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baystateparent FREE

AUGUST 2018

GRAB-AND-GO BREAKFAST IDEAS

THE WORLD IS HER CLASSROOM Meet Leila 2018 DISTRICT REPORT CARD

Making The Grade THE GENDER DIVIDE AT TECH SCHOOLS

Massachusetts’ Premier Magazine For Families Since 1996


Notre Dame Academy All Girls, Grades 7-12

Discover The Difference Notre Dame Academy is the only all-girls school in Central Massachusetts for grades 7-12. Founded by the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur, the school offers a rich college preparatory academic program that combines the essential elements of a classical education with the best of contemporary technologies. NDA offers students a wide variety of co-curricular activities to help further develop students’ interests, talents, and leadership skills. The athletic program exemplifies superior sportsmanship and teamwork and offers opportunities for participation at every level including varsity and sub-varsity. Schedule a tour today by contacting our Admissions department at Admissions@nda-worc.org. Notre Dame Academy 425 Salisbury Street Worcester, MA 01609

Visit our website: www.nda-worc.org

Saint Julie Division for 7th & 8th Grade Statistics show that 31% of girls lose self-confidence during the middle school years. At NDA, our students flourish in an all-girl learning environment during a critical period of development and transition. Our St. Julie Division offers a program in which young girls can feel comfortable exploring and developing their gifts and talents while preparing for the rigor of our high school curriculum. St. Julie Division students are supported and encouraged both in and outside of the classroom to explore new ideas, take risks, and develop the skills to become curious, independent, and successful learners.

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, October 21st 2:00pm-4:00pm Register online today!

Contact Admissions@nda-worc.org, or call 508-757-6200, x229 2 AUGUST2018

NDA 9.25x11 Space Ad 071618.indd 1

7/16/18 3:20 PM


Because it takes expert care to deliver a miracle

Bringing miracles to life is our passion at the LaChance Maternity Center at Heywood Hospital. Our expert team of physicians, nurses and doulas, provide personalized attention in a state-of-the-art environment that promotes a tranquil and natural birthing experience, resulting in the lowest caesarean birth rate in the state. And our specialty services – from our post-birth celebration dinner to our rejuvenating spa treatments including relaxing whirlpool hydrotherapy, post-partum massage therapy, music therapy and aromatherapy – will leave you feeling just heavenly. To find out more about the services offered at the LaChance Maternity Center visit www.heywood.org. To register for a Childbirth Class or schedule a tour of the LaChance Maternity Center call (978) 630-6216.

242 Green Street, Gardner, MA 01440 | (978) 632-3420 | heywood.org

HWD021_MatAd_BayParJunior.indd 1

BAYSTATEPARENT 3 7/11/14 10:09 PM


For your child’s next milestone celebration, make it special at the Beechwood Hotel where our exquisite Four Diamond and Award Winning property is the perfect backdrop for your event. Impress your guests and enjoy the ease of planning with our onsite event planners who will work with you to ensure your event is everything you want it to be – whether large or small – the Beechwood will ensure it is memorable and spectacular. Call our onsite party planner at 508.453.1112 4 AUGUST2018


Making a Difference One Skater at a Time

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table of contents AUGUST 2018 VOLUME 23

10

Elephants for Easton: How Local Parents Are Honoring Their Infant Son

12

NUMBER 4

Oh, The Places You’ll Go: August Calendar of Family Events

in every issue

22

Muddy Hands, Budding Minds: Nature the Backdrop for Learning in Tinkergarten

ripe

10

Elephants for Easton: How Local Parents Are Honoring Their Infant Son

12

Oh, The Places You’ll Go! July Calendar of Family Events

22

24 30

Add to Cart: Backpacks for Every Age & Stage

Muddy Hands, Budding Minds: Nature the Backdrop for Learning in Tinkergarten

25

Tips for Lightening the Backpack Load The World is Her Classroom: Meet Leila

45

Finally Forever: August’s Children & Area Adoption Events

26 28 35 36

Very Special People: Easing the College Transition for Students with Disabilities

46

By the Numbers: Stats for Breastfeeding Awareness Month

50

Take Eight with Puppeteer Terrence Burke

meet team president PAUL M. PROVOST

associate publisher KATHY REAL 508-749-3166 ext. 331 kreal@baystateparent.com

6 AUGUST2018

Photography Stephanie Piscitelli belinipics.com

features

Editor’s Note: Happy New (School) Year!

7

Leila, age 10

8 47

Bites: Make-Ahead Breakfast Ideas Ask the Nutritionist: Is There a Link Between Gluten and a Child’s Behavior?

The Gender Divide at Tech Schools How a Boston Teacher is Using Art to Connect with Foreign Students

8

District Report Card

editorial & creative

advertising

editor in chief AMANDA COLLINS BERNIER 508-865-7070 ext. 201 amanda@baystateparent.com

director of sales REGINA STILLINGS 508-865-7070 ext. 210 regina@baystateparent.com

creative director and events coordinator PAULA MONETTE ETHIER 508-865-7070 ext. 221 pethier@holdenlandmark.com

account executive KATHY PUFFER 508-865-7070 ext. 211 kathy@baystateparent.com

senior graphic designer STEPHANIE MALLARD 508-865-7070 design@baystateparent.com

account executive CHERYL ROBINSON 508-865-7070 ext. 336 crobinson@holdenlandmark.com

baystateparent is published monthly 22 West Street, Millbury, MA 01527 508-865-7070 It is distributed free of charge throughout Massachusetts.


EDITOR’S NOTE

Happy New (School) Year!

While the calendar insists that the New Year is still about four months away, we all know that the beginning of a new year is right around the corner. You know the signs: vacations are over, binders and backpacks have replaced pool floats and coolers on store shelves, and kids are starting to stress about that summer reading. Reality is sinking in. The lazy days of summer are numbered, and Back to School season is here. While it can be hard to let go of summer, there’s something exciting about this time of year. The start of the school year marks the beginning of a new adventure for kids: new things to learn, friends to meet, memories to make. For parents this time of year brings back rhythm and schedule, and, if you’re anything like me, a sense of nostalgia. From the time I was little girl, I always got butterflies in my stomach when the first day of school rolled around. It was a mixture of excitement and nerves: Will I be able to find my room? Is my teacher nice? Who will I sit with at lunch? Back to school meant rituals, too. Picking out the perfect outfit, an extra special homemade lunch, and a picture (with an actual camera containing a roll of film) of me and my sisters on the front steps of the house. Wearing our bulky backpacks and clutching our shiny new lunchboxes, we looked tan, happy and hopeful. That first day always held so much possibility and promise. These days I see those same type of pictures all over my Facebook feed. It’s funny how times have changed… but not that much. As your children head back to school, take some time to get to know their teachers and the staff and administrators who will be caring for them and teaching them for the next 10 months. It’s proven that children perform and adjust better at school when their parents are engaged and involved. May this be a year of learning and growing, academically and socially, for your kids. May your be mornings be smooth, and the coffee be hot and plentiful. Cheers to the New (School) Year!

