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UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE v olume 1 | issue 3 | s p e c i a l E dition : T he c a de de c a de

S O U T H E R N A L B E R TA M A G A Z I N E


plunging in I met Dr. Bill Cade on Dec.15, 1999. It was a month after I started at the University of Lethbridge, and it was his first official visit to campus after accepting the job of president and vice-chancellor. I had the pleasure of interviewing him and having him photographed for upcoming University publications. Yes, I was naïve enough to think he would graciously climb to the top of the high diving board of the Max Bell pool to indulge my “taking the plunge” analogy – he did. Never once did I think, “What if he won’t? What if he thinks the idea is stupid? Or, god forbid, what if he is afraid of heights?” For those of you who know Bill, he is a good sport and over the last 10 years we have used many methods to fly the U of L flag – indoor fireworks, confetti cannons, province-wide distribution of University publications, a new mascot. We celebrated many successes, from building openings to national championships, school anniversaries to alumni homecomings, celebrity visitors to multi-million dollar research awards. So how do you say goodbye to someone who you have known and worked with for more than a decade? Someone who has put up with your crazy ideas and supported your somewhat untraditional efforts to tell the U of L story? Quite simply: you say, thank you. Thank you, Bill and Elsa, for everything. This issue of SAM is a tribute to you and the time we are affectionately calling the Cade Decade. Enjoy!

Tanya Jacobson-Gundlock, Editor

EDITOR: Tanya Jacobson-Gundlock ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Jana McFarland DESIGNER: Stephenie Karsten FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHER: Rod Leland ILLUSTRATOR: Steve O’Brien

WRITERS: Natasha Evdokimoff Trevor Kenney Jana McFarland Kali McKay Bob Cooney PROOFREADER/ FACT CHECKER: Betsy Greenlees CONTRIBUTORS: Lynette LaCroix Maureen Schwartz

PRINTING: PrintWest SAM is published by University Advancement at the University of Lethbridge three times annually. The opinions expressed or implied in the publication do not necessarily reflect those of the University of Lethbridge Board of Governors. Submissions in the form of letters, articles, story ideas or notices of events are welcome.

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At 11 years old, Dr. Noëlla Piquette-Tomei was already concerned about the marginalized. Today, she shares her life-lessons with educators around the world.

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Who would suspect that a new media major would end up researching the addictive nature of gambling? Here is Greg Christie’s unusual path to studying science.

From the outside looking in

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DVOCATE TE CHARACTER CH C HAR HA RACTE AC A CTTEER AADVOCATE Artist Dr. Hiroshi Shimazaki shares how memories of a trip to Mexico led to a tribute painting.

Measuring the odds

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Lasting impressions

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Alma matters

News and notes from former classmates including a basketball team admitted to the Lethbridge Sports Hall of Fame, new partners at V I S I O N A R Y Munton & Co. and more… P E R S O N A B L E

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With her fun-loving personality, it’s not just her hats that set Elsa Cade apart.

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Sure, “fun” might be the last thing that comes to mind when you think of fundraising… but here’s a new take on the topic.

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SUP Fond memories SUPPORTIVE Adventures in SUPPORTIVE E Philanthropy and farewells

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Read about a memorable reunion from the spring, and keep up-to-date on events taking place this summer.

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Alumni News & Events

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A look at the transformations of the U of L campus V I S I and its culture in 3,650 days.

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D Y N A M I C Special edition: The Cade Decade P E R S O N A B L E

What do a plush cricket toy, western novel and cactus all have in common?

SAM is distributed free of charge. To subscribe, unsubscribe or change your address, please contact us. SAM – University Advancement University of Lethbridge 4401 University Drive West Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 Toll-free: 1-866-552-2582 E-mail: sam@uleth.ca www.ulethbridge.ca

U N I V E R S I T Y

Call it clutter with a purpose

It’s been a full spring with the announcement of two new deans, an act of generosity from an icon in the music industry, multimillion dollar funding from the government, a U of L faculty member who made Canada’s Top 40 Under 40TM... and that’s just to mention a few of the highlights.

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The Cade Decade When President Dr. Bill Cade first laid eyes on the University of Lethbridge in 2000, he saw an institution on the verge of a growth spurt, ready to come of age. Still not completely sure of its identity, the U of L was a young, emerging University poised to break out of its adolescence. A decade later, as Cade prepares to wrap up his 10-year presidency, he sees an entirely different picture – the U of L’s growth as a comprehensive university reflected by its stunning physical profile atop the Oldman River valley. “I think it was a well-kept secret,” says Cade of the University when he arrived on campus. “I think we were known well in some quarters, but I thought we needed to become more well-known in others. “Today, I love to stand on the other side of the river with my dogs and look at the campus. I especially like it when the lights are on in the new stadium.” The Community Sports Stadium is the most recent addition to campus (it opened in September of 2009), and when Markin Hall opens this fall (Cade will return for the ceremony), it will bookend the Cade Decade, a 10-year period of unprecedented expansion and self-awareness at the U of L. “For the past 10 years, as Bill and I worked together to advance the University’s relationships with Canada and Alberta, he has been a visionary and dynamic force to identify and further the goals of programs, advancement and infrastructure development,” says Dr. Jim Horsman (LLD ’04 ), U of L chancellor emeritus (1999-2003) and a former member of the Board of Governors.

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The building boom was just beginning in 2000 with the addition of Anderson Hall, a multi-purpose classroom and office facility. A year later, the $34 million Library Information Network Centre (LINC) and Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience (CCBN) would follow, and while their planning had begun before Cade’s arrival, it was he who introduced the new U of L look to the broader community. It was a role he was ideally suited to perform. “Bill is the greatest cheerleader the University has ever seen – it must be the Texan in him,” says Greg Weadick (BSc ’77), MLA for Lethbridge West. “Under his watch, the U of L has become a stronger community partner and a source of immense pride for all southern Albertans.” Cade recognized early that the U of L had a great story to tell, and a southern Alberta community eager to not only listen to that story but become a part of it, too.

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“Initially, I don’t think I had an appreciation for the prominence of the University and the office of the president in this community, and that turned out to be one of the very enjoyable aspects of the job,” says Cade. His previous position, at Brock University in St. Catharines, Ont., did not afford that luxury. Whereas Brock was one of many players in the eightmillion person Golden Horseshoe region of southern Ontario, the U of L is a benchmark southern Alberta industry. “When Dr. and Mrs. Cade arrived in Lethbridge, it became clear quite quickly that their outgoing and positive approach to community involvement was going to make a difference in the connection between the community and the University,” says Cheryl Dick, chief executive officer, Economic Development Lethbridge. “The University has grown during his tenure through new facilities, but its footprint has also grown in terms

of influence. By association, the reputation and respect of our city has also increased.” Cade and the University couldn’t accomplish this simply by putting up buildings. Growth for the sake of growth, in Cade’s own words, “is stupid,” and what the University was able to do over the last 10 years was identify areas of need and create programming that connected with emerging trends. “We grew because we’re in the business of admitting students to the University, we’re not in the business of excluding them. I’ve always been proud of that fact,” says Cade. Already blessed with a solid base of undergraduate programs, the University sought to increase its presence in the graduate world. The spring following Cade’s installment saw the CCBN taking shape and the first doctoral students for the University’s PhD in Neuroscience program being accepted.

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While expanding graduate programming along with the University’s research portfolio stood out as key priorities, to do so required money – a lot of money. The answer came in the form of an advancement office. “I’d learned the advancement structure at Brock, and I enjoyed asking for money,” says Cade. “It’s easy to ask if you’ve got people who know what they’re doing and will point you in the right direction. I thought building our reputation, letting people know who we are and what we were doing was a real priority. “Asking for money is the easiest part of it; the hardest part is building up to it. If you’ve done the proper work leading up to it, I think you’re OK to ask.” As funding for graduate programming grew, so did the University’s research portfolio. In the past 10 years, the U of L’s research funding has soared a phenomenal 610 per cent, taking what was a primarily undergraduate university to a research-intensive, compre-

Dr. Allan Markin


T he C ade D ecade

“If you had told me 10 years ago that all of these things would be happening on campus, I would have thought it was wishful thinking.”

hensive university with a focus on both undergraduate and graduate studies. The University’s Community of Research Excellence Development Opportunities (CREDO) initiative, a new grant program for researchers in the social sciences, humanities, fine arts, education and management, was established. The U of L’s allocation of Canada Research Chairs, nine, was met, and unique, issue-driven programs such as the Alberta Ingenuity Centre for Water Research were established. In 2008, the Alberta Water and Environmental Science Building (AWESB) opened, and in 2009, the U of L attracted foremost neuroscientist Dr. Bruce McNaughton and $20 million in funding to the CCBN, earning the inaugural Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research Polaris Award. “The research side of our mandate has certainly grown tremendously and is as high a quality as you could find around the country and around the world,” says Cade, noting that the University has worked hard to maintain its foundation of providing a personal, supportive small-school approach. “We’ve done that while keeping our undergraduate and graduate programming very strong as well. If you don’t grow in terms of new programs and evolve your interests in other

degrees, you stagnate, and if you’re starting to stagnate by resting on your laurels, you’re in trouble.” Modestly, Cade is the first to admit that some of the University’s growth was a matter of being in the right place at the right time. While the U of L worked hard to create the community alliances necessary to open the new 1st Choice Savings Centre for Sport and Wellness in 2007, the Community Sports Stadium, a crown jewel for southern Alberta sport, was basically dropped on the University’s doorstep. “Clearly there were things that we went after and we got them, but there were things that came out of the blue. Serendipity is a wonderful thing,” says Cade. “We didn’t see the stadium coming, we didn’t know that was something the city would propose, but seizing the opportunity is a really important part of it; that’s something the University has done since its inception, seize opportunities.” With more than 8,000 students, a new home for the Faculties of Health Sciences and Management ready to open and a continually emerging research presence established, is Cade comfortable with how he is leaving the U of L?

