Page 1


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.AD V£<J( nSEtlfEN7~).

iii

OF TilE

STEVENS INSTITtf TE OF TEGIIN 8 L 8 6V,

HOBOKE,

OPENS SEPT.

. J.

is, 1886.

Fu ll COZLrs{'s oJ Study preparatory to S{hools

0.1

Scz'ellce and Collcg'es.

RATE OF TU IT ION FOR THE YEAR 1886-87. JUllior Vepartlllellt, SCIlio]' Departmellt,

$75.00 PCI' . [50.00

per

11l7lltlll.

Annltlll.

THESE TERMS INCLUDE ALL THE STUDIES.

For Catalogues appl), to tlte Librarian

of

StevC1ls Institute.


iv

,.JDVE<J(TISE~'1fENTS.

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OFFICE 路

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N J.

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}

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"TH8 8CC8(J'{T"1?,lC .

.'/ .

" -'",

~

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5

ORITURI TE SALUTAMUS," deal'reade",and,debpitethe fact. that you are one of

you may find

OUI'

exeeutioners, we wioh that

much LO enjoy in this volume.

clearly see the fate that avvaits us. can save us fron,. it.

vve

No power on earth

Fop months vve have spent 'anXl-

ou .. days and sleepless nights, have racked Our vveary brains, and dragged our uchiny limbs Rbout,

in endeavors to

painted it, as it ought to be.

make this

H

Eccentrie" nil that Our fancy

And for vvhat is all this toil?

That vve may be set

upart as marked men, boycotted by common consent, untIl from very misery of

loneliness vve give up the ghost and lie rotting ,n the Elysian Fields, a prey to (hose harpies-our fellovv.students.

Already'Ne hear the rustling of their vvings

as they gloat over their prospective feast.

VVell, they will find us poor eating.

VVhnt though the fat of the land has been placed befol'e us in the Hobol<en boal'cling.house?

Has not. this little volume sucked the rnarrow fl'orYl Our bones

-the blood from our veins? B UT, after all, perhaps vve ought not to comp lain.

'Ne

have been given the

power to criticise and to jeer at our executioners bef'ope we meet our fate. have not taken undue advantage of this poW"er.

'Ne

'W ith aleRt'" and unerring insight

we have read the character 01" each man, With btern and impartia l Justice Judged


6

':THE ECCE {;'(T"1?IC.

hien, and vvhere vve thought he needed correction, have applied it in fevv but fitting 'W"ords.

"We have spared neither rank nOl~ station.

Like the

l(

Pale Death "

of Horace, vve have" knocked vvith impaPtial step at the hovels of the poor and the palaces of the rich."

But it is your innings novv, dear readers, and bitterly do

vve reflect that you are good for several base hits. 'Ne do not ask you to spare usit would be useless.

\/Ve ourselves have nssi.::;ted at the oiJse(luieti of those vvho

have filled thi" position before our turn came, and vvell do vve recall the devill"h u1ee 'W'ith which 'W'e tope them limb fl'om 111'-lh, Hl1d wnllowed In their gOl'e.

vve die like brHve

mell,

and AS -w-e yo ltke Jat'nb"-t to the !;Inughler, not. a

will be heRrod frOlYl QUI' lips.

for our hard fate.

No,

rnUJ'rnl,lI'

We do not even ask pity from the prebent genel'utioll

'W'e look to posterity fol' OUP laurels.

VVhen futupe generationb

or Stevens men find OUI' bones where they Jie vvhitening in t.he sun, Jet us ll'Ust

that they vvill not pass them by vvith careless kick, nor yet colleet them anel sell them to a fertilizer factory, but ,,"viJl moisten them 'WIth a revel"ential tear. w-hile

they reflect upon the ingpatitude that truly gpeat men buffel' at the hands of their o'Wn generation.

AND no'W", dear readers, vve Jeave you to plunge into the vvild excitement of the follovving pages, stopping only to gIve you one caution: Do nqt Jose yourselves in the intricacies of the plot.

After you have safely emerged from it, and

"With -w-rath in youP souls hJ.lve 'Wreaked your vengennce on us, your victims, pause a moment to reflect upon the bitterness of Our fate, nod W'hen you ex_ amine our "W'ol'k in your calmer;' moments-

" Still ld some m,ny i/l. youI'

AJ/d

bOSIJIIIS "Vi',

if :;'011 call't app/ami, ullrilst fi,rgi"-'l路 .'''


TIlE ECCEo'7'(T<J?JC.

MRS.

E. A. STEVENS,

7

REV. SAMUEL B . DOD, IIENRY MORTON,

Ph. D.


TIlE RCCR.\'Ti\.f('.

IIENRY MORTON, Ph. D., 1\0.4 River Sl., Ilobokcn. ALFRED M. MAYER, I'h. D., South Orange, "1. J. Ih. VOLSON WOOl), .\.:'IT., C.E., Boonton, :-\.

J.

l'resitlL'lll. I'''!/t'ssort!/ I'lly,i,.,.;.

l'ruji·.I·s,1I

if fllcchtllliL<l1 1:'11-

XiIlL'('rill,t.;.

J.

BURKITT WEBB, C.E., South Orange,

~.

J.

l'I"0·.\.I"Oro/ .1/lzlllCIllc/licl"lllld

.J/e(hillti(s.

CIlARLES W. M \CCOKD, A.M., Sc. D., No. G Tenth Sl., 1I0boken.

1 'J'<!lCS.1 ,I!

,!I ,llce/llllli,'al IJra"'i1lK'

,\LBERT R. LEEDS, Ph. D., corner 9th and 1I udson St:)., IIobokcn.

/)rr!fi'.Hor

I!I (,/lelllistry.

CH,\RLES F. KR()[IJ. A.I\1., Orange, N. RE\.

EDWARD \\' \LL,

.\.~T.,

Orange,:\.

J. J.

I'r,0's.IIII'I!I ,lfodolll.lllIJ':H<lKI·.I'. I'rt!l".I'sor I!I' Ildl,'s·l.dlri.l.

JAMES E, DE:"lT()\;, M.E., No. 533 l'a\onia ,he., Jersey City. E.I}<'IiJIIL'llla/ .l!cchtllli,·s tl1Id Slto} I Vorl.-. WM. E. CEYER, I'h. D., NO.4 River St., IIobokcn.

I'ruji's.I·OJ'I!I' JpplictI IJc,

Iril il)'; A[)A~I

RIESENBER(;I':R, M.E., Union Illll, N.

J.

IlIslrllclor ill .JIc(hllllitlll

Dn17I.Jill,i[.

W!\L H. BRISTOL, M.E., No. 13G W. 55th St., :-\cw York City.

II/.I'lmdor iI/

,lfallleJIIlllicl'.

THOS. B. STILLMA '\, No. 34 Seventh St., lIobokcn.

..

IIl.,lmt'lor

III

CIIL'II/isll)' .


'TIlE ECCE:;'(T'iUC,

9

All the doubts that were expressed about his successor, when it was understood that the Institute was really going to lose Professor Thurston, have been set at rest by the characteristically systematic and practical manner in which Professor Wood has taken hold of the Course in Engineering, We would suggest, however, that though the Text Book of Materials of Construction is a very handsome book to have upon one's shelves, it seems rather a costly investment considering the amount of use we make of it. For the course we pursue is an exceedingly expensive one as to books, and it seems very hard upon a student to ask him to huy books that he uses during a very brief part of his course and then lays aside never looking at them again. This is especially true of Rankine's Machinery and Millwork, a book of 600 pages, which is bought every year by the Junior Class in order that they may study less than IOO pages. When we add that after the Junior becomes a Senior he has to buy a Rankine on the Steam Engine which contains, with the exception of a few pages, exactly the same matter that he has previously bought in the Machinery and Mill-work, it would seem that something ought to be done to prevent this useless expenditure.


10

rHE ECCEtlI(TYfJC.

N ext year it is to be hoped that the Junior Class will not be put into the Machinery and Millwork before they have learned the first principles of Mechanics as was done with the class of '87, for the work was thereby rendered much harder. The Course in Chemistry has been much improved by Professor Leeds' new system of giving out a certain number of questions covering tbe most important points in the text at each recitation, and then examining the Class upon them at the recitation following. We are very glad, however, to see that the system of commenting upon each other's recitations by the members of the Class has been stoppell, as it m.et with general disapproval from the Classes. The custom of requiring a physician's certificate in the case of illness, that exists in this department) seems to be rather a.n unjust one. For a stuclent may be confined to the house by an illness so slight that it would not warrant his going to the expense of calling in a physician, which he would have to do in order to Why cannot the Classes, or at prevent the lowering of his standing in class. any rate the Junior Class, be allowed the same liberty in this department that they have in Professor Wood's? They do Dot abuse their privileges there, and they certainly would not do so here. The introduction of Bloxam's Metals as a text-book has been very acceptable to the Junior Class. The Department of Belles-Lettres has also taken a step forward. Instead of devoting themselves entirely to the study of Shaw's Manual of English Literature, the Sophomores have been spending the greater part of their time in the reading of Chaucer, and the systematic study of Shakespeare's best plays and Bacon's Essays. This change not only makes this department far more interesting to the student, but it also gives him an insight into much that he has hitherto only touched upon in a very general manner. It is to be hoped that this plan will be continued and if possible extended. In the Department of Mathematics there seems to have been some little trouble a.nd dissatisfaction owing to the fact that a new professor, with new ways and methods of teaching had come among us, but this appears to have all passed away now and things are progressing very smoothly. We are glad to see that the new catalogue is out so e:uly this year, and to notice that the Faculty have further raised the standard of admission by the addition of French to the requirements. This gradual increase in the requirements for admission should be continued till the Institute finally becomes what it should be now, viz: a post-graduate school devoted entirely to the study of Mechanical Engineering. We wish to express our thanks to Professors Morton and Mayer for permitting us to use the Physical Laboratory as a. ball-room in which to hold the Germans given by the S. S. S.


".THE ECCEO'(T'l(IC.

C.

R.

E. M.

H_ B.

J.

S.

II

COLUNS .. _ .. _. _______ .. __ . __ . _____________ ___ President_ COTIART ________________ .. __ . _____ . _.. ________

Vice-President.

EVlcRHART. __________________________________ _Secretary. MER R [1''1'. ___ . ____ . ________________________ . ___

WILUA~L

FUCHS_ ..... _ ..

ANTONIO AGUILERA, JR.,

c __ •• __ • ____ • ______ . _______ _

Treasurer. Historiall.

2 . .Y. ____ ... _____ . _. _ . ____ . ______ .. _.. _____ . ____ . ____ Cuba.

JOHN THOMPSON ARNOLD_. __ ._ .... ____ _ _________ • ___

______ . ___ .. Cheyenne,

Wy. Ter.

lC. 1'_' .. __ .. _. __ .. ____ .. ____ . ___ ... ____ .NtrdJ YO/,k City. CORNELIUS DEVERE BLAUVELT .. _____ •. ____ .. ____ . ____ . ___ . _______ . _____ O,'adell, N. J. WILLIAM SIDELL CHESTER, Ll. T. Ll ____ . ___ . ___ . _______________ . ___ . ElIglewood, N. J. EDWARD TRACEY BIRDSALL, Ll.

CHARLES RUSSELL COLLINS,

I'i.

:=;._. ____ . ____ ._ . ___ ._ . __ ...... .. __ .. Philadclphia,

Pa.

2. -X-. _____ ._._ . ___ .... ____ . ____ .. ____ . ______ ... _._Spri..gjield, O. EMILE MAURICE COTTART, 1-). :=; .... _... ____ . _______ ._ . ____ . __________ .lIava..a, Cuba_ HENRY BANNERT EVERHART, 73. I"). II .... . ___ ... _____ .. _____ . . ____ .1I1olltgomery, Ala. CORNELIUS JAMES FIELD, 13. I"). II _____ .. _. ____ .. ____ .. ____ ... __ . __ ._.Broo/dyll, N. Y. WILLIAM FUCHs, B.S., X.'F ____ ____ ..... __ ,, ___ . _.. _______ .. ___ .... ___ Willfield, L. I. EDWARD JAY COOK,

OVIDIO GIHERGA,

C. E. _____ . ____ .. ___ . _ ______ . _________ .. ___ . ____ • ___ ... __ . _. __ Cuba.


111£ ECCEtJI(Ti(IC.

12

'l'... __________ . _____ . ____ . __ . __ .. ____ So1Jurvill,·, lV. J.

\VJI.UA" LES:\El'R HAYNES, "\.. JOHN

1\1 CKJ;\:\ EY

lIEISKEL.. __ .. ____ .' . ___ . ____ .. ____ .. __ _ . _ . _________ ,JIelJlphis,

FRANCIS EDWARD JACKSON. _____ . ____ ._ .. _____ .• _____ . ____ . . ____

\\' JI. LlAM ROBERTS KING. ____ .• ___ . ___ ... _ . ___ .. ___________ ' _____ .

Lambertville,

FRANCIS LA POINTE. _______ . __ •.. ____ • ______________ .... _ .. .... _ ... .... EIobokm, MARTIN GRANT LII.LY,::E. \. . . . . . . . . . . . __ .. .. _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JOI!~ Al'STIc> l\! CCl LI.O C II,

]A\IES S\llTll MERRII"1", (-).

Tmll.

._East Orange, ,\-. J. 1\-.

J.

N. J.

Yolk, ('a.

'P. __ .. .... """ . ........ ' "" __ .. __ ...... Clmcoe, .lId. Z .... __ .... " __ "' ____ .......... _.... . _.. Plliladdphia, 1'11. ,.

GEORGE !ZICIDIO::-;U :-!gTCA1.l". . . . . . . . " " ..•. , •.••. " ..••.•.•..•. .• _.Brookly/l,

ll'. Y.

J. ..1. T . .:J._ .•.• ___ ..•.. _.••..••.. _..•• ____ .j\'ew YorkCil),.

FREDERICK KASI! :ll0RTON. __ ••.•..... _ .• _ ... " ._ .. _ . . • • . . .•. __ •• _. ,J/,'rri.rftJ'iiJll, ,\ '. EJ)WIN PEAI(SAI.L l\fO\\" Tfl N,

I1ENRY

KE"I' l\JORRISON ... __ . . . . . . ___ .•. _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... Sollll, Om II';" ', 1\'. J.

01"1'0 PFOIUHE •...•..... _ ... ____ ..••.•• ___ ... _ ••••. , •.••• _ •. Jas,;,'

\V 1I.I.lA \[

ComJl-:

1'051',

13. (-).

LEO".\RD GREGORI' PAINE, \\"11 .1.1.\\[

\V, RA:\J)OI.I'II,

n .. __ . ____ ... _........ _...... .J,'/'S,'),

Cit;.

If(l~.;hls,

"\', J.

Cit)' Ihighls, N. J,

n. (-). n. __ . __ ...... ___ .... __ .. . '" __ ''' ._ .... ftall,::or,

<P. A.

1[f ..... __ ....... _ ......•. _.... _ .. lfalll/>skad

file.

1'.0.,1(,.

..1. T. ..1 .. _.. _..... __ .. ____ ...... ...... S,I/ttl, Ora7l.~e, lV, J. A,B., Z. IfF .•.....• _ . ........•.•.. ___ F,SI,J.,itl.on.lfudsoll, 1\'. V,

EIJ\\ARIJ j) ,\:" FORTII SI':I.F, JOII:\ Ru(;(;I.I(S SLACK,

WI1.1.1AM \\"IIEI.I'I.EY TIIO\lAS,

EDGAR

ED\\'ARP FR.\:"CIS

\VlIlI E, 13.

\VII.LlAI[ FREDEIUCK \\'1I1

JOSEI'll

.I IL,

..1. '1' . ..1. ___ ........ ..• _........ .I1{>]")"is!,,,,,", ,\ '. J,

F. R. YARICK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . . ___ . . . . . . . . . . . ..... Jers.')' Ci(J'.

LFSTOR

n :,

1-).

~ 1.

IT . •..... _., ........... _... . ....

Her.!,"'1l

.i'Oilll, /\ ', J.

'f'. .0, .... , .... ' ....... _" ... _.. ' .. , _.' .llt.XlCO, ,l/e.lII·o.

\\'O""IlIUI'(;E .•. _ . . . . . ' " ... ,_ . . . . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . ....

i>'/ooA'ly", .\ '. J'.


<.THE ECCE,fJ\(T"I(IC.

J,i;~~~; REGORIE

13

LETI being one day at Charles II's levee, the king said to him: "Leti, I hear you are writing the history of the Court of England." "Sir," replied ' Leti, "I have been for some time preparing materials for such a history." "Take care," said the king, "that your work contains no offence." "Sir," answered Leti, "I will do what I can; but if a man were as wise as Solomon, he would scarce be able to avoid giving some offence." "vVhy, then," rejoined the king, "be as wise as Solomon-write proverbs, not histories." How great's the pity that a class-historian, even though he be a Senior, can not be as wise as Solomon! But, you say, there is not much in the history of a class, that can give offence to anybody. Let us hope so ! While attempting to get the statistics of the class, the historian found that many members were unwilliug to allow the publishing of details apparently not at all detrimental to them. It was thought best not to state such uninteresting items as the aggregate age of '86, the total length of moustache, the entire area covered by the pedal extremities, or, even the number of damsels soon to be made happy by our matrimonially inclined Seniors. Modesty and love of truth forbid me to say that we are the llandsomest set of men that have ever trodden these" classic halls;" still, anyone that wishes to convince himself to the contrary, may view the beautiful group of the class made by our photographer.


14

THE~

ECCE{J(T<J?JC.

\Ve are a very peaceful crowd; but still, when our temper is up, we can do things that would make Napoleon blush with shame. The first bloodless battle was fought in the class-room, during a "class-meeting." (I presume, kind reader, that it is not necessary to define that term 1) The call, " To arms," came so unexpected that many of us had no time to draw weapons; and we gathered around our King, strewing death and perdition around us. A great painting of the field, after the battle, was drawn by the illustrious artist, Jackson, and thus the fame and glory of '86 is perpetuated throughout futurity 1 On a later occasion, a war-dance was held on this battle-field by the class, rejoicing over the partial routing of the mortal enemy, Rankine. Soon, however, his adjutant, Jove, came to them, saw them, and subdued them in a wink --some say with a wink-granting them the longed-for freedom (which they already possessed 1) Suspended for the day 11 Many a successful fight was fought in marshalled battle-array against the Amazons called Mathematica, Electra, Physica, Thermodynamica, and, perhaps, otheJ icas. The hunch-backed functions, lightning, dynamos, glaring microscopes, and colored trusses and pin-wheels, used by the enemy as terrific offensive weapons, were disregarded as so many potato-bullets from a popgun; all were at last taken by storm. One battery of books was scaled after another, till now the class has fairly reached the heart of that proud citadel, called by mortals, Knowledge. Many a noble warrior had to leave his blue-blood on the battle-paper, ruled in double sense; many a bright and genial youth came near losing his mightiest defence, the mind, when imprisoned in a dingy drawing-room, obliged to while away his valuable time and use up his brawn and muscle in painting printed letters on the sheets before him; many a gallant football-player was forced to wield the slim pen (303) to subdue the Giant Grap. Stat. by dint of strategem and manceuvre; and many a stealthy pioneer carried the end of his guiding paper spool through the webby labyrinth of polygons of forces, searching for the invisible maximum point 1 Victory, however, smiled on her favorite child throughout its struggles. Hurried on by the speeding foot of Time, came the last serious encounter. Electra and Physica, frightened by the gigantic powers of the growing child, fled from the field before the first alarm was heard j only two of the class' former opponents dared to hold a steady ground. One of them, the weaker, was attacked, when separated from its ally, with all possible heat and fury. Many were the wounded and conditionally cured, but none succumbed. The other enemy, Dame Thermodynamica, was attacked at a preconcerted timethree days the bloody battle raged 1 Thrice did the crimson sun bathe his orb in the western cloucls, and thrice did he observe the successful skirmishing of our different parties. At last, as he rose on the day of St. Allfools, truce was made; soon the articles of peace were drawn up, and the only stipulation


<JHE ECCEtJ(T7(IC.

against the class was the compiling of a thing called, Thesis. Whyfore, or wherefore, or whenfore is unknown! Definite peace will be made in June, when the Senior will receive his wellearned recompense, the skin or a poor, dumb sheep! HISTORIAN.


16

"TllE ECCl:.:tYT''l(1c.

R. N. M.

J.

BAyLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Prcsidm/.

C. BE.\RD . . . . . •....•.•..•....... ...• . . . . . . . . . . Vice-Presid,,/I/. A . MCELROY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . Scc. Treas.

R. M.

ROIlERT

ANIII<:RSO'l . • . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . • . • •.

MARSHAl.l..\); OERSU:-l,

. • ....••...•

.lhrlt'riall.

..J. T . ..J ...........................•. Cirrlt!Vill~, Ohio.

JA)IES HE:-iRY B.\IES •.••.•....•..•.•.............••.....•..•........

JOHN HEkllERT BALLEi\lIi\E, \ .

Cill,i11l1ali,Ollio.

P .. ..................... .............. •\·1'7"ar~· • •\'. J.

LEON GUILLOld) BANDERI·:T. •• . .•......• , .•.•••.•.•••• , .••.. • ..• . •..•. J!ob"kell. }I.'. ROBERT

N ELSU:-l

BAYLES.

..J. T . ..J .•.........•..••.•... . ••.......•.. E1Zgle'/Jood.

MAXIMILIAN CORNELIUS HEARD.

\ .

D\Y

CRANF.,

\ .

JOHN LY)IAN

PEARCE CRlsFa;I.D.

J.

. . . . • . • • ...• .1.1obokm, j \'.

J.

P ...•....................... Bric!.: Cll1Ir,h, , \ '. J .

NORMAN ST. GEORGE (' I \I PilE!.!.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .Jjoboke1l. }I.'.

JAMES ilLFREO

J.

P ...... .. . .. , .... . ... , ...... .... New Orlea1ls. La .

JULIUS CAUSCII. •..••...•••..•••........• , •...•••• . ""

\ VILI.IAM FOSTER

}I.'.

(-i.

:=: ......... .... .............. Ch,·stert01i'1'.

.f.

11.1,1.

Cox ..................................................... Oral1gt'. N. J.

EDGAR RIIODF.S

D.I WSO'l.

\ .

</'.......................... . ........... Bilitimore. 11ft!.


"THE ECCEtl(T"l?JC.

WALTER SMITH DIX ... .. ..••••. • ""

.•.•.•••....••••• , .•••••• •••••• Morristown,

HERMANN FRED. THEODORE ERHE:\!,

(.;y. :=; ............ _.· .......... Portsmouth,N. H.

JOSEPH FREDERICK FIRESTONE, JACOB DAY FLACK,

N . J.

X. P ................... _..........•.••. Canton, Ohio.

2:. X .... _......................................... J]aftimore, Md.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN lIART,

X. IP. _.................... ............ . Jfoboken. N . J.

B. (-J. II __ ......... -- ...... ----- .. ---- .. -- .... j)fobile, Ala. JENKINS,. ___ .. _. _ •...•..•.. _ •... _. _ .• _. _ •. _ .. Je1-sey City, N. J.