Amanda BAYSTATEPARENT 7


Bites

3 Make-Ahead Breakfast Recipes for Busy Mornings Mornings get more hectic when school is in session. Make things a little less stressful by having breakfast already done with these make-ahead, grab-and-go ideas.

Mini Frittatas

Breakfast Banana Pops

What You Need:

What You Need:

• 6 eggs • 1/3 cup milk or cream • 3 slices of deli meat (your choice) or cooked bacon, roughly chopped • Handful spinach, chopped • 1/4 cup chopped veggies (your choice – try peppers, corn, broccoli, etc.) • 1/3 cup shredded cheese

• Bananas (two bananas makes four pops) • Yogurt of choice • Granola (or crushed graham crackers, cereal, etc.) • Fun mix-ins (mini chocolate or peanut butter chips, shredded coconut, raisins, dried cranberries, etc.) • Popsicle sticks

How to Make Them: Heat oven to 350F and grease a muffin tin. In a bowl, whisk together eggs and cream, then add remaining ingredients and mix well. Pour batter into muffin tin, to about ¾ full. Bake 18-20 minutes. Cool completely before removing frittatas with a butter knife. Bonus! These can be frozen for up to a month. Just reheat in the microwave.

How to Make Them: Spread granola or crushed crackers and any other toppings out on a plate. Peel bananas, cut in half, and insert popsicle stick. Dip each banana pop into yogurt, then roll in your topping mixture. Place on parchment paper, and freeze overnight.

Breakfast Cookies What You Need:

How to Make Them:

• 1/2 cup rolled oats • 1/2 cup mashed banana • 1/4 cup almond butter • 1/2 tsp. Vanilla extract • Add-ins of your choice: mini chocolate or peanut butter chips, dried fruit, chia seeds, shredded coconut, etc.

Preheat oven to 350F. In a large bowl, combine mashed banana and nut butter until smooth, then stir in all other ingredients. Shape into cookies (should make about 10-12), and place on a greased cookie sheet. Bake for 15 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes before removing from sheet.

Our Favorite Lunch Bag

Stress-Free Grocery Shopping

Parents who know the struggle of a smelly lunchbox that’s hard to clean will appreciate this washable, insulated neoprene lunch bag. Funkins Lunch Bags, created by a mom, feature fun patterns, soft handles, durable zippers, reinforced seams, interior labels and a convenient interior pocket. Parents can rest assured each lunch bag is free from any harmful chemicals including lead, phthalate, PVC and BPA free. You can also buy matching reuseable napkins and placemats to reduce lunchtime waste. $29.95. myfunkins.com.

Got a little one and a lot of shopping to do? No more putting baby’s car seat in the grocery cart then trying to wedge all your items around it. The Binxy Baby Shopping Cart Hammock keeps baby snug, safe and secure while mom and dad shop. The simple-to-use seat clips on to most shopping carts, then folds back up to store in the diaper bag. $49.95. binxybaby.com.

8 AUGUST2018


BAYSTATEPARENT 9


s t n a h p e l E r Easton fo

Locals Collect, Donate Hundreds of Elephants in Memory of Infant Son BY AMANDA COLLINS BERNIER

P

ictures of little Easton adorn the walls of the of Ryan and Melissa Malone’s Wilbraham home. Typical first-time parents, they captured it all: beaming in the delivery room, a trip to the beach as a family of three, and baby’s first Halloween. There’s a sparkle in Easton Marc’s eyes and his mouth is open, grinning, in most of the pictures. The happy baby was almost always smiling, Melissa recalls, even on the day he was born. That infectious grin and joyful spirit is how the Malones will always remember their baby boy. Little Easton passed away unexpectedly in November at just four months old. “Wherever he went he brought a smile to people’s faces. I know everyone says that about their baby – but really, people everywhere couldn’t help but smile at him,” said Melissa. “He warmed everyone’s heart. He was so happy, so laid back.” Everything about Easton was easy, in a meant-to-be kind of way. The Malones found out they were expecting just a couple months after their wedding, and Melissa’s pregnancy smooth and comfortable. Baby Easton arrived, healthy and perfect, on hot evening in July. It was two days before Thanksgiving that Melissa got the phone call at work – Easton, who was at daycare, had stopped breathing in his sleep and had been rushed to Baystate Medical Center. He was revived shortly, but he did not survive. Some 2,300 infants die each year in the United States of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome or SIDS, which the 10 AUGUST2018

CDC defines as the sudden death of an apparently healthy infant less than one year of age that remains unexplained after a thorough investigation. The gut-wrenching, unimaginable loss leaves a gaping hole in the hearts of parents like the Malones. Still, through the blur of grief, the couple remembers the kindness of the medical team who cared for Easton. “They were amazing,” Melissa said of the staff at Baystate PICU. Their gestures on that day – cutting a lock of Easton’s hair and making imprints of his hands and feet – have given the couple cherished reminders of the baby boy. The Malones keep those precious treasures in Easton’s nursery, a grey and mint green room accented with elephants. The animal, which Easton dressed adorably as for Halloween, has become an important symbol for Melissa. Since Easton passed away, she’s noticed that she sees elephants everywhere. The Malones started Elephants for Easton to help spread his infectious smile to other children and families in the hospital. Putting the word out on Facebook, they hoped a few people would donate stuffed animals that they could deliver to hospitals on what would be Easton’s first birthday. But, they arrived by the herd. Boxes of plush grey elephants were dropped on their doorstep day after day, eventually taking over their living room. They came from people all across the country; family, friends, and complete strangers. The Malones spent the days leading up to Easton’s birthday attaching


tags with his smiling face to more than 300 donated elephants. “It’s unexpected and overwhelming, but it makes me feel so good to know that so many people are seeing his face,” Melissa said.

The Malones plan to collect and donate stuffed elephants every year for Easton Marc Malone’s birthday, July 6. To find out how to donate, go to facebook.com/elephantsforeaston.

SEVEN HILLS CHARTER PUBLIC SCHOOL APPLICATIONS FOR THE 2018-2019 SCHOOL YEAR

Helping a Family Who Has Suffered Infant Loss Nearly 90,000 children in the United States die before age 1 annually with nearly 2,500 of those due to SIDS. Friends, relatives, and coworkers can play an important role in helping a family that has experienced the sudden death of an infant. The most valuable thing that anyone can offer to such a family is caring presence. Often, there are no words that can capture the feelings of the moment. Merely “being with” the bereaved persons can provide the support and solace that they need. -infantlossresources.org Ways to Show Support • Acknowledge their profound loss, right away. You may be afraid you’ll say something ‘wrong,’ but the worst thing you can say is nothing at all. • Don’t say, “let me know if I can help.” They are not in a place where they can give direction right now. Offer an idea instead. Say, “I am going to bring you dinner Thursday night,” and just do it. • Don’t be afraid to say the

baby’s name. Let the family talk about the baby, and let them know you’ve been thinking about the baby, too.