Dr. Bill Cade

“At the risk of sounding egotistical, yes, I think so,” he says. “I think in terms of our academic development and in terms of having a functioning advancement office and having an outstanding faculty and good facilities, yes, I think so. There’s always more you can do, but I feel pretty satisfied.” He pays no heed to trying to write his own legacy. “I hope I have a legacy,” he laughs. “I feel extremely good about the University. It is without question the most satisfying experience of my professional life. But as to a legacy? Somebody else has to figure that one out.” Perhaps it’s the western skyline that will tell his story, now pierced by the glass and steel that represent a transformed campus and a new, confident identity. “I scan the horizon and I can see the new stadium, the residences we put in, I can see Markin Hall rising, and from a certain vantage point you can see the Alberta Terrestrial Imaging Centre satellite dish, the AWESB and, of course, the new gymnasium. If you had told me 10 years ago that all of these things would be happening on campus, I would have thought it was wishful thinking.”

2000 • Dr. Bill Cade officially jumps into his new role as president and vice-chancellor of the University of Lethbridge. • The U of L actively takes steps toward moving from a small, undergraduate institution to a comprehensive university – the first graduate students are admitted into the Master of Science in Management program, as well as the first doctorate students to the PhD Neuroscience program.

2001 • The University recognizes its third Rhodes scholar, Russell Goodman. • On the first day of fall classes, the $34 million Library Information Network Centre (LINC) opens. The 201,922 square foot facility stands as one the largest construction projects to take place on campus since the completion of University Hall in 1971. • Two months later, the University celebrates the opening of the $7.3 million Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience. As the only research building of its kind in Canada, it helps lay the foundation for the U of L to emerge as an expert in the mysteries of the mind.

2002 • The traditional Blackfoot name, Medicine Rock, is given to the University to recognize its 35th Anniversary.

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the cade decade

2003

2006

• Six new townhouse units open to house 96 students in 24 four-bedroom suites. The $6.15 million expansion project also includes the construction of a 5,000 square foot amenities building.

• A year of milestones: the University proudly holds its 100th convocation ceremony, while the Faculty of Management celebrates its 25th anniversary.

2004

• President Dr. Bill Cade is inducted into Kainai chieftainship, a group limited to 40 living individuals recognized by members of the Blood Tribe for their service to the community.

• Continuing to meet students’ needs, doctoral degrees offered at the U of L grow to include Bio-molecular Science; Biosystems and Biodiversity; Earth, Space and Physical Sciences; Evolution and Behaviour; and Theoretical and Computational Science. • At spring convocation, the first graduates of the neuroscience PhD program cross the stage.

2005 • The U of L continues to grow beyond anyone’s greatest expectations, and in September, combined enrolment for the U of L’s Lethbridge, Calgary and Edmonton campuses exceeds 8,000 students. • As plans form to build a new regional health and wellness centre, students agree to contribute $2.5 million and the City of Lethbridge approves a $5.3 million contribution. • Then-Premier Ralph Klein visits the Lethbridge campus at the end of October to announce $1.2 million in provincial funding to help purchase scientific equipment for the Alberta Terrestrial Imaging Centre. • A $3 million donation from Dr. Allan Markin kicks off the Legacy of Leadership campaign – the most ambitious campaign in the U of L’s history.

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• The Prentice family announces an $8.25 million gift to establish the Prentice Institute for Global Population and Economy.

2007 • The University of Lethbridge launches its 40th anniversary celebrations at the grand opening of the 1st Choice Savings Centre for Sport and Wellness, with more than 2,000 people attending the celebration. • The Government of Alberta invests more than $78 million toward developing the U of L campus, including Markin Hall, University Hall and the Alberta Water and Environmental Science Building (AWESB).

2008 • With more than $35 million raised, the Legacy of Leadership Campaign concludes. When combined with government funding, the result is a $113 million investment in the U of L. • The U of L is the recipient of the inaugural Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research Polaris Award, which brings Dr. Bruce McNaughton, one of the world’s foremost brain scientists, and $20 million in research funding to the U of L’s CCBN.

• The U of L campus continues to transform with the opening of both Turcotte Hall and the AWESB. The AWESB brings experts together and allows for up to 100 new graduate students.

2009 • The University charts its course for the next five years with the release of the 2009-2013 Strategic Plan. The plan affirms what has taken place and promises to stay true to what the University has done well, while making a call to move into a more comprehensive framework and to expand graduate programs. • In March, President Dr. Bill Cade announces he will step down at the completion of his second term. • In late September, the new Community Sports Stadium officially opens. Built on partnerships, the estimated $12 million multi-purpose, public-access facility is equipped with an artificial field, a natural practice field, a 400-metre synthetic track and bleachers for 2,000 fans. • The School of Graduate Studies celebrates its 25th anniversary. • Pronghorns women’s rugby team successfully claims its third straight CIS national title. • Just before the new year, Dr. Michael Mahon is appointed as the U of L’s next president.

2010 • The U of L celebrates with its littlest members and opens a daycare facility. • The U of L community bids farewell to President Dr. Bill Cade and wife Elsa while looking forward to another decade of success and growth.

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Call it Clutter with a

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University of Lethbridge President Dr. Bill Cade has collected a carefully constructed mass of objects that fill his office. One wall of windows overlooks the Oldman River, while another is lined with bookshelves housing artifacts that connect Cade to his travels, colleagues, students and interesting experiences or people he has met. Space is reserved for his trusty office mates Stan, Stella and Steve, a trio of African veiled chameleons, who occupy well-appointed cages within arm’s reach of Cade’s desk space.

The overall result is one of continual surprise, a beginning for many conversations and a clear sense that this is an office occupied by a curious person who isn’t afraid to put a South Park talking-cartoon key chain on his desk. With Cade’s open-door policy, many people have seen the space at some point in time, but for those who have not had the pleasure of sitting in his office, here is a snapshot of the “so-called clutter” and just a few of the many stories behind the objects.


A. ABORIGINAL ARTIFACTS

B. Skeletons Quick: which one is the turtle? Not many people get it right, and most people have no clue what the skeletons are, unless of course, they ask.

During his time in southern Alberta, Cade has developed a relationship based on a mutual respect with the First Nations community. Several gifts remind him of this: a pair of eagle feathers given to him by a student representative of the U of L Native American Students’ Association, as well as commemorative images of his induction into the Kainai chieftainship.

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E. ELEPHANT DUNG

F. CRICKET CAGES

Collected in Africa, this specimen the size of a bowling ball is from a herd of elephants that came though Cade’s camp at 4:30 a.m. in search of food. To distract them, Cade got out of his tent, waved a flashlight in one of the elephant’s face and tossed rocks at it. By startling it, Cade narrowly prevented his truck from being wrecked.

As a researcher of crickets, Cade’s natural interest in these tiny, vocal insects and their communication and mating habits is well known. For years, people have given him cricket enclosures, ranging from fancy to plain, which are used in some cultures to keep crickets for good luck or to transport crickets en route to cricket fights.

G. AUTOGRAPHED MEMORABILIA Reflecting Cade’s Pronghorn pride, this autographed basketball was a gift from the 2009/2010 men’s team and was signed by the players as well as the1999/2000 men’s team during a recent alumni reunion and game.

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H. THE KILLING TRAIL A paperback western story about a man named Jubal Cade who is “Trained to Heal but Born to Kill” sits on Cade’s desk. The fact that Cade shares his last name with a character in a pulp fiction western makes him laugh.


I. CRICKET SYMPHONY This trio of green crickets was a gift from a colleague at Brock University, Josephine Meeker, who encouraged Cade to move forward in his career and run for dean of the Faculty of Mathematics and Science at Brock University, a position he formerly held that served as a steppingstone to his presidency at the U of L.