CHARLES ANDREWS HALL, MATTHEW COMSTOCK

EUGENE HENRY KIERNAN .. __ .• _ " __ .... __

••• '. . . . . . . . . . . . ____ • ...... Lfoboken,

N. J.

CARLOS A. LOZANO . . . . . . . . . . . . . __ .... __ ... _ ...••. _ . . . . . . . . . . _ .. _ . . . . . . . . . __ Portugal. JOSEPH ALOYSIUS McELROY,

X. 'F ......................... __ ...... Bridgl'port, Conn.

SAMUEL WYLIE MILLER •• ______ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . __ • ____ .... __ .. __ •. FRANKLIN

New York City.

MOELLER. -- _ .. __ . __ . ____ ... __ ... ____ ..... .... . . . . . . . . . . . . New

York City.

X.'lf .... ...... "" .. __ ..... '''' .... Salisbury, Md. X. iP .. -- .... ---- .. -- .. ____ .................. Cobham. Va.

WASHINGTON EVERETT PARSONS, CARTER HENRY PAGE, JR.,

WILLIAM EVERETT QUIMBY,

2:. X .................. __ .................. Orange, N. J. X. rp .. __ .... _. _.. __ . _..... _..... _. College Point, L. 1.

ALFRED HENRY SCHLESINGER,

Ll. T. Ll ............................. Plainfield, N. J . X. rp ....... _... __ ..... _...... __ .. Washington, D. C. THEODORE ERNEST THEBERATH . . . . . . . . . . . _ .. __ .. __ •• ____ .. - . . . . . . . . . .. Newark, N. J . HERBERT ApPLETON WAGNER ______ . . . . . __ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ____ ........ __ New York City. LEMUEL WILLIAM

SERRELL, JR.,

WILLIAM ERNEST SCHOENBORN,

DRUID ALEXANDER WALTON,

B.

e.

II ....... __ .... __ . __ . ._ _____ .. __ .. .. Louisville, Ky .

WILLIAM HARRISON CRAWFORD WHEATLEy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . __ •.• _ ..... .. Americus,

Ga.


18

'TilE ECCEil(Tl(IC.

IS after nine o'clock on a viciously cold winter morning, and a few ordinary mortals in the shape of some handsome youths, whose m<tin peculiarities are their invariably early arrival and promiscuous use of tobacco and profanity, are clustered about in graceful attitudes on the cushioned settees of '87's boudoir in our l)alace of Learning. The boudoir is finely decorated with choice specimens of the students' ::nt, and familiar quotations from the various professors ornament in parti-colored chalk the sepulclual whiteness of the walls; such as "Take another color," "Austin didn't know much about mathematics," and similar striking sentences whidl have made their impression upon S0111e weary student's brain, and who takes this method of getting rid of their burden. Some of the youths bear the appearance of studiousness. Others, with ears and noses rosy with the cold, hug the radiator and )lull at cigarettes in the endeavor to warm their vital fluid, tormenting and annoying with their harmless chatter those studiously engaged at the table piled with books and covered with weary-looking, over-worked cards. " Jerusalem! but it's cold, and a beastly wind is blowing!" remarks one of the aforesaid youths at the radiator. "Oh, chestnuts!" "Tell us something we cIon't know!" "Give us a rest !" come from various voices. " 'Tis all the same," rejoins the first; "and I'll bet that every man that comes in will say the same." Sure enough, in comes Jingle, our rag baby, large as life, and with the remark, " Jerusalem! but it's cold !" at which there is a general laugh, anel being apprised of the gag, shuts up and waits for the next man. Presently in comes Mother Schoenborn, who doesn't say a word. General disappointment; but her ladyship is not given to superfluous remarks. Bang-ketty-bang! and in comes Cap, the pride of the family, followed by Chul1(;ky, who both make the


'HIE ECCEiJI(T7\IC.

19

same remark, and are thereupon laughed at in turn, anll catching the idea, subside and wait for the next unfortunate lad who has any comments to make upon the weather. The discontented Atom, Grandma Schlesinger, Father Parsons, and third cousin Lozano, with brains full of the day's lessons, have no remarks to make upon the want of caloric outside. The excitement is dying out, when in pops Butzy, our court jester, followed by Bowlegs, with their mouths full of revilings against the cold, which bring do wn the house, in the midst of which Miss Johnny Lyman attempts to open a window, but is arrested by rude hands, and Butzy exclaims: "Aw, Johnny, don't do that! You'll give us colds in our heads." "Which would not damage the diatomatic proportion of your cerebral anatomy," retorts this unfeeling maiden aunt. (Johnny glories in diatomes and risapods, and never fails to let us know it.) The room is filling fast, and Walter S., the philosopher and family solicitor, " Pretty Boy," Jowles, Ponce, the neglected one, Dickey, Maud, the wayward child, Dude, Quinby, the all路~uffi.cient, Bobby Nelson, who wields the sceptre, and Shoebrush, are among the last to enter. "Hullo, Shoebrush, when are you going to take that thing off your face?" ejaculates the jester; but the fonner is discussing with the others the important question of the day. Something is evidently wrong, which calls forth some remarks more forcible than elegant, and a class路 meeting is ordered, after the recitations, for its further discussion. The gong in the hall knocks off time, and with cries of " Webbellion, webbellion," the class departs for the du ties of the day.

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Class meeting is finally in order, and everybody remains, to a man; a most unusual occurrence, considering that dinner usually has its strong attractions, denoting intense interest in the business at hand. Now, far be it from me to intrude upon the sanctity of this particular class-meeting by venturing a description. Let it suffice that the burden of the eloquence on that occasion will not bear repetition here, as we have due regard for our earthly happiness so long as we are students. But the result of that meeting, in one department, at least, has had its appreciable effect, however small, ever since. The term goes quickly on its way, and days go fleeting through the back door of time and lab. water-fights become the order of the afternoon. Then it is that the sombre Junior returns to the frolicsomeness of his early youth, and squirts a fine jet into the ear or down the back of his nearest neighbor, being careful to get out of reach of the latter's bottle, and get within range of some other water fiend who is waiting for a victim to come within reach of his pent-up hilarity. This afternoon the fun is commenced by some one drowning the unfortunate Butzy with the funnell hose attached to the faucet, who retaliates by setting up a general squirting match, making Miss Bates his first victim, who, in


zo

rHE ECCE.\Ti(.!C.

self-defense, is perforce compelled nervously to join the fight. In other quarters of the room the racket is becoming boisterous. The wayward child is working his patent applied for, continuous action distinguisher with dire effect, and the stone jars threaten to float from their places in the deluge which prevails. Just at this moment the door is thrown open with quiet haste, and in steps the Doctor, his rosy cheeks flushed with shame at the sight which meets his eyes. The maiden aunt is defending herself with aggressive violence in a naval battle near her desk, the continuous action bottle is working with wilting effect on " Pretty Boy's" collar. But the most shocking and wettest sight of all is directly under the Doctor's nose and engages his attention. Two lads, with eyes closed and faces red from exertion and their own volcanic hilarity, are squirting well-aimed streams like small fire engines, full into each other's faces and down each other's necks, with seeming tireless energy and disregard of consequences. Oh, where is the dignity of the sombre Junior? Like that of his collar-gone. The Doctor gen tly touches the 11 uman waterspouts upon the shoulder and says, as they open their eyes with surprising alacrity, " My lads, I'm sorry to do it, but I think you had both better take a week off to dry yourselves. " Later in the afternoon the Jester and Rags are taking their leave, arm in arm, when, on reaching the outer door, the Jester says: " Look yonder, Rags," and wildly warbles: "No mantillas they sport, But a petticoal short. Shows an ankle the beSl, an ankle the best, And a - but, 0 murther ! I clare not go further, So here's to the West, so here's to the 'Vest.

" Do you know them, Rags?

I don't.

Let's go home."


'11/1:" I:CC;':·'Jf\.fC.

21

~ ~

GORIJEN CA~IPIlELL . . . . . . . . • • • . . . . • . . . . . . . • • . . . . • . . • President.

THOMAS TAYLOR, JR •••..•.....••••....•...•••...... I).

H.

LOPEZ . . . . . . . . • . • • . . . . . . . . . . . . __ . . . . . . . . . . • . .. Sec.

Treas.

P.

IIALL .••••.••..•.....••....••••••.••.• ... Historiall.

B. S.

WHALEy . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . • . • . . . . . . . . . . .. ClltljJlain.

BURTON WnL

Vice-Presidelll.

..1. 'f'. ..1 ............................ CiJl,;l1J1ali, Ohio. J'or,(' Cily. ••.. __ ••...•• __ •.• ____ ..•.. __ ••.. •••.• ,Ifobokl'1l, 11': J.

LARI. \VOR'IIlI;\C;TON ANlll,J{SU;\,

HENRY AUC;UST BA'IG •••••••••.••••...•••••....•..•..•.• ............. J\'e'1t! RICHARD BEyER . . . . . . . . . . . . __

'If............................. Richlllolld, Va. York Cily. Tf .. __ . __ . __ .... __ ....... __ ...... __ .. __ .. flarls7/ille, S. C.

ROliERT MILLINGTON BLANKI'~NSIIII',

\.

GORDf:N CAMPBI'!.!.. . . . . __ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , __ . __ ..... __ ..•• ..•• 1\'e1u JA~IES LIDE COKER,

JJ.

1-).

FRED NEYII>S CONNET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FI,·mim;-,

11'. J.

THUMAS \VILLIAM DEMAREST. •...••••••••..•••••••••.••••••••• __ •••. ElIglnUt>od, liT.

J.

Cily, liT. J. __ .•• ,Ifoboken, N. J.

GEORGE DINKEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ••.. Jersey PA UL AARON

DOTY .•.•..•• __ ••...•••••••••.•••.. __ .•...•. __ ••••

EDWIN MAY DRUMMOND,

B. 0. II ..... __ ...... , .....•.... __ .... __ .... LouiS'llillr, Ky.


22

• .... ... . . . . . Ruth~iford, }I.'.

EDWARD DUCUMMU1'>.................................

FERRElL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... N<"Iv

PIERRE FERRI':R

C IRR

III,;-IRY

FERRIC;,

ARTIIUR A\lE5

i'!

1'.

1/ .. : ........................ ........... Cleve/and, Ohio.

GRIS\\IIII) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . "

11111 "

WIILlI\I CI.;\R);;I'.

I-I.

1.1.1(11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Providcllcl',

1I1J\\;\RIl CLJ/oI(l'\ EI RTo'\

n.

I-I.

II

JJ.

I-I.

• •••.....•.•... 1\',..(1

Vork Cil)'.

.. .... .. 1\rn (l

}'ork Cit/,.

\'Jo:RI'LA'\ (,K ITO/'DI I " . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

MILIIRIlCI/,lJIII-L1

ell IRLES

IIA\IIIH)N,

n.

I-I.

II .....

. ........ Omaha, \ 'd,.

\'01 '\1-'\' KJo:RK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .'... . . . . . . . . . . .

D.\ \'I!) If.

/'III 'I"Z, ~',

. ..•.•.. .... Ft. lI 'Il),IlC,

\ ...............................................

:'IL\.-K,

n.

\ . <}I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Eu;"

R'I(\' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

L o/{'I'O'; E,IBURY GEOR(;F.

JnUN

l\1elll

N. J.

1·1. If ................... ........ SlIIII1JIt'l7Jille, N. J.

AIIE :-I Sln,\Jo:Y IIIILLEK, /'1)('11/(\:-11-:

Jlld.

C",-,saw, S. C.

,\Lell' '{I'LSON LIIKI:\' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... EI;.abelh, AU:X,I'\IH,R \\'IlI FG I";

A'y.

.\ '. Y.

II ...... ............... ......... Talllltoll, .llllss.

•\I 'I,I'STUS M ool{J'; II ERRI'\(;................. S,\\!UI'I

R . .1.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lollisvil/c,

:=; ............. : ................... ....... ... Rroo~·I)'n,

III KI'\S,

J.

York City.

. . . . . . . . . . . Richllllllld,

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IerSt')'

McDEK'IOI I .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Va.

Cit)', 1\'. J.

/;'ast Om1lgt', l\.~ J.

MeL'·:I.' ........................................ ........ .. }Iobokm, 1\'. .1. Yod' Ci(J'. 'lellOI IS :lkK I Il iii': , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..

......... ,',.w

. . . " .. RfotlJlljidd,

N . .f.

II E:-IRY EOWIRO REEI'F . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... Bre/oN)'lI,

1\'. Y.

\' \'\

La:\\'

PI ERSO'\ .... ...... .... ...... ...... .. • ....

THOR'BUR:-I REID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Stal/lltoll, WILLIAM III01'>ROI-: RI CKOFF, 1-).

E................... .......

LlcWIS SEARING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......... \VI 1.1.11\1 \\' ILn:R SCII LNCK, ROHERT GAS'I E'\

n.

,Vew Yod' Cit)l.

\.

C.

Jlt·~r;hls,

X . .I.

<I> .......................................... COllllllbl<l, S. C.

WILLIAM WIII l: IIIM, JR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -- . . . . • . . . . . • . . . • . . . • • . . . • • ... EDWARD JONES \VII .I.I S,

JJol,,,A-t'II. ,\ '. J.

1-1.11. ....... . " .................... ..... Chica,.;o, III.

STUELK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... .f.

TUO~IA S T\YLOR, J R.,

\. "' __ ........ __ . __ . . . . . __ .....

Ca/lldell,

1'0111.

__ . . . . . . . . __ .. Ri('hIl101ld,

HUBERT SelJUR~IAN \\'Y'iKO()I' ..••..•.••...•••..•.•..•..•...•.....•••.. Rroo!'-!),1I,N.

THOM;\S

A.

Va.

1\'. V.

::So \ .................................... ,Vn(J rOIl- Clly.

S'IIIII .• .. . • . . . . . . . . . . . . • . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . • . .. .

RUS SELl. llml l'lIREY 5\11111, GEORGE IIE1'>RY

}'on~·crs,

.. ....

VAN /lER \\'JJ.I.!(;DI __ . . . . __ .. __ . . . . . . __ . . . . . . . . . . __ . . . . . . Broo!.-!YII, "V.

'VILI.IAM B UR'E'IT YERI'i\NCE . . . . . . __ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ____ . . . . . . . . "\·t"1V

I~l

Va. J~

V.

}'OlA-Clly.


'THE HCCE ,路 "(T1{fC.

23

H EN last you lent a kindly, listening ear to the history of our brief existence, we were Freshmen. No loud disgrace, quite true, but still all know the vague ideas and fancies which the name of Freshman carries with it. But behold! Behold the changes of a year! We passed from infancy to that stage of boldness, depravity, ancl careless indifference, to the cares of life known as the" Sophomoric stage." Yes, we are Sophomores indeed, but in becoming such we have had our share of haps and mishaps, and it is to a narration of these that we ask your indulgence for a little time. The study of history would be unworthy of a serious attention were we to confine ourselves to a bare knowledge of historic facts, and to an uninteresting inquiry into the times to which they belong. It shall be OUr encleavor to not only tell what we have done, but why we have done it. Having overcome the traditional contempt of the Sophomore for the Freshman, we became, in our way, no longer Freshmen. No longer such in the eyes of other classes, but, alas! not so with the Faculty. We had yet to assert our right to be " Sophs" before we could become such. So with fear and trembling we went to our June examinations. It is a strange fact that tbe strongest often fear the most, and though our fears were great, we prospered well, and the triumph of our massive inte~lects over the intricacies of our various branches severed the last link that bound the title of Freshmen to us.


We began our career as " Sophs " by entering into our preliminary term shortly after Commencement. But notwithstanding the acquisition of our new-found hOllor, there was yet one flaw in our felicity. It was the unavoidable and unfortunate circumstance of being obliged. to do our preliminary work at the same time that '86 was carrying on its course in experimental mechanics. \Ve were, in consequence, compelled to he more or less in contact with them, and as the weather was warm, we often found ourselves pbysically discomforted as a result. In the course which '86 was pursulllg," engine testing" was included, and the subject was the engine which ran the shop. This was connected with a large hlower outside, and the mouth of .the blower was closed by a drop. When the drop was down the blower worked extremely hard, and the engine being tbus heavily loaded, would proceed at a moderate rate even with a full head of steam. The blower was left in this way when no test was being made, but occasionally one or two little '86 boys would come up and lift up the drop. Away would go the engine. But what bothered us was the fact that they never would say a word about it, when they were going to lift up the drop, and, of course, as the engine speeded up the machinery did likewise. What was the result? A man at a wood lathe would be entertained by having his work take a hop, skip, anti a jump over to the other side of the shop . Work in iron lathes would begin to jump and spin on seven or eight consecutive centres inside of a minute. Drill presses ripped out holes four times bigger than the drill. Planers worked so fast that they'd shove work right into the cellar, and everything manifested a desire to do a whole day's work in fifteen minutes. Of course, much work was damaged, but the little boys just kept this thing up, notwithstanding ollr remonstrances, and as we had no means of preventing the agony, we bore It patiently, and without further happenings our preliminary term closed. After enjoying our summer respite we returned refreshed, and set vigorously to work again. Now, of course, the Fresbmen thought, as all Freshmen do, that it was their solemn cluty to "rush" the" Sophs," and they accordingly endeavored to perform their duty. But we merely smiled an indulgent smile, and looked upon them in a Pooh Bah-ish way, and said, " Go ''''ay, little boys, go 'way! Go to mamma! Don't be naughty. Go to mamma, like good little boys!" And like good little boys they did go to mamma. Such was the extent of our rushing. The remainder of the term was uneventful, nothing happening to disturb our equanimity until the Christmas cxaminations. They staggered us somcwhat, and a few managed to get an inordinate n umber of "Cons" associated with their names. But a little extra work soon corrected things, and all, save two who" resigned" started again after the Christmas holidays.


<fIfE ECCEtJI(T'/(IC.

With the new term began a general clamor for a class-room. A room where we would be unmolested, and enjoy in seclusion our unoccupied time, for we had grown weary of the publicity of the hat-room, which we then occupied in company with the Freshmen; so by dint of talking and scheming, ancl various tours of inspection, we finally succeeded in securing for ourselves a class-room, thereby accomplishing what no other Sophomore class had done before us. And to us will be indebted the succeeding Sophomore classes for their room. The room contained no window, and was, perhaps, not all that could be wished for; but still it was far preferable to nothing. In bold type can be seen imprintecl on the wall, as one enters the room, "Inaugurated by the Class of '88, ] an. 25, 1886." Thus have we endeavored to perpetuate our name in the years to come. \Ve started out nobly with our newly acquired jJossession. We purchased spittoons, whisk brushes, waste baskets, shoe brushes and blacking, and, indeed, a full e(luipment. We stole hosts of chairs and a table. We placed all these in our little room, and said: "Now let the world roll on. \Ve ask no more." But ah! alas! where now are all those pretty things-those cherished things? Gone! Gone principally to decorate the campus and any piece of landscape within throwing distance. The] uniors began the work of demolition by using our spittoons to generate H z S in. Of course the spittoons went out of the window without further ceremony. Then, sir, the matinee commenced. It sounded as though our bump of destructiveness had raised to giant size. When the noontide hour arrived, the class would gather in the room and read, study, or eat for a while in quiet; but ere long, upon the slightest provocation, the quiet assembly would be turned into a howling mob. Then would ensue a scene of riot and destruction that would strike terror to the hearts of the bravest. Out goes the gas; total darkness ensues; chairs, cards, ink-bottles and rubbers fly hither and thither in dangerous profusion. In distant parts of the building the noise sounds like the roll of distant thunder. Then some one opens the door and lets light upon the scene. The riot stops and order reigns again, but only for a while. Again and again the riots rage, and you can well imagine how, in time, our once beautiful furnishings became completely demoralized. Thus have we become reduced, but perhaps we may start again, doubtless to come, though, to the same state again. In the early part of the term we had another picture taken, but again the ignorant and uneducated vagabonds belonging to '86 got off one of their characteristic disgraces to humanity by throwing upon us a quantity of assorted slops. Of course we got the photographs, but you may be sure that '86 looked out for the escaping part of the job. We have been struggling manfully all the term with the far-famed bugbear, Integral Calculus. But we seem to be attended by success, and we trust that we will come out victorious in the end.


26

'ZHE ECCE.!J'(T7?JC.

Our athletic members begin to arouse themselves and stretch their limbs for action, and we know from previous experience that '88 will hold its own in muscle as well as intellect. We can see before us the dim outlines of the Junior year, to reach which we are striving day by day. And it is our hope that we may master the difficulties that fall in our way, and that we may complete triumphantly the work of our Sophomore year. We have yet the finishing touches to make, but we trust that they will be satisfactorily made, and that we will stand ready to again take hold and grappl~ with the work which still lies before us. HISTORIAN.

/


"T//Jo' ECCE ['(T<J?JC.

@ffice'l.<§l . W. D .

A. C.

HOXIE ____ •.. , _ . . . . . . __ •... __ ... _ ... _ . . . . _ ... fJn'siri£'1l!.

PECK __ •. _____ ' ____ ... __ .... ___ -. - . . . . . . . _. ___ Vice·PresidCll!.

L. C. MACK_ •.. _ ... _ ... _ . _ . _ .... ____ . . . . . . . . . . . _ . _ .Scodar)'. L. T .

C. E. C.

J.

FINCH. ___ . __ .. _. . . . . • . . . . . _ . __ ... _ .. _ .. __

. _ l;-eas7Irer.

HARRISON _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , ___ ..•• _ . . . . . . . _ ... ili..-!oriIl1l. F.VERF.TT __ . . . . __ .• __ . . . . . ______ • __ •. _._ •. __ ._cll<1jJ/rriJl .

• _______________ •• _______ •

_ •

__

• ___

• _______ t \

\VI I. I. [ I\){

"J.

HI( I' RS ... ___ . . . . . . . . . • _ . . . . . __ .... _. _. __ ... __ . _. __ ", __ .

CllARl.Jo:S

P.

BENNS . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . _. ___ . ... " _ .... _ . . . . . . . _ .. .

-t'iiJ

l'ork

L.~i:)I.

_Jers')' Ci()" N. J.

Sdtllectady, /ll. Y.

LOUIS B. BONNET. . . . . . . . . . . . . . __ .• __ . . . . . . _ • .- __ ._ .••.•.•.•... •..•.. E/izllueth,

N. J.

II. BRODHEAD,::E . .\ - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . • . • . . . . . . . . . • . ..•••• A-iligStOl1, N. Y. JOSEI'll A. COEN, X . 'F.-_ ... _._ ....... __ ........ _.. _ ................ ROltl1dollt,N. J;: H()RACE G. COOKE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . . . . Falersoll, N . J. TI[O~[AS C. COYKENDAI.L. . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Nollndoltt, N. Y. JA COB C. DANZI"GER ... _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . __ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cil1cimlllti, OJ,io. ElJWARD

JA~ll<;S EASTWOOD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •...

l[E:-.-RY

Pt/hYson, 1\-. J.

L. EnSE" ............. : .................. .- ......... .- ........ l1ouokm, N. J.

RICARlJO J. ECIIEVlcRIA, H . CIIARI.ES

d. \".- .... .- ..•.... _.............. __ .......... Cosla/(i{"{1.

J. EVI.;RE"lT ...•..•••••• __ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TmllJ1y,

N . J.


<J"HE ECCE!J'(T9{IC.

28

'WILLIAM J. FELLIIElM~;R . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... Nnf1

T.

LUCItTS

FINCH,

York City.