Seven Hills Charter Public School is a free independent public school that offers challenging academic programs for children in grades K through 8.

OTHER IMPORTANT FEATURES ARE:

• Two outstanding educators in each • A commitment to family involvement core classroom • An appreciation of diversity • An emphasis on college and career readiness • Comprehensive programs for students with • An enriched curriculum including character special needs or English language learning education, integrated arts and technology needs Applications are available in our main office and on line at sevenhillscharter.org starting September 5, 2018. Application deadline: February 4, 2019. Lottery will be held on March 15, 2019 Location: Seven Hills Charter Public School, 51 Gage Street Worcester MA EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR CERTIFIED TEACHERS

• Maintain contact with the bereaved family, even if they do not seem to be receptive to calls or visits. Don’t feel rejected if initial offers of help are not accepted. • Try to remember and acknowledge important dates, such as their due date, loss date, Mother’s Day, and Father’s Day.

The Seven Hills Charter School is a tuition - free public school serving Worcester’s children. With no admission test, the school serves a student body that is representative of Worcester’s diversity. Seven Hills Charter Public School does not discriminate based on gender, race, religion, gender identity, cultural heritage, linguistic background, political beliefs, physical or mental ability, sexual orientation, marital status, or national origin. In the event that there are more applicants than seats, a lottery will be used to select students.

Explore your possibilities in 2018

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BAYSTATEPARENT 11


Photo Courtesy of the Discovery Museum

OH,

THE PLACES YOU’LL GO

11th Annual Boston GreenFest August 3. 12 JULY2018

Photo by Rzescotti Photography, courtesy of Red Fire Farm

MAKEmobile. deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum

Photo by Darragh Dandurand, courtesy of the Boston GreenFest

Fairyborough. Discovery Museum, Acton. August 7.

MAKEmobile. deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln. August 12 & 26.

18th Annual Tomato Festival, Granby Farm, Granby. August 25.


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! MELTDOWN WARNING: Before you pack up the minivan, please confirm your destination. Although we’ve done our best to ensure accuracy at press time, things can and do change.

outer space, and featuring Steve Martin, Bill Murray, and Jim Belushi. $12.75. coolidge.org.

Music Makers for Tots. Worcester Public Library: Main Branch, 3 Salem Sq., Worcester. 10-11 a.m. Celebrate the wonderful world of music with stories, listening games, and more. For ages 1.5 to 3. Free. mywpl.org.

4 Saturday

Courtesy of deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum

1 Wednesday

WAM Stroller Tours. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St., Worcester. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Enjoy a docent guided tour to look at the art in the galleries, before enjoying an age-appropriate story and light refreshments. Recommended for ages up to 3. Free. worcesterart.org. Wednesday Wonderings: Forest Adventures. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Participate in an exploration into the nature surrounding the Fruitlands Museum. Recommended for Pre-K aged children. Register ahead. Member children $5, nonmember children $10, adults free. fruitlands.org. Trivia Nite @ the Library. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Stretch your brain and win great prizes, as teams up to 6 attempt to best the other in thrilling trivia challenges. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Five-Week Performing Songwriter Showcase. Berklee Performance Center, 136 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 8 p.m. Enjoy this concert featuring the top 10 winners of the Five-Week performing songwriter auditions, with original songs and accompaniment by a group of Berklee students. Free. berklee.edu/events.

2 Thursday Take Aparts, Jr. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Drop-in and grab some tools, discover resistors, capacitors, gears and more, as you uncover the inner workings of household gadgets and gizmos. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Rock Out with Tambourines. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 10-11 a.m. Rock out for a musical adventure listening to stories all about music before making tambourines with bells and ribbon. Recommended for ages 3 to 8. Register ahead. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. Let’s Get Dancing Storytime. Worcester Public Library: 3 Salem Sq., Worcester. 10-11 a.m. Bring your favorite stuffed animal and join storytime where all animals can dance together. For ages 3 to 5. Free. mywpl.org. In the Yard: Charlestown Navy Yard Family Days. USS Constitution Museum, Charlestown Navy Yard, Building 22, Charlestown. 1-5 p.m. Enjoy, play, and learn during this family day featuring family-friendly

Yoga in the Park for Kids. deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, , Lincoln. August 12. activities from rope making, to knot tying stations to monkey’s fist throw. Donation suggested. ussconstitutionmuseum.org. Little Beats Yoga Dance Party. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 4:30-5 p.m. Join Little Beats for an outdoor yoga and dance party. For ages 1 to 5. Register ahead. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Castle Hill Picnic Concert: Soul City. Castle Hill on the Crane Estate, 310 Argilla Rd., Ipswich. 7-9 p.m. Enjoy a walk around the grounds, play with frisbees and balls, enjoy delicious food from local vendors, and settle on the lawn for a terrific soul, Motown, and funk performance by Soul City. Member carloads $20, walk-ins $8; nonmember carloads $30, walk-ins $10. thetrustees.org. The Love Dogs: Concert. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 7:15-9 p.m. Gather on the lawn for our annual Summer Concert Series and listen to beautiful music and the great sounds of The Love Dogs, and taste from our food vendors. Member cars $15, walkins $5; nonmember cars $20, walk-ins $10. fruitlands.org.

3 Friday Music with Movement with Miss Bernadette. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 9:30-10 a.m. Explore sound through singing and playing, as you move, make music, listen, learn, and get a multi-sensory workout. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Backyard and Beyond: Forest Fridays. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton.