C. CHIRPING TOYS

D. Prickly Corner

As people found out about Cade’s research, cricket toys started to appear. He uses them as a teaching tool for young children (and some adults) who visit. The most important fact people need to remember is that Disney got it wrong: Jiminy Cricket did not have six legs, as most insects would; he had four. And, crickets don’t wear gloves.

You don’t want to trip and fall into the northeast corner of the office lest you meet this cactus. Brought from Texas years ago, it has now reached beyond the ceiling multiple times and its offspring can be found throughout the U of L campus.

J. Antilocapra Americana Cade’s interest in the U of L pronghorn symbol started as simple curiosity then grew. He found pronghorn stamps dating to the late 1950s and others have given him pronghorn stuffed toys, sculptures and items related to the second-fastest land mammal.

K. HOOK ‘EM HORNS! The “other” horns, that is. A proud dual citizen of the United States and Canada, Cade is a triple-degree graduate of the University of Texas at Austin and a fan of the legendary UT Longhorns teams.

L. STAN, STELLA AND STEVE Common names for very uncommon office guests, this chameleon trio, known fondly as Stan, Stella and Steve, have it pretty good with constant visitors, a spectacular view and an endless supply of their favourite food, crickets.

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“The Cades have inspired many to give back.� Dan Laplante

Adventures in

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Actions speak louder than words – it’s an old adage and the message is repeated in numerous phrases such as “practice what you preach” and “put your money where your mouth is.” These sayings reflect the understanding that, at its very essence, philanthropy is personal and intimate, something that requires individual sacrifice. Together, University of Lethbridge President Dr. Bill Cade and his wife, Elsa, are a living testament to this truth. When they came to the University, Elsa expressed a desire to be part of the U of L team. Now, with 10 years of service coming to a close, it’s undeniable: these philanthropists believe in their cause. As the presidential couple, Bill and Elsa have served as frontline fundraising ambassadors; encouraging community members, government officials, faculty, staff and even students to support the goals of

To date, the couple has contributed more than $100,000 personally and supported initiatives as diverse as student awards, athletics and the library. This past spring, the Cades donated their long-loved BMW to the Students’ Union to be raffled off in support of student scholarships. Michael Nolan, as the car is affectionately named, illustrates the playful energy and enthusiasm characteristic of Bill and Elsa, who have always made students their priority. Christine Michell is one such student who has benefited first-hand from the Cades’ generosity. As a recipient of the Bill Cade and Elsa

important to Dr. Cade,” says Michell, who jokingly hopes the president isn’t too disappointed that she studies birds instead of insects. Michell emphasizes that she admired Bill’s dedication to students throughout her time at the U of L. “He’s been a visible presence on campus. As a biology student, I saw him in the department and at the seminar presentations for the students who work in his lab. He says hello in the halls and attends as many student events as he can,” says Michell, who admits his approach isn’t what she expected.

• The endowment for the Bill Cade and Elsa Salazar Cade Scholarship in Evolutionary Ecology has reached close to $130,000, providing tangible opportunities for students like Christine Michell. • Bill and Elsa have shown their Pronghorn Pride by sponsoring a male and a female athlete through the Adopta-Horn program each year. “The financial support Bill and Elsa have provided to athletics over the years is substantial,” says Executive Director of Sport and Recreation Services Sandy Slavin. “But more importantly, they’ve helped foster a sense of pride in Pronghorn athletics. Their enthusiasm for giving back is contagious, and they have encouraged many others to get involved.”

PHILANTHROPY the University. But what made their requests so powerful, and ultimately successful, was the example they set themselves.

Salazar Cade Scholarship in Evolutionary Ecology, Michell was able to move her interest in animal ecology from the classroom to the field.

“Bill and Elsa have been incredibly generous volunteers and donors at the University of Lethbridge and in their community,” says Dan Laplante (BMgt ’88), the president of CTE Ltd. and Chair of the U of L’s Legacy of Leadership Campaign, which wrapped up in 2007.

“I’ve spent three summers doing field work in animal ecology,” explains Michell, who graduated in June with a combined degree in biology and education. “These were great experiences and they wouldn’t have been possible without the scholarship I received.”

“Their support has been given quietly, but has not gone unnoticed by the many students, alumni, faculty, staff and community members who have seen the impact of this philanthropy. The Cades have inspired many to give back.”

In addition, as a fellow biologist, Michell is flattered to be funded specifically for her work in evolutionary ecology. “It’s an honour to be recognized for my work in an area that’s obviously so

The Cades’ philanthropy is driven by the spirit of generosity that Michell describes. The role of the presidential couple is a busy one, but Bill and Elsa have graciously volunteered countless hours to both the University and the broader community, going above and beyond the call of duty to help. No matter what the project or initiative, whether raising funds for a new building or a new student program, the Cades don’t just talk the talk, they walk the walk, creatively making their gifts and believing in the results of the support they provide.

• In support of the recovery and disaster relief efforts underway in Haiti, Elsa encouraged the support of ShelterBox, a Rotary International campaign aimed at providing necessities in times of disaster. As a result of Elsa’s efforts, 130 ShelterBoxes, each worth $1,000 US, were purchased and sent to Haiti. • The Cades’ BMW, Michael Nolan, made appearances on campus and brought in ticket sales from faculty, staff, students and community members. With matching money from the Government of Alberta’s Access to the Future Fund and an additional contribution from the U of L Board of Governors, the campaign raised more than $30,000 toward a student scholarship in honour of Bill and Elsa. As for Michael Nolan, the car found a new home with student winner Joshua Og.

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U N I V E R S I T Y

We asked for your memories, parting words and what you’ve most appreciated about outgoing U of L President Dr. Bill Cade. Your answers poured in. Here, in your words, a collection of just some of the many tributes we received...

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considerate and above all, focused on the needs of students. Bill and Elsa have played important parts in the University of Lethbridge story over the last 10 years, but they have also earned the respect and love of people they have come in contact with throughout the community. Good luck, my friend!

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participation in the ULAA endeavours to grow within its own parameters and to participate to make the University better and stronger. Thank you for allowing me to be a friend. Good health as you proceed into the next stage of your active life.

Robert Tarleck, Ako-taosi Mayor, City of Lethbridge

While originally from texas, U of L President Dr. Bill Cade is A proud dual citizen of the United States and Canada. He showed true Canadian spirit, Celebrating the Olympics with U of L staff.

One of my first meetings with Bill Cade came within weeks of taking office as mayor when he called on me to live up to a campaign promise. Throughout the 2001 mayoralty campaign I had promoted the concept of a communitydriven economic development model. Bill and several of his friends made it clear that it was not only a good idea, it was one they expected me to implement forthwith. And with Bill’s guidance

and support, Economic Development Lethbridge moved from vision to reality.

I was deeply moved at the time that a U of L president should be so engaged in his community. As I was to learn, this was just the first of a series of partnerships between the University and the city that Bill had a hand in creating. What kind of president has Bill been? Energetic, charismatic, passionate,

What I appreciate most about Bill was that he was a great and enthusiastic supporter of the community and local projects. He considered the University to be a partner with the Lethbridge community at large, and was always prepared to step up and get involved.

Bob Hironaka (Dsc ’02) Chancellor emeritus

My first meeting with Bill was in my office. He insisted on coming to me. How about that! To me, it was a generous thing to do and indicated his strong character personified by a professional humbleness.

TTE TER ER

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Paul Pharo President 2009/2010, Lethbridge Chamber of Commerce; U of L Senate Member

I have watched the University of Lethbridge Alumni Association (ULAA) grow into a significant contributor to the University. I recognize and thank you for your support, encouragement and

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Bill Cade was a great president of the University of Lethbridge. I thank him and Elsa and won’t ever forget them. Clint Dunford Former MLA, Lethbridge West

Bill Cade has the best memory for names! He can walk into a room and address each person by their correct name, and if he is meeting you for the first time, you can bet he will


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ORTIVE ORTIVEE

N A M I C R S O N A B L E I O N A R Y

CHARACTE CH C H HA A RACTE R AC A C TE T E Dr. Billlll C Cade remember meet. given an honorary degree to a Yiddish Dr. Cade! Make sure you take the time I C C I Mit theAnextNtimeYyou D I was on a shoot at the University writer, despite the fact that Canada has to reflect on what you have meant to the E ETheatre L and B BillAwalked N byOand Ssaid,R E been P host to a vibrant Yiddish culture V I S UI ofO A RAlberta, Y how L andN to southern muchN betterAthe B institution Y Y“Hi, RDory…Hi, A NTed!” OTed,I ourS I V for more than a hundredPyears.EI have R S O L Eand all of us cameraperson, was completely floored no words to express how very moving are for having you come to town. I hope N your A wonderful M I bride C continue that Bill would remember his name! this is to me and how grateful I am. D Y you and

D Y N A M I C E Y

Bill’s attribute of treating everybody with respect has endeared him to friends and business associates alike. When we met with a number of people in Ottawa promoting the U of L he impressed everyone with his passion and demeanour.

