND MANILLA ROPES. No.

::..!2fl 'W ASI-l:INGTO:N'

Cor. Sixth Street,

STR)1,;ET, HonOKE,,", X.

=a=IRSO=?=BERG

J.

j

---------- --- .- c..r.: ..... -•. •--- .••. --- ••••

~~~~~~

THE

HATTER t~~c~ .. . .

"

~Jf' .

..sas!i

.. '"

158 JVASI:ILNGTON S TREET, :S::oboke:n., N_ J_

C orner of F o u rth Stre et ,

• Measures for Silk H ats t'\ken by tbe celebrated Conformeters.


1884 Eccentric  

1884 Eccentric

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