X. P...................................... .. ..... Nt!7.IJ YO/'k City.

HENRY H. GIFFORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... Nt!7.IJark,

B.

RAYMOND DAVID

II.

GII.JlJo:RSLEIWE,

II.

EGBERT

GILCHRIST. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jersey \'".

N. J. City, lIT. J.

P ........................................ Tmaj!)"N.J.

GOLD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Englnuood.

N. J.

PAUL C. A. GHAUPNER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... Jersey

City. N. J.

FREDRICK GUBELMAN. JR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jersey

Cit)" N. J. liT. J.

D.

CARROLL HARVEY,

(-J.

:=: ............................................ IIobokm,

T. .J ............ ......................... " A IM"y. N. Y. "lIa. WILLrA~1 M. IlILI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... Nt!7.lJark, N. J. NICOLAI H. IIfLf.ER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . St. Pete1'sburg. Rlfssia. WILl.L\M R. HILLYER ..... " . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... NnIJ BrigMoll. S. J. WII.LlAM D. HOXIE,,d. T. Ll .......................................... Brooklyn.N. Y. \VALTF.R W. JACKSON . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . •..... C,'OV" Stend, lI'. J. LEWIS C. MACK, 13. (-). II .. ..................................... .... Sollll!l"IJllle, N. J. MAURICE MARCEAU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... If/est India. ALFRED G. MAYER, :E. \: .................................. ....... South Orange, N. J. CHARLES T. MWDJ.EllROOK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Nn(J Brighton, S. I. WII.L1AM J. HA)IILTON, ,d.

E.

CHARLES

HARRISON.

X.

cf> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alobile,

N. J.

ALBERT

B.

GF.ORGE

H. MUI.DAUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elizabetlt, N. J.

MOORE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . .. Roselle,

ROHERT C. OLlPIIANT, JOll:>l

:E. -"" .......................... _................. Orallge, N.J.

l{. ONDERDONK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... New York Cily.

D.

WII.LlAM

PALEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... Phi!addpllia,

ALFRED C. PECK,

Pa.

Ll. T . .J ........................................... Brookl)"l, N. J'.

GEORGE G. PLYER, .I1.

.J. iP ........ ...... "'''' .................. ...... Nt!7I1 York Cit)'.

IIE:\RY POWER, \:. cf> . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Afolltdair,l'l. .1. HE:\RY LUIS J.

J.

PREYIISS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... j\Tno )'0,-.(' Ci(l'.

SCHOl.TZ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . La

II.

Clfana, Venezllela.

Riel,ll/ond, Va. 13. 1-). n .................................... ...... Hoboken, N. J. ARTHUR L. SHREVE, .J. T . .J ........................ ................. Baltilllore, Ald. EARNEST A. STICGI, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Louisville, J\"y. FRANCIS B. STEVENS, (-). :=; ........................................ .... IIobokm, N. J. CLARENCE A. ·WILLIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... Jersey City, N. J. IRA F. \oVJ[ORTENDYKI;, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " . . . . . . . . " . . . . . . . . . . ...... Passaic, N. J. CHARl.ES F. WRI(AKS, (-). ,s .......................................... Brooklyn, N. Y. WI LLIAM B. WREAKS, (;C;. :=: .. _.. ' .................................... Brook/J'n, liT. Y. ROBERT E. WYANT, X. 0/ ...... __ .......... ________ ... .... CormMll.on.Huds()1l, N. Y.

JA11ES

SCOTT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HE:>IRY J. SHELDON,


'THR~

ECCEO'(T?(IC.

IN the course of human events it becomes the honored privilege of the historian to write up the history of a class, the Freshman class in particular, he trembles, fearing lest his words should not fully impress the rising generation with a proper reverence and awe for the class in question. We do not need to write our annuals [or the perusal of the Preps., for tlteir delicate minds could not quite "grasp" the mighty "points," nor would we take their tender minds from their books, for where would they be in the coming June examinations, and who would we have to rasll next fall if tlte), failed to enter the S'tute. Nor yet woule! we pen them for the amusement and erlification of our college men, for tile), see us every day and of course know just an infinitesimal (see Bowser's Calculus) about us. The Soph's are acquainted with us in a slight degree, and even the Juniors have not found us lacking in what is commonly called" push," for though it is a known fact that they will Firestones at a fellow as quick as anything else, we enjoyed a little affray with them one day in which we did not get the worst. Then if our doings are not to be recorded for college mates nor Preps., who are they for? For the 1florld gentlemen, for the world. Come right up and help proclaim to the world what an " '89 " man really is; do not be satisfied to sit calmly in the back chairs while the world busily revolves through space, but /

/


'1HE ECCE9(T<JCIC.

help to increase zls greatness by proclaming abroad the greatness of the class of" '89 "-come right up and take front seats, and if you find no vacant chairs just go into the Sophomore coat room and borrow (?) some; you know the way for we have all done the same thing before. But we have attained too great speed, so let us retrace our wayward steps back to the time when a class meeting was first suggested. We were all very anxious for it to "come off," and at length went to one of our professors for permission to use his class-room, and he after showing a logical reason why we should keep order, gave vent to the inevitable" yes, yes," thereby sending us off in our fresh happiness to enjoy the first class-meeting. The "Merry Little Mountain Maid" felt, like Joan of Arc, that he was designed (and oh, what a gigantic design he is! it must have been a whole life's work to perfect all the plans) to fill a special mission, but not having any bloody fields on which to expend 11is energies, he took the part of chairman of the meeting. All things progressed well, the "Merry Maid" having complete control of the assembled multitude as did his predecessor of old, until the time came for the election of chaplin. Well we are all so good that it seemed as though a choice was impossible, and the advantage of each one being his own individual chaplin was being loudly discussed, when one of our members, feeling his own inability to act in that capacity, demanded to know whether or not such preceedings were" parliamentary." Alas that unfortunate word was the one to destroy the spell of influence wielded by the" Maid." What did he know about parlIamentary rules? Notlting.l and on being forced to acknowledge his lack of information on the subject, missiles, such as chalk, antique rubbers, discarded books, and so forth, were shied at his body with a strength and force of affection that would have done honor to the most affectionate Romeo and Juliet. While this affecting and terrible scene was being enacted, the god of literature, of logic, and of grammar appeared, and dispersed us to our several places of abode with a feeling that unless we brought a " 7CJrittm excuse" for our behavior, something awful would happen. Here endeth the first meeting, and all the rest were like unto it, only (to quote one of our professors) a " little more so." Ever since this first class-meeting we have been noted as tile" live" class of the college, and we can be seen almost any time of day in our gambols round about the college halls. As a class we are particularly brilliant, for though the catalogue says that the Freshman class must be limited to fifty, and that the selection will be made from the best informed applicants, yet we started with more than the usual number and almost every day since we have had one Moore join us (this is a chestnut with chin whiskers), so that if we keep on the Institute will have to be enlarged, and the Sltll will have to shut up shop, for our brilliancy will throw it into the shade.


THE Eccuyrl(IC.

31

We have still another evidence of the amount of brain possessed by the class, for in other classes, "'88" and" '87 " for instance, Calculus was not taken up till the latter part of the college year, but our" '89 " men gave evidence that they longed for" more workls to conquer," and so Calculus was added to their list of studies about the first of the second term. Not satisfied with this small display of our capacity for study, and our desire for additional research, we have delved down deep into the wells of science and of natural history, and what we have discovered would make Gallileo hold his breath with surprise, would cause poor old Sir Isaac Newton to fall over in a faint, and would force the insatiable Darwin to throw up the sponge and die, because that theory ill which he firmly believed, and to which he wished to convert the whole world, has at last been proven. That for which Darwin searched in vain has been found, and all mankind can now trace their ancestors back to the other end of the chain without the least llifficulty, for the" missing link" has been found and restored by the class of" '89 " to its original place.

The Professors are not the only ones who appreciate us, for our higher classmen-except the poor little Soph's and tlzey clon't know a good thing when they see it-seem to be thoroughly convinced of our worth both as regards athletics ancl our literary powers. Our powers of endurance have been" manifestly" great, we having endured having those puny Soph's in our cloak-room all of the first term, but the Facculty saw what our feelings were and kindly relllmleti them from our midst, and this way of removing the poor Soph's when they get in the 7C1ay, has been


32

<JHE ECCEtJI(T<J?,IC.

adopted by the Freshmen, for in a number of little rushes we have swept them all before us, as the poet would say" like the chaff before the winds." N ow from all that has been said, one might judge that the class of" '89 " is a model A No. I class, always working together as one until-well it is almost so; of course we have the regulation number of "cranks" and" kickers" who sometimes split the unit in the middle and pull the two parts away from each other, but then the majority seem to feel a genuine class brotherhood, which we all hope will continue ,,"ith us after w~ have assumed the dignity which properly belongs to a Sophomore, and have laid aside the mantle of greenness which is the regulation covering for all Freshman sins. HISTORIAN.


<fifE ECCEtJ'(T<J?/C.

33

ADDRESS. . •.•.•.••• 4 2 7

NAl\IE. ANIlERSON,

Gardm SIred.

R. M .... __ .... __ .. __ ..... :: ..... -- ....P7 Gardell " A:'J>ERSON, L. 'v·--····--····--····--··--~~~. __ .... __ .3I4 Bloomfield " AC;UILFRA, A., JR------------------------. --------. 3 Hloomfieid " 21 ARNOLD, f. '1' ........ -- .. -- ..... -- . -- ...... : : : ______ ' . __ .133 /flldsOIl " BATES, J. H., JR--------------------------. ------ .• --.SR "ldallls " 1\ \NllERET, L. G ...... -- •....... --' ... -- .... -- . .. I R6 IllIdsoll " BWLES, R. N ...... -- .. --. --. -- ..... -- .... -- .. -- .. -- . ._: ....... __ ilfqer's lip/e!. BE.\lW, c. .......................... ·.·.~:::~~·.·.3(i9 IVlldlill,l[lolI SIred. BI·.:'OiS, C. P ...... -- .. -- .... -- -- -.. --.. . __ .... 34 Gardell " 0 BEYER, R. --. --' --. -- -- -'" -- -- -- . . . . . ...... -- --.~~ __ . __ . 3 lludsoll " 21 BLA KINSHIP, R. .\1. .......• -- .... -- ........ ::::: •. __ Wasltill<~/olI " 300 llROIl\{EAn, E. 11. ....... __ .... __ , ... __ .... __ __._.212 llut/solt " CALISH J. -- -- -- .. -- --' --- ... -- ..... -- .. -- -- .. -- -- -3 IVill(}'l() AVe1Iue. N . ST. G ....... -- .... -- -- .. -- - ... -- ..... : __ : ...... __20 . 14 Slreet. COLT.lNS, C. R __ -- ... , -- -- -- .. -- .. -- . - -- .. -- --. '. __ .. 286 Bloom/iefd " COOK E. J------------ . ----------oO-12 Eigh/h " COT! E . M __ .... -- .. -- . -- ... -- ... -- ... : :: : Bloomfield " COKFR J. L______________________________ 4 7 Garden "

M.

CA~IJ>BI~LL,

~Wl',

E~t;hth

~ ~'. ~ ~ ~:: :;6~' 1'-- --. ---- -- ---- -- ---- ----. -- -- -- :::: :~8~ BlooJlifidd

J. A. ])ANZINGJo:R, J. C .... -- -- .... -- .. -- .. -- .... --::::: __ .... 2S7 CRYS;Y:;LI>, DAWSON,

w.

E . RoO ______ .

----. --------

2

"

Hudson

"

S----oO .. ----------oO--·::::: _ _ ::~:~::::::~~ _ :: ___

DIX, DOTY, P. A ______ ... ________ • __

"

IVashillgloJi 186 Huds01I 10

"


HIE ECCE-\T1(IC.

34 EBSEN, H. I~RBEN,

L. __ . ___ . ____ . ___ . ________________ . _________ 412 Bloomfie/d Sired. 1~ __ ..... _.. _... __________________ . __ . ___ ... ___ 12 Eighth "

H. F.

ECHEVERRTA, R. 1.--------------------------------------194 Hudson EVERHART, H. B. __________________________________ .. _____ .II8 Ri7'l''''

FERRIS,

H. Co_

'0

_____

0.'.0

_.,

_

'0

___

'0

_______

__

__

___

.0

-346

Hlft/SOll

L. T.------------ ... ------------------------------135 Hudson FIRESTO:-.lE, J. F. _________________________________________ 21 3 /-1udsoll FLACK, J. D. _____ ... _____________________ _. ___ . _______ 286 BlooJlifie1d FUL.LER, A. A .... _ . _____ - .. ___ . ________ - - _ . - - - _____ _ -372 vVasllingloll GILCHRIST, R. 13 .. ____________________ . __________ ......... 12 E(l.Jhlh G I BERe, ,\, O. - .. - ..... _.......... _. - ..... _......... - - . _... 2 I 3 BlooJlljield I-fAl..L, C. A .... - - . _..... _... - .. -. -.. - _- _- - ..... - - - .. - . _-300 ll/'asllillgloJl l-lAl\TlLTON, M. C .. _ . ___ ... __ . ... __ ... _________ .. __ .... _.. 300 Waslting/oll FIxeH,

" " "

" " " " " " " "

HAMILTON. W. J.----------.----.-.------------------.----345 Garden Sln'e!. llART, B. F. ________ . ____________________________ . __ . _ .378 Bloomfit!ld IIARVEY, D. C. __ ... ____ . __ ._ .... _. ___ . ____ ....... __ ........ _ . . I2 Eiglltll " HA\VKIN!=;, W. C ........ -- .. - ... ---.-- ....... -- .......... -364 Bloo1Jljield " H~:ISK£L, J. M ................. __ ..... __ . _____ .. __ .......... ___ II8 River " HILLER, N. H ......... -------- .... -- .. --.--- .. -.- ......... 249 J,f7ashillgtoll " HOXIE, \V. D ___ . ___ ..... _...... -. _.... __ " - .. - ......... _...... 345 Garden " KIERNAN, E. 11 __ .. ___ ... ______ .... __ ...... __ ._ .. _... __ .. _..... _... 114 Newark " LA POINTE, F. ____________________________________________ 184 Park Avenue. LOPEZ, D. H. _______________________________ - __ . ______ -314 Bloomfield Sireet.

C. A. __ - - - ___ -. _- __ - _ - - -_ - - - - __ - - - _-- -_. - - _-392 lVashillgt(l1l A. W .. ____ .. _. __ ... ______ . _________ - _. ___ . _.. _ .... 192 lInt/SOil rv1ACK, L. C._. __ .......... ___ ._. _______________________ . ____ .192 j-/utiSOJl LOZANO, MACK,

" "

------------------.-.- .. 302 Garlle"

"

liFasldllg/oJt A .. --.-- .. -.---- .. - ..... -----.-- ..... ------ .. 135 llut/soll

" " "

1-1 ILLER, A. S. __ ..... _._._ .. __ .. __ . ____ ... _. __ .. _.. _....... 213 Hudsoll

"

MARCEAU, Mo .. ______ .... _ ... _. ____ MCCOLLOCH,

MCELROY, MERRITT, METCALF, !\10RTON.

J.

A---.----- .. ------ .. -.------ ... -_ .... _257

J. J. S __ . - - ... - ... - -- - .. - -- - ... -.. - -. -- ---- _..... - ... 14 l'..-~t{/lI!J. J. R ___ . __ ............ _.... __ .. _._ ... _..... ___ . ___ ... 118 Ri1JCr F. N. __ ._ .. _. __ . __ . _____ . ____ ... __ ._. __ .. _._ .. ~ ..

_.II8

}\)iver

"

"

J.

- - --. _.... ~ .. - -.- -. -- - - .. - .. -. -194- Hut/SOil " . _______________________ .. _______ _A/eyer's H(}Ie/. PALEN, W. D ________________________________________ . ____ 140 Cardell Street. ONDERDONK, H....... - ..... PAGE, C. II. ________________

L. G- .... __ .. _. _____ . _... ____ . _... __ ...... _..... 300 It'ashill,t:.loll - ..... --- .. --.-.--- .. - ........ --.135 HlldS01t __ . _____ . _.... __ ........ _.. ____ 262 IIIOO1Jtjicld (.lUJ~fBY, \v. E ______ ............ _. _. ____ ............ _. . ____ .286 Bloollljit!ld RANDOLPH, W. \V ... _. __ . __ ....... __ .... __ .. _..... _.. __ ....... _._~(18 A'i7ICI"

PAINE,

"

PARSONS, \v. E-.- .. -.- .. -- ... PFORDTR, 0_ ... _____________ .

"

" (( (( REID, T. ______ . __________ - _. ______ - ____ - _.. _- ___ - - ___ - _-32 lViI/mil .,-171e1//le. RICKOFF, W. M. _____ . ____________________________________ .12 E~II-!ttlt Street. SERRELL, L. W- ..... - .. - ... -.- ...... - ... - ... _-_ ..... -_ .. - . . - .. 427 GfzrtieJl

"

SCHLESINGER, A. II ... _.. _. - - - __ - - - - ... _. - - -. _- - ... - ... - - - 135

"

Hudson


"THE ECCE·CYT"l(IC.

SCHOENBORN, SCOTT, J. SHELDON, SCHREVE,

35

W. E ...... __ . _. ___ .................... 232

Wasltil~f{ton

H ..... ------ .............. - ........ - ........... --.-- ....... ------143 EludS01t J. Ho . _.. _.. -- ......... _.... ____ ......... _........ -- ........ .............. 265 Gardtn A. L. ____________ .. ________ .. .4-27 Gardl'u SCLACK, J. R .............................................. 12 EZ!{htll SMITH, R. H ................................ ... ........... 19:! fl/ldsoll S'\IITH, R. G................................... .., ....... 104 RivL'Y SIEGE, E. A ................................... . ...... :!86 Bioolllfield STEVENS, F. B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . Castle TAYLOR, T ............................................. :!13 117ft/SOil vV ALTON, D. A........................................... 194 I/Ilrisoll WHITE, W. F ........••........••........ .............. 2S0 Rioollljield \VII\LEY, W. B. S ........•••..............•....•...... .. :!13 H7fdSOIl WIIIGIIAM, W ..••.......•..•.•......•..•.•....•... ..•••.. 143 Hut/SOil WILLIS, E. ] .................................................. Mt')'l'rs \VY ANT, R. E ............... _.............. _.. " ........... 6 I/lidsoll _0_

..

0

_____

0

..

__

0

__

0

__

Street. " " "

Point. Strut.

" " Ilotd. Street.


'lHE ECCE.tJ'(T'i(IC.

OF

-'~·@Qet8 .:. Xi .

• . 6294 e·


TilE ECCE "<.7il../C.

. ."

3')

XI. P.

EMILE M. COTlART,

BURTON

JAMES A. P. C'RISFI ELl),

D. CARROLL HARVEY,

JAMES S. MERRITT,

THOMAS

HERMANN F. T. ERBEN,

FRANCES

C. RUSSELL COLLINS,

CHARLES F. WREAKS, JR.,

WM. MONROE RICKOFF,

WILLIAM

HALL,

A. VAN DER WILLlGEN,

B.

STEVENS,

B. WREAKS.


'1.f.fE ECCEo'.fI(TY(.fC.

- - - ----

OF THE ~FR...A.TER.~ITY ~

01'

ca.

._~~j) e \ C8 路:路@au .:. j)e\


erNE ECCEtl'(T"J?IC.

4'

OF T H E

@Jrafernity

Of

FRANK

LOUIS J. BRUCK, JA1IlES E. DENTON,

)@)efta @au )@)efta .

M.E.,

E.

[lll<:l.l.,

M.E.,

ALFlZED P. TROUTWI<:IN, M.E.

LARZ WORTHINGTON ANIJI{RSON,

EDWARD P I;ARSAI.L MOWTON,

ROBERT MARSHALL ANDERSON,

ALI'RED CARY PECK,

RO])I!:RT NELSON BAYLES,

EDWARD DANFORTH SELF,

WILLIAM SIDELL CHESTER,

LEMUEL WILLIA~[ SERRELL, J R.,

WILLIAM JUEL HAMILTON,

ARTHUR LEE SHREVE,

WILLIAM DIXIE HOXIE,

WILLIA~ 1

WHELPLEY THOMAS, J R.


OF THE

OF

,., 1879 .


43

"

C~APTER

SIGMA

OF TilE

@J.zate'Zt1it y

Of

}J,eta @IReta ~i.

EDWARIl

CORNELIUS J . FIELD, WILLIAM

C.

IlENRY

POST, LEONARD

CIIARLES

HARRY

C.

WII.LlA~! JA~IES

G.

\VHITE,

PAINE.

A. IIAI.L,

DRUID

FERRIS,

C.

F.

B. EVERHART,

A. WALTON.

MILLARD C. I-lA'''LTON, E\)WIN

HA \I "-1:,\S,

L. COKER,

M. DRUMMOND,

RUSSELL

II.

S~IITH,

AI.EXA1\DER \\'. I\IACK .

JA~IES H.

SHEL I)ON,

LE\' IS

C. M ACt'-.


<J"HE ECCE "(T'i(/C.

44

~

441 t'J.:. Xl·:· e~jl P@€f\

~

OF TilE

OF

• 1883 ,;


"IHE ECCEt:(T'l?JC.

ALPHA .

XI " CHAPtER OF TilE

JOHN AUSTIN MCCULLOCH,

WILLIAlIl FUCHS,

WILLIAM LESUEUR HAYNES.

I3ENJAM1N FRANKL1N HART, JR .

W ASHlNGTON EVERETT PARSONS,

JOSEPH ALOYSIUS MCELROY,

ALFRED IIENRY SC III .ICS1N(;ER,

WILLIAM ERNEST SCIiOENnORN.

RflBERT M I LLTN(;TON BLANKENSIII I'.

JOSEPH AGUSTA COEN,

;

ROBERT ELTING WYANT.

45


THE ECCE ."\.' r'1(fC.

::i

r~

lJhp"l-l jl.:..D(ll'©C'J .:. e~C'Jp©E~ ~

OF TilE

~

FR..A..TER.NTTY ~ OF'

.;!<


47

,~, ALPHA ~:, BELlA

0

CR.APYER

@.

OF TilE

@Jraternity

Of

~i~ma @~i.

ANTONIO AGU I LERA,

Ell. J.

COOK,

M \RTIN G , LIl.LY,

J.

DAY Fl.ACK,

\V~!.

D . 11. Lopl':z,

E . QLJ I ~ll:Y.

\ V ,\ !. SClfF:NCK.

ALFRED MAYER,

ROBERT OLI PHANT,

Ell,

BRODHEAD.


'THE ECCEtl'(T:J?IC.

~ u~e41jlp@E:l\ ~~~ OF THE

OF

.. 1883

.€).


rIlE ECCEl"(T1(IC.

49

OF TilE

@J rat e r n i t~

0

f

@ R i ~ Ri ,

~e&li61.ent M em8er. BOll DINOT KEITll, 'If.

JorIN HERBERT BALLANTlN I·:,

DAVID IIAMILTON GILDERSLEEVE, JR.,

MAXIMILL\'\f CORNELIUS BE.\RIl,

Cll.\RLES EDWARD IIARRISON,

W1LLL\\1 FOSTER DAY CR \NE,

ALTEN SIDNEY MIl.LER,

Ene; \R RHODES DAWSON,

CARTER HENRY PAGE,

Ll;CIUS TL RNER FINCH,

HENRY POWER,

JOS EPH FREnRICK FIRESTONE,

THOM\S TAYLOR, JR.,

EDWARll JONES WILLIS.