I organized a luncheon for a visiting Chinese delegation that Bill attended. Roast beef was served along with a side of horseradish. A dish of horseradish was placed with the starting salad at every seat during the meal. Bill is very charismatic and of course was the focus of our luncheon. As we started the meal, he picked up his dish of horseradish and poured it all over his salad (thinking it was salad dressing). Before we knew it, every visitor from China was doing the same! In the following moments, everyone was digging into their salads and not understanding our instructions of “it’s for the beef.” Garden salad is not served in China and with the

Laurel Corbiere Manager, International Centre for Students

Bill at convocation is a dynamo. He rises to the occasion and gives a barnburner of a speech. We all feel better about ourselves and stand a little taller.

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Dr. Billlll C Cade

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Dr. John C. Poulsen   Assistant Dean, Faculty of Education

leader le ADVOCAT A DVOCATT I remember when Bill told the story of the streaker in the new stadium.... After an enthusiastic monologue of the young man’s escapade, without cracking a smile, and with his deep Texas accent, he said, “Of course my official stance is I am shocked and appalled.” Most of us were nearly in tears laughing by this point.

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Mari Daunt U of L Senate Member

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I’m not sure how many people know that Bill is a hot rodder at heart and spent time at the drag strip in his day. I promised to take him for a blast in my 1967 GTX – haven’t done that yet but will.

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The first time I was in his office at the University my questions regarding his collection of crickets quickly led to a lesson on the reproductive machinations of the species.

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Rick Casson MP, Lethbridge; Former U of L employee

U N I V E R S I T Y

I have many reasons to thank Bill Cade, but the one that has meant the most to me is the interest and support he has shown for my mother and her work over the years. My mother is the Yiddish-language writer Chava Rosenfarb. Yiddish and the rich literature and culture associated with it are little known in Alberta. This is not surprising since the language itself is dying, a victim of the Holocaust. Today, there are few speakers and fewer readers. To have someone promote and encourage the work of a Yiddish writer the way Bill has done is truly remarkable and truly praiseworthy. To date, the U of L is the only university in Canada to have

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Dory Rossiter CTV Lethbridge; former U of L Senate member

to enjoy peace and happiness.

Dr. Goldie Morgentaler Professor, Department of English

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That is a real gift!

horseradish it must have been an unusual culinary experience for our guests – but a great story for us!

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Richard Davidson U of L Chancellor

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“The thing I appreciated most about Bill was that not only did he understand what his job was and did it well, but he understood what his job wasn’t, and he did that well, too. He and Elsa will be missed....”

ORTIVE ORTIVEE

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F ond M emorie s and F arewell s

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CHA C H HA

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Students, staff and the community of Lethbridge have all benefited greatly from your leadership, ingenuity and success. You can take pride in everything you and this institution have accomplished during your tenure.

Under your leadership, the University of Lethbridge’s offerings have evolved to include the first-time admission of PhD students to the School of Graduate Studies. Program decisions like these will help the University to continue to prosper as part of Campus Alberta.

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Bill Cade… My heartfelt congratulations on your upcoming retirement from the University of Lethbridge.

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contributions to improving both are immeasurable.  Best wishes, Bill, in your upcoming professional endeavours, and thank you for your guidance and leadership.

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Rob Renner MLA, Medicine Hat Constituency; Minister of Environment

bill bill iilllll Bill Cade was the right person at the right time to continue the University of Lethbridge’s progression to an elite comprehensive institution. During his term, the alumni base almost doubled in size. With his encouragement and support, it has become an increasingly important component of the University community. Indeed, the University, city, province and country will miss Bill and Elsa’s involvement, enthusiasm and commitment.

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Greg Weadick (Bsc ’77) MLA, Lethbridge WEST

Five years ago, when I was being recruited for the presidency of Lethbridge College, I did lots of research on the institution and the community. When I found out that Dr. Bill Cade was a fellow Longhorn (we’re both graduates of the University of Texas at Austin) I gave him a call to

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find out his perspective on Lethbridge as well as his impression of the relationship between the U of L and Lethbridge College.

I remember I was between flights and Bill spent 30 or 40 minutes with me on the phone, answering my questions and providing his insights. He also directed me to a U of L student who had transferred over from the College who was very helpful in providing further information. I have very much enjoyed working with Bill. . . He is a colleague and a friend. I hope we’ll still have a chance to catch up as he continues with his teaching and research at the University. Conversely, I would be happy to visit him in San Antonio, perhaps we could take in a football game at UT. Hook ‘em, Horns! Dr. Tracy Edwards President and CEO, Lethbridge College

Bill Cade is one of that rare breed who truly understands all of the roles they’re expected to play in their position. He’s equal parts academic, administrator, scientist and statesman. And he can express his passion in each of those roles in a way that everyone can understand, appreciate and share. He can even make crickets sound exciting!

Don Chandler (BA ’73) President, University of Lethbridge Alumni Association

TTE TER ER

It would be impossible to list all of Bill’s accomplishments here. For me, his most enduring legacy will be the passion and joy that were always contagious whenever I spoke with him. I will miss working with him in our official capacities, but I’ll always consider Bill a personal friend.

Bill took great delight in introducing future University of Lethbridge students to the fascinating world of crickets.

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Ed Stelmach Premier of Alberta

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Please accept my best wishes for a fulfilling and healthy retirement. Wherever the road takes you, may happiness follow.

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leader le SUPPORTIVE SU P ADVOCATE A DVOCATE TE SUPPORTIVEE Never did I ever imagine I would develop such a strong respect and working relationship with someone whose passion is bugs – or, as Bill would say, the Phylum Arthropoda – however, that is exactly what happened. During Bill’s presidency, I have come to respect and admire his knowledge, understanding, passion and commitment to postsecondary education. Bill has been a tireless advocate for the University of Lethbridge and our province’s overall post-secondary system. His

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Given all that Bill was responsible for, I admired him for always putting the students first and for his infectious passion for the University of Lethbridge. Karen Bartsch U of L Board of Governors Member

Bill is a very sincere, welcoming man, who converses easily and comfortably with people from all walks of life.

When I mentioned that my daughter had started her first year at U of L , Bill encouraged me to have her give him a call and stop by for a visit sometime. For a few months she procrastinated, thinking he would be too busy and was not really serious. Finally, when she did make an appointment to visit Bill, she


TIVE TIVEE

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University of Lethbridge from

V I S I O N A R Y For the past four decades, you have been an P E R S O N A B L E researcher and educator. As a zoologist esteemed father 4: Professor of your work has brought you great D Y N A and M entomologist, I C Biological Sciences 5: Expert 2000 to 2010 2: Husband to

Elsa Salazar Cade 3: Devoted

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praise, and as an academic leader, your dedication has earned you the respect and admiration of your peers. I know that many colleagues and students have benefited greatly from your counsel and guidance.

cricket mating behaviour 6: Dedicated student

advocate 7: Possessor of an amazing memory for names 8: Head cheerleader for the

In addition to your professional work, you have always been active in the community.

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Dr. Billlll C Cade U of L Pronghorns

9: Previous owner of Michael Nolan 10: Slinger of beef at free barbecues

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For a decade, you have served as an exceptional visionary, ambassador and innovator for the University. Through your guidance, the University of Lethbridge has developed a reputation for teaching and research excellence, and it has become a key part of Campus Alberta.

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This commitment, coupled with your impressive academic work, has won you accolades from many prestigious provincial, national, cultural and educational institutions. I have no doubt that you will continue to make significant contributions as you turn your focus to new ventures.

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Sincerely,

D Y N A M I C P E R S O N A B L E V I S I O N A R Y

The Rt. Hon. Stephen Harper Prime Minister of Canada

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To read all of the tributes and stories submitted, visit: www.ulethbridge.ca/Unews

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Bridget A. Pastoor MLA, Lethbridge EAST

On behalf of the Government of Canada, I commend you for your enduring and successful career in research and education. I wish you continued success in all your future endeavours. L E T H B R I D G E

Sample Sentence: The U of L Bookstore staff wishes Bill Cade the best of luck in his future pursuits.

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Southern Albertans pride themselves on their ability to cope with our climate. Imagine my glee when President Cade went above the call of duty to pace his heavy breathing in preparation for a True North polar bear dip! This man can do it all.

12: Wristwatch aficionado

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Doug Horner Deputy Premier; Minister of Advanced Education and Technology

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of acoustic signals in field

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I extend my warmest congratulations to you on your retirement as president of the University of Lethbridge.

