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CON TEN T S F o r e w o r d .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 I n t r o d u c t i o n .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 S E C T I O N 1: S E T T I N G U P T H E B A R BAR DESIGN

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G L A S S WA R E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

B A R T O O L S .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 0 E Q U I P M E N T .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3

ESSENTIAL MIXERS AND GARNISHES .. . . . . . . . . . . . 2 4

TECH NIQUE S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 T H E P D T E X P E R I E N C E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 6 SECTION 2: THE RECIPE S C O C K TA I L S .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 0

H O T D O G S .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 74 S E CT IO N 3: T H E B AC K B A R S P I R I T S P R I M E R .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 9 4 T H E P D T PA N T R Y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318

S E A S O N A L M I X O L O G Y .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 4 T H E H O M E B A R T E N D E R .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 4

E T I Q U E T T E .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 6 Resource Guide........................................... 338 T he B ar tender ’s L ibr ar y. ................................ 342 A c k n o w l e d g m e n t s .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 6 0 I n d e x .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 6 2

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BAR TOOLS As bartending has evolved over the last decade, a handful of cocktail bartenders have imported or helped design better tools to get the job done. Professional barware has helped reposition bartending alongside cooking as a noble trade in America. Until recently, many of the items on this list were unavailable in the United States and difficult to source. Like cooks in a starred restaurant, the top bartenders bring their favorite tools to work. Here are the tools we stock behind the bar at PDT.

Absinthe Spoon

Absinthe Fountain

Atomizer

Bar Spoons

Bitters Bottles

16 oz. Blue Blazer Mugs

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18 oz. and 28 oz. Boston Shaker

Champagne Stopper

Channel Knife

Citrus Press

Cobbler Shaker

Cutting Board

Fine Strainer

Funnel

Garnish Spoons

Ice Cube Tray

Ice Pick

Ice Scoop

B a r To ols

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BL ACK JACK In 2009, Gonçalo de Sousa Monteiro lead a delegation of bartenders from Berlin who mixed a selection of original recipes and classics at PDT.

1.5 oz. Pierre Ferrand Ambre Cognac .5 oz. Clear Creek Kirschwasser .5 oz. 9th Street Alphabet City Coffee Concentrate .25 oz. Demerara Syrup Shake with ice and strain into a chilled coupe Garnish with three cherries on a pick —Jacques Straub, Drinks, 1914

9th Street Alphabet City Coffee Concentrate 80 oz. Filtered Water .5 lb. Coarse-Ground 9th Street Alphabet City Coffee Blend Steep for 12 hours at room temperature using a Toddy Coldbrew System Fine-strain, bottle, and store in the refrigerator Yield: approx. 68 oz.

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The Recipes

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B L A C K S TA R The Blackstar was created with Smirnoff Black, a full-bodied vodka that isn’t available in the U.S., and named after the whole star anise pod that floats on the surface as an aromatic garnish.

2 .75 .75 .25 .25

oz. Smirnoff Black Vodka oz. Lime Juice oz. Grapefruit Juice oz. Borsci Sambuca oz. Simple Syrup

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled coupe Garnish with a star anise pod —Jim Meehan, New York, 2007

Cocktails

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CR A N B E R R Y CO B B L E R Cranberries are the last berries available before winter settles in in the Northeast. We used them to make a classic cobbler, fortified with English gin and a historic style of off-dry Sherry.

2 oz. Beefeater Gin .75 oz. Lustau East India Sherry .5 oz. Cranberry Syrup 7 Macerated Cranberries (reserve 3 for garnish) 1 Orange Wheel 1 Lemon Wedge

Add the citrus, cranberries and syrup to a mixing glass and muddle Add everything else, then shake with ice and strain into a chilled rocks glass filled with pebble ice Garnish with a mint sprig and three macerated cranberries —Michael Madrusan and Jim Meehan, Winter 2007

Cranberry Simple Syrup & Macerated Cranberries 16 oz. Simple Syrup 1 8-oz. bag Cranberries: frozen is fine Heat the simple syrup until it almost boils, then turn the heat down to medium and add the cranberries. Once the skin of the first few cranberries splits, remove from heat and allow to cool. Bottle a portion of the syrup and reserve the rest to store with the cranberries in the refrigerator. Yield: approx. 31 oz.

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The Recipes

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F LY IN G D U T CH M A N An ancestor of the Aviation Cocktail, the name references Dutch genever, not the cursed ship forever lost at sea.

.75 oz. .75 oz. .5 oz. .5 oz. .5 oz. 1 barspoon

Clear Creek Plum Brandy Bols Genever Crème Yvette Lemon Juice Pineapple Juice Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled coupe Garnish with one brandied cherry —Jim Meehan, Winter 2009

F O G CU T T E R Tiki historian Jeff Berry called this drink “the Long Island Iced Tea of exotic drinks.”

1.5 1 1 .75 .5 .5

oz. Lemon Juice oz. Bacardi 8 Rum oz. Hine V.S.O.P. Cognac oz. Orange Juice oz. Tanqueray Gin oz. Kassatly Chtaura Orgeat

Shake with ice and pour unstrained into a chilled tiki mug Float .5 oz. of Lustau Cream Sherry Garnish with a mint sprig —Jules Bergeron, Trader Vic’s Bartender’s Guide, 1947

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M A N H AT TA N Regardless of the cocktail’s exact origin, the popularity of Italian vermouth in the latter half of the 19th century made it inevitable that it would eventually end up in the Whiskey Cocktail.