50

"THE ECCE{YT:Jr,IC.

NOT CHAPTEREll .\T TilE

WM. W.

RANDOLI'll,

'86 ............................. U7Iivl'rsily

of

T'ir;l.[illia.

~eta ~i&i. JOHN R. SLACK,

EnWARD

T.

'86 ........................................ Columbia Collc.i.[e.

BIRDSALL,

'86 ................................ . Ne7£) Yorl.' Coll<:£:e.

@IReta 5@)efta @fi.i. RICA RI)O

J.

ECIIEVER RIA,

GEORGE G. PLVER,

(0).

'89··· ................... . ... N"msdat'/" /'olyft'dillic.

'89.·· ....... ··· ........... Col/e.ge

of tilC

City

of Nt'>,l

:=; .................................................................

12

.d. T . .d .... ..................................•..•••............••.... 13

n. (-).

1[ ...... ...................................... _................• 6

"\". 'P ...... .......................................................... ::E. \ ....••.....•..........•••...••.• • •......................•.••••..

II II

\. </> ...•.•...•••.•.........•.........• . .•••....••.•••.••..•....... 13

Total .............. .. . . . . .................... 76

) l>rl.'.


e.

~.

.~ ,'

..... 7~""

,'

Y;'

~C>

~').~

,'.....

7~""

..

~

.... ,.;.

~

..... 7~""

,'.....

7~""


'THE ECCEtl'(TiUC.

54

APRIL 28 ... Lacrosse at Brooklyn. Stevens vs. New York University. New York University, 4-1. MAY 2 ...... Base Ball at Troy.

Stevens

Troy Polytechnic.

7.1S.

Won by

Won by TI'OY.

MAY 5 ...... Meeting of Athletic Association. MAY 6 ...... Appearance of ECCENTRIC of 1885. MAY 7-- ____ Lacrosse at Hoboken. Stevens vs. New York University. New Vork University, 3 -2.

Won by

MAY 13 ..... Glee Club Concert at Brooklyn. !\lAY 13 ..... Lacrosse at Hoboken. Stevens vs. Williamsburg. Won by \Vil liamsburg, 5-0. MA Y 18 ... _. Lacrosse at Baltimore. Stevens vs. 2nd Druids. Won by Stevens, 4-0. MAY 19 ..... Spring Games held under the allspices of the Athletic Association. MAV 21 ..... Lacrosse at Hoboken. Stevens vs. New York Lacrosse Club. by New York Lacrosse Club, 5- 1.

Won

MA Y 25 ..... Appearance of BOLT for 1885. MAY 28 .. . .. Lacrosse at IIoboken. burg, 5- 2.

Stevens

ZIS.

Williamsburg.

Won by \Villiams-

MAY 30 ..... Lacrosse Tournament at Prospect Park, Brooklyn. JUNE 8 ..... Final Examinations. JUNE 14··· .13accalaureate Sermon by Prof. E. Wall, at First Presbyterian Church Hoboken. JUNE 15·.·. Professor and Mrs. Thurston's Reception to Senior Class. JUNE 16. _.. Class Day Exercises at Castle Point. JUNE 16 .... Glee Club Concert at Odd Fellows' Hall, 1I0boken. JUNE 16 .... '85 Class Supper at Martinelli's. JUNE 17··· .Senior Promenade. JUNE 18 .... Eighth Annual Meeting of Alumni Association, 2.00 P. l\I. JUNE 18 ...• President Morton's Reception, 5.00 P. M. JUNE 18 .... Alumni Social Reunion, 6.00 P. M. JUNE 18 ...• Commencement Exercises at First M. E. Church. JUNE 19· _.. Beginning of Sophomore Preliminary Term. AUG. 26 ...• Beginning of Junior and Senior Preliminary Terms. SEPT. 16 .... Entrance Examinations. SEPT. 22 .... All conditions must be removed before 1.00 P. M. SEPT. 23 .... Beginning of First Regular Term. OCT.

7.· .... Meeting of Athletic Association.

OCT.

10 ..••. Foot

Ball at Hoboken.

OCT. 14 ..... Foot Ball at Hoboken. 94- 0 •

Yale vs. Stevens. Princeton

VS.

Won by Vale, 55-0.

Stevens

Won by Princeton,


'TIlE ECCE.';\..-rf\IC.

55

OCT. 17 ..... Foot Ball at Princeton. Stevens ~/J'. Princeton. \Von by Princeton, 78- 0 . OCT. 20 .•... Foot Ball at Hoboken. Stevens '89 VO'. C. C. N. Y. '89, \Von by Stevens, 86-0. OCT. 24 . . .. · Election

of Neutral Editor of ECCENTRIC.

()( 1'.

28 .... Foot llall at E,lslOn. 16-12.

()~ T.

31

Stevens vs. Lafayette.

Won by Lafayette,

... Foot Ihll at Hoboken. Stevens vs. Columbia Graduate Team. by Columbia Graduates, -1--0.

No\'. 7 ...... Pennsylvania

7/0'.

Stevens.

Won by Pennsylvania,

\\'011

22- 9.

18 .... Foot Ilall at lloiJoken. Stevens V.I'. Lafayette. \Von by Lafaydll', 23 - 18. N\)\. 21 __ .. Foot Ilall at I JoiJoken. Lehigh vO'. Stevens. \Von b) Stevens, 20 -1-.

\1m.

NOI. 25.·· .C. C. N. Y.

7'.1'.

Stevens.

\Vun by Stevens, 162

o.

Tltl' Itll;t{l'.\/

score l'7/er /Illld,..

No,. 28 .... Foot Ball at llobuken. Stevens, l-l--o. DEC. JAN.

Ste\ens vs. Brooklyn Ilills.

10 .•••. Examinations.

-1-,

'86 .. Beginning uf Secollli Mathematics.

Term.

Mr. Bristol appointed Instructor In

JAN. 17 .. · •. Professor I\JcCord's Euchle Party. FEll.

\Von b)

4 ...... Regular l\leeting of Athletic Association.

FEB. 13 ..... President and Mrs. Morton's Reception to Senior Class. FEB. 24 ..... Inauguration of the S. S. S.


<THE ECCEil'(J'illC.

@J J{ ~ ~@J && 11@JJ{

J\I1I1UJ\1§ @@MMfiI1@fiMfiI1@J, @J~urJqQ~, ~une ~~, ~~~~, AT 8 O' CLOCK, P . M. ·~~0GXl)~...:'

@lr~e r

@rrran @rrlube,

Of

,.

&~ er ci~ e~ .

-

-

Wm. S. Chester, '86.

PRAYER .

jfntrobuctorp llrtnarhlS, ~r1cction ,

By President Morton.

-

" Nell Gwynne,"

-

J ohn M. R ushy.

§alutatorp ~ bbt'ClSlS, - "Dola jar lIientl'," -

UnIlSe, -

- Planquette.

- Delbrueck.

CONFERRING OF DEGREES AND ANNOUNCEMENT OF PRIZES .

(to[(crrc

~ IrIS,

D iller.

" Selectl'll,"

Clayton H . Pratt.

Ualcblrtorp ~bb n66,

Wm. S. Chester, '86.

® rgan Jl:>oGtlullc, ~o).:

J1!)opuli,

- "Sdected,"

-

Diller.


<rifE ECCE0.'7"l(IC.

57

1l1,\1{\ .\IlIlL\ _____ . __ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ullio.

\\'.

A. AJ)RL\NCE .•. ___ .•...•.•..•••..•....••.. _ .. __ .. _ •. __ . _.•. 1\'/'7,'

O. II.

BAL\)WIN ..••••....••.•......••.... _._ ••. _ •........••...

. N'·711

EJ)W/N BURHORN .. _._. __ ••.•. ____ .• _______ •. ___ ... __ .•.. ___ ...•. 1Vnv

A. \V. B l" RCII \ RIl ••

BRO\DMFI/)OW ... ___ . . . . . . . . . __ • __ ._ . . . . . . __ .• __ •. __ ..... \','7l1

\V. T.

CLERK ... __ .. ____ •. _. __ • . • . _. ____ .. __ • __ . . . _ •

B. II. CO[FE\' ___ .... ______ ._ •... __ .. __ • ____ . ____ " ' __ W. II. COR\\ ' " ________ . ___ . __________________ . ___ .. . \VI!.!.!.\\!

Jo'sey. Jersey.

_ •. __ •••• ___ • ____ • ____ • __ . . . . . . . . __ •• _ •.... __ • Cill!/ornia.

w. 1-

ER

York.

. ... _ ....• N<'7"

Jersey. Jersey.

' ____ .. __ .. .. VC7V ___ .. __ .. lI','7lI

DIL\\()RTII . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . _ .... _ .. _ ..

J'II'-!.·.

J"ysq.

_Nt'7" J,·/'Sl')'.

'EST DRL\S/,RI:-':G. __ .. __ .• __ ....... __ . __ •.•. _ . . . . • . . ___ .... _ ... Ala{!tlllla.

FRI· DERICK F/SLII I::R ... __ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ___ . _ .. _ . . . . . . . • . _ . • I'ellm.yh"lwia.

J.

R.

FUR ~/.\ '" _ ..... _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ ••.. _ . . . • . • . . . . . . _ . . . . . . . . . . • • N C7,'

A. G. G I..\SCOW. LEO'"

CRE/':NEIlAUM __ ..•• __ " . __ •. __ •• _. __ ...•. _ . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . • Calijill'llia.

P. G. II L. N.

J ·orl.-.

____ • __ . ____ ' " . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ___ • __ . . . _ • _' . __ . __ . T'i/Killia.

SS[·:\, _____ .. __ . _ .. __ .. ____ . __ . . . ____ ... ______ ..... _. __ ... \'<""

J'o,./'·.

LUKI·:,\S_ •.... _ ...•.••.•.•••....• _ •.. _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ••• '\'C7U

Jersey. J,'1'scy. C. E. !\1ACHOLIl_ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ . . . __ •• ____ . . . . ____ . . . . . . .. Nt'7,' Jersey. SI~IEON MARTINEZ __ . . . . . . . . ___ .. _. __ . _ .. __ ••. ___ •... _. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .Jfexico.

NORTH McLEAN. __ • _ ... _ . . . . . . . . . . . __ ......... _... __ . . . . . . . . . . .. N'·7,'

J.

S. M cCO\.

•• __ . . . . . . . . . . . __ .. __ •••• __ •••••• __ •••..••.

Dis/rid oj" (ii/llmbia.


TIlE ECCE·\'7'''l\.IC.

E. H.

MUNKWITZ ...••.......•.•••...••••••..•. , . " . " " " " " ' "

\V. I!.

MUNKIVITZ ...•.....•....••...•..•.. : .•.•.••••• , . . . . . . . . . . .

f,Visco/lsin. (,-Viscollsill.

,J£aryll!1lll. C. A. PRATT • . . • . . . . . • . . . • . • . • . . . . . . . . . . . • • • . . . . • . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IlliJ/ois. J. C. R)';N J)UN. .. • .. .. ..... __ ...... __ . . . . . . . . . . . __ .... __ .. __ -- . __ __ l~-Clltlll(ir. \V. W. R EN IV I C K •. __ . . . . . . . . ____ . . . . . . . . ____ .. __ •... __ . . . . . . . . . . New Jersey. R. H. RICE. _ .. ____ . ____ .• _______ . __ . , , , , , ____ . ____ . __ .. __ . " " " " . .tlllillL'.

ROLl.lN NORRiS •.... __ •. __ ... __ . . . . . . . . . __ .•• __ ..•• __ ' " ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ' __

J. M.

RuSBY .......... . ... ____ • __ . __ .. ____ ...... __ .. ______ ...... Ncw Jt'rsey.

A. A. A. SILBER .. __ .•. __ ... ____ ' .... ____ . T. C. S\I ITIl __ . . . __ . . . . . . "'" ____ .. ____ .. \V.

STE\,~;NS................

\V. il. \VAJlE __ . . . . . .

J. F. 1-1. D. I'

\UL

WILK),;S. __

__ . __ .• _ .• ____ • ____ . .. New

Jersey.

__ . . . . , _____________ . __ • __ .. Ohio.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . _ .......... __ ... NC1V

.. ____ .. __ ...... ______ • ____________ .. __ . ____

__ . __ . . . . . . . . . . . . ______ . ________ • ____ .... __ Nortll

JerSt')'.

Vil;l{illia.

Carolilla.

\VrLLIA\I" . . . . __ . . . . . . . . __ . . . . . . . __ ... ________ .. __ . . . . . Pellw,,),i7lllllill. WI l.LlS ..•....••..•. " •... ' ••••.....•• " " " ' "

. . . . . . -"

..

New Jersey.


59

<rifE ECCEb'(T"J(IC.

OF TilE

Jllstituted, Jllly 1st, 1876.

f'res ide /I t, AI.EXANllI路:R

C. HUMPIlREYS, 'SI.

Vire- f'residl'J/ t, WII.LIAM

\V.

DASlllEl.l.,

'79.

(.llrn'.\路polldill/: Secri'lllry, AI.FRED

P. TRAUTWEI:-';, '7('.

N"c(/rdiIlK Sardcl?)" ALI:ERT SI'II':S,

'81.

Tn'lIs 11 rcr, ADAM RIESENBER(;ER,

&&ecuti~e ALEXANDER

'76, ALFRED P. TRAUTWEIN, '70, FRANK E. IDELL, '77, WILLIAM W. DASIIlJ.:L1., '79,

ADAM RIESENBERGER,

'76.

@ommittee.

C. HUMPHREYS, (fiairmall. EDWIN TATHAM, 'SI, ALBERT SPIES, '81, JOSEPH WETZLER, '82, DAVID

S.

JACOBUS,

'84.


60

:rHE ECCEtl'(T<J?IC.

~"[ยง)UMI1~ J\11)@) UI1)@)&~~~J\)@) uJ\@Ja

* * * &11@J&~f)~~ ~ &. * * * IT is difficult to add much of any value to what has been said in previous years in these pages of the EcceJttric, in behalf of the Alumni of Stevens; but at the risk of bringing up a topic which might perhaps be better discussed elsewhere, the writer, in accepting the kind invitation of the editors of this annual, will avail himself of the opportunity of placing the alumni aright in the estimation of some of the undergraduates in a matter which has recently been made the subject of some discussion in the college community. In doing so, however, the writer does not assume to speak officially, or ex catlledra, for the alumni, although he feels safe in saying that his own views are those of a large proportion of the alumni who have given the subject some thought, and with whose ideas he is familiar. In recent numbers of the Stevem Indicator, appeals have been made to the alumni with a view of identifying them in some manner with the management of the paper and of enlisting their interest to a sufficient extent to induce them to contribute more heartily than in the past toward its financial anclliterary support. The appeal in the April issue is especial1y urgent; it grew out of the


<THE ECCEtJ(T7?IC.

61

official action of the Executive Committee of the Alumni Association, which, in response to the repeated requests of the editors, deemed it necessary to inform those more directly interested in the paper, that, inasmuch as the .Indicator is no longer a general rnstitute enterprise, being conducted in the interests of a joint stock company, they cannot, in hehalf of the alumni, consistently take cognizance of its existence and identify the Alumni Associalion, as such, with the paper in its present form, no matter what the individual opinions of the alumni might be. In taking such action the undergraduates cannot, \IT think, misunderstand the position of the Alumni Association, hecause few societies of its kind have been and arc doing more for the undergraduates in at least one direction than the alumni of Stevens; as a rule they take an intelligent interest in everything that concerns the Institute, and they have always conlially supported every meritorious student enterprise. It is well-known, however, that the .llldicator, in the estimation of at least a large portion of the college community, is not what such a paper might be; it is known, that as a financial undertaking, it leads a precarious existence and involves constant anxiety and attention on part of those who conduct it; as a literary venture it has not realized general expectations, although in candor it must be said, that its literary standard has of late been greatly improved, since it has wisely banished from its columns certain lines of subjects, which had, for some time, marred the respectability of the paper; it is further known that the time which the editors are at present compelled to give the paper, for want of a more general support on the part of the undergraduates and alumni, is far beyond that which these gelltlemen can, in justice to themselves and their duties, be asked to give their work. As a means of influencing public opinion, in and about the Institute, one of the objects of most college papers, it has signally failed, while the small number of alumni subscriptiuns clearly show that it docs not well meet the wants of that class; and not a few of tlw alumni who thus subscribe do so, as the writer know,; beyonrl doubt, more from motives of 10),ality to Stevens in all of its enterprises, than from a genuine feeling of appro\路al of the character of the paper. It seems, thell, that there must be something radically wrong in the plan and execution of the .Indicator. For all this the editors cannot justly be helcl responsible, because, in the writer's estimation, they have ueen saddled with a. trust wh ich they cannot carry out under existing circumSl:mces-it is their misfortune, not their bult-anel they really deserve much credit for the work that has been done. It is well, now, to inquire what success similar papers meet with at other colleges, but more especially at scientific schools, in oreler to narrow the in quiry clown to parallel cases. A close examination of a number of such papers reveals the same evident lack of alumni interest complained of hy the editors of the .ll/dicator and an extensive personal acquaintance among college gradu-


62

"THE ECCEtJ(T<J?IC.

ates, fully corroborates this observation. They flourish, if at all, only in a large college community ill which they can serve the double purpose of influencing public opinion and conveying news and intelligence, and where the institution is essentially literary in its character. There is one magazine, however, to which attention should be drawn, as being, perhaps, the best example of what is best adapted to the wants of Stevens in the journalistic field. The writer here refers to the ScJlOol of .Milles QuarterlJ, publIshed at Columbia College, jointly by the undergraduate Engineering and Chemical Societies, and the Alumni Association of the School of Mines. It is a highly creditable publication, which, from the character of its contributed articles (chiefly from alumni), has attained a well-merited position among the scientific and engineering magazines. So far as we are aware, it is financially successful, owing, probably in no slllall degree, to the fact that the annual dues of the Alumni Association include a subscription for the Quarterly. It devotes conqiderable space to alumni personals, reports the official proceedings of the Alumni Association, has an abullliance of School of Mines news items, is carefully edited, neatly printed, and exactly supplies the requirements of its readers. In its general features it would be an excellent pattern after which the literary and financial policy of the Stc7'etlS '///(iicat{/r might be modelled, with, perhaps, the one change, in that rather more space might be devoted to college news; in the magazine referred to, this feature is not so essential, because the discussion of undergraduate affairs is generally carried on in the //cta Colltl/lbialla and the Sjectator; with us the llltiicator might well ile made to combine this douGle duty. A quarterly magazine after SOllle such plan, would, we feci sure, receive the cordial support-financial and literary-of the alumni, iJoth individually and collectively; it would be regarde([ with favor by the authorities, which, it is understood, the present paper is not, for many good reasons; it would require less time for preparation than a monthly paper, and greater care could leisurely be Gestowed upon it by the undergraduate editors; its financial success would be insured without difficulty; it would be creditable to Stevens and a better exponent of a scientific school than any paper can ever hope to Ge, so long as conducted on the basis of the ./71dim/(lr in its present form.


Till': ECCE·\'l'1(IC.

®

~@JEf"EfI1® ~11~@J~@JU@JEf

J\@JJ-f1§Ef@J~@ J\W®@@~J\@J~@ f1.

§it~t (i[;cnn.

E. P. MOWTON, '86, President, M. C. BEARD, '87, Vice-Presitim!, J. A . P. CRISF IELD, '87, Rec. Sec., J. S. MERRITT, '86, Cor. Sec.,

R. N. BAYLES, '87, Treasurer, B. F. HART, '87, Captain FootBall, W. WllIGIIAM, '88, Captain Base Ball, J. DAY FLACK, '87, Captain Lacrosse.

.§etonlJ (i[;Ctlll. H. K. MORRISON, '86, PresidCllt, A. P. CRISFIELD,'87, Vice-President, C. H. PAGE, '87, Recordill,f[ Secrdary, L. W. ANDERSON, '88, Cor. Sec.,

J.

R. N. BAYLES, '87, Treasurer, B. F. HART, '87, Captain Foot Hall, W. \VJlIGHAM, '88, Caplai1t Base Ball, W. C. POST, '86, Captain Lacrosse.

2>oarq of l@)irec1or~. §tt~t ([crill.

E. P. MOWTON,

('/lllhlJllllI,

B. F. HART, '87, J. DAY FLACK, '87,

M.

C.

W.

WIlI!;IIA~I,

BEAR\),

'87, 'S8.

.§ttonlJ ([crill. H. K. B. F. HART, '87, W. C. POST, '86,

MOR~ISON.

Chairman,

J.

"',T.

A. 1'. C RISI'I ELI!, '87, WHIGHAM, '88.


VI E E C CE ,fJ\(T7\l c.

RILE we have not been as successful as we might have been, the records of our teams have been fairly satisfactory. Our football team did not win as many games as it should have, but it has lowered considerably the scores of other years against the stro)lg teams of Yale and Princeton. Yale's score against Stevens was, with one exception, the lowest it made during the whole season. In our second game with Princeton, her score was very small, when compared to that of other teams. "liVe suffered defeat three times, when we had reason to believe we had the stronger team. We have had the extreme satisfaction of capturing the football record, by making 158 points in sixty minutes, against the team from the College of the City of New York. Football is our best hold here, and, with the increased experience of last year's players, we expect to have an excellent team next season . In baseball our record is far from satisfactory, but it is all that can be expected, as long as it receives so little attention and support. It was difficult, last season, to get nine men together for practice, and \ve had to fill several places with high-school players! If this department of our athletics is not given more attention and interest, it will soon die a natural death. But we do not


66

"T/'/E ECCE/JI(TiUC.

see any reason why this, our" national" game, should be allowed to suffer through lack of interest on the part of the students. Let us "brace up" baseball this season. Lacrosse seems to have found a permanent home at Stevens, if one may judge from the number who practice every clear day on the campus. Our last year's team has a record which any college may look at with pride. They have " measured sticks" with the best teams in the country, and have stoo<1 the comparison admirably. If the progress we have made in three years be a criterion, Stevens has a bright outlook in lacrosse. General field athletics does not receive much attention at Stevens, from the fact that we have neither the time nor the number of students necessary to support it. \Ve have one field day each year, but even that does not create much interest or enthusiasm. One great drawback to success in athletics is the lack of a gymnasium in which to exercise through the long winter months. It is to be hoped that something may be accomplished in this direction before many years.


"THE ECCE{J-(T"l?,IC.

OF

~. ~. @J.,

J\. J\.

MAY 19, 1885.

EVENT.

WINNER.

TlM!': or DISTANCE.

700 Yards Dash ............. lsAAC, '88 .............................. . 2~0

Yards Dash .............. COTIART, '86 ......................... 264.5 sec.