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Susan Burrows-Johnson CEO/Executive Director, Galt Museum and Archives

As you step down as the president and vice-chancellor of the University of Lethbridge, I am pleased to join with your many friends and colleagues in recognizing your distinguished career.

Bill Cade \ ‘bil ‘kad\ Texas

U N I V E R S I T Y

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University and the people involved.

Dear Dr. Cade,

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The world would be a better place if more people were like Bill Cade.

from the University of Lethbridge Bookstore Collegiate Dictionary:

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found that he was not only the University president, but moreover he was a friend – a friend from a different walk of life, a friend from a different generation – but someone who made every effort to be a friend.

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HATS OFF

to the woman (not-so) behind the scenes Looking back, native-Texan Elsa Cade recalls that after living in cloudy Ontario for 23 years, the decision to relocate to Alberta felt like coming home. “The idea of moving out west and enjoying the big sky, the sunshine and the down-to-earth nature of the way people are here really appealed to us,” explains Elsa, wife to University of Lethbridge President Dr. Bill Cade. “Yes, it was hard to leave, but settling in was made so much easier because of the way we were received by the community.” And while she admits that at the start there were occasional times when the couple felt like “deer caught in headlights,” it didn’t take long until both Bill and Elsa were a deeply knit part of the University. In large part, that reality can be credited to Elsa’s attitude. “I always saw myself as a servant. It’s a model I’ve held for years: if you want to see something done, you need to get involved and just do it,” says Elsa. “I knew I was part of a presidential couple, and I felt that part of my role was to support Bill in accomplishing the mission of the University.” Now, 10 years later, it’s hard to imagine any University function without the cheerful presence of Elsa. Not only has she graciously hosted many groups

and individuals in her home, attended countless dinners, student receptions, lectures, celebrations and other events, but she has been to every convocation since arriving. “I really do enjoy each one of the ceremonies – they’re all so different. Besides, it’s given me a chance to wear my hats,” says Elsa with a laugh. As for Bill, having Elsa by his side is something he doesn’t take for granted. “I could have done nothing without Elsa’s help, assistance, friendship and love over the years. I just couldn’t do it,” says Bill. “I’m not a real party person, and we’ve gone to many, many functions over the years and having Elsa along allows me to do that. I’m much more comfortable sitting at home with my wife and my dogs.” An accomplished teacher and educator in her own right, Elsa earned her Alberta certification when the couple first moved to Lethbridge. While the demands of her role did not allow for her to carry a full-time job, she has still managed to make a huge impact on the greater community.

Only a short time after arriving in Lethbridge, Elsa began a google-search to find out what was happening in science education in Alberta. She soon satisfied her “itch” to be involved in this area through active volunteer involvement with Science Alberta Foundation, as well as 5th on 5th Youth Services.

“It’s a model I’ve held for years: if you want to see something done, you need to get involved and just do it.” Elsa Cade In recognition of Elsa’s contributions, both on campus and off, Elsa received a Senate Volunteer Award at the Spring 2010 Convocation. “I feel extremely good about that,” says Bill. “It makes me feel very satisfied that the University acknowledged her in that capacity.”

As for the next chapter, in October Bill and Elsa will embark on a six-week research adventure throughout South Africa, with the first stop of Namibia, somewhere Bill has promised to take Elsa for years. “We’re going to shed our fancy duds and jump into our grubby gear and go back to our life as people in the field, eating SpaghettiOs out of a can on a four-wheel trek,” says Elsa. Not surprisingly, Elsa’s life-theme of service remains forefront in her longterm plans, with intentions to move back to Texas and support her parents, now in their 80s. But even so, she’s not setting any plans in stone. “I look forward to spending more time with family and making trips to Africa and to settling into a new life, but I try not to have too many expectations,” she says. “I would never have thought Bill and I would end up out here, I just would have never thought. So it’s nice to be open because who knows what the future holds?”

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Lasting Impressions Academic, artist, author and world traveller, Dr. Hiroshi Shimazaki is widely known for his watercolour landscape paintings. Shimazaki’s career at the U of L in management and human geography allowed him to incorporate his passion for travel and painting into his life journey. While working on research projects around the world, he has always

Initial sketches

recorded his excursions through sketches and paintings. Here, in his own words, he recalls a trip with University of Lethbridge President Bill Cade and wife, Elsa. Fondly remembering that time and commissioned by the University, Shimazaki painted Solid Foundations as a parting gift for the couple from the University of Lethbridge.

I wanted the subject of the watercolour to be a place with which Bill and Elsa connected through their work with the University, and to reflect their long-standing interest in native cultures and their personal ties. In discussion of its subject matter with the University, several choices presented themselves, all familiar landscapes: the University of Lethbridge, the City of Lethbridge, Lethbridge environs including Waterton National Park, a Kainai site or some other place. What I ultimately chose was Xochimilco (flower field place) at the outskirts of Mexico City, now a UNESCO World Heritage site. Xochimilco’s history is long and, of course, complex, but what speaks to me in relation to what Bill and Elsa have done for the University these past 10 years is the development of “chinampa” in this area. This agricultural practice enabled the inhabitants to utilize the shallow lake to grow crops and thereby sustain a civilization. The foundation for the crops was created by placing large reed mats on the water, covering them with a thick layer of mud taken from the lake bottom and planting fast-growing trees that put down deep roots to anchor them. Centuries later the chinampa are now solid land crisscrossed by canals like the one in the painting. Families and tourists enjoy music and food on the “trajineras,” the colourful boats that ply the canals. The title of the painting, Solid Foundations, speaks not only to the Xochimilco landscape but also to the Cades’ innovative, unswerving efforts to strengthen the internal and external foundations of the University, with outstanding results. The original sketch of this waterscape was created in 2002, the year the Cades, Ali Dastmalchian (then-dean of the Faculty of Management) and I visited Universidad Panamericana (UP) and Instituto Panamericano de Alta Dirección de Empresa (IPADE) in Mexico City, and UP’s Guadalajara and Aguascalientes (Universidad Bonaterra) campuses to renew the Faculty of Management’s first international exchange program agreement. I have wonderful memories of that trip, especially the opportunity it presented for me to get to know both Bill and Elsa better and, of course, the incredible introduction they gave me to the world of crickets as we listened to their love songs on the Aguascalientes campus.

Dr. Hiroshi Shimazaki Professor Emeritus, Faculty of Management, University of Lethbridge Member, Società delle Belle Arti Circolo degli Artisti di Firenze and Canadian Society of Painters in Water Colour (CSPWC )

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Solid Foundations, Xochimilco, Mexico City Hiroshi Shimazaki

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Fine Arts alumnus Greg Christie finds beauty in neuroscience research

Greg Christie (BFA ’05) knows his way around graphic-design programs. It just so happens he also knows his way around neuroscience research labs. While on paper his polar interests seem an unlikely pair, in practice Christie’s love of art and science melds perfectly in his research that uses neuroimaging to study addictive behaviours. After attending high school in Cochrane, Alta., Christie enrolled in the engineering program at the University of Calgary. It didn’t take him long to realize he didn’t want to be an engineer, so Christie transferred to the U of L to explore the artistic side of his scienceinclined personality. “I really liked computers and computer graphics, so I thought I would combine the technical with the artistic and study computer arts,” Christie recalls. Christie graduated with a BFA in computer arts in 2005 and worked as a professional graphic artist for two years before the lure of the science lab drew him back. “I discovered that art is something I love to do as hobby, not a livelihood,” Christie says. “I’m a scientist at heart. I

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knew the neuroscience program at the U of L was exceptional, and I loved my time here, so it was an easy decision to go back.” As a master’s student in the neuroscience program at the U of L, Christie has been studying brain dynamics related to feedback processing. He conducts tests on subjects to see how their brains react during gaming activity, watching the electrical responses to both positive and negative feedback – what happens when people win, and when they lose. So far, Christie’s research has focused on people who don’t have any issues with gaming. Now, with a good understanding of the brain dynamics of that group under his belt, Christie feels the time is right to turn his focus to a group of people that epitomizes the study – compulsive gamblers. Interestingly, compulsive gambling hasn’t been unanimously accepted as a form of addiction in the scientific community. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (published by the American Psychiatric Association) lists pathological gambling under the category of impulse control. While the manual alludes to the fact that compulsive gamblers have other addictive tendencies, it does not label

gambling itself as an outright addiction. Christie isn’t comfortable with the sidestepping. He’s out to show, one way or the other, if compulsive gamblers are afflicted with a problem beyond their control, and hopefully change public opinion about addiction in the process. “There is a notion that willpower can overcome anything, that addiction is something people should be able to handle,” Christie says. “We glorify stories of people who quit something ‘cold turkey.’ The reality of addiction is much more complicated than that. We don’t really understand or legitimize addiction, particularly with compulsive gambling, because it hasn’t been studied much. If we don’t understand it, we can’t really treat it.” Since returning to his scientific roots and to the U of L, Christie has dedicated his time and investigative talents to finding out why some people know when enough is enough, while others don’t. Christie knows what should be going on in the brain during gaming; what he wants to find out is why it doesn’t happen in certain individuals. Ask him why the research is important, and Christie doesn’t hesitate in his response. “I remember one day when a participant came into the lab,” Christie recalls.