2 oz. Wild Turkey Rye Whiskey 1 oz. Martini Sweet Vermouth 2 dashes Angostura Bitters Stir with ice and strain into a chilled coupe Garnish with three brandied cherries on a pick —O. H. Byron, Modern Bartender’s Guide, 1884

M A R G A R I TA Margarita is Spanish for “ daisy,” a style of sour originally sweetened with curaçao.

2 .75 .75 .25

oz. oz. oz. oz.

El Tesoro Platinum Tequila Cointreau Lime Juice Agave Syrup

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled rocks glass filled with ice or a chilled coupe (optional salt rim) Garnish with a lime wheel —Picador Cocktail listed in W. J. Tarling’s Café Royal Cocktail Book, 1937

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HO T DOG S A night at PDT wouldn’t be complete without the hot dogs we serve through two small metal doors that connect the Crif Dogs counter to PDT. These recipes reveal the secret toppings of a few of our loyal customers who also happen to be some of the best chefs in the world: Wylie Dufresne of WD-50, David Chang of Momofuku, and Daniel Humm of Eleven Madison Park, among others. Here, too, are some Crif Dog specialties, like the John John Deragon.

HUMMER Crif Dogs/PDT is across the street from an Israeli grocery store called Holyland Market and down the block from the Hummus Place. It was inevitable, we think, that our hot dogs would want to get in on the chickpea action.

Oil for frying 8 Vegetarian Hot Dogs, cut in half lengthwise 8 Hot Dog Buns 1 8- or 10-oz. Container Hummus 16 Israeli Cucumber Pickles, sliced in half lengthwise 1/2 cup or so Israeli Pickled Hot Peppers, sliced crosswise into 1/8-inch- thick discs 1. Heat a griddle or wide skillet (preferably cast iron) over medium-high heat. After a minute, slick it with oil. Arrange the dogs, cut side down, on the cooking surface and cook until browned and crisped, about 5 minutes. 2. Build the hot dog: Reunite griddled dog halves so the dog looks whole again. Nestle it into a bun and schmear it with a heaping tablespoon of hummus. (At the restaurant, we put the hummus in a squeeze bottle and zigzag it on.) Arrange the sliced pickles between the dog and the bun: they should flank it like Secret Service agents. Scatter sliced pickled 274

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peppers over the top—enough to give the dog a kick, but not so much that they hide the hummus from view. Serve at once. Note: For the hummus, Sabra, a widely available brand, is what we use. The Israeli cucumber pickles are from Kvuzat Yavne Food Products, a kibbutz that makes pickled products in the Holy Land, but any small, dense, smoother- skinned pickles will do. And the pickled peppers from Israeli stores have a hot pepper kick, but won’t give anyone heartburn. If you don’t have access to a Middle Eastern grocery, any Italian or Italian-American brand of pepperoncini should do the trick. For 8

H o t D o g s 275

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on sale NOVEMber 2011

advance reading copy · not for sale Beautifully illustrated, beautifully designed, and beautifully crafted— just like its namesake—this is the ultimate bar book by NYC’s most meticulous bartender. To say that PDT is a unique bar is an understatement. It recalls the era of hidden Prohibition speakeasies: to gain access, you walk into a raucous hot dog stand, step into a phone booth, and get permission to enter the serene cocktail lounge. Now, Jim Meehan, PDT’s innovative operator and mixmaster, is revolutionizing bar books, too, offering all 304 cocktail recipes available at PDT plus behind-the-scenes secrets. From his bar design, tools, and equipment to his techniques, food, and spirits, it’s all here, stunningly illustrated by Chris Gall.

• National publicity • Features and reviews in spirits and general interest magazines • Newspaper coverage in entertainment and book review sections • Online coverage and recipe excerpts on spirits blogs and entertaining websites • Cross promotions with liquor brands featured in book • Events in New York City Jim Meehan, a bartender, educator, and writer, has worked at some of New York City’s most popular restaurants and bars, including Five Points, Gramercy Tavern, Pegu Club, and PDT. Meehan has edited numerous editions of Food & Wine Magazine’s annual cocktail book, Mr. Boston’s Bartender Guide, and writes a monthly column for Sommelier Journal. In 2007 and 2008, he was recognized as a rising star mixologist by Star Chefs.com and Cheers Magazine, and in 2009, he was named American Bartender of the Year at Tales of the Cocktail. He lives and works in New York City’s East Village with his wife, Valerie, and French Bulldog, Pearl.

Award-winning illustrator and author Chris Gall has created artwork for clients all over the world, from logos to gigantic murals. His work has been showcased in virtually every major publication in America, and has received more than fifty major awards from the likes of the Society of Illustrators and Communication Arts Magazine. Millions of New Yorkers will recognize Gall’s “Flying Fish,” which was commissioned by the MTA for display throughout the New York subway system. He resides in Tucson, Arizona, with his wife, Ann.

Reviewers are reminded that changes may be made in this uncorrected proof before books are printed. If any material from the book is to be quoted in a review, the quotation should be checked against the final bound book. Dates, prices, and manufacturing details are subject to change or cancellation without notice.

For more information, contact Leah Eagel at 646-688-2557 or leagel@sterlingpublishing.com Culinary/Wines & Spirits November 2011 $24.95 ($29.95 Can) Hardcover 5 3/8 x 8 1/4 | 368 pages Sterling Epicure | 978-1-4027-7923-7


The PDT Cocktail Book