One Mile Run .. ............. McLEAN, '88 .................... 5 min. 23 3' 5 sec. One Qltarter Alilt' R /{ n . ....... ISAAC, '88 .. __ ......... . .............. 51 I -2 sec. One Alile l,valk ............ . McLEAN, '88 ...................... 8 min. 43 sec. Tltree-legged Rare ........... lsAAC, '88 and HAWKINS, '88 ............... 14 sec. Sack Race_. ___ ." ........... RICKOFF, '88 ............. _........ _..... 43 sec. R1I1I7Iing lliglt .lumjJ ....... _GREENEBAUM, '85·· ... -................ 5 ft. 0 in. Standing Broad .llt1)zjJ ....... . ISAAC, '88 .. _ ..... __ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - ... 9 ft. 10 in. Running Broad J/{1/Zp ____ ... CRISFIELD, '87 ........... _............ 18 ft. 1 in. Hop, Step and Jump ........ _GREENEBAUM, '85 ............ _..... 38 ft. 3

1-2

in.

Throwilt/5 Lacl-osse Ball ... _.. MORRISON, '86 ___ .................... 3 11ft. 3 in. Kicki1lg Foot Ball ........ .... KLETZSCH, '84 ....... __ .............. 168 ft. 6 in. Putting Shot .. _............. KLETZSCH, '84-···· ..... · .......... 31 ft. 8

1-2

in.

Hi,g-h Kick .................. HERRING, '88 ........ _.............. 8 ft. 3

1-2

in.

Tug

of

l.var ..... -- - ........ WON BY '86.

..


68

'THE ECCEi7'(T'l(IC.

~n.速tjtute

n,j ne.

II. K. MORRISON, Cajl/t/ill, S. Sto},

]. T.

ALDREDGE,

]. A.

Calcht'r,

eOEN,

3rd Base,

L. PLATTllERG, Pitcher,

W. WHIGHAM,

B. F . HART,

D. C.

F. L.

1St

Rase,

SEVENOAK, 211d

Rase,

HARVEY,

L. Field,

C. Field,

EDWARD DUCOMMUN, o. N. PENN AL,

Sulistitlltc.

I~I

R. Field,


'THE ECCEtl'(T'l(IC.

~u&lRer&l.

B. F.

/':. J.

W. W.

J.

HART, JR.,

'87, Captaill, H. C. FERRIS, 'iiR,

'86,

COOK,

RANDOLPH,

E. D.

'86,

F. FIRESTONE,

J.

'87,

A. P.

CARCNAHAN,

CRISI'IELD,

'87,

'87路

Quarter ~ac~. W. F.

WHITE,

E. M. COTIART, '86,

N. ST. G. CAMPBELL, '87.

T. R.

W. C.

POST,

'86.

HART,

'89.

'86,

]. H. SHEl.DON, R.

B.

GILCHRIST,

'89,

'89,


"TJlE ECCEf\'T:f\IC.

st,ecorq o~ €\ame~. OLT. 10 . • . . • At

Hobokcn.

\ ale

OCT. 14 ..... At Hoboken.

Stevcns.

110'.

Princcton

7'.1'.

\\ on by Yale: 55

Stevens.

OCT. 17 ..... At Princeton.

Stevens VS. Princet,l1l.

OCT.

::!O . . . . .

Stevens '89

OtT.

:!4 . . . . At Easton.

At Hoboken.

Stevens

Stc\'cns umbia Graduatcs: 4

Nov. 7 ...... At T-Iohoken. 22

21 . . . . .

o.

\Von by Princeton: 7S- o. Won hy Stevens: So

\Von by Lafayette:

Columhia Craduate Tcam.

7'S.

0

I:!.

10

Won by Col·

"0.

Stevens

Pennsylvania.

7'.1'.

\Von hy Pennsyivania:

"9.

NO\'.IS ..... AtIIob0ken. Stevens7ls. Lafayette. No\'.

\Von by Princeton: 9+

C. C. N. Y.

Lafayctte.

7'.1'.

OCI". 31 ..... At llobokcn.

7'S.

o.

At Hoboken.

Lehigh vs. Stevens.

\\onbyLafayette: :!3-IS. \Von by Stcvens: :!o '4.

Nov. :!5 . . . . At lIoboken.

Stcvens

7'.1'.

C. C. N. Y.

Nov. :!8 ..... At Hoboken.

Stevcns

7/"~.

llrooklyn lfills.

.

.;.

. .

\Von by Stevens:

102

\Von by Stc\"ens: 14

O.

o.


"THE ECCEtJI(T:J(IC.

J. D.

FLACK,

71

'87, Goal,

W . C. POST, '86, Point, E. G. COLDEWEY, '87, Cover Point, R. W. ISAAC, '88, 1st Defense, ROLLIN NORRIS, '85, Capt., 1st Attack, J. A. P. CRISFIELD, '87, zd Defense, E. M. COTIART, '86, 2d Attad, W. S. HAWKINS, '88, 3d De.feuse, A. N. LUKINS, '88, 3d Attack, E. J. COOK, '86, Cellter. C. HALL, '87, 11lside Home, E. BURHORN, '85, Outside Home,

T. G. S~T1TlI, '85,

N. McLEAN,

'85,

S. W. MILLIm, '87.

NelV York Lacrosse Club

7/-'.

Stevens ............ . ........................ 5- 1

New York University vs. Stevens ..... __ .................... __ ............ 4- 0 Williamsburg vs. Stevens .......... . .................. . .................. 5-0 Williamsburg Druids, 1St

71S.

71S.

Stevcn路s ............. . ................... . .............. 5-2

Stevens ................ " ' " ...... ' ..................... ' 路4-3

Druids, zdvs. Stevcns ................................................... 0- 3 Lehigh vs. Stevcns ....... __ ............... __ .... " .... __ ... '" .......... 0-4 NclV York University

71S.

Stevens. __ .. __ .. __ .. __ .. __ .................. __ . 路3-z

Total p"illis gained 0)' 0ppollellts, 26; Stl'7I t ' IIS, 15.


<fHE ECCE;JI(T'I(IC.

72

H. K.

J.

MORRISON,

S. MERRITT,

E. R.

DAWSON,

'86 ____ . _. ___________ . ___ __. ________ _Presirlm!.

'89- - - - - -- -- ----.- - - -- - - - ____________ . _Vice-Prl'Sidenl. '87 ___________ . __________ _________ .. __ .Secretary.

L. \V. SERRELL, '87- _- - - - - - .. _____ . _. _____ . ____ _____ .. Treas1lre,-.

E. P.

'86,

C. H. PAGE, '87,

N. ST. G. CAMPBELL, '87, L. W. ANDERSON, '88,

'86, R. SLACK, '86, H. F. T. EKBEN, '87, W. W. THOMAS, '86, W. F. \V III l' E, '86, M. C. BEARD, '87, E. J. WILLIS, '88, H. MORRISON, '87, ARTHUR L. SHREVE, '89,

'87, '87, C. R. COLLINS, '86, E. R. DAWSON, '86, F. B. STEVENS, '89, L. W. SERRELL, '87, E. H. KIERNAN, '87, W. M. RICKOFF, '88, J. S. MERRITT, '89路

MOWTON,

W. S. CHESTER,

J.

E. M. COTIART,

]. D. FLACK,


'lIIR RCCE.,\'Ti..:IC.

73

~. ~. ~. @ffice'Z@. E . F. R. 1\1.

'86. __ ._ ................................. l'rcsidl'lIl. '88 ............................... St'crdary. T. TAYLOR, JR., '88 . _ .................... _ ............ TI·eaSIWt'r. J. O,\y FLACK, '87········ .. · .. · .. · .... ···· .. ······_· .. Leadt·r. \VHITE,

BLANKENSHIP,

W. \\'. RANDOLPH, '86, R. COLLINS, '86, E. M. COTIART, '86, J. T. ARNOLD, '86, O. C EIlER(;A, '86, ;\1. e. BEARD, '87, e. A. HAI.L, '87,

e.

W. L.

'86, '86, FIELD, '86, B. £\ERIIART, '86, C. RENDON, '85, F. T. ERln~N, '87, G. PAINE, '86, A. \VALTON, '87,

J. S. e. J. H.

J. H. L. D.

IlAYNES,

MERR ITT,

W. E. E.

J.

QUJMI1Y,

'87,

\V 1T.r.rs, '88,

W. B. S. WHALEY, '88. W. J. HA\UI.TON, '89, D. II. LOl'EZ, '88, H. J. SIIFLDON, '89, W . D. liOXIE, '89.


75

@IRe reaf rRiW'.

iJ;7e t,\boye J"lejJ"lescnes y~et?ts trvyin~ st~~e.

one

to

of cJ;7e ~ceyen)

I~SS an

oysterv


.A. CO//,路g,路 6'1lt.'rprise '"a' sIIollld /"t'uh'e tlu SIIpport '!l '''/Iel)' Stlltlo" awl. JlIlI/IIlIIS. FOUNDED 1884.

BY Till-:

H II BER l' S. \V\ N !'-OOI', '!lH,

I~路diltlr-il/-C!ti(:f.

CORN !eLI US J. FIELD, LucIUS CARTER I L I' \(;1", JR., '87, JOSEI'll J\. McELRO\', '87,

T.

'86, HI/sill/'ss ,Ual/ager. '89, Secreta I)' and Exdlllllge

FINCII,

EIt',t; ,Voles, Alltldi,'s,

/lURToN

P.

/~路dil(/r.

HALL, '88, SllIjJill,t;

ARTII UR A. VUl.LER,

110.1.

'88, !'l'r.Wllai.\".

~tod'Rofaer~. JOSEPH 1\. Mcl':I.Iwv,

TIIOR IlURN REI D,

Presitit'llt,

Vit"t'-I're.l'itit'lll,

ROIH:RT C . S\IITII, St'G'rdm:l', CORNEL I US J. FIELD,

Tn'II.l"IIrer.

C. RUSSELL COLLINS, '86, CARTER II. P,\(;E, JR.,'87, JICBERT S. \VYN!'-()ol','88, CORNbLll S J. FIELI>, '86, ARTHLR A. FULLER, '88, LUCIus T. FINCI!, '89, WILLlA~1 FLcHs, '86, BURTON P. HALL, '88, C. E. HARRISOX, '89, OTTO PFORIlTF, '86, THORBURN lh:lll, '88, GEORGE B. MULllAUR, '89 JOSEPH A. l\lcELRO\,