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“When I asked her if it would be OK to participate in a gambling experiment, she was contemplative for a minute and then agreed, saying that someone in her family was an addictive gambler. She obviously had great contempt for gambling, but agreed to participate in the study in the hope that it might help to find a solution to a problem that had greatly affected her. Compulsive gambling isn’t just a problem for the gambler, it’s a problem for their family and friends, too.” While Christie’s research is geared specifically toward gaming, he sees the applications of his findings having much greater reach. “We all receive dozens of positive and negative feedback messages every day,” Christie says. “If you look at how you discipline your children, for example, some methods work and others don’t. If you continue to use a method that doesn’t show good results, you have to wonder why you go back to it.” The next phase of Christie’s research took place throughout the spring 2010 semester. Findings are expected to be published in NeuroImage, a journal available on the U of L campus.


While there are those who compartmentalize their lives into tidy, distinct categories, Dr. NoÍlla Piquette-Tomei is not one of them. She doesn’t separate her research, teaching and service, just as she doesn’t make generalizations about the people with whom she works.

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As a veteran educator, Dr. Noëlla Piquette-Tomei, is an expert at integrating people with learning or physical disabilities into regular classroom settings. Her teaching and research interests have led her down many roads, including a recent trip to the United Nations as one of a handful of Canadians involved in a worldwide effort to make education systems more inclusive. “If there’s one overarching link through everything I do, it is that I am very interested in assisting marginalized populations,” says Piquette-Tomei. “I have been since I was a child.” Piquette-Tomei began volunteering when she was only 11 years old, and to this day she describes it as a saving grace. “For five years, one night a week, I would take two buses across Edmonton to volunteer with seniors who were disabled, and on weekends I worked with a man named Henri. He had had polio when he was 15 and was a quadriplegic, but he was also an artist and one of the most intelligent people I’d ever met.” Being with Henri and his friends while at the same time attending a junior high school where there were a lot of misconceptions surrounding disabled and disadvantaged people, caused PiquetteTomei to really examine traditional world views and learning systems. “I remember questioning it all the time. I am sure I drove everyone crazy, but that really set out a path for me to follow,” says Piquette-Tomei. “I’ve never stopped

asking why, and I have tried to alter misconceptions, but not in an antagonistic way. If there are narrow thoughts and beliefs in a community, then I try to show evidence that supports a different perspective.” After earning a degree in education, Piquette-Tomei’s first job brought her back to junior high school, but this time as a teacher of a class of special needs students ranging from grade one to six. “It was thought that the students in my classroom couldn’t be contained in regular classes. They had meltdowns. They carried knives. They had a host of behavioural challenges,” recalls PiquetteTomei. With nothing to lose, Piquette-Tomei began to implement some of the new ideas she had about integration, and it wasn’t long until she began to see positive results. Often bending the rules, Piquette-Tomei worked with her students to develop their interests in ways that worked for them. “One of my students had severe behavioural problems and was living in foster care. He was told that he could return to his mother if he was able to move forward and ‘graduate’ from the behavioural adaptation class. “He learned that he loved to read only after being introduced to the book version of a movie he had recently viewed. I encouraged him to read it. As a grade 5 student, this was the first book he ever read. After, he asked if he could be ex-

cused from other courses in order to read more. “I remember thinking, I could be fired for this, for basically ignoring the rest of the curriculum, but I also thought what he really needed was to be engaged. So I allowed him to read for more than a month in my class, every day, all day. I couldn’t even get him out of the classroom for recess. By the end of the year, he did go back to his other courses, and by the end of grade six he was reading at a much higher level and had no evidence of behavioural issues.”

“I have always known that the responsibility of being a teacher is that you do change lives.” Dr. Noëlla Piquette-Tomei As mindsets changed and classes generally became more integrated, Piquette-Tomei ignored critics who said that special education teachers, such as herself, would not be well-suited to the new environment. “I started my master’s in special education around the time school boards were looking at mainstreaming and inclusion. I was told by most people that my skills would not be needed. However, I was already using the basic principles – I had been for about five years – and now it

was even more interesting to study the theory by night and put it into practice in the classroom the next day.” Despite being under a microscope as the teacher of the first inclusive class in the Calgary Catholic school division, Piquette-Tomei succeeded in winning the support of her colleagues and administration. Now, with a PhD in human development and learning and as a U of L professor in the Faculty of Education, Piquette-Tomei is using her vast experience to develop a new generation of teachers. “It is easier to infuse knowledge about social justice and equity at the pre-service level and have teachers walk out into the world with those concepts already in place, than it is to alter someone’s philosophy later. “I have always known that the responsibility of being a teacher is that you do change lives. From the time I started as a student teacher, I understood the power of acceptance and inclusion.” It is a message she is taking again and again to her current students, colleagues and, as a result of her recent international experiences, to other educators worldwide. “At the end of the day, it is not about the teacher. First and foremost, it is about the students and how they can benefit and learn best.” 23


To stay up-to-date on what’s happening at the University, visit the U of L’s official online news centre at: www.ulethbridge.ca/Unews

Significant and mentionable

U of L at forefront of water hub

Education Dean O’Dea passes off leadership to Loewen

World Water Day, on March 22, served as the perfect occasion for federal Environment Minister Jim Prentice to announce $1.5 million in funding for the creation of the Water and Environmental Sciences Water Hub at the University of Lethbridge.

Chancellor named Citizen of the Year Widely known as one Alberta’s most influential people, University of Lethbridge Chancellor Richard Davidson was recognized in May as the Lethbridge Citizen of the Year by the Rotary Club of Lethbridge and the Lethbridge Herald. “Clearly in his law practice, his work with the Chamber of Commerce, his work with the University of Lethbridge and his work with virtually every other volunteer organization you could imagine, this is one cool dude,” says Lethbridge Mayor Bob Tarleck, who also presented Davidson with a key to the city. “This is the highest honour we can bestow upon anyone, and Richard is extremely deserving.” Davidson was appointed a Queen’s counsel in 1986 and is a partner at the law firm of Davidson & Williams. In recognition of his many contributions to the community, he has received numerous awards including the Commemoration Medal for the 125th Anniversary of the Confederation of Canada by the Governor General, the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal, the Alberta Centennial Medal and the Law Society of Alberta Distinguished Service Award for Service to the Community.

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The Hub, which will be developed over the next two years, will serve as a data repository and will be an authoritative public source of information, providing tools to analyze water and environmental data. This data will be used by governments, industry, academia and the public to make moreinformed decisions regarding water, and will create a better understanding of this resource by these stakeholders. Prentice explains that the government needs reliable water data to make better decisions concerning water. “To make good decisions, governments in Canada need good information – and it’s not as though you can just turn on a tap to get it. We need knowledge generated by scientists and researchers who can provide the evidence for informed decisions about freshwater use,” says Prentice. Ellis welcomed as new management dean On July 1, Dr. Robert (Bob) James Ellis will join the University of Lethbridge as the new dean for the Faculty of Management.