10-10:45 a.m. Join a nature-based activity based on the weather and season. Head outside no matter the forecast. Recommended for ages 2 to 6. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Library LEGO Fun. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 10-12 p.m. Become a LEGO inventor. Build with LEGOS using your imagination. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. Free Fun Friday at the Carle. Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, 125 West Bay Rd., Amherst. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Come celebrate picture books with art activities, films, music, and special story-times with authors/illustrators Jessi Sima and Jeff Mack. Free. carlemuseum.org. 11th Annual Boston Green Fest. Boston City Hall Plaza, 1 City Hall Sq., Boston. 12-6 p.m. Enjoy local food trucks, an EcoBazaar, artist performances, and fun activities and games for the entire family. Through Sunday. Free. bostongreenfest.org. Jazz String Painting. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 4-5 p.m. Make unique works of art using string. Find inspiration from jazz music. For ages 5 to 8. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Summer Friday Nights Free. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 4:30-8 p.m. A night of exploration as food donations for Open Table of Concord and Maynard and the Acton Food Pantry are accepted. Free. discoveryacton.org. Little Shop of Horrors. Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St., Brookline. 11:59 p.m. Watch this cult classic musical film, following Rick Moranis as he confronts a wicked plant from

Redcoats and Rebels. Old Sturbridge Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Rd., Sturbridge. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. See the largest military re-enactment in New England with nearly 1,000 soldiers, as well as canon demonstrations, martial music, drills, music, 18th-century baseball and more fun. Through Sunday. Free with admission. Adults $28, youths 4 and up $14, ages 3 and under free. osv.org. Meet the Farmer. Chestnut Hill Farm, 9 Chestnut Hill Rd., Southborough. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Stop by and meet the farmers who grow all of our delicious food, as we participate in fun activities, and learn all about the farm. Free. thetrustees.org. Families @ WAM Tour. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St., Worcester. 10:3011 a.m. Explore the Worcester Art Museum galleries with your family on a docent-guided discovery tour, as you hear fun fact, stories, and enjoy sharing observations and time together. Free. worcesterart.org. Beyond the Spectrum: Color, Texture, and Shape. Museum of Fine Arts: Boston, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Explore the relationship between color, texture, and shape to create unique visual artworks, before we create marbled paper collages during this adventure in art for children on the Autism Spectrum. For ages 8 to 12. $9. mfa.org. Aladdin Jr. Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art. 125 West Bay Rd., Amherst. 11 a.m. & 1 p.m. Discover a ‘Whole New World’ with this Disney classic and its Broadway musical as performed by the Starlight’s Youth Theatre of actors ages 7 to 17. Members $6.50, nonmembers $7. carlemuseum.org. Everyday Engineering: Cup Towers. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Drop-in and challenge yourself to build a one-of-a-kind tower made entirely out of cups. Explore everyday engineering. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Arms + Armor Demonstrations. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St., Worcester. 11:30 a.m. & 2 p.m. A fun interactive program to learn all about different kinds of arms and armor used by everyone from Roman soldiers and Medieval knights. Free. worcesterart.org. Jumanji. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 2 p.m. Watch siblings and a wild Robin Williams as they attempt to finish a game that comes to life and begins invading the real world. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. BAYSTATEPARENT 13


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO!

Free Fun Fridays in August

Photo Courtesy of the Discovery Museum

Highland Street Foundation’s Free Fun Fridays offers free admission for your family at any of these amazing institutions this month! August 3 • Franklin Park Zoo - Boston • Cape Cod Museum of Art - Dennis • The Children’s Museum of Greater Fall River - Fall River • Davis Museum at Wellesley College - Wellesley • Naumkeag, The Trustees - Stockbridge • Worcester Historical Museum - Worcester • Osterville Historical Museum - Osterville • Historic Deerfield - Deerfield • The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art - Amherst • Paragon Carousel - Hull August 10 • Boston Harbor Islands National and State Park - Boston • The Institute of Contemporary Art/ Boston - Boston • Jacob’s Pillow - Becket • Cahoon Museum of American Art - Cotuit • Nichols House Museum - Boston • Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists - Boston • Wenham Museum - Wenahm • Fuller Craft Museum - Brockton • The Greenway Carousel - Boston • Freedom Trail Foundation - Boston August 17 • John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum - Boston • Plimoth Plantation - Plymouth • Commonwealth Museum - Boston • Lynn Museum - Lynn • New England Historic Genealogical Society - Boston • Fort Devens Museum - Devens • Fruitlands Museum, The Trustees - Harvard • Old State House - Boston • Berkshire Museum - Pittsfield • Museum of the First Corps of Cadets - Boston

August 24 • Harvard Museums of Science & Culture - Cambridge • Buttonwood Park Zoo - New Bedford • MASS MoCA - North Adams • Heritage Museums & Gardens - Sandwich • Cape Cod Children’s Museum - Mashpee • Smith College Museum of Art - Northampton • The Old Manse, The Trustees - Concord • Emily Dickinson Museum - Amherst • Hull Lifesaving Museum - Hull • Museum of African American History - Boston & Nantucket August 31 • Old Sturbridge Village - Sturbridge • EcoTarium - Worcester • Norman Rockwell Museum - Stockbridge • Cape Cod Museum of Natural History - Brewster • Chatham Marconi Maritime Center - North Chatham • USS Constitution Museum - Boston • Cape Ann Museum - Gloucester • Griffin Museum of Photography - Winchester • Provincetown Art Association and Museum - Provincetown • The Mary Baker Eddy Library & Mapparium - Boston

Looking for parenting support? UMass Memorial Medical Center and New England Prenatal and Family Education offer classes for expecting women, new moms, their families and support persons. Call 1-855-366-5221 or visit www.umassmemorial.org/healthymoms

Caterpillar Lab. Discovery Museum, Acton. August 29. India Day. DCU Center, 50 Foster St., Worcester. 2:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Join the India Society of Worcester during this celebration of the ‘Colors of India’ featuring dances, food, kids activities, shopping, and more. Free. iswonline.org.

followed by art making during this inclusive playdate experience. Recommended for ages 4 and under. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $25, ages 7 to 17 $10, ages under 7 free. mfa.org.

Massachusetts Pirates vs. Lehigh Valley Steelhawks. DCU Center, 50 Foster St., Worcester. 7 p.m. Join the resident Massachusetts Pirates during this final regular season home game of the National Arena League. $7. dcucenter.com.

Riverfront Family Theater: Performance Workshop Festival. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 11 a.m.2:30 p.m. Learn improvisation, movement, singing, and puppetry during this workshop for the afternoon led by author and educator Sally Cragin. For ages 6 to 13. Register ahead. Free. leominsterlibrary.org.

5 Sunday Little Tree Huggers. Stevens-Coolidge Place, 92 Andover St., North Andover. 1-3 p.m. Find inspiration through ‘The Lorax’ and ‘The Giving Tree’ and create your very own giving tree in the gardens, enjoy truffula tree snacks, complete a scavenger money, and wear a Lorax mustache. Register ahead. Member children $5, nonmember children $10, adults free. thetrustees.org. Gregory Groover Negro Spiritual Project. Jazz at the Fort, Highland Park, 20 Fort Ave., Roxbury. 5 p.m. Join Berklee College of Music graduate Gregory Groover Jr. in this performance of negro spirituals and original compositions. Free. berklee.edu/events. Family Film Festival: Moana. Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., Boston. 6 p.m. Join Magic 106.7 during this outdoor showing of the Disney animated flick Moana, with entertainment, children’s activities, and giveaways. Free. prudentialcenter.com.