'87,

ROBERT G. S~IITII,

'88,


~~~~~~~ -

-

---

-


'THE ECCEtJI(T"l(IC.

II

79

And pond'rous slugs cut swiftly throu gh the sky."-POPE.

AND--RS-N.

"There lies a deal of deviltry beneath his mild exterior." I3-LL-NT-NE.

" An ocean of words, a desert of ideas." B - ND-R-T.

"If dirt was trump, what hands you would hold. " - Cltestnllts. B - YL- S.

"Thou art too gay and frivolous. young people and strangers."

Keep not much company with

B - RD.

"Here comes lean Jack, here comes bare-hones. How now my sweet creature of bombast? How long is't Jack, since thou sawst thine own knee?" C-L- SCI-I.

"Bait the hook well, this fish will bit." C- x. "Give it to my mamma.

She reads all my letters."

CR- SF-LD.

"And he had been a dog that should have howled thus, they would have hanged him; and I pray his bad voice bode no mischief." D - WS - N.

" An atom.

An infinitesimal deal of nothing."

D- x.

" Kind self-conceit to some her glass applies, Which no one looks in with another's eyes." ERB-N.

"Consider what you owe to society, and clon't let yourself be injured by too much work." F - R - ST-NE.

"He has the fatness of twenty boys, he has."


路 ------

'THE ECCE "'(T?(IC.

80 FL-C;;:.

" Knowest thou not me by my clothes?" H-RT.

"Thou art long and 1.1nk and brolVn as is the ribbed sea sand." II-LL.

" A very forward March eh ick." K-RN-N.

"Did he play, 'Blood of Billy,' or 'Crappies Lie Down'?" "II. man who could make

50

vile a pun, would not scruple to pick a

pocket. " M - LI.- R.

" Ilcho]d the child, by nature's kindly law, Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw." F. M

LT.-R.

"lI.nd Maud forgot her brier t01'1\ gown, And her graceful ankles bare and bro\\ n." P-RS-NS.

"This week he hath been heavy, sour, sad." Q-MB-Y.

"Stiff in opinions, always in the wrong; \Vas every thing by starts, and nothing long." SCH I.-S-NG-R.

"Her mouth so small, when she does speak, Thou'dst swear her teeth her words did break, That they might passage get." SCH 路N Il- HN.

" 11 is stomach, too, begins to fail;

Last year we thought him strong and hale; But now he's quite another thing, I wish he may hold out till spring." TH-

H-R-TH\NI) ]-NK-NS.

"They grew together like a double cherry." W-I.T-N.

"Be cheerful, for a peaceable man does more good than one that is very learned." INDICATOR'S JOKES.

"Thou art chestnuts." EXA .\IS.

"Look through fate, beho]cl the scene she draws." CAPT \11'1 OF THE ROCKVILLE NINE.

"Vain as the leaf upon the stream, And fickle as the changeful dream." IJl CondllsioJl. " \Vas it well done, sirs, to assist in rendering

U5

ridiculous." GOT.f)S~1\

L路Il.


'TIlE ECCDJ(T7\lC.

82

~

EA TED

alone by the fire to-night, I wistfully think of days 1011 g> past; Dreamily watching the flickering Hames, And the shadows wb ich they cast.

Whenever I fall in these pensive moods, My thou ghts turn back to that bright Spring day, When over a shaded mountain road I wen dee! my lightsome way.


711E ECCEtJI(T'1(1C.

Its the same old story so often told: T'was then that I and my love first met. How pretty she looked and the words she spokeI can hear their echo yet. For I thought that nothing could sound so sweet, As the "Howdy" with which she greeted me: And I think my memory shows good taste, In the things it chooses to see.

..

..

That was ten years ago, and we're married now, And when 1 come home from the club at night To find that the key-hole'S taken French leave, It isn't with great delight That I hear her voice from the top of the stairs, Propounding conundrums I cannot solve, As to where I've been, and how I got home. And mentally I resolve, That though it is easy to fall in love, When you meet a girl on a bright Spring day, It isn't as easy as one would think, To know just what to say.

â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘


'TIlE

HCCl~·!yj'1\lC.

Ef 1§EfM &11@JeJ\~;J ~@J@"& ~@J~Ef eJ\11eJ\1§;J®@J~

HIS subject to which so little time has been devoted in our colleges, is not only one of the IllOSt useful ancl fascinating employments, but is also one of the most amusing-to those not engagecl in it. Almost all works on this subject have, heretofore, been confined to encyclopedias and pamphlets issuetl by tlll~ proprietors of furniture moving vans. Therefore, in order to supply the readers of the ECCFNTRIC with something which they have long felt the need of, I have determined to give in as few words anel in as dear and concise a manner as possible the principle actions and reactions; so that anyone with even the limited amount of intelligence found in the Institute can take up this subject frolll the point at which I leave off. This study may be consistently pursllecl in three ways: (a). By yourself. (b). By a man hired for the pllfjJose. (c). By a servant girl. It may be here stated without (ear of contradiction, that those methods taken in the order in whi('h they stand are: (a). Disagreeable. (b). Expensi\'e. (c). Positively dallgl:rolls.


-----

The extent of this article will not allow me to consider the minuti::e, but only the principle reactions. The apparatus required is very simple and inexpen<;i\'e, consisting merely of a slo\'e with a fire in it, several lengths of stove pipe, a hole in the wall slightly smaller than the pipe and a step ladder. I n stove pipe analysis the phenomena which occur are of three kinds: phpical, chemic11, and moral. The physical phenomena comprise: (a). Trepidation, an irresistible feeling which possesses one when he begills to e\periment. (b). Investigation, which comes in during the experiment. (,-). Consternation, "hich appears after the e.\[Jeriment. The chemical phenomena are more important, and consist of: (el). Charring, which takes place when the hand is brought 111 contact \\ ilh I he hot stove pipe. (()). Simple decomposition, by which a gas is given ofC It generally follows charring, and is caused by letting the stove pipe drop. This phel10m ellOll is greatly enhanced by putting fresh coal on the fm.: at the beginning of the experiment. (c). Combustion, which takes place when the stove pil'e comes in contact with the carpet, rug or any other wooly substance. There is hut one moral phenomenon, and it has been the aim of chemists for many years back to prevent its occurrence. The) have so far been unsuccessful, however, and it still appears witll its customary regularity. It is: (a). Cussation , which is SpOil taneous, and occurs at the same time as charring, but lasts longer. The physical changes I will assume, an:! too well known to require any exphn ltion here, allll [ will proceed to illustrate some of the chemical changes. (11) Charring. Take hold of the pipe suddenly:

eu So

+ Y E L .=O'B+ SwE + A R.

This is accolllpanied by a blister ane! a sulphureous smell about the room. (b). Simple decomposition. Let go of the pipe quicker than you took hoH

G R IN

+ AT ='1' HE Âą FuN.

I f there has been some tar or india rubber mixed \\ ith the coal, the effect will be immense. Ch:lfacteristic odors will be given off. If you give the tar a chance, it will sublime on thc lace curtains, and picture frames, when the effect will he suhl imer. The coal gas is meanwhile getting in some good. licks and is gently tending to ]lut you to sleep ancl cause you to forget your cares. If the smcll of the coal gas is disagreeable it my he disguised by mixing a large proportion of sulphur with the coal. If sulphur cannot be obtained use judgment.

- -


-

-

-

-

86

~~--

_

.

......

"FIlE ECCE路y,/ 'i(lC.

(c), Combustion. This lakes place with alacrity or even sooner. If the preceding parts of the experiment have ueen correctly carried OUI , this one wlll go it alone, All you have to do is to sit clown and watch the beautifulworking of the laws of nature and the way the oxygen of the air combines with your rugs and ca rpets to form ca ruonic acid anti ruggite of carpogen.

It is about here that the nloral phenomenoJl, which to()k place simultalleousIy with charring, but whic h has been going on in a mechanical anti uncertain way, comes to the front stron g.

I L~

+ B E + Da SH e D + I F + I + \V U L ]) + NoT R At H e R + !) 0 + T H , S + T H a N + G o+ TO + B A, N U M S = TIlE + 0

ENd.

rTo be {(Jlld ttti"iI, I

O. Fifty.


WHl\T

viE

.4CTJVl Tr-oF - I10IJI'

LERRO lilT COllELE. .


88

H

Theil g\l3.wcd his pen) then Ja .. bcd it on lhc grotllld."

N the course of our lives we are all perforce subject to many trials and mishaps, and it is my object here and I believe my duty also, to do what is in my power to lighten the burden for Illy fellow men. By these motives alolle ha\'c I been persuaded to disregard my private feelings in the matter, and to submit to ) o lIT perusal the following. When just about to take up thc numerous and difficult studies of the Junior year, at a cGlain ScllOOI of mechanical engineering, not a hundred miles from Hohokell, a circumstance occurred which seriously effected my hr3.lth and happiness for many weary days, and not only nearly ruined my future, but with a little encouragement would have deprived me of such a thing altogether. I all ude to my election as editor of the college annual. How I hate and [car that worcl, editor. It makes me feel chilly even on this hot May day. But I am anticipating. My first impressions when I found that I was, to use a familiar expression" the people's choice," were many and various, but the predorninent one was that of my utter and complete inability to fill the position. A sense of vagueness of all that pertained to book-making and composition weighed heavily upon me, and but for the honor that I felt my friends had conferred upon me, I think I might have resigned at once.


"FIlE ECCE,CYT1(fC.

In a day or two I grew more confident, and reasoned that my fellow students must have known what they were about in choosing me from their number, and that perhaps my innate modesty had prevented me from recognizing my ability. So with pen and paper before me I sat down to write. r h:1d not thought of any particular subject, but so many themes were racing through my brain that r hac! only to choose. At last I c1ecided to compose a sonnet to the //loon, feeling sure that her beauty alone would inspire me to write something acceptable. I got the title of my verses written to my satisfaction, but found some difficulty in beginning the latter. I had some idea of commencing with an appeal to my muse as all the other great poets do, out as that is getting to be a" chestnut" r dismissell it. I seemed to he overflowing with all kinds of beautiful thoughts and proper similes, but for the life of me I could not frame them in words. I kept cool and patient for some time, though as the fever of composition waxed hotter, 1 became a little nervous and several times I caught myself worrying the varnish off my desk with the toe of my boot. By this time I had on paper two lines, with the exception of one word, but :1S this word must rhyme with the last word of the first line, it gave me a serious check. After getting my feet up in my chair, pulling the cloth off my desk, and upsetting a bottle of ink, I removed the difficulty temporarily by deciding to make the first and third lines rhyme. About the time I had the third line finished I had begun to perspire, and my head was aching like sin. I arose and walked around the room. In passing the mirror I noticed that my cravat was gone, my collar unbuttoned, and my chin smeared with ink. I was too much engrossed in my poem to comprehend the full significance of these facts, or perhaps r would have taken warning and stopped work for that day. Removing most of my clothing, I returned with renewed vigor to the construction of the fourth line. r spent some hours op this verse, and was twice interrupted before completing it; once to get a new chair (I had destroyed the castors on the old one in my struggles) and again to borrow paper, as all of mine ha.d been used in experimenting upon different expressions of the fourth line. My ideas which had seemed so copious at first, had been in some mYiiterious manner wonderfully condensell when r commenced verse two. My condition to say the least W:1S unfavorable to literary work. The perspiration streaming from 111y brow had an unpleasant trick of getting in my eyes, and I was so intensely nervous that I could with difficulty keep my seat. I had bitten in pieces three pen-holders and endangered my life by upsetting my lamp. I did not mind a little thing like that though; death seemed a small matter compared to the success of my poem.


"rHE ECCE/JI(T"l(IC.

90

I had long since ceased to work with a poetical spmt. I considered each verse an enemy who was offering a most stubborn resistance. I looked upon the completion of a line with devilish delight, and found it impossible to refrain from loading a refractory sentence with the most bitter invectives. I remember giving a yell of triumph when the third verse was completed, and then, as Uncle Remus says, "I disremember what come to pass."

*

*

â&#x20AC;˘

*

I was ill for three long weeks. The physicians said it was d - - t - - and I could never make my friends believe otherwise. And now my friends let me give you some advice, in case these lines have failed to warn you-Do not tackle any kind of literature unless you have a keeper, and above all give poetry a wide berth.

\


TffR ECrE,<'(Tf\lC.

~ .

ITTING

in a wayside station, While r waited for my train, On l11y summer's brief vacation, Near me sat fair maidens twain.

Little heeded I their chatter, For in fact 'twas rather tame, Till my thoughts from other matter \Vere recalled by Bessie's name.

"Indeed," I heard one siren say, "Bess was in an awful rage, But she, her father must obC), And she has gone on the stage."

\Vhat! 111 Y Bes3ie made an actress By that villain her papa. What I the gaping crowd to \\itness M)' dear Bessie as a "star."

9'


-

"~- -

-

-

,- -

<.

J

-

~

_

â&#x20AC;˘

---"-

<rifE

~

_

_

-

ECCEt'(T~IC.

In fact I hac! heard fellows say, That "her guv'nor'c! lost a pile," On the horses clown at Rockaway, And" it worried the old file."

Raging at the ancient scapegrace, I got in the dusty car, Thinking \lith what joy I'd efface From the earth that same papa.

Soon I reached my destination Very mad I must confess. Calmly standing in the station, I beheld my lovely Bess.

"Bessie dear," I quickly cry, "If you would my grief assuage, Tell me that it's all a lie, And you've not gone on the stage."

"You silly boy! Are you insane? You ought to be put in a cage. \' Oll know papa detests the train, An(1 so we both went on the stage."


--

TIlE

...----. - -

. -

-,..........

ECCE-~路T:I\.IC_

--

.......-

93

Some 'J)z"shllcrcsted L 1rt'Z'拢ce to Y01tJl,r:- e5J,1. E's. forget, in any of your business and professional relations, that you are a Stevens man; that your fellow-graduates as well as your instructors, and even the undergraduates, have a sincere and kindly interest in your career; that they will be as much annoyed by your f<lilures when brought about by bad management of work entrusted to your care, as they will be pleased to learn of your successes, as the result of training which you received at Stevens_ Let your professional record be clean and untarnished. Don't fail to direct any promising young man in your neighborhood to Stevens; the Institute knows of no better mode of advertisement than when it receives the unequivocal endorsement of its alumni. Don't fail to do missionary work generally in the interests of Stevens; it needs and appreciates such efforts at any time. Don't fail to attend the Annual Alumni Reunion; make up your mind to attend once every three years if not oftener; it will do you good to renew the acquaintanceships and friendships of your college days, meet the later graduates and new professors, and judge for yourself of the progress of Stevens_ D(lN'T


94

"THE ECCEtJI(T<J?JC.

Don't use the title M. E. too freely; there is no patent on it at present, and all who are unprincipled enough to do so, can use it without fear of punishment; the day will come, however, when the title M. E. will be as sacred to the profane as that of M. D., and then the real M. E's will be happy; at present the bogus . M. E's seem to have the day. Besides, a good deal of prejudice exists in the minds of some people agai nst "these titled fellows," and there are other ways of informing those whom you deal with that you are a graduate of a scientific school. Don't belittle the accomplishments, or dilate upon the errors, of the" practical man" as those are apt to style themselves, who have not had your advantages of a technical education; whatever your own opinion, it will not pay you to ventilate your views too loudly, even if their methods, often of "the rule of thumb," are open to obvious criticism. These engineers constitute a large proportion of those in active practice; it is to them and their work that you must look fOJ examples and methods of actual construction, which will enable you to apply your theoretical knowledge with proper limitations, acquired by close observation of existing structures. You can well afford to wait until age and experience will justify you in sweeping aside all precedent and making new and bold departures. Don't bury yourself at the outset of your career in some outof-the-way-country-place, away from the large centers of population. A young mechanical engineer must remain in the current of thought and progress, which in this profession, as in almost all others, centers in the large cities and towns, whose libraries, clubs, societies and lectures are only a few of their many channels of instruction for young professional men. Every man owes himself, especially in his early years, certain social pleasures which will determine to a large extent his standing in any community; frontier life and experiences in mining camps and similar communities do not afford such opportunities. Don't remain connected with any enterprise in any capacity after you feel certain that you have reached the "end of your rope."


'1fIE ECCEtJI(T<J(IC.

95

Don't, on the other hand, make a change unless you fecI that there is a prospect of permanently improving yourself by .so doing; do not contemplate a change, where merely a larger salary is offered, without using it as a lever to better yourself in your old position; frequently your services are not appreciated in a financial sense, until your employers see that they are about to lose them, and will then without hesitation increase your salary. Don't hesitate to accept, if nothing else offers, any position , no matter how unremunerative it may prove in the beginning, provided that the concern is an active and growing institution which will afford chances for advancement; it is both unwise and unfair to accept any position except one in which your inexperience will not be seriously felt. Don't waste time, energy and influence in securing a position unless you are able beyond doubt to fill it; no amount of influence will keep an incompetent man in his position. Don't, for many years to come, set yourself up as consulting mechanical engineer, and then only when you have accumulated sufficient experience to enable you to deal authoritatively with some branch of engineering upon which you propose to give advice. In times of great business activity, when many new enterprises are projected and much work is going on, a young consulting engineer has at least a living chance, but when business is depressed none bu t men of experience and good and wide reputation are consulted. Don't, similarly, engage as expert in patent causes and law suits, no matter how tempting the retaining fee might appear, and then only if you feel secure in your knowledge of the subject. The professional expert has sadly fallen into discredit in this country during recent years, the most able and honest being classed with the incompetent and dishonest. There is neither glory nor money in this sort of work for Stevens men for many years to come. Don't engage, for the present at least, in journalism as a profession, if you have any other means of making a livelihood. Nine-tenths of the technical and trade papers of this country ought to be abolished at once, and most of


96

'rHE ECCEtJ(T'i(IC.

them will doubtless die an early and natural death as a consequence of the struggle for the survival of the fittest. They have a precarious existence and there is no good reason why they were ever begun. There are not a dozen journals in this country that are really creditable to the engineering profession and its subsidiary trades. On these the services of young men are in demand, simply because the salaries that are available cannot tempt older men to identify themselves with them. Don't engage in newspaper controversies, either in the daily or technical pre~s ; life is too short to carryon that sort of warfare. It usually serves to help you or your opponent into unenviable notoriety. In such controversies somebody usually has "an axe to grind" and every body intuitively realizes that fact. Don't engage in teaching unless you feel that you have a special aptitude and natural inclination for such work, and then enter upon it, as a profession, only after some experience in the practical affairs of life. As a temporary subterfuge any time spent as an instructor is so much time robbed from your profession of Mechanical Engineer. Don't engage in the sale of machinery and supplies on commission, as a regular business. It may financially better pay you to act as selling agent, pure and simple, than to stick to the profession; but don't engage in such a business until you realize beyond all doubt that you cannot hope for success as a mechanical engineer in the accepted sense of the term. Don't expect to make your fortune rapidly in following mechanical engineering as a profession. Like all professions it offers opportunities for accumulating wealth as well as reputation, and the latter generally brings the former with it; but, on the other hand, in this as in all professions, a larger proportion of those engaged in it will have to be content if they have the means for a comfortable and honorable livelihood. Don't accept the "customary commission" which may be offered you by those who have machinery to sell, and which they will sell to your employers or clients, if you


'THE ECCEtJ(T"lf.IC.

97

give them your recommendation. It is neither more nor less than a bribe, the offer of which should be resented in terms that cannot be misunderstood. You will, as a rule, be safe in supporting the claims of rival firms who do not offer such "commissions" and who depend on the merits of their wares to make their sales. Don't lose any opportunities of thoroughly acquainting yourself with the habits, methods and thoughts of mechanics; study also th~ ways of the labor organizations. The most lucrative, responsible and satisfactory positions are generally those which involve the management of labor, both skilled and unskilled. The labor question is the most important before the country to-day and its prominence will increase rather than diminish in the future, in proportion as labor becomes more intelligent and ready to assert its rights; as employers and managers of labor, it is every mechanical engineer's duty to keep abreast of the times and carefully study the elements which are involved in the labor question. Don't try to take advantage of mechanics, or unskilled laborers in the matter of time or wages; no matter how ignorant they may be in other things, you will find that on pay-day they will have it all "figured out right" and are quick in seeing any wrongs. Don't be unreasonable, harsh or overbearing towards your subordinates; treat them decently and kindly, and you will find them glad, as a rule, to reciprocate your action, by performing more and better work without special effort on your part. I t is well to remember that the men do not have the same interest in their work that you have, and it is unreasonable to expect that they shall have, as relations between employers and employees now stand. Don't let this go the way of almost all other advice that you have received from time to time in the past, but bear it in mind and satisfy yourself, that what is said above is essentially true.


erHE ECCEtJI(T''1?JC.

I.

~ @

OME months ago, alas! my heart was stolen . By whom I never knew. In vain detectives searched, in vain their cunning, And I despairing grew; For tho' my heart a worthless thing may be To others, it had value great for me. II.

Then, thought I, I myself will go a-seeking, For this will never do. First borrow Jack the Giant-killer's coat, Then search the city through, And finding it, away will fly my grief, For into prison I shall throw the thief. III.

For weeks I sought but eyer unsuccessful, Until at last I came Unto a house; well known in happier days, The street I shall not name. Here, thought I, search is vain, here who would steal? With people of another sort I have to deal.


"THE ECCRtl(T<J(/C.

IV.

But still I entered, and thro' rooms went seeking, And not a door passed by. At last I came upon a little drawer, Which quickly caught my eye. No one was near, I ]ook'd behind, in front, aroundThen ope'd the drawer, and lo! my heart I found. V.

Yes, here I found it, yet it cost me sorrow, And this the reason why; The thief who stole my treasure counts it nothing, But securing, throws it by'Mid broken fans, torn gloves, and billet-deux, Ribbons, and fancy-work, my heart she threw! VI.

Ah! I will punish her for this, I muttered; Weeping, she shall repent, vVhen, for this crime which caused me so much sorrow, She'l! be to prison sent! Vain then, will be her anguish, vain her grief. Just then I turned, and I beheld the thief. VIr.

A girl, young, fresh and fair, loft had met her, And naught to her compares, Bring her to pain? Ah no! She stole my heart 'Tis true, but unawares; I cannot her to prison send or cause her woe, And so I give my heart to her and go.

99


THE BA TTLE OF SLYLOW.

federates hit upon the plan of climbing trees, and we marched by without seeing them. We continued our advance for two days, before discovering our mistake, and then hastily retraced our steps. By the twenty-seventh we were ready for the attack which we were to make on the following morning. That night a council of war was held in my tent, and the following plan of assault, was decided upon. General Slapdash was to take eight thousand men and march to Bumble-bee Creek across which he was to throw a bridge. This movement was never executed, however, and General Slapdash has since been severely, and I may add unjustly, criticised for not carrying out my orders in this respect. That he was not to blame will be rendered evident when the following facts are stated: 1st. That he could not find any bridge to throw across the Creek, and

plan was arranged, but anyhow none of it was ever carried au t. As we knew nothing of the topography 0 f the country, it was considered the correct wrinkle to have a reconnoiter- (' '\ ing expedition. This work was assigned to I.IEUTENANT . L 1 eku ten ad n rt [From a tintype taken at the tillle. J C 1'0 er, an cannot do better than quote from his excellen t report. "According to your directions I selected eighteen of the best men in the corps, ancl at ten o'clock, P. M., I started to reconnoitre the Confederate lines. We marched / f~/ . ra pidl y for about two /¢/ / miles after Q) / leaving / â&#x20AC;˘ 1/"" I calnp, when \ I concluded it would be ! ~~ I much better /~}'" to lie flat on the ground I and crawl, and we trav~ eled th e remain in g eight miles in this manner. For this reason our progress was necessarily slow, and our advance was frequently interrupted by meeting stragg leI'S from the Confeder a te

)

CI~OKEIL

/ ~

/l/ /

/

LT. CROKER'S MAP SIIOWING THE I'OSITION OF THE

CONFEDHHATES.

This is the most authentic map published.-EoITOR.

zd.

That he couldn't find any Creek across which to throw a bridge. r have forgotten how the rest of the