After 10 years of incredible success, Dr. Jane O’Dea will step away from her role as dean of the Faculty of Education at the end of June. And while she is handing the reins of leadership over with plans to return to the classroom, she has no plans to leave the University. “Absolutely not. This is a tremendous University. I love its size, I love its entrepreneurial innovative spirit and its emphasis on community and student engagement,” says O’Dea. Taking over the Faculty, Dr. Craig Originally from Vancouver, B.C., Ellis is an accomplished administrator who successfully bolstered business programs at both the University of Northern British Columbia and Wilfrid Laurier University. With a collaborative and visionary approach, he has a strong record of attracting accomplished faculty and raising the research profile of programs. His current research focuses on increasing educational opportunities in society, specifically for aboriginal students in a business environment. Ellis is looking forward to the creative

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Loewen (BEd ’84) will serve as acting dean for a two-year term. A veteran faculty member, Loewen admits he will miss the classroom, but stands firmly in a belief that whatever the setting, teaching is an important calling. “You’re looking after the path, building for the future, caring about the kids of today. I find it really hard to see anything much more important than that,” he says. “The person who you are can, at some point, be traced back to a teacher or mentor.” atmosphere he sees within the Faculty. “Throughout my career, my focus has always been to try and increase opportunities for students through the development of new courses or new programs,” says Ellis. “The faculty at the U of L are very innovative, and I think at the forefront of management thought and action.” Ellis succeeds Dr. Murray Lindsay, who spent the past five years in the position and is returning to the academic community at the U of L.


significant and mentionable

CREATE funding translates to employment opportunities

Sakamotos give back

On June 10, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) announced the University of Lethbridge as the recipient of the CREATE program award. The U of L will be the only institution in Alberta to receive the award this year. With more than $1.6 million, the CREATE program award provides funding for approximately 50 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral candidates working in satellite and other imaging programs, including photonics, climate change, civil engineering and optical networks. Through the program, 20 projects will receive $32 million over six years, support that will help science and engineering graduates upgrade their skills to make a successful transition to the workplace. As part of this, participating students will complete work placements with local, national and international organizations including companies such as Iunctus Geomatics, the Alberta Terrestrial Imaging Corporation, Natural Resources Canada, NASA and several European research institutes. U of L Vice-President of Research Dr. Dan Weeks says this will give students a strong mix of professional skills development and workforce preparation. “The exciting aspect for me is the employment rate for graduates,” says Weeks. “It isn’t unreasonable to expect 100 per cent employment, because we are looking at this as a model that will provide for sustainable training for research workforce preparation.”

Top 40 under 40 Dr. Olga Kovalchuk, a biological sciences and epigenetics researcher at the University of Lethbridge, can now add recipient of Canada’s Top 40 Under 40TM to an already long list of accomplishments.

Dr. Igor Kovalchuk, they have brought new people with a wealth of international talent to the University community. It is an understatement to say that we are extremely proud of her achievement.”

Canada’s Top 40 Under 40TM, a prestigious national award program, annually honours 40 Canadians in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors under the age of 40.

A University of Lethbridge Board of Governors Research Chair, as well as a Canadian Institute of Health Research Chair in Gender, Sex and Health, Kovalchuk focuses her research on the effects of long-term exposure to radiation, and how that exposure changes cellular and molecular structures in animals and people.

With more than 1,200 nominees, honourees were selected by an independent advisory board based on five key criteria: vision and leadership; innovation and achievement; impact; community involvement and contribution; and strategy for growth. “This is an outstanding award for Olga, the members of her lab team, for her research collaborators here and literally worldwide – and for our University,” says U of L President Dr. Bill Cade. “Olga has worked very hard to bring new research and new programs to the University and has influenced countless young researchers. With her husband and research collaborator,

Inspired by her experience as a high school student living in Ukraine, only 600 kilometres from the nuclear Chernobyl blast, her work examines how radiation induces secondary tumours in cancer patients, the different effects radiation has on women and men, and what can be done to protect the children of radiation-exposed parents from contracting cancer. Kovalchuk has also played a key role in working toward establishing an Alberta Institute for Epigenetics at the U of L.

Ron Sakamoto (LLD ’03), or “Sak,” as he is affectionately known, has presented shows from KISS to Shania Twain. In March, the concert provider and his wife, Joyce, announced a $200,000 donation in support of students in the U of L Digital Audio Arts (DAA) program. The gift will be matched by the Government of Alberta’s Access to the Future Fund, bringing the total to $400,000. Launched last fall, the DAA program is the first of its kind in Canada and produces graduates who are experts in music technology and have skills to integrate with visual media, audio and advanced research. “The role of audio across all media has changed monumentally from the traditional broadcast media of the past. The culture of audio and visual media is growing and evolving rapidly,” says Sakamoto. “Joyce and I are happy to support students in the DAA program. These are the people who will be superstars in the years to come, and I look forward to the contributions this group will make to the music industry.”

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alumni new s & e v ent s

2009/2010

U OF L ALUMNI ASSOCIATION COUNCIL President Don Chandler BASc ’73 Vice-President Kathy Lewis BN ’83, MEd ’99 Treasurer Lanny Anderson BMgt ’06 Secretary Rachel Yamada BMgt ’07

ALUMNI EVENTS Calgary Stampede Event July 17 | 4:30 p.m. Ranchman’s Calgary RSVP to oneill.lindsay@gmail.com

Alumni News

Past President Sheila McHugh DipEd ’84, MEd ’97

2010 Alumni Honour Society Inductees

Directors Grant Adamson BSc ’03 Ted Likuski BEd ’74 Jeff Milner BFA ’06 Cheryl Meheden MgtCert ’97 Rebecca Remington BSc ’90 Shaun Serafini BMgt ’02 Faisal Shaffi BMgt ’03 Jan Tanner BA ’04, MA ’06

Calgary Chapter Golf Tournament Aug. 31 McKenzie Meadows Golf Course Cost is $150 per person Faculties of Health Sciences and Management Reunion Sept. 24 Markin Hall For more information about these and other upcoming events, visit: www.ulethbridge.ca/alumi

Board of Govenors Reps Don Chandler BASc ’73 Kevin Nugent BMgt ’88 Senate Reps Robert Christiansen BMgt ’07 Holly Debnam BA ’97 In June, the Alumni Association inducted six alumni into the Alumni Honour Society for their exceptional professional achievements and service to the community. This year’s recipients are: (L-R ) Back: Jill Kotkas (BEd ’77), Betty Jean Bastien (BA’76), Doug Hudson (BASc ’71), Belinda Crowson (BEd ’92, BSc ’99); Front: Jessie Snow (BASc (BA) ’71, BEd ’72, DipEd ’81); Missing: Clarence Taal (BMA ’82)

Alumni Benefits & Services As a graduate of the University of Lethbridge, you have earned a free lifelong membership into the Alumni Association. Stay connected to make the most of your membership. Visit: www.ulethbridge.ca/alumni

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Join Facebook group: U of L Alumni – Official Site Join LinkedIn group: University of Lethbridge Alumni, Students, Faculty and Staff Follow: @ULethbridgeAlum s am | so u t h e r n A l b e r t a M ag az i n e | U n i v e r s i t y o f Le t h b r i d g e

Students’ Union Rep Taz Kassam Calgary Chapter President Georgina Lieverse BMgt ‘07 Edmonton Chapter President Kelly Kennedy BMgt ’08 First Nations, Métis and Inuit Chapter President Leroy Little Bear BASc ’72, DASc ’04

Contact us:

University of Lethbridge Alumni Association 4401 University Drive West Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 Phone: 403-317-2825 Toll-Free: 1-866-552-2582 E-mail: alumni@uleth.ca


’94 Hockey Horns reminisce with Babcock

Above: Mike Babcock with members of the ’94 Pronghorns mens hockey team (including Mark Wobick and Trevor Ellerman) at the 1st Annual Calgary and Friends Alumni Dinner in Calgary.

Mark Wobick (BSc’96) works in the financial sector and is a hockey coach to his novice-aged son; Trevor Ellerman (BMgt ’94) is the head professional at a golf course; Mike Babcock just coached the Canadian Men’s Olympic Hockey Team to a gold medal at the Vancouver Olympics. What all three have in common is 1994, the year they were all University of Lethbridge Pronghorns and winners of the Canadian Interuniversity Sport (then CIAU) men’s national hockey title.

“When you win together, you walk together, forever,” says Babcock, as much a Horn now as he was in 1994, despite the fame and fortune he’s since experienced.

Ellerman, the head pro at the Riverview Golf Club in Redcliff, Alta.

The majority of the group was back together at the sold-out 1st Annual Calgary and Friends Alumni Dinner in Calgary this past spring, with Babcock as the keynote speaker. The bond they established 16 years ago is still evident.

Wobick, who works with Meyers Norris Penny in Lethbridge, says the players reached a point where they completely trusted one another.

“I’ve seen probably four or five guys who I hadn’t seen in 13 or 14 years, and it’s like I just saw them yesterday,” says

“Looking back, that closeness we had, that was the whole key to our success.”

“I don’t think I ever experienced a team that had that type of a bond. You just lived and breathed for everybody and Mike made us believe,” says Wobick.

For Wobick, that has translated into lasting relationships with his teammates and successes that trace back to that championship season. “As you get older you better understand what you accomplished,” says Ellerman. “At the time, you won and you think it’ll last forever and you don’t really grasp the concept. I think if you look at our team, the successful careers the players forged for themselves away from hockey, the foundation was laid there in 1993/1994. Winning builds success, friendships and bonds, and this was a special group.”

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Alma M atter s

Winner of the $10,000 Alberta Readers’ Choice Award Michael Davie (BMgt ’94) won the inaugural $10,000 Alberta Readers’ Choice Award for his first novel, Fishing for Bacon. The Alberta Readers’ Choice Award is modelled on the very popular Canada Reads prize. Five books, each one championed by a celebrity, vie to win a popular vote. With $10,000 going to the winner, the competition is on the same financial level as the Governor General’s Awards.