6 Monday MFA Playdates: What to Wear. Museum of Fine Arts: Boston, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston. 10:15-11 a.m. Bring your toddler to enjoy story time and looking activities in the galleries,

14 JULY2018

Five-Week Vocal Night. Berklee Performance Center, 136 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 8 p.m. Enjoy this concert featuring students from Berklee’s Five Week Summer Performance Program in this cross-genre appeal night. Free. berklee.edu/events.

7 Tuesday Dance and Movement Class. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 10-10:45 a.m. Join the Joanne Langione Dance Center as it presents a music and movement class for toddlers and preschoolers. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Fairyborough. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Design, build, and explore a mysterious forest environment of fairy houses, gnome homes, and sprite skyscrapers constructed completely out of natural materials and creativity. Through Saturday. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. A Journey Through Fairytales. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 3-4 p.m. Enjoy as the University of New Hampshire’s Little Red Wagon Theater as characters from all of the fairy tales you know and love become reimagined. Free. leominsterlibrary.org.


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! Berklee City Music Scholarship Concert. Berklee Performance Center, 136 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 7:30 p.m. Enjoy this concert featuring Berklee City Music scholars, as they perform jazz, pop/rock. choral, big band, and R&B music. Free. berklee.edu/events. Folk Open Mic: Carlin Tripp. TCAN: Center for Arts, 14 Summer St., Natick. 8 p.m. Performers from around the area come on stage to present the best of entertaining open mic music, featuring Carlin Tripp with a special performance. Members free, nonmembers $5. natickarts.org.

8 Wednesday Rainbow Fish Clay Workshop. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 10-11 a.m. Read some fun rainbow fish stories, before making your own fish out of air-dry clay and sequins. For ages 3 to 8. Register ahead. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. Play in the Park. deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, 51 Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Play, experiment, and engineer together in the Sculpture Park. Collaborate to construct large-scale temporary structures in response to deCordova’s art and landscape. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $14, ages 12 and under free. deCordova.org.

Dances From Around the World. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 4-5 p.m. Learn several dances from around the world, from the Melbourne Shuffle to the Samba. For ages 5 to 8. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Awesome Robb Magic Show. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 7-8 p.m. Enjoy this fast-paced, laugh-out-loud magic show for all ages, featuring unusual magic and Thunder, the Wonder Rabbit. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Five-Week Blowout Concert. Berklee Performance Center, 136 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 8 p.m. Enjoy this concert featuring a wide range of musical styles including jazz, rock, funk/fusion, salsa, and blue grass. Free. berklee. edu/events.

9 Thursday Family Sing Along. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 10-10:30 a.m. Join children’s librarians for songs and movement. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. Let’s Get Dancing Storytime. Worcester Public Library: 3 Salem Sq., Worcester. 10-11 a.m. Bring your favorite stuffed animal and join our storytime where all animals can dance together. For ages 3 to 5. Free. mywpl.org.

Special Storytime: Holly Hobbie. Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, 125 West Bay Rd., Amherst. 10:30 a.m. Join Holly Hobbie the creator of the Toot & Puddle series, as she reads from her latest picture book, Elmore, about a warmhearted porcupine. Free with admission. Adults $9, youth $6, ages under 1 free. carlemuseum.org.

9 p.m. Enjoy bluegrass tunes during this outdoor concert. Gather on the lawn with our lawn chairs, picnic basket, and food vendors’ offerings. Member cars $15, walk-ins $5; nonmember cars $20, walk-ins $10. fruitlands.org.

Game Day. Worcester Public Library: Great Brook Valley Branch, 89 Tacoma St., Worcester. 2-5 p.m. Come play some of your old time favorites or try something new. Free. mywpl.org. Dorchester Food Co-Op Pop-Up. Nightingale Community Garden, 512 Park St., Dorchester. 4-7 p.m. A pop-up market run by the Dorchester Food Co-Op, building a community and workerowned grocery for all. Free. thetrustees.org. Castle Hill Picnic Concert: Soul Rebel Project. Castle Hill on the Crane Estate, 310 Argilla Rd., Ipswich. 7-9 p.m. Enjoy a walk around the grounds, play with frisbees and balls, enjoy delicious food from local vendors, and settle on the lawn for a terrific reggae performance by the Soul Rebel Project. Member carloads $20, walk-ins $8; nonmember carloads $30, walk-ins $10. thetrustees.org. Damn Tall Buildings: Concert. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 7:15-

Five Week Instrumental Showcase. Berklee Performance Center, 136 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 8 p.m. Enjoy this concert featuring the winners of Berklee’s showcases, ensemble groups, and orchestral and rock workshops. Free. berklee.edu/events.

10 Friday Free Fun Friday. Institute of Contemporary Art: Boston, 25 Harbor Shore Dr., Boston. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Join the ICA as it opens its door at no cost to visitors, as activities for the whole family takes place throughout the day. Free. icaboston.org. Summer Friday Nights Free. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 4:30-8 p.m. A night of exploration with food donations for Open Table of Concord and Maynard and the Acton Food Pantry accepted. Free. discoveryacton.org. Friday Farm Dinner at Chestnut Hill Farm. Chestnut Hill Farm, 9 Chestnut Hill Rd., Southborough. 6-8 p.m. Join an al fresco dinner on the farm, featuring farm-to-table experiences, with lawn games and open space

THE 136

TH

BOLTON FAIR 2018

Thursday August 9th Preview night for midway

• Expanded Midway • Food • Entertainment • Exhibit Hall • Animal Shows & Contests • Commercial & Craft Vendors • Demolition Derby • Monster Trucks • Petting Farm with Pony Rides • Horse Drill Team • Magic & Hypnotist Shows • Lumberjack Show • Kenya Acrobats • Sheep Herding Demo • Kids Country Entertainment & Games

Friday August 10th thru Sunday August 12th

See Website for schedule of events, entertainment, prices & hours

www.boltonfair.org

The Fairgrounds at Lancaster, Rt. 117, Exit 27 off Rt. 495

Sponsored by BAYSTATEPARENT 15


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! to explore. Register ahead. Member adults $36, children $16; nonmember adults $45, children $20. thetrustees.org. Peter and the Wolf & Other Animal Friends. Eleanor Cabot Bradley Estate, 2468 Washington St., Canton. 6:30-8 p.m. Enjoy this family concert from The WestwoodWinds, as it plays family-friendly and familiar pieces, and enjoy our ice cream truck. Register ahead. Members $5, nonmembers $10. thetrustees.org.

11 Saturday 11th Annual Barbara J. Walker Butterfly Festival. Broad Meadow Brook Conservation and Wildlife Sanctuary, 414 Massasoit Rd., Worcester. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Enjoy educational fun where butterflies fly free in their natural habitats, with workshops, performances, live caterpillars, butterfly art, face painting, activities, food, and more. Members $5, nonmembers $6, ages under 2 free. massaudubon.org. Families @ WAM Tour. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St., Worcester. 10:30-11 a.m. Explore the Worcester Art Museum galleries with your family on a docent-guided discovery tour, as you hear fun facts, stories, and enjoy sharing observations and time together. Free. worcesterart.org. Second-Saturday Storytelling. Institute of

16 JULY2018

Contemporary Art: Boston, 25 Harbor Shore Dr., Boston. 11 a.m.-12 p.m. & 1:30-2:30 p.m. Connect with family and friends at the ICA Watershed through the art of storytelling. Look, listen, and participate while making connections to artworks through movement, music, poetry and readings. Recommended for ages 3 to 8. Free. icaboston.org. Disney’s Beauty and the Beast Jr. The Hanover Theatre for the Performing Arts, 2 Southbridge St., Worcester. 2 p.m. & 6 p.m. Enjoy as YSP Pre-Teen presents this fantastic adaption of the story of transformation and tolerance, based and adapted from the Disney animated movie and original Broadway production. $12. thehanovertheatre.org.

12 Sunday

13 Monday

Yoga in the Park for Kids. deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, 51 Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln. 10:30-11 a.m. Get moving as a family, as teacher lead this kid-friendly yoga session in the sculpture park. For ages 3 to 12 with caregiver. Register ahead. Member children free, nonmember children $5, adults free. deCordova.org.

The Wizard of Oz. Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St., Brookline. 7 p.m. Enjoy one of the most beloved movies of all time, featuring a young girl from Kansas transported over the rainbow and into an adventure facing off against the Wicked Witch of the West. Adults $12.75, children $10.75. coolidge.org.

MAKEmobile. deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, 51 Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln. 1-3 p.m. Take your imagination for a spin with activities that explore artistic and material processes through amusing prompts and challenges. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $14, ages 12 and under free. deCordova.org.

14 Tuesday

STEAM and a Story: Fairy Houses. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 2-3 p.m. Enjoy a story about fairies before designing your own fairy house using a variety of materials and your imagination. For kids entering grades K through 2. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net.

Family Film Festival: The Little Mermaid. Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., Boston. 6 p.m. Join Magic 106.7 during this outdoor showing of the Disney animated flick The Little Mermaid, with entertainment, children’s activities, and giveaways. Free. prudentialcenter.com.

Especially for Me: Free Autism-Friendly Evening. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 5-8 p.m. Come explore the new Discovery Museum building and Discovery Woods, during this special evening especially for families with members on the Autism Spectrum, with dinner provided. Register ahead. Free. discoveryacton.org.

Perseids Meteor Shower: Family Hike. Castle Hill on the Crane Estate, 310 Argilla Rd., Ipswich. 10 p.m. Enjoy a late-night stargazing adventure for the whole family. Experience one of the main celestial events of the summer with a hike, s’mores, and lemonade around a bonfire. Register ahead. Member adults $9, children $6; nonmember adults $15, children $10. thetrustees.org.

Tinker Tuesday: Inventions in Motion. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Drop-in and explore the possibilities of reusing what we usually throw away to make your very own kinetic art inventions. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Rainforest Reptiles. South Shore Natural Science Center, 48 Jacobs Ln., Norwell. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; 1-2 p.m.; 3-4 p.m. Meet alligators, turtles, and snakes from the neo-tropical rainforest to the subtropical rainforests of the world during this thrilling reptile show. Members $7, nonmembers $10. southshorenaturalsciencecenter.org. Rock Out with Dots. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 3-4 p.m. A hands-on creative maker day art program inspired by Herve Tullet’s books by creating dot


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO!

Music and Games. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 4-5 p.m. Come for an hour of outdoor games, all of which involve music and sound. For ages 5 to 8. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net. End of Summer Discovery Celebration. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 7-8:30 p.m. Celebrate the end of summer discovery with ice cream, and magician and juggler Scott Jameson for an extraordinary performance that will have you laughing out loud. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net.

15 Wednesday Harvest and Salsa Making Party. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 10-11 a.m. The Children’s Salsa Garden is ready to harvest. Chop up the ingredients and create a spicy or sweet salsa. Suitable for ages 4 and up with a guardian. Register ahead. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. WAM Stroller Tours. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St., Worcester. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Enjoy a docent guided tour to look at the art in our galleries, before enjoying an age-appropriate story and light refreshments. Recommended for ages up to 3. Free. worcesterart.org. Astronomy Night. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 8:15 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Join a local astronomer for a Fruitlands Museum Star Party, learn about the stars, planets, and moon. Register ahead. Member adults $5, nonmember adults $10, children free. fruitlands.org.

16 Thursday Doggy Days: Portraits of Abby. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Drop-in and visit therapy dog Abby. Let her be your muse to create your own works of art. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Take Aparts. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 2-4:30 p.m. Drop-in and learn about telephones, computers, radios, and more. Grab tools and discover circuit boards, resistors, and capacitors behind everyday electronics. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. The Wizard of Oz. Worcester Public Library: Great Brook Valley Branch, 89 Tacoma St., Worcester. 3 p.m. Drop by the library and enjoy a showing of the classic film following a Kansas farm girl brought to a wondrous land over the rainbow. Free. mywpl.org. The Greg and Axel Show. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 3-4 p.m. Enjoy a show of magic, comedy, audience participation, and one hilarious dog. Free. leominsterlibrary.org.

Footloose. Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St., Brookline. 7 p.m. Enjoy as Kevin Bacon slides into the role of Ren, a big city kid who finds himself in a small town where dancing and Rock N Roll have been outlawed. Adults $12.75, children $10.75. coolidge.org.

The Ultimate Children’s Discovery Farm

Castle Hill Picnic Concert: Beantown Swing Orchestra. Castle Hill on the Crane Estate, 310 Argilla Rd., Ipswich. 7-9 p.m. Enjoy a walk around the grounds, play with frisbees and balls, enjoy delicious food from local vendors, and settle on the lawn for a terrific big band swing performance and accompanying laser show. Member carloads $20, walk-ins $8; nonmember carloads $30, walk-ins $10. thetrustees.org. Astronomy Night & Summer Picnic. Powisset Farm, 37 Powisset St., Dover. 7-9 p.m. Join us and our local astronomer for our quarterly star party, featuring lawn games, space for picnic dinners, and fabulous sky viewing. Register ahead. Members $5, families $15; nonmembers $10, families $25. thetrustees.org.

17 Friday Preschool Films. Worcester Public Library: Main Branch, 3 Salem Sq., Worcester. 10-10:30 a.m. Join us as we watch a series of favorite picture book stories and more brought to the big screen. Recommended for ages 3 to 5. Free. mywpl.org. Backyard and Beyond: Forest Fridays. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-10:45 a.m. Join a nature-based activity based on the weather and season. Head outside no matter the forecast. Recommended for ages 2 to 6. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. 151st Annual Marshfield Fair. Marshfield Fairgrounds, 140 Main St., Marshfield. 12-10 p.m. Enjoy everything a great fair should have, as you explore 4-H, live animals, arts and crafts, agriculture, horticultural events, agriculture, plenty of food, and entertainment. Through August 26. $10, ages 6 and under free. marshfieldfair.org. Family Fun. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 3-5 p.m. Drop-in for family games and activities, during this opportunity to spend quality time with games, building materials, activities, and friends. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net.

August Events

G O T K I D S ? SM

Now – Labor Day

(Daily) Rainforest Reptiles at Davis Farmland SUMMER EXCLUSIVE – HANDS ON REPTILE SHOWS BY RAINFOREST REPTILES! Tortoise exhibit, snakes, alligators and more slitherin’ summer FUN!

Acres Of Family Fun Await you! Experience the magic of hands-on animal encounters, award-winning discovery play areas and so much more… It’s a full day of fun for families with younger ones!

Great for Birthdays, Sleepovers and Corporate Events!

Summer Friday Nights Free. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 4:30-8 p.m. A night of exploration with food donations for Open Table of Concord and Maynard and the Acton Food Pantry accepted. Free. discoveryacton.org.

18 Saturday Heath Fair. Heath Fairgrounds, Colrain Stage Rd., Heath. 8 a.m.-10 p.m. Enjoy a day filled with exhibits, food bars, kids garden tractor pulls, zucchini racing, kids games, music, and

*Adults must be accompanied by a child 12 years or younger.

DavisFarmland.com (978)422-MOOO (6666).

FREE! $3 Souvenir Cup of Animal Feed! One per family. Exp 8/31/18 Not valid with other offers, discounts, packages or special events. BSP8 S T E R L I N G ,

M A S S A C H U S E T T S

©2018 Davis Farmland

action books. Recommended for ages 3 to 12. Register ahead. Free. leominsterlibrary.org.

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OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO!

20 Monday

more. Admission $8, ages 9 and under free. heathfair.org.

Photo Courtesy of Worcester Art Museum.

In the Yard: 1812 Marines. USS Constitution Museum, Charlestown Navy Yard, Building 22, Charlestown. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Join the all-volunteer 1812 Marine Guard, as we climb aboard the ship and learn how soldiers served both ashore and at sea during the War of 1812. Donation suggested. ussconstitutionmuseum.org. Textile Weekend. Old Sturbridge Village, 1 Old Sturbridge Village Rd., Sturbridge. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Visit the theme ‘Repurposed, Refashioned, and Reused’ and take part in gallery tours, demonstrations, and more fashionable fun. Through Sunday. Free with admission. Adults $28, youths 4 and up $14, ages 3 and under free. osv.org. MFA Playdates: What to Wear. Museum of Fine Arts: Boston, 465 Huntington Ave., Boston. 10:15-11 a.m. Bring your toddler to enjoy story time and looking activities in the galleries, followed by art making during this inclusive playdate experience. Recommended for ages 4 and under. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $25, ages 7 to 17 $10, ages under 7 free. mfa.org. Families @ WAM Tour. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St., Worcester. 10:30-11 a.m. Explore the Worcester Art Museum galleries with your family on a docent-guided discovery tour, as you hear fun fact, stories, and enjoy sharing observations and time together. Free. worcesterart.org.

Families @ WAM Tour. Worcester Art Museum. July 7 Happier Family Comedy Show. Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, 125 West Bay Rd., Amherst. 3-4 p.m. Join this performance all about letting creativity flourish in an accepting atmosphere during this hour-long improv show. Recommended for ages 5 to 12. Member adults $9, youths $4.50; nonmember adults $10, youths $5. carlemuseum.org.

Batman & Robin. Coolidge Corner Theatre, 290 Harvard St., Brookline. 11:59 p.m. Come watch as George Clooney portrays Batman, as the Dark Knight and Robin take on Mr. Freeze and Poison Ivy. $12.75. coolidge.org.

19 Sunday 10th Annual Bob Anderson Memorial Show. Waters Farm, 53 Waters Rd., Sutton. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Drop by for this annual showcase of cars and at this living history center. $10. watersfarm.com.

Since 1953

520 Northwest Main Street, Douglas, MA 01516

BreezySummer.com

ALL DAY FAMILY FUN…NEARBY! New Mini River Slide!! (For the little ones 42” and under Included in your general admission!)

Open daily thru Labor Day (weather permitting)

• (3) 300’ Waterslides • Certified Lifeguards • Free Parking 18 JULY2018

• 500’ lakefront swimming with sandy areas • Clean Restrooms & Changing Facilities • Concession Stand • Great Spot for a Playdate!

Bouncing Babies. Boston Public Library: West End Branch, 151 Cambridge St., Boston. 10:3011:30 a.m. Enjoy stories, songs, tickles, and bounces for babies and their caregivers. For ages up to 18 months with caregiver. Free. bpl.org.

21 Tuesday Make a Mess: Icy Artworks. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Explore and compare the properties of different types of frozen paint cubes and create an original artwork as they melt. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Cold as Ice: Exploring a 300lb Block of Ice. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Drop-in and make chilly discoveries when you put salt, coins, keys, and liquid watercolors on a 300-pound block of ice. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org.

22 Wednesday Play in the Park. deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, 51 Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Play, experiment, and engineer together in the Sculpture Park. Collaborate to construct large-scale temporary structures in response to deCordova’s art and landscape. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $14, ages 12 and under free. deCordova.org.

Special Sundays in the Studio. Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, 125 West Bay Rd., Amherst. 1-4 p.m. Explore some Nature Narratives with crafty activities inspired by nature. Free with admission. Adults $9, youth $6, ages under 1 free. carlemuseum.org.

Everyday Engineering: Kites. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Put your engineering skills to the test by designing and building simple kites out of a variety of materials, and see how high your kite will fly. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org.

Sunday Volunteer Days. Wachusett Meadow Wildlife Sanctuary, 113 Goodnow Rd., Princeton. 1-4 p.m. Learn about nature as you assist with a variety of property, maintenance and ecological management projects from gardening to building to groundworks and wildlife monitoring. Free. massaudubon.org.

Eyes on Owls. South Shore Natural Science Center, 48 Jacobs Ln., Norwell. 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. Join owl experts Marcia and Mark Wilson, be introduced to a menagerie of owls, and get an up-close view of these amazing citizens of the New England fields and forests. Members $7, nonmembers $10. southshorenaturalsciencecenter.org.

Boston Area Chantey & Maritime Sing. USS Constitution Museum, Charlestown Navy Yard, Building 22, Charlestown. 2-5 p.m. Listen, learn, and lift your voices, as you participate in your maritime heritage by joining a rousing chorus of sea chanteys. Donation suggested. ussconstitutionmuseum.org.

Sunset Drum Circle. Fruitlands Museum, 102 Prospect Hill Rd., Harvard. 7-8:15 p.m. Join on the hillside at sunset for a facilitated drum circle, as we connect with the landscape, and celebrate the community. Register ahead. Members $9, nonmembers $15. fruitlands.org.

Family Film Festival: Beauty and the Beast. Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., Boston. 6 p.m. Join Magic 106.7 during this outdoor showing of the Disney live-action film Beauty and the Beast, with entertainment, children’s activities, and giveaways. Free. prudentialcenter.com.

23 Thursday Dressed Your Stuffed Pet. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Treat your favorite stuffed animal to a new outfit, as we use our imaginations and a variety of creative materials to design and construct a special


OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO! costume for your furry friend. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Craft Day. Worcester Public Library: Great Brook Valley Branch, 89 Tacoma St., Worcester. 3-4 p.m. Make your very own origami flying disk, and see how far yours can fly. Free. mywpl.org. D.W. Counts to Kindergarten. Leominster Public Library, 30 West St., Leominster. 6-7 p.m. Learn about what to expect when entering kindergarten during this time of interactive play. For children entering kindergarten with families. Free. leominsterlibrary.org. A League of the Their Own. Worcester Common, 455 Main St., Worcester. 6:30 p.m. An evening of vendors, food, popcorn, and this presentation of the Tom Hanks, Geena Davis starring movie tracking an all-female baseball team as a remedy for a war worn country. Free. worcesterculture.org. Castle Hill Picnic Concert: HELP. Castle Hill on the Crane Estate, 310 Argilla Rd., Ipswich. 7-9 p.m. Enjoy a walk around the grounds, play with frisbees and balls, enjoy delicious food from local vendors, and settle on the lawn for a Beatles Tribute performance by HELP!. Member carloads $20, walk-ins $8; nonmember carloads $30, walk-ins $10. thetrustees.org.

24 Friday Backyard and Beyond: Forest Fridays. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-10:45 a.m. A nature-based activity based on the weather and season. Head outside no matter the forecast. Recommended for ages 2 to 6. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Build a Bubble Wand. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Drop-in and see what happens when you build a square bubble wand, and try your and build a wand that proves that bubbles need not be round. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org.

the galleries, try out a family pop-up talk, sketch the view, and take in a performance. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $15, youth 17 and under free. icaboston.org. Families @ WAM Tour. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St., Worcester. 10:30-11 a.m. Explore the Worcester Art Museum galleries with your family on a docent-guided discovery tour, as you hear fun fact, stories, and enjoy sharing observations and time together. Free. worcesterart.org. 18th Annual Tomato Festival. Granby Farm, 7 Carver St., Granby. 12-4 p.m. Join the Red Fire Farm to celebrate the annual Tomato Festival

through fresh food, live music, kids’ activities, pick-your-own in fields, hay rides, tastings, and more. Free. redfirefarm.com. Avengers: Infinity War. Newton Free Library, 330 Homer St., Newton. 2 p.m. Follow Captain America, Iron Man, Thor, Black Widow, and the rest of the Avengers as they gather for one last stand against Thanos and his campaign across the universe. Free. newtonfreelibrary.net.

26 Sunday Latino Family Festival. Fenway Park: Gate K, 4 Jersey St., Boston. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Enjoy

this fantastic festival promoting family health and fitness. $10. mlb.com/redsox. Worcester Caribbean American Carnival. Institute Park, 82 Salisbury St., Worcester. 12-7 p.m. The 6th Annual Worcester Caribbean American Carnival featuring vendors, performances, and a parade. Free. worcesterculture.org. MAKEmobile. deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, 51 Sandy Pond Rd., Lincoln. 1-3 p.m. Take your imagination for a spin with activities that explore artistic and material processes through amusing prompts and challenges. Free with admission. Members free; nonmember adults $14, ages 12 and under free. deCordova.org.

HELL we’re welcoming new pediatric patients Meet the pediatricians who are welcoming new patients at reliantmedicalgroup.org/kids.

Summer Friday Nights Free. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 4:30-8 p.m. A night of exploration with food donations for Open Table of Concord and Maynard and the Acton Food Pantry accepted. Free. discoveryacton.org.

25 Saturday Dog Day. Francis William Bird Park, 41 Rhoades Ave., East Walpole. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Enjoy a day filled with canine creativity, raise money for charity, enjoy activities, vendors, refreshments, a Flying High Frisbee Dogs performance, and more. Free. thetrustees.org. Play Date: Seaport Adventures. Institute of Contemporary Art: Boston, 25 Harbor Shore Dr., Boston. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Come relax on the ICA Grandstand, revel in the ocean view, and visit

A Division of Reliant Medical Group

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OH, THE PLACES YOU’LL GO!

50 Leominster Road Sterling, MA 01564 978-422-6989 office@paulameoladance.com

ADCC 2018 National Studio of Excellence Award Winner Voted Best Dance Studio Once Again

Open House & Fall Registration for Students Ages 2-10 Wednesday, August 15th 4:30-6:30 PM

Join us for a fun afternoon of free classes, entertainment, and a chance to meet the faculty!

The Sterling Youth Ballet in association with Paula Meola Dance present the

Nutcracker Ballet

Open to PMD Ballet Dancers Ages 6 & Up Saturday, September 15th - Auditions at PMD

Team PMD

Offering unique performance opportunities in addition to regional competitions, national competitions, and popular dance conventions!

Children’s Dance

Family Film Festival: The Secret Life of Pets. Prudential Center, 800 Boylston St., Boston. 6 p.m. Join Magic 106.7 during this outdoor showing of the animated animal adventure The Secret Life of Pets with entertainment, children’s activities, and giveaways. Free. prudentialcenter.com.

Folk Open Mic: Carolyn Griffin. TCAN: Center for Arts, 14 Summer St., Natick. 8 p.m. Join us as performers from around the area come on stage to present the best of entertaining open mic music, featuring Carolyn Griffin with a special performance. Members free, nonmembers $5. natickarts.org.

Full Moon Paddle. Tully Lake Campground, 25 Doane Hill Rd., Royalston. 7:30-10 p.m. Come out and enjoy the wonders of the full moon out on Tully Lake with canoes and kayaks. Boat rental: members $24; nonmembers $30. thetrustees.org.

29 Wednesday

27 Monday Bouncing Babies. Boston Public Library: West End Branch, 151 Cambridge St., Boston. 10:3011:30 a.m. Enjoy stories, songs, tickles, and bounces for babies and their caregivers. For ages up to 18 months with caregiver. Free. bpl.org.

28 Tuesday Make a Mess: A Fanfare of Colors. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Drop-in and create a colorful fan using a fun, whole-body painting technique with spray bottles and watercolor. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org.

Creating brighter futures.

Try PMD’s new Pre-K J