101


102

THE BATTLE OF SLYLOW.

camp who insisted upon having us drink other side of the house and engage her with them. In spite of their being rebels in conversation. While he was doing we found them very jolly fellows, and we this I stole through the window, and also assured them that should they ever have the butter cakes. occasion to reconnoitre our lines we should Evidently no baking powder had been reciprocate the attentions. At last we used in them as they were very heavy, t came in sight of the Confederate lines, and I could scarcely carry them. As I and hastily tearing a leaf from my note could think of nothing more to do I rebook, I made a sketch of the camp which turned to camp." you will find appended to this report. About 250 feet from where I stood was a house, which I afterwards learned belonged to Mrs. Baggiesmasher. There was a light burning in a lower room, and I was determined to see what was going on inside. Taking with me Corporal Gunn and Adjutant Coffin, we crawled cautiously towards the house. We met with a slight mishap on the way, by Gunn's falling into the cistern. After pulling him out we proceeded towards the LIEUTENANT CR OKER AND CAKES RETURNING TO CAl\Ii'. house, and looked in through the win- The rest of the pJ.rty are in ravines beyond the trees. Croker is in the landau here shown and the cakes are in the dow. boat.-EDITOR. Mrs. Baggiesmasher was standing Early next morning the Confederates opened a heavy fire on our left wing, which we returned with spirit, and soon after the two armies came together with a crash. At a most critical point in the conflict one of our bands commenced to play, "0 had I the Wings of a Dove." Observing the dispiriting effect it had on our troops I ordered them to stop, but the leader, Mr. SchmittfluegeJ, who did not understand En glish, started them on "St. Patrick's Day in the Morning." What was our surprise and delight to see the 18th Kentucky, which was recruited CROKER' S PARTY ADVANCING ON BAGGIESMASHER'S almost entirely from the Ancient Order of HOUSe:. Hibernians, throw down their arms, and The hen-coop is ShOWll in the near left foreground, and the rock to the right. Gunn advanced from directly refuse to fight against us, and soon after behind the house, and met with his repulse.-EDlToH. desert to us in a body. This put the two armies 011 an equal footing, and the COI11near the stove cooking butter cakes." ordered Corporal Gunn to go around to the "manders seeing the uselessness of fighting any longer, agreed to give up the * Lietenant Croker is mistaken in this. They were contest and execute more flank movenot butter cakes, but buckwheat cakes. -Extract from Adjutant Coffin's letter to Editor of Ce1d1.t1'J', March ments. So ended the battle of Slylow; a fight 8th, r88s. Much controversy has arisen regarding this matter, which has caused more controversy than but I am able to state positively that they were neither butter cakes nor buckwheat cake~J but were sausages. any other battle of the war, and if this conAs both Lieutenant Croker and Corporal Gunn were tribution to the CENTURY War Series will JJ

H

under the influence of liquor at the time, their remarks should not be received with the credence which mine are, as I had been fully sobered by falling into the cistern. ,)See Corporal Gunn's Article in the April Century.

tFor Mrs. Baggiesmasher's denial see October Celliury, pages 480 to 51:2 inc1usive.-EDITOR.


TIfE BATTLE OF SLYLOW.

do anything to clear away the entanglements which have hitherto beset the historian's path, I shall feel amply repaid for the work I have put upon it. Let me in closmg say that both sides fought with consummate bravery, and many instances of personal valor were shown upon the field. One in particular which I recall, was the case of a young officer of the 69th N. Y. Vol. who on being ordered to support one of the guns

103

which was in iminent danger of being captured, replied, "that he would if he salY any use in doing it, but that he thought his life might be of more service to his country at some future time." He in 1884 became a member of the New Jersey Legislature. This paper would be incomplete, were I to omit the following letter written by myself to the Secretary of War:


"TlIE

ECCE~T<J(lC.

iJ{ z::J

0 U'D ill describe a student's life I f you should fail to tell Of milny random little thoughts, Quite unprofessional.

We're thought to study all the time, But seldom will you find A man who never stops a while To recreate his mind. 1I0w pleasant on a cold, raw night, When we of study tire, To lay the dry old text-book by And sit before the fire .

There lounging in our easy chair, With half unconscIOus smile, We let our truant thoughts take us Back to a certain stile, \Vhere on a balmy summer day, Mid pastures fresh and green, I met a maiden fair to see, By Jove! she was a queen.


~.

-

-

---

"TIlE ECCEtJI(T<J?IC.

She might be called a country girl, But with such eyes and hair, Such perfect figure, hands and feet None ever can compare. \Vhen once we met it happened, that We often met again, In fact, the stile.became the place To linger now and then. How graceful was her modest step, How pleasant was her smile As, holding to my willing hand, She mounted o'er the stile. IIow hard it was for both of us Our hearts to reconcile, When at length the last time came To linger at the stile.

,_.

--

---


â&#x20AC;˘ 106

lIIE ECCE ."'(T1\IC.

NEW -FERRY HOUSE, 14TH ST., IronoKEN.

~ w

UR college town seems to be passing through a kind of transition period at present; a putting away of the old customs which were so characteristic of the ancient Teuton. This progressive wave is almost irresistible; its advance was checked for a time by the" wilden-sau-hautz," but the effect was only temporary. The echo of th.e fatal shot fired by Hoboken's shooting editor had scarcely died away when affairs relapsed into their 01<1 condition. The origin of this" new departure" has been traced, and Hermann T. G. (The Good) is held amenable for the disasters which have befallen the town. It was he who wilfully ordered the prohibition of Sunday "beerings," adding an amendment to the ordinance which made it a misdemeanor for all the uniHe ignorantly instituted many other obnoxious verse, excepting himself. measures, disregarding the promptings of his own conscience and the traditions of a noble ancestry. Where contentment claimed undisputed sway, chaos has succeeded; inof-


THE

ECCEtl(T~JC.

fensive "foreigners" are thrown into the common gaol for acts, which, under the old regime would have secured a nomination for school trustee at the next election. Grocerymen chain their wagons to awning-posts, thus with malice of forethought ruining one of the harmless provincial gdmes, which for generations had been the sport of Hoboken's best people. "Botanizing", too, has received attention in the penal code; truly, the times have changed and Justice may be said to be fairly blinded when it thus strikes at the root of a once so popular system of education. Children are taught to make" mud pies," ancl their infan tile hrains are crowded with notions of high art; it was not so in days of " auld lang syne" when blushing maidens at the district schools stuffed each small boy's mouth full of soap and sponges to keep him from matching pennies for drinks with his neighbor. The people are patient under this growing despotism, but it is a sael spectacle to see a noble race forced t,o quietly submit to what is sure to end in their fmal extermination. Happy is he whose home is beyond the power of this modernizing plague; thrice happy is he, who with" a great big head" builded his abiding place on the deep (" the meadows" speaking poetically, but in reality the sll路amps of Hoboken.) Even in the "daisiest" sort of weather ever prescribed by the Weather Bureau, this meadow mansion is surrounded by sluggish waters. There is but路one avenue of approach and that is over a precarious plank, so adjustecl as to tip the unwary into an oblivion of marsh grass and mud. The humble cl weller in this romantic spot owns allegiance to none; a colony of goats and geese bleat and cackle the greatness of their rightful lord to each passer by, taking liberties which are never dreamt of by goats and geese of other places. If Jersey justice attempts to invade his dominion, our hero simply pulls in his plank and laughs to scorn the minions of th(, law. Another unyielding institution is the tippling r00111. Immovable as that august body, the Board of Police Commissioners 路in their celebrated case of noise vs. '85, it will remain until time itself is ended. Unlike the close shuttered, evil-sheltering grog shop known generally to the world, this resort is (tuiet, open. Here may be found Hoboken sires who love to pass their leisure hours over a foaming mug of Thiiringer. Thus they muse, with no other companion but Thiiringer, "thinking" and in vain attempting to disprove the theory that up's up. Traditions and legends will soon be the only a路venues open to the exciting incidents which would have filled a book, if unluckily they had not been discardecl by historians. Hoboken's greatest charm has been the general tone of contentment and peace which prevails everywhere. Everyone feels its inHuence, and hurrying


108

'THE ECCEtJI(T'l(IC.

thousands from the shops of New York, after each day's work, claim a share of its quiet. To the philanthropist and his kind it is most pleasing, this indifference to all the disturbiug influences of the great metropolis across the river. To the i"ollseroati1!e man it has its painful side. No other excitement is known than an occasional alarm of fire, and even this rude attempt to break the peace is easily smothered-houses will not burn when public sentiment is averse to disturbances. Hoboken has other uses-the N ell' York comedian asserts that Hoboken was made for his sole purpose. He uses it when the temper of his audience is such that his standard jokes fail to illicit applause; when this occurs he but whispers demurely" Hoe-buck-en," then grins, an<l if the" house" fails to appreciate, they are set down as being mentally incapacitated. There seems to be something magic in the word that is past finding out, but will not even the claim to this distinction be lost if we view matters in the light of past events. Verily this is a time when the souls of men are put to the test. To see the superannuated peeler succeeded by young athletic men, to be required to pay four dollars for tiring snow-balls at the mayor of the town, to see our own Pete McCoy shake the dust from his pedal teguments and depart for the Hub, where every evening he pounds the countenance') of the "cultured" beyond the borders of recognition, to realize that" private tips" cannot be obtained at any price, to see how Fortune's hand has turned against us, makes us weep! yes, we would feign dig a hole anel fall in. Some mysterious power is :1t work. Ever since the day on which the" terrible boar" bit the dust, Hoboken has bowed its hcacllo the inevitable and clispairingly yields to a cruel fate.

VI!::W LOOKING UP THE HUDSON.


"TIlE E C C E t7'(T'i( I C.

I

0<}

NCE upon a time-the precise date I don't remember, but long before the learned men of the East ever dreamt of the Continent 0 f America-once upon a time there dwelt in that part of Virginia now known as Powhatan County, a small but flourishing tribe of Pamuoky Indians under the rulership of Chief Opeccaocanough, or Opaddleyourowncanoe as he was called by his familiars, presumably because he was in the habit of paddling other peorle's canoes. N ow when Chief Opeccaocanough, an aggressive man, was one day on the war path several days' journey from his village, he was beset by such an overwhelming number of hostile Indians that he and his braves were put to flight or made to " tote the mail" as was the expression at that date, and realizing the force of the couplet, "he who is in battle slain will never live to fight again," they threw away all their arms and provisions in order to accelerate their speed sufficiently to escape. And can we accuse them of cowardice? Not at all. Does not Time fly ? And is not he the most cruel, relentless and invincible warrior the human race has ever faced? Their pursuit was finally abandoned, but the Chief and his party were left in a sad plight; their provisions gone, their arms also, helpless, and six days


HO

'THE ECCEtJI(T<J?IC.

journey from home (the hostiles had run them about a two days' journey in an hour and a half). They set out for the village. It was not long, however, before the pangs of hunger became unbearable. In those days they were not troublecl with thirst, for they, unlike the Kentucky "Kernel," still thought that 10ater was the correct thing to slake it. At length the Chief ordered his staff to eat some weeds growing along the route, and finding the effect harmless, he partook of them himself, and soon the whole party was using them, being still five days' journey from home. At the close of the first day a violent nausea prevailed among the braves, so on the second they abstained from the weed entirely, but they were forced to return to it and before reaching the village became quite fond of it. After this, chewing tobar:co was a ha.bit in Chief Opeccaocanough's tribe, and it is probable that he levied an internal revenue tax upon it and became one of the wealthiest chiefs in the country, but on this point history is silent. N ow it came to pass that one winter it waxed wondrous cold in Virginia, and the poor Indians, not prepared for such weather, suffered terribly. They burned all the fuel in the village, but were too frozen and benumbed to go out in the deep snow and procure more. In this emergency a council of the wisest men in the tribe was called together; Chief Opecca. etc. presiding, with his son Shake-Spear [or recording secretary. After a short but speaking silence, the medicine man HomCX!opathist the Pill, ilrose and addressed the meeting as follows: " Mr. Chairman and members of the council: It is with mingled feelings of pleasure and regret that I arise to address this assembly." (This sentiment provoked the applause of all save the Oldest Inhabitant who was suspected of muttering " Chestnuts" between his frozen lips.) No further record could be found of this speech, but tradition says that Shake-Spear, the secretary, was overcome at this juncture and swallowed his quid of tobacco. When he returned several days later, the orator had taken his seat and the chief was asking for more suggestions. The Oldest Inhabitant immediatdy arose, and, trembling with age and cold, said in as sarcastic a voice as his infirmities would allow: " I too arise with mingled feelings of pleasure and regret; pleasure because Homey the Pill has finished, and regret that he ever began. Deuce take his high-fallutin' bosh, we've got lots of tobacco on hand, let's make a fire with it and thaw ourselves out." The rest you can easily guess. They used tobacco fires for some time, and finally when the winter was past, the rain was over and gone, and the time of of the singing of the birds was come, Shake-Spear (not the voice of the turtle) was heard to remark, "How use doth breed a habit in a man," and


TIlE ECCE!;\'T"J?IC.

III

dug a hole in the ground : l.Ildlightec1 a tobacco fire, hence as a natural sequence, the pipe of to-day. I know a great cleal has been said and written detrimental to the habit of smoking, but here comes an average smoker, let us button-hole and question him. Ile begins in the conventional way by warning us not to contract a habit which we will never cease to regret; but let us break through the outer skin and go a little deeper. As he gradually warms to the subject he tells us what a dear friend his pipe is to him, what a sociable companion in time of solitude and trouble. When his mind is clouded and disturbe(l he is al ways sure of its soothing effect. When restless or out of temper it restores his good-humor. Fortified by it, his wife's lectures fall like rain on a duck's back. Behind its \'eil he is alike secure from the untiring punster and his most urgent creditor. It lengthens and swedens his whole life and turns his curtains a dusty yellow. Can anyone advise such a man to stop smoking; to give up for no earthly reason one of the greatest and most innocent pleasures of his life? Y Cl'tl shudder at the very idea; you sa)' such a step \Youlll be worse than barharous; you are right.


'THE ECCEiJI(T<J(IC.

113

T wn.s Benjamin Franklin I think, who said that" next to living one's life over again, the best thing was to point out one's stumbling blocks, that others might make stepping stones of theirs." I beg that you will not think me egotistical because I, in agreeing with this celebrated man, conclude to tell you of some of my experiences, that you perhaps, may profit by them at some future time. Of course I do not expect that these remarks will be read with as much interest as if they had been written by Benjamin Franklin. Why should they be? I, as yet, have done nothing to distinguish myself. I haven't stood out in a thunder storm and flown a kite while trying to prove that the lightning flash and electric spark were identical. The only time I ever stayed out through the whole of a thunder storm was at a picnic, and I wouldn't have stayed then, only I couldn't find any place to go into. Even if I had evinced a fondness for meandering about through thunder storms, I wouldn't have tried Franklin's experiment, because I have too high a regard for my personal safety to monkey with lightning that way. I would much rather have small-pox. Having pointed out this slight difference between Benjamin Franklin and myself, I proceed with my experiences. They are the experiences of an Inspector, a position which I have no doubt many of you will fill at some time in your career, and you will never appreciate the difficulties which one encounters until you do fill it. I think there is no place


II4

'THE ECCE/JI(T"1(IC.

where one's faith in human nature is so badly shaken as in an Inspector's position. Naturally after having been associated with gentlemen all your life, it is hard when plunged into the midst of a lot of" Micksand Eyetalians" to believe that everyone is lying to you. But such is the case, and the contractor generally has his men and foremen trained up to such a degree, that they will go as far as to us~ mud in place of mortar unless you keep your eye on them all the time. The first thing a foreman does when he thinks you don't know much about the work, is to wait until you give an order as to how something shall be done and then try to make you ashamed of yourself; failing in this, he tries to bulldoze you. I remember one time when I was inspecting some concrete which we were to use in foundations for heavy iron columns, that the sand they were mixing with the cement contained a large amount of gravel, thus making too great a proportion of stone in the concrete. I said to the foreman: " I'd like to have that sand screened." " What fer?" he replied. " Because there's too much gravel in it." He looked at me a moment with a well-if-you-aren't-the-biggest-lunatic-Iever-did-strike expression on his face, and then said: " Why don't yez know that's what yez want in con crate ?" " Yes, but I don't want about ten parts of stone to one of cement, so you'll have to screen it." Then his pitying expression vanished and he said: "Say, luk at here, young feller, wudn't yez loike me ter git a couple of nagurs in livery here and set 'em clown at that sand pile wud a piece of chammy in their hands, and tell 'em ter pick out thim stones wud their fingers and polish 'em off and put 'em in a pile there fer yez ? You wucl heh? Well I'll not do it, and what's more I'll not scrane the sand." "Yes you will!" " I will, will I, well who'll make me ?" "Well if you don't, you won't get paid for the concrete." " 'Yell you bate the devil! Mike, you and Pat bring that scrane over here and scrane this sand." But the most politic foreman I ever had under me, was one named Fitzpatrick. He was somewhat better educated than any of the other men, but he had the same way of getting round a thing. "All right, sor," he said the first time I saw him, "I'll do anything you loike fer I don't want to foight, but I'm a terrible man when I git in a muss. The last man I hit I knocked him-come here," he said, pulling me aside confidentially, " the last man I struck cost me fifty dollars an' you bet I won't hit anyone else unless they provoke me, an' then I forgit mesilf an' can't help it." I'm the divil himsilf whin I'm mad."


'TIlE ECCE.[1I(T<J?JC.

Thi~ was said with the idea of impressing me that I'd better not say anything about the work, or there might be occa,ion for his paying another fifty dollars. "I suppose you've had a good deal of experience in masonry." I said. "Well I should think so mesilr. I've had thurty years of experience-Here you" he yelled fiercely at one of the Italians, " Didn't I tell you not to let that water run." This so scared the fellow that he illlll1ediatly dumped another barrel of sand in the mortar after it had been all mixed up. He evidently lahored under the impression that, when Fitzpatrick told him to do anything he didn't Ilnderstand, it was best to dump an extra barrel of sand or stone ill the concrete. "What did yer do that fer?" shrieked Fitzpatrick, "Turn off that wakr I tell yer." "Alia right" responded the Italian sweetly, and snatching up a pick-axe he commenced vigorously to dig up a flag-stone out on the side walk. This so enraged Fitzpatrick that he snatched up a stone and flung it at him, but missing the 1'11ark he rushed' over and picked up the hose himself. Then turning to me with a look on his face which meant plainly," if you think I'm one of these uneducated Micks you're mistaken," he said impressively: "'Tis a fountain whose sources are in the infinq/e and whose placid waters How on forever. That's an extract from a lecture I delivered a short time ago." " Oh! I didn't know you lectured, " I said. "Oh! occasionally, occasionally," he replied. "But as I was sayin', I have had thurty.years of experience, such as no man ever had before. I tell you, he continued excitedly, "No man exists, no man call exist who knows more about masonry than I do." ThiS was another shot at me and, of course, meant that my opinion would be as nothing COIllpared with that which \1ad come frol11 thirty years of experience. " Have you been at it as long as that," said I in a surprised tone, " Did you eyer build any stone arches in that time? " "Did I ever build any stone arches? Did I ever build any stone arches? Oho, did 1 ?" " Where did you build them?" FITZI'.\TRI C K. " Where did I build 'em? Where did I build what? Arches? Where did I build-Oho-o-o where did I ?" and he walked away disdainfully.


116

?"HE ECCEtJI(Tl(IC.

" I see they're considering some way for putting the telegraph wires underground," he said a little later. "I was down at the meetin' of the CO/llmittee the other dayan' I was sittin' down among the spectators, an' not thinkin' of anything particular, whin all of a sudden the Chairman, who I know well, say's c I see among the visitors a man who I know has had years of experience in these things, and I call upon Edward Fitzpatrick fer his views.' Well I got up an' I says c Mr. Chairman and Gintlemen; I am a plain man an' not much given to talk, but if you want my views I will tell yOll what thurty years of experience leads me to think is the best plan. I wud construct electrical subways of brick wud man路 holes at each block, an' I wud put the wires along the sides of this subway.' 'l'he Chairman then says C Thank you Mr. Fitzpatrick, thank you; we'll do that.' But I see they're considerin' some other plan now an' I don't understand it." J llst then I notice one of the masons putting what is known as a c' niggerhead" in the wall, and I told Fitzpatrick not to let any stones like that go in. " All right" he replied, " I'll see to it." Then I went to dinner. On coming back I saw Fitzpatrick trimming off the "nigger-heads" with a big sledge hammer. As soon as he caught sight of me he called out: "Come here a minute. D'ye see how nice I'm fixin' thim stones up. Thim masons wudn't have brains enough to do that." I said nothing for I knew he wouldn't trim them off well enough to go in the wall. Shortly after I saw one of the half trimmed stones in place, anc! I immediately ordered it taken out. Fitzpatrick planted himself in front of me and fixing a severe gaze upon me said: " Don't my thurty years' experience entitle me to any consideration? " "Yes, but I don't want that stone in the wall." " \Vhin a man knows more about a thing than 1 know mesilf 1 like to have him give me his advice. I've had thllrty year's experience an'-" c. I don't care, the stone must come out." " I'dloike to build a castle of thim stones. Take it out Jack." 'vVe weren't on speaking terms for about an hour after that, but at the enc! of that time he came up to where I was standing, and without any warning saicl : " You don't know everything." " I know it." "Well neither do I; neither does anybody. We can't all be smart. The Lord didn't make us so; but I've had thurty years of experience an' I know somethin !" I didn't have the pleasure of having Fitzpatrick under me for a great while, as he left the contractor for a place on the aqueduct. I don't know whether I shall ever see him again, but I'm willing to bet that at the Judgment Day when


:nEE ECCEb'{T''lfIC.

"7

the final trump bids us all rise, Fitzpatrick will make a rush at Gabriel, and wresting the trumpet from his hands, will blow a prodigious blast and will then inrorm the rightful owner of the instrument that "I know all about blowing horns, for I've had thurty years' experience at it."

-~-=--- .

WHERi1: FITZPATRICK BUILT STONE AR CHES.


1I8

"fIfE ECCE!J'(T'7\IC.

5@lrClmClli.® ~er.®0rzce. IMPECUNlUS-Lord Ifigll COl/SIt! of BIUSTOLlUS-ltis page. LUClUSJOSEPHUS-

~

tll~

JJ£alltematicus.

L01'ds ill Sltspellsioll.

SCOTlUSHOXzETuM-a

rich alld illfluelltial citizell.

DOOR-KEEPER.

CITIZENS-Collsisting of Freshmen, SopllOlI/ores, JUlliors, Seniors. ACT 1. SCENE

LORD

I.-Jlle COIiSlll'S Sallctum. tlte aid of a dim lig!lt. HIGH

Tile COllsul discovered ill deep thong-Itt by

CONSUL.-Now by my last year's chewing gum Had I to do the same thing o'er again, Their sentence should be thrice as harel. I would not let them off with days and weeks, But give them months and years To think them on their sins. (JValks to tile otiler side of tile room and 11iolmtly jillgles an alltiquated cowbell) (ellter BRISTOLIUS).


'TlfE ECCE{JI(T"1(IC.

BRISTOLlUS.CONSUL.-

My lord did'st ring for me? Yes Bristolius I did ring, And who would come but th() u Who hast sworn allegiance to me ? Thou who hast so nobly peddled My patent papers to the populace . .But more of this in future time! How fare the nobles We have banished from our court? Are they retluced to skin and bones As was our first intention? (BR I STOLLUS tUrJlS a pale blad~ 1CIltidi gradually sltat!es

BRISTOLlUS.-

CONSUL.-

BRISToLlUS.-

CONSUL.-

119

o/l to

a ulllile).

Oh noble Consul! Hast thou not heard the latest For t'is just out? The lords whom we suspended, Have pushed the prison b'us Just fifteen thousandth inches back! And this combined with scanty flesh Has gained to them their point. Their escape was thus effected J n the early hours of morning, When we were deep engaged Calculating the entire profit On one dozen sheets of patent paper. (TVlto has bem striding liP alld dowli Ille rOOIll a la Lawrellce Barrett) . Oh foolish man! and have they thus escaped me ? They will hie them to the Facultas And thus demand their liberty, This gained, they'll rush upon our castle, Break clown our doors, and rush upon us, Then turn us 011, (Palltillg like a dog in July). Say not so my noble master, Or thou wilt wreck mine equanimity. My little legs will cease to do their function And I will tumble down a total wreck From fear. Wretch, coward that thou art,


'TIrE ECCEtJI(T<J?IC.

120

There yet is hope. We'll hurry to our castle tower, And there defend the apertures Which furnish the ingress To Its mysteries. But bring along the papers For therein lies the boodle. Vve'll get us to the tower, And then we'll pass the merry mug around, And will be happy In the face of all our dangers. (Exit CONSUL and BRISTOLlUS. The orchestra strikes It} the "March 0./ the .iliika(io" ill double tillle).

SCENE

II.-A poor!.y ligltted cellar wifll a sl~i[litly raised platform at tile ./urtller elld, Oil Wllielt are seated, JOSEPHUS, LUCIUS, awl SCOTIUS, sltY10lmded by a tOllgh looking mass of people __ all are assembled ill tlte Guy Frt1f.lkes style.

LORD

L.-

LORD

J.-

Most noble lord Josephus Wilt thou unfold to us thy weary talc, And give us all the pros and cons Of thy most wretched case? Yea, and with a hearty right good will, For I have been so much abused From day to day, That I would rise me up in arms Against this most cruel tyrant. We were assembled there in open court, And I was chewing on a borrowed cud, Which did not please the Consul's page, So I resolved to leave for other parts,路--But woe was me ! For as I wandered through the open door A most cruel perverse wind Did blow it shut with slam and bang That rattled all the building round about. This riled the wrathy ire of our Consul, And stirred unto their very depths


'THE ECCEO'(T"RJC.

LOlm L.-

LORD

S.-

His most foul and wicked purposes. He rushed upon me, kicked me out, And would not hear my explanations: BlIt I hied me to the Facultas, (Which was then in solemn session) And there did plead With such good might and power, That they resolved to think upon my case. But noble lords While they do thus consider, I came to cast my lot with thine, And thus in sweetest unity We can regain our place by force of arms. Most nobly spoken, sweet Josephus, But it was by this very force of arms Tl1at I did lose my place, For one from out the common herd Was pounding me with might and main, When I did think me to retaliate. I struck for freedom and relief, And while I thus was striking, That wicked page of our Consul's Di(l catch on to the racket. (.He tit I'm to the people). N ow, thou sweet and tough appearing populi, Thou, even thou can'st see The groundless cause .for my suspension. So let us strike While now the deeds are fresh Upon our minds, And" turn the rascals out." Sweet lords and noble gentlemen If Ihave trazled unto your purpose, I would add my powers up with yours, And we, aided by these followers Could" put the rascals out." But let us think upon the matter more. Has not this our threatened Consul A right to wreck his own sweet will ? Have we a right to judge, And act to suit ourselves

121


122

"IHE ECCE{)I(7''i(1C.

In this momentous question? I should advise resort unto the Facultas, There pour out OLlr griefs and sorrows, And their hearts, if they are human, Will bleed for all our trials. Scotius, thou of rcd hot Southern !Jloou, LORD L.Thou had'st !Jetter hie thee To a swimming pond, And soak thy thickened head. Or hie thee to a deep, dark, wicked wood, LORn J..\ncl he buried in oblivion. NO.f but I will not hear Illore of this, LORD S.For I will lay aside my many scruples And will join you heart and hand I n any mode of vengeance. THE DOOR KEEPER.- \Vhate'er thou doest my lords, do quickly, For time speeds on apace, And the mid night hour approacheth, At which time we've sworn a mighty oath That we this hall would vacate. And what-50-e'er thou may'st decide upon HOXZETUl\l.1 will promise for this multitude Their best support, Yea, even to the last drop of their blood. Hoxzetum thou hast rightly spoken, ALL CITlZENS.And we will pledge ourselves To give the firmest of support To these our noble lords. Grand, brave, and mighty people, LOlm L.Since thou so no!Jly <lost support us, I will unfold to you our plans. At two o'clock to-morrow morn We meet upon the sporting ground Where the wild boar Is hunted in the chase. Each of us will don a mask. Remove our shoes, And then in all our strength Will rush us to the conflict. From latest news we learn That Consul and page are hidden in the tower.


<[fiE

ECCE~T:JUC.

.,

12"

\Ve'll capture them, And take them to the Facultas, \Vhere we're assured That all our rights will be most amicably settled. --But now the hour is near, And we'll disperse to buckle on our arms, And meet again at two o'clock As we have thus decided. (Exit all 'witl, slow and quid slef>. The I~ÂŁ;ht begills tfJ j!icktr, dies dOWII, alld jades, alit! ei'el),tllillg is left ill dar/mess).

ACT I!. SCICNE

LORI>

I.-TIle illterior oj the Consul's castle, ill tl,e allk-room oj tIle tOll'er. TIlt, roolll crowded witll people arllled i1l all st.yit-s, alld I/llt/krill,ÂŁ;" CIIrses /fPOIl tI,e COIISII/ ami lIis page. L.-

DRISTOLlUS.-

LORD

1..-

Cease your oaths and mutterings, And I will ask admission to the tower. (r[e advallces to tIle door and kllocks.) What ho within, or are all dead? \Ve have not come to murder nor suspend, But to demand our most just rights. And if thou doubtest of our power, Refuse admission to your base retreat And we will hammer down the door And take you out Anel slide you down" an inclined plane Which is o'er-laid With greasy patent papers. (Groallillgs from Witllill). Stand back and we'll unbar the doors, For if you all do think 'tis right To thus molest a quiet couple, T'were vain for us to offer a resistance. (Tilt doors are flung open alld BRISTOLlUS alltl tlte CONSUL ai{' seell in a sTlpplicatillg allitudl'.) Arise anti follow to the Facultas! For we there have made complaint, And are assured of a settlement


VfE ECCE!:"\7 ':R.IC.

12 04

BRISTOUUS.LORI.

L .-

HOXZRTUM.-

Concerning all our many trials. You Consul have ruled With iron will. Have bounced, suspended, and done what-e'e r Thy humor prompted thee unto. But we've revolted from thy sway, And now will start A little play court o[ our own, \Vith rulers better suited to our purposes. And what on earth Will now become of II/t'? Thou art to us of sllch small cunserluence That we forgot to give thee place In our settlement of matters. Most noble lords and fellow citizens, Let us not waste our useful time, But let us hence with all alacrity To hear our doom. (Exit Iht' prillcipall', 1t111i/t' Ih,' cili~('J/s rt'lIIllill /(1 drillk 1o tI,e sllaess of the 7'ld,Jlio/ls party.)

SCENE

LORI)

III.-A ltall in the .LlIalht'lIIalims. Elller a 111f1llbt'r of lI(1bks, amoliK whom art' Luci us, JOSEPli us (lilt/ SCO'I"! us, walkillK arm ill arlll.

J.-

TIOXZETl1M.-

Ah ! all is well. ;\n<l we have gained our point. I think me that I'll chew an extra" cud ,. To celebrate this best of all occasions. (EllIeI' HOXZETUM with jOyjl)'illg '!ll at a lilligmt fn"" n'ny part (If his bt!(~)'. IIe J"/lsl't'S up /() tIlt, Ilm'l' limls.) My noble lords it does me good To see you wander thus Around our halls. Sweet, nohle Lucius, I would thank thee heartily For having gained to us our rights. And mine handsome own Josephus, I would filII upon thy noble neck And weigh thee down with sweet caresses, For all that thou hast done. But to Scotius, nobh: Scotius,


. '1 HE ECCE,JJ'(T<J?,IC.

12 5

What words to him can half express Our deep and lasting gratitude? N one, so we'll leave it to his great big head To divine our inmost thoughts. (A distallt sound of several brass bal/ds 1IIixedttp 10itl, shouts and tramping of feet, is lteard, fail/tly at first, bllt gail/ing volullie ttl/til tIle)' ellter tllt: lta!l). But here they come, The festive citizens. So we must join the merry throng And let our voices swell the glad refrain That even virtue has its just reward, And will come out ahead at last, Of even those who wield Tyrannical authority. (Each Olle groups !tilllselj).

Curta ill.


® -' ~.,

",~"

PAGE.

Alumni Association...... . ... ... .. ....

59

History of the Class of '89- .•.. · .•.....

29

Alumni and Undergraduate I':nterprise..

60

Hoboken Directory of Students.. ......

33

Annual Spring Games .•........... ....

67

Howdy.... ...... .... .... .... .... .. ..

82

At the Stile .•••...................... J04

Indicator. . .. .. .. . . .. ..........•.....

76

Athletics, (Illustration)...............

63

Lacrosse. .. . .. .. .. .. . . .. ... . . .. . .. ..

7I

Athletics .............................

65

List of Class of '86 ...................

II

Athletic Association ... _......... ......

64

Base Ball._ ..........................

68

Battle of Slylow ................ _..... 100 Beta Theta Pi ............... ' . . .. ... .

42

" '87............ ....... " '8~L ___ . __ _______ . ____

21

"'89 ..... ' ... - ..... --.

27

Members of Fraternities not chaptered at the Institute .....................

50

(,

16

Bessie's Debut...... .... ...... . ......

91

Chi Phi .............................. Chi Psi ..............................

48 44

Chronicle ... __ .......................

53

Clas~

57

Revolt Against Tyranny ...............

118

56

S. S. S. .... ... . .. . . .... . . .. . . .. . . . . .

73

9

Salutatory.... ...... ....... .... ......

5

Sigma Chi.... .... .... ...... . .... ... .

46 79

of '85······ ....................

Commencement, 13th ................. COJllment .......... '.. ... ...... ......

l\1odern lIoboken ...... .... .... ...... J06 Not Ilis Sister Evidently .............. ')0 Origin of Smoking .................... J09

Delta Tau Delta ........ _... . .. . . . . . ..

40

Don't .............•... - .... - ........

93

" SI ugs " . . .. .. . . .... ... . . . .. .... . . . .

Ed i torial Board ................... - - . . Elementary Stove.pipe Anaiysis .......

3 84

Steps, The (Frolltispiece.)

E,periences .......................... 113

Stolen lIearL ........................ Strain ])iagram .......................

')8 81

Summary of the Fraternities .... -.. ....

50

Faculty and Instructors ..... __ _........

8

Foot Ball Record.... ...... .... . .... ..

70

Surveyor's Notes,(IIlustration) ........ 112

Foot Ball Team.... .... ... . .... .... ..

69

TenmS...... ...... ...... ...... ......

72

Theta Xi ....... -- .... _ ..............

38

Fraternities in the order of their Estahlishment, (Jllllstration.) .............

37

Trus tees ... --. . . . . . .. .. . .. . . . . .. . . ...

7

Glee Club ...........................

74

What we Learn at College (Illus.) .....

87

History of the Class of '86.. .. .... .....

13

Word to the Wise ....................

88

" '87. . .. ... . .. . . .

18

Yacht Club ..........................

75

"'88 .......... _..

23


PAGE .

American Machinist. ____________________ xi L_ H_ Bates __ , ________________________ xxii Becker Bros ____________________________ xv Boehm Bros- ___________________________ vi A. Bogardus & Co. ____________ . . ___ __xx iv Busch's HoteL ___ ____ . _____ . ____________ x

PAGE.

Kohlhusch & Son ___ __________________ . xvii Lidgerwood M'rg. Co __________________ _vii Charles Lippert. __________ ___ . ___ . ____ xxiii F. Luthin _____________________________ viii G. Meiners ____ . ___ . ____________________ x Montgomery & Co _______________________ i Myres' HoteL _____ . _____ __ __ _. _________ ii

Cavanagh, Sandrord & Co. ___ . ______ . _____ x C. S. Crossman _________ .. __________ . ____ v

Naegeli's HOlel. __________________ ____xxiii

W. C. Cullen __________________________ xxi

Newnlan._._ . ___ . _____ _______________ ._jij

Dean Steam Pump Co __________________ xix

Pach Bros ___________________ . _________ vi i

F . W. Devoe & Co ________ . _____ . _____ xxvi

J. M. Patterson ________________________ x,

Estey Piano. _____ _____________ .. ____ . xxvii

Jens F_ Pedersen. ________________ . _______ i

Joseph Gillot. ____ _ _____ . _____ . __ . . ____ . ix Louis GaIL _____________ ______________ viii

Hen ry N. Peters _____________ . __________ ix

C. F . Gnth ____________ . ______________ xvii

Photo-Engraving Co ______ Tnside back cover. 1'h05 . J. Pope & Bro ___ . ______ .. _.. ____ xiv Ricln,.,ls & Co. _______________________ xxv

Hall Duplex Steam Pump Co ____________ xix II. H . Hankins _________ . ____ . _ . _______ xxi

Oscar Seihurg ____ . ________ . ___________ xvii

W . A. Harris _______________________ .xviii

E. G. Soitman ________________________ xxi i

Hartford Steam Boiler Inspect'n & Ins. Co .. xii S. Hawkridge ____ . _________ ____ . __ ____ xvi

Stevens High SchooL ___________________ iv

Griffith's Pharmacy ___________________ xxiii

Scharer & Budenberg ____________ . _____ xxiv

Hirschherg __________ : ________________ .xx

Thomas B. Stillman ____ . ___ . __________ xxiii Albert Slllrken _________________________ xx

Horsman _____ .. ____________________ ___ xxi

Tiffany & Co ________ _________ _ ________ xiii

Judson Printing Cor. ______ .Outside of cover. Chas. F. Kaegebehn _______ . ___________ .ix Kearny & Foot. ___ . _________ . _____ . . ____ iii

Wareings Theater _________ . __ . _. __ . _.. _xx

Keuffel & Esser ___________ . _____ _____ xxvi Wm . S. Kimball & Co _________________ xxv

D . Van NOSlrancL _______________ . _____ xxii The Watts Campbell Co . . ____ .... _______ vii "Vhil"ll, Tatum & Co ... __ Inside rront cover. YOllmans _.••. ___ . _. _. _. _. __ ____ . _ . ___ .. vi


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:Nfl/SIC,

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, STRINGS, ETC., 5@)raCJJi~

@J.n.e)t'Zume7tj anq Mate'Ziafj,

Bl1ANK . BeeKS, ,; Nate Baaks, Scratch Pads and Writmg Paper af all kind;.

TEXT BOOKS SUPPLIED AT SHORT NOTICE. DISCOUNT OFF ON ALL BOOKS.


.ADVE'Y\. T1SE~-fENTS.

ix

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. Cold Medal, Paris Exposition, 1878.

in Fine Drawings, Nos. 659 (The celebrated Crowquill), 290 and 291. FOR FINE WRITING, Nos. I, 303, and Ladies', 17°· FOR BROAD WRITING, Nos. 294, 389, and Stub Point, 84-9. FOR GENERAL WRITING, Nos. 332, 404, 390, and 6°4· FOR ARTISTIC USE

JOSEPH GILLOTT &0 SON~, 91 Jolm St/.:et, lV. Y.

HENR Y HOE,

S~,e

A-;rmt.

CHAS. F. KJEGEBEHN,

Ufi I)~S!)<' a I)d ~(;. Bra I)d i~s, ®Jmjillorteet

J1o.~o.no. @igo."Z~,

fife.,

3I-I and 3I6 'lVdlSH.1:!,{(;TO:!,{ ST7\.GG'T, HOBOKEN, N, J,

lVlLolt!Sale and Rdail Dealer itl

FANCY GROCERIES, Gann@d

~oods,

Preserves, Wines, Liquors and Gigars,

223 WASHINGTON ST. , Hoboken, N. J.


oADVE"1(TISEilfENTS.

x

73U5CH'5 HOTeL, (9HI~D

Northwest Cor.

@]fie

@1ine~t ~iffia'Zq

J1aff irz

<ft

I)UDSON SillS.

J1oi)o~erz,

Containing the Best Col lender Tables.

<><]G.

MEINERS,[><>

WGttc~f1[Gt~er, OpticiGtr.? i5lr.?d Jeweler, 130 WliSHINGTON STREET.

BANGLES AND BADGES MADE TO ORDER.

ALL THE LATEST LONDON FABRICS REGULARLY IMPORTED.

CAVANAGH, SANDFORD &. CO.,

~ MERCHANT . TAILORS . ~ . IMPORTERS,~ 16 WEST 230 STREET, NEW YORK.

OPP. 15TH AVE. HOTEL.

MAKERS OF THE C. & S. SHIRT, PAJAMAS AND UNDERWEAR.

...

. ..... __ ....... . ..... ......... .


xi

.AD VE"J? TfSEiil:fENTS.

PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY.

ALive, Independent 16-page Weekly Illustrate(l Journal of Practical Mechanics and Engineering. lIas the htl'gest paid circulation of allY Btrictly Mechanical N owspaper in the worM. Its COIUlllllS contaiu eOlltrilmtions from LEADING }IECHANICAL WRITERS of tho day, on the mORt important tOpi(,B belonging to PRAUTICAL MECHANICS, inclUlling all In'alwheB of STEAM and LOCOMOTIVE EN(uNEElUNG and FOUNDlW PllACTICE. Also correspondence on mechanical topics from a largo number of practical men in the shops, together with early illfonuatjon nbout tho eRtablishment. 01' Ol'OctjOll of IH'W 8110PB and the enlargement of old shops.

Flo Paid Flot io8s OF any l\ind g® i Ato its Re@ding Cb olu mns. Subscription Price, U. S. and Oanada, $2. 50 a Year (postage included.)

SIj"VG'£E COPIES} 5

CEN~TS.

Order of any N ewsdealer, or send subsoription to

--» J1~EI\ICJ1]'!

~J1CrII]'!Ip'l'

FlfJ3LlprII]'!Gi CO., *-

96 FULTON STREET, New York.


xii

.AD VE"E\. TfSEtlolENTS.

OF

SSTdl "ELZSH&'iJ 1866.

Careful IJzsjectzo?t

0/ Stcanz

ryjoz"lers.

ag-ainst loss or damag-e arisillg- from

5TG'AM 730ILe~ EXPLOSI0:;YS. Full information conccrning- the plan 0/ tlte Compan)/s opera tions, can be obtaimd at the C017Zpa71Y's O.!fice, Hartf01 d, Co 7l 1l. , or at any A,r.rc71C)'. r

7. ,.'"iff. e:A LL eJ\(, 'President. W. "E. F"1(dl5l(KLN1'(, 1-'ice-President,

y.

"E. PZ8"1(CS, Secretary.


xiii

.ADVE1\.TI SE.'l fENTS.

WATCHES. TIFFANY & Union Square,

CO., New York.

Include in their large and comprehensive stock of Watches, Chronographs, Chronographs with split second, Chronographs and Repeaters, Repeaters, Strikin g hours a nd qu arters.

Repeaters, Striking h ours and five minutes.

Repeaters, Str iking hours, q uarters, and min utes.

Repeaters with calendar. Their Timing Watches , both simple chro nograph and with split second, have received the highest commendation as time-keepers and markers by many prominent owners of running and trotting horses, to whom, by permission, purchasers will be referred. In addition to the standard and other high-priced watches, Tiffany & Co., present this season a new line at lower prices, recommended as the best yet produced for the money. Large size for gentlemen, Medium " " ladies Large " Small " "

-

$75 65 60 50

These watches have sound, stem-winding, anchor movements, cased in 18-kt. gold, in variety of styles, and each is stamped with the name of the house, thereby carrying its guarantee.


.AD VE~ TISEfAfENTS.

xiv

THOS.

J.

POPE

292

&

BRO.,

P EARL S T REET,

NEW YO RK.

I mporte rs a nd C olllmission M

erchants.

~teeI and hon l\aiIs, WirJe l\ods, WirJe OF ALL DESCRIPTION .

~teeI

J3IoOIIls,

Fi~

hon, J3essemerJ and otherJs. ppie~Ieisen, FerJrJo路man~anese,

ppelterr.

Lead, 'tin, 'tin Flates, ~opperJ. fIn timon y, J3ismuth, ~admi urn, fII UIIliIl UIIl, Nicl\eI. Old l\aiIs and

~crJap

of everry descrJiptioIl.

AGENTS FOR THE

ORFORD COPPER & SULPHUR CO., In~ot ~opperJ, ~ulphate

of

~opperJ

aIld bon.

CONSIGNMENTS SOLICITED and LIBERAL ADVANGES MADE.


dJ)/'Et(TISE.'lEENTS.

xv

BECKER BROTHERS, SI Cl ESSORS 10

BECKER &. SONS . MANUFACTURERS OF

Balances and \Veigllts of })recision, FOR

. illd ill gellcral for Cller)' use wl/erc accllra()' is rCljllircl/.

NQ. 6 M f:l RRAV Sr REEY, NEVI V8RK . Every Balance and Sct of Weights leaving this establishment is guaranteed to be accur, ately adjusted, as represented in our price list. For ,omc time we have heen aware that imitations of Our Balances and \\'eights have been placed on the market, represented as heing manufactured hy us, and we would caution our customers that only the goods made hy us bear our firm name.

OUR ILLUSTRA TED PRICE LIST MAILED ON APPLICA TlON,


.AD VE'I?TISE:;tIENTS.

xvi

s.

I-IJlWK7tlVGe~

Philosophical Instrument Maker, TO THE

Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, N. J., Has on hand or made to order, the following:

BLOWPIPE ApPARATUS, SPECTROSCOPES, MAGIC LANTERNS AND ATTACHMENTS AmI APllnraltlls ill conllection witl. Prof'. A. M. ![I\yer's };xperilllelltal

Science Series for lIes-inners.

The Combination Spectroscope, $100; the Pocket Spectroscope, $15; the College Lantern, $200; the Experimenter's Lantern, $75; the Megascope, to show solid objects on a large scale, $50; Vertical Attachment for Experimenter's Lan· tern, $75; Attachments for Lanterns as follows :-Glass Chadni-plate and Clamp, $15; Circular Glass Tank, $3; Elliptical Brass Ring, $1; Air Drum, for Waves, $4.50; Oil and Pipettes, $2.50; Iron Filings, Sieve and Magnet, $1; Watch Glass for Water Lenses, 25cts.; Vertical Tank for Chemical Experiments, $4; Ditto, for Decomposition of Water, $6.50; Ditto, for Solar Prominences, Frost Crystal Solution, 25cts.; Eclipse Slide, (Prof. Morton's), $7.5°; Electric Light Hand Regulator, with Rotating table, $73; Adjustable Slot, $9; Wheel of Diaphragms, $6; Pair of Hollow Prisms, $15; Adapter, $3; Triple Tank, $6; Sodium Bank Experiment, $3.5°; Qualitative 13l0wpipe Set, complete, in Polisbed Mahogany Box, $35.

Students can obtain the necessary supplies mentioned on page 37 of the 1881 Catalogue.

MANUFACTURERS OF

Orders thankfully received and promptly attended to.


,.;lDVE<J?TlSEiAfENTS.

CH~TI.LES

*Ii OIIL'BUSCII,

xvi i

-".'NuFACTURKR OF-

-;+ FINE +BALANGE$ +&+WEIGHT$ -~:For any purposes. ANALYTICAL ASSAY

,\NlJ

BALANCES. PLATINUM ASSAY

GOODS. Prompt Attention given to Repairs .

. 35 Nassau Street, NEW YORK.

~~ OSGA~ ~:~ SI E BU ~G,~~

~"--P:>e)TME1~~N

184

YP

WA SHINGTO N STREET,

o<]C. F. GUTH,[>o

ARIISTIC .~~ RAIR .~ Ct:lIIER. ~Ra'e)in~ * a~ * J1ai'Z * S@)'Ze~~i'49' * ~a'Zfo'Z, 318 WASHINGTON ST., "lie/wun 811t alld 911t Streets,

Reducec1 Rates to Monthly Oustomers .

Hoboken, N. J.

Special Rates to .students.


.AD VE"l( TISEMENTS.

xviii

Harrls-Corl1ss Steam Engine. Built by" WILLIAM A. HARRIS, Providence, R. 1. FROM

10 to 1,OOO _- - -H- - - _

Horse Power, WITI[

Harris Improvements.

These ENGINES are of Unexcelled Workmanship, and are known the World over as the

Most Economical Steam En[ille Built. Send for a copy

E1Zghuers' 6-:1 Steam Users' lila nlla I, BY J. W. HIll, M.E"

Price.

-

-

$ 1. 25


oADVE<J?T/ SE:'1fENTS.

XI X

THE DEANE STEAM PUMP CO., HOLYOKE, MASS. NEW YORK, BOSTON, PHILADELPHIA, CHICAGO & ST. LOUIS. \1.\"Il F_\ CTURERS OF

-

STG" 1011 P {J3Il P I ., -'C /illA CIJ1:5\'61( Y OF EVER Y VA RI ETY.

Water Works Engines a Specialty. :

SEND FOR CATAlOGUE.

:

->rHALL DUPLEX STEAM PUMPI<- - II _ -

SEND FOR:CATALOGUE. ~

~(!{rr ~te:(!{m P>~mJi> @0mf>(!{f1~, ~ 91

LIJ3El\tty pTl\EET,

New

yOll~"~-


.A.DVE<J(TISE!:IfENTS.

xx

::: V. M. PArtERSON ' S ~:::

;{OBOI-\EN ~

](NEW YO ~ I-\ t&XP~ESS.

Agent for New York, Ontario and Western R. R., Philadelphia and Reading R. R.

0< Office, 254 Washington St., Hoboken.>O T ELEPHO NE 33, HOBOKE N.

New York Orders left at

302

Canal St., 119 \\ cst Ilrnatlway, 117 John St. and at the Fen y Building, Foot of Bnrclay Street.

->+WAREINg'~x NEW X OPERAx HOU~E'~<1\(lN l£ lJUT

F II~SJ1l '.. G LASS '..:- G OMBINAJ1lIO NS

0

WILL APPEAR.

H I RSCHBERG, ~ THE * HATTER ~ 168 Wash i r2Qton

Str.88t, IfOBOf/EN, N. J.

Cor. 41ft Sired,

Measures for Silk Hats taken by the Celebrated Conformeters.

ALBEB'r· S':(URKEN, MANUFACTURER OF

@1i7e @o7fectioner~, @}Ce @ream a~ @}ce~. 296 WASHINGTON STREET, Bet. 7th and 8th Sts.,

HOBO KEN, N. J.

Fam ilies, Part/es, Festival s, Exoursions, Eto., supplied at short notioe and at lowest rates.


oADVE1\TlSEiJJ1ENTS.

DO"'W'"N"

Axi

TO"'W'"N"

'PHOTO HG"A DQUcA RTERS -FOR-

STEVEN'S IN"STITUTE.

ROSS LENSES,

DEVELOPING AND PRINTING,

W '..

C..

CUE,E,EN7;

62 WILLIAM Sn~EET,

NEW YORK.

:H:. :H:. :::H:.ANKINS, DeaJer in all kinds of

Hardware & Mechanics' Tools, Lumber &Timber, S:a::IF 229

O:a::.A..N"I:)LE~7 ,

WASHINGTON

E'I'O_

STREET, HOBOKEN, N. J.

Corner 6th Street, TELEPHONE CALL , 6SA .

HORSMAN'S

Celebrated LAWN TENNIS. The " SPECIAL " Racket for ,886 used by best players.

Cnsillo,

EJ~cron &

Brighton Hockets, RetluctJd to $5.00. Agent for F. 11. Ayre's ChampiollshilJ Seud for 1'eunis C"talogue. Tennis Ball. Silecial rates to Cluos.

E . I.

HORSMAN, 80 &.

82 WILLIAM

STREET,

N . Y.


.AD VE"1?.TISEWENTS.

xxii

L. ::H:. BATES, DEALER IN

t

f1ercJie:£', IDi££e:£' @~ircJf'e:l"l' ~ ~ WALKING ·~· SHOES, ;~ AI.SO ,\

F ll LI. l.I i'a: OF

IN THE LATEST STYLES.

202 Washington Street, Hoboken. N. J. -

:BUY YOUR:-

7- -D BA '~fjl' ~1CI[:,'" ~}~} =~.,.> g ""," = _ J

'awiAT~"Ej'\ 'DJJ[J ATr

~.{-o

X ,II~~ = = ~~ = .=-= ~~ FRO\[

E. G. SOl1iMAN, 119

F u lton S treet, N evv- York. W Speoial Rates to Students,

~

V. VAN cJ\{OST7\.,. lNV, Publisher and Importer of

SCIENTIFIC

BOOKS,

28 Murray and 27 Warren Sts., (Up Stairs. )

NEW YORK.

98 Page Catalogue sent gratis on application. SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEX T

BOOKS AllS PECIALTY.


.AD VE"I( TISEtMENTS.

xxiii

NAEGELI'S HOTEL,

Cor, 3d and Hudson Sts.,

E_

HOBOKEN, N. J.

NAEGELI, I'"'OI~TFR.

COB~RG

AXil

GI!f'.:EI~'-\1.

.\GENT OF

'rlll'~

STOCK BEER COMPANY.

Orders jar Bottled Beer promptly attended to.

CHARLES LI~~ERr; i::' F ASH rONABLE <~,

LadiB$' and ~BnnIBmB~'$ Boon a~d ~hoBma~B~, 247

WASHINGTON STREET,

Between 6th and 7th Sts.,

HOBOI{EN, X. J.

REPAIRING DONE' NEA TLY AND OHEAP.

~~

GRIFFITH'S

~'(;

PHARMACY, *

D. W. SA RRY, Proprietor. 270

WASHINGTON STREET,

Corner Seven th Street,

T IfOS.

Opposite Trinity Church.

'l3.

STfLLllfAN, P EJ.

D.,

40 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. Assays of Ores and all Commercial I'roducts. Analytical Chemistry.

Pmdiml Courses or instruction Assaying ancl

Price lists and descriptive circulars furnished upon application.


.I/DVE<J?,.TfSEnrE.\T\路.

XXIV

$(?,HAPPER & BOf)ENBER~ , nUI路kl\lI .~I l\~t1h ll r!(,

al\t1 10 .Iohn St. , N. Y.

Steam Engine -.\Nn-

Boiler Appliances. (:1\ UGRS, for hteam, Hydraulic, Ammonia, G:t!';,

:ttld Air Vactllllrt.

Liftillg.

INJI':CTOH.S, Lifting and Non

EXII\I ST

THEH~IOM~:TEHS,

T ASI\1 KI"'RS.

and Gallges.

PU \11'5, for Testing nailers,

AND

Trains, Printtng

COU~TEHS.

RECORDERS,

l'ressc~,

Pipe~,

SPEED 1:<1for Railway

AUTO~IATIC

Pumps, .xc.

EX!' \NSrON REGULATORS ernors.

I"JECTORS,

ENGI'iE REGISTERS, with new,

improved movement. ()ICAT()RS

STI,:,nr

l'YRO\JETEHS, TllALPO-

for Engine Gov.

WATCHMAN'S CO'lTROL WATCII,

RI':])l CIN" VALVES, FUSIBLE PLUGS, LOW WATER DETECTORS, &e.

<><J A.

BOGARDUS & CO .. r:禄

WE MAKE THE FINEST WORK At lxe[lI"lorlnl )IG 1 'rjCG~.

I NSTANTANEOUS PICTURES IN PEH.FECT I ON.

IJroad7.ual' ~

J

Corner fL~'th Street.

NO BRANCH ES,


oADVE"1(TISEtMENTS.

xxv

M [XTURES FOR P [ PE OR CIGARETTE.

THREE KINGS, T URKISH. PER IQU E AND VI RGIN IA. MELLOW MI XTURE, T URKISH AND PERIQUE TURKI SH AND VIRGINIA. PE RIQ UE AND VIRGINIA . GENUINE TURKI SH. FLAKE CUTS, ESPEC[ALLY ADAPTED FOR THE PIPE.

VANITY FAIR.

OLD COLD.

SALMAGUNDI , GRANULATED- A NEW MIXTURE.

Fragrant Vanity Fair, Superlative and Cloth of Gold Cigarettes, REgAL AND NOBLE$$[ Our Clgarettes were never so fine as now; they cannot be surpassed for purity and excellence.

rice paper used.

Only the purest

ESTABLISHED 1846, 14 FIRST PRI Z E MEDALS.

WM. S. KIMBALL & CO., PEERLESS TOBACCO WORKS ,

ROCH ESTER, N . Y .

RICHARDS & CO., WHOLESALE IMPORTERS

or

CHEMICAL APPARATUS, N o . 2 4 "W' I-I I TEHA LL S T R EET, NEW YO RK.


xxvi

oADVE'l?TI SEtMENTS.

KEUFFEL & ESSER, 127 Fulton Street. a n d 44 An n S t ., Nevv York. I\fl'OR'1 F.RS ":\Il M\"UFAC'II IRERS OF

DRAWING PAPERS, TRACING CLOTH, D l( A TYliVG .11",1 7E7(f A L S,

Surveyi ng In s trum e nts, Cha in s, I{,ods, E tc. EXCELSIOR MEASURING TAPES ,

ANERO I D AND MER CURI A L BAR OMETERS. SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE.

F. W . DEVOE & CO., (ESTABLISHED

1852.)

FULTON STREET, COR. W ILLIAM, NEW YORK, MANUFACTURERS OF

-AND-

ENGINEERS' S(dPPLIES,

Dra'wz'71g-, Cross S ectz'071 and B lue P rillt P apers. ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUES ON REQUEST.

ARTISTS"

l.\l[ATERIAL S _


.AD VE "l\ T ISEiMENTS.

xxvii

T:a:: E

= ~

5'"f' Ei Y

?~~

Fl ~ ;\. N

e) ~

Used exclusively Unexcelled in by the

TONE NEW YORK and

CONSERV ATORY DURABILITY. OF MUSIC.

Is fad becoming tlte Favorite by all L eading Artists. VVAREROOMS:

FlG. 5

E@st

RGUPU88Quh ~ tJr.88t,

NEW YORK CI TY.


~P2Sm8-B~€i~.fl1¥rFl€i 67 - 71 '

PAR~~ .~.

as.,

PIJAGE . •

DESIGNING AND ENGRAVING FOR ALL PURPOSES. We give Special Attention to College and School Work. THE CUTS IN THIS BOOK INERE MADE BY US.


THE JUDSON PRINTING COR., COLLEGE PRINTERS. PRINTERS OF THE DELTA KAPPA EPSILON QUARTERLY. DELTA UPSILON QUARTERLY. PHI GAMMA DELTA QUARTERLY. PSI UPSILON DIAMOND THE WILLIAMS" GULli OF '87. THE DARTMOUTH AEGIS OF '87' THE COLUMBIA COLUMBIAD OF

~7'

THE MADISON SALMAGUNDI OF '85 AND '8ยง. THE STEVENS INSTITUTE ECCENTRIC OF '86.

ALL CLASSES OF COLLEGE WORK. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.

16

BEEKMAN STREE~

NEW YORK.

1886 Eccentric  

1886 Eccentric

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