1980 Nancy Walker BMgt ’82 Walker was awarded a Fellow of Chartered Accountants (FCA) from the Alberta Institute of Chartered Accountants. Bill Neudorf BEd ’88 “In memory: some of you may remember the little three-year-old girl who would come to class with her dad and spend the time colouring or playing with dolls. Her name was Bobbi Renee Neudorf. Bobbi later suffered from Crohn’s disease through her time at university but finished a BSc in Occupational Therapy at the U of A and worked for three years in the QEII hospital in Grande Prairie. Bobbi succumbed to complications from the disease and passed away from a massive blood clot on Sept. 21, 2009. She was 25 years and two months old.”

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Pamela Zollner BEd ’86 After graduating from the U of L, Zollner taught for a couple of years in Alberta before developing a taste for international travel by backpacking around Australia and New Zealand. Zollner incorporated this love for travel into her work by teaching in Singapore and India. Zollner completed her Master of Education in June 2008 and is currently teaching Grade 2 in Calgary.

1990 Aaron Berg BSc ’95, MSc ’97 Dr. Aaron Berg was recognized as GeogNews’ (News Digest of the Canadian Association of Geographers) Geographer of the Week. Berg is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Guelph. He completed a BSc and an MSc degree in Geography at the University of Lethbridge, an MS in Geological Sciences at the University

WHAT’S NEW? Let your classmates know what you are up to by sharing a note about your life. Share your news with us through e-mail, phone or mail.

Alumni Relations University of Lethbridge 4401 University Drive West Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 Toll-Free: 1-866-552-2582 E-mail: alumni@uleth.ca

Submissions chosen for publication may have been edited for length and clarity. The requested information is collected under the authority of the Alberta Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, for the purpose of managing the alumni records for use in University of Lethbridge publications. Questions concerning the collection, use and disposal of this information can be directed to University Advancement.

of Texas at Austin and his PhD in Earth System Science at the University of California, Irvine. His research focuses on hydrology and hydro-climate simulation. Areas of current research interest include: macro-scale modeling of hydrological states and fluxes; climate change and water resources; the spatial scaling of hydrological properties; and evaluating the impact of land use change on regional hydrologic cycles. Thomas Latta BMgt ’97 “I am currently working as the manager, Operations Accounting and Business Solutions for Enerplus Resources Fund and have been with Enerplus for a year and a half. Prior to that, I was with ConocoPhillips Canada and its predecessor companies for 15 years.”

2000 Amos Altman BA ’04 Altman’s play FORTITUDE is part of Fuse 2010 (The Enbridge New Play Development Program) at Theatre Calgary. This heartwarming and hilarious play emerged from the 2008/09 FUEL Playwrights’ Circle at Theatre Calgary. Ryan Epp BA/BMgt ’05 Epp, former captain of the University of Lethbridge Pronghorns men’s hockey team, is now a constable with the Lethbridge Police Department. Barry Gergel BSc ’05, MSc ’07 “I’m currently working toward my PhD in the Department of Computing Science at the U of A.” William Katelnikoff BMgt ’05 “I received my chartered accountant designation in January, and I am currently assistant coach with the Pronghorns men’s hockey team.”

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Kinahan holds community focus Brian Kinahan (BMA ’79) believes his time spent at the U of L was foundational for his career. “At the University I gained the ability to think through problems and come up with solutions, to expand my mind and think beyond more than just one focus,” he says. Now the president and CEO of 1st Choice Savings, Kinahan has played an integral part in the growth of the credit union, which currently boasts a balance sheet in excess of $400 million. While helping to build a successful financial institution is something he is proud of, he is also grateful for the opportunities he has to serve his community. “My goal is to continue building on the success of 1st Choice Savings, guiding it to be a viable and important part of the financial world that focuses on being a community-minded institution that cares about individuals.”


alma matter s

Congratulations Daniel Wong (BFA ’03), Mary-Anne McTrowe (BFA ’98) and Robyn Moody (BFA ’00) have made the long list (Prairies and North region) for the 2010 Sobey Art Award. Munton & Co. chartered accountants recently announced that Curtis Michaelis (BMgt ’03) and Michael Quinton (BMgt ’04) have been admitted to partnership. Susie Martin (BEd ’81), Judy Lynn Miller (BA ’91, BEd ’93), Matthew Berrigan (BA/BEd ’06) and Tracy Inaba (BEd ’92) were among 23 outstanding Alberta teachers selected to receive the prestigious 2010 Excellence in Teaching Award.

Matthew Berrigan BEd/BA ’06 Lethbridge College announced their 2010 Distinguished Alumni Award recipients and recognized U of L alumnus Matthew Berrigan with the Rising Star Award. Since completing his education degree, Berrigan’s rise as a teacher has been meteoric. Named best new teacher by the Foothills School Division for his work in Cayley, Berrigan is now a lead teacher in Turner Valley. The success of his teaching is reflected in his students’ achievement results. Angela Kastelic BN ’06 “I am currently pursuing a Master of Nursing (Family/All Ages) with intent to become a family nurse practitioner.” Keely (Kavanagh) Semenuik BEd/BA ’09 Following graduation in April 2009, Semenuik was married and travelled to France. She is now excited to begin her teaching career with École St. Mary School in Lethbridge, teaching French immersion kindergarten.

In Memoriam The University of Lethbridge wishes to extend its sincerest condolences to the families and friends of the following members of the University community: Richard Barbeau BEd ’88 passed away on May 13, 2006. John LaFlamme (former Senate member) passed away on Sept. 26, 2009. Stan Sawicki (former Board of Governors, Senate and Alumni Association Council member) passed away on Jan. 7, 2010. Frank Jetter BASc ’85 passed away on Jan. 15, 2010.

sports hall of fame The University of Lethbridge Chinooks women’s basketball team (1970/1971) was inducted into the Lethbridge Sports Hall of Fame at this year’s celebration. The team won the provincial and national championships and represented Lethbridge with pride. Members of the team included: (Back row, L-R) Wilma Winter (coach), Dixie Dow, Linda Dogterom, Leona Voth, Minnie Van Dieren and Sharon Giduk (BA ’73, BEd ’75). (Front row, L-R) Marge Moore, Linda Voth, Rosemary Brodrick, Joan Cannady and Linda Dow (BEd ’71). Andrea Hlady (BEd’93) and Sharon Chmielewski (BEd’75) were also inducted at this year’s celebration. Hlady was recognized in the athletes category. She was a two-time All-Canadian basketball player with the U of L Pronghorns. Chmielewski, recognized in the builder category, was honoured for building high school and high-level curling in Lethbridge with her work as an official, instructor and coach.

Kinley passes on the inspiration

what I wanted to do,” says Kinley.

After attending a presentation by guest speaker John Carr from Pixar, Brad Kinley (BFA ’04) remembers telling a friend that the talk was life-changing.

Now, after being a key player in the design of Mass Effect 2, one of the most popular and highly rated games ever made for the Xbox platform, Kinley returned to the U of L this spring and gave a presentation to the next generation of new media students.

“Seeing what he does and his approach to the whole process of character animation crystallized

Heather MacDonald-Webber BASc ’87 passed away on March 3, 2010. Michelle Chechotko BEd/BA ’09 passed away on March 9, 2010. Pat Viel BN ’90 passed away on March 19, 2010. Robert Patterson DLitt ’90 passed away on March 21, 2010. Marilyn Spanos-Hutton BASc ’86 passed away on March 24, 2010. Douglas Hartley BEd ’71, BASc ’79 passed away on May 17, 2010.

“I know how influential my exposure was to somebody actually working in the business,” he says. “If I can lend a little knowledge or inspiration to someone else, hopefully it will help them the way it helped me.”


U of L President Dr. Bill Cade and wife, Elsa, came to Lethbridge in 2000. This June marks the end of their 10 years of service as the presidential couple.

“The University of Lethbridge turned 43 this year, still a youngster as universities go. In this very short time we have become a university of the first class, a campus where outstanding students, faculty and staff come to

I have been honoured greatly to serve as president of our University. Elsa and I thank the many people in Lethbridge and across Alberta who welcomed us to the province and worked with us to represent the University of Lethbridge.

study and work.

Wherever our travels and careers take us in the future we will always be Pronghorns and members of the U of L community.�

The great success of the University of Lethbridge did not just happen. A group of visionaries persisted, overcame obstacles and founded the U of L. Many people followed and worked many years to grow and nurture our University. Today, we have one of the finest universities in Canada, a centre of intellectual activity and innovation and a significant social, cultural and economic engine in Alberta. The future of the University is very bright. I am confident the next four decades will be even more successful for the U of L.

Publications Mail Agreement No. 0040011662 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: University Advancement University of Lethbridge 4401 University Drive West Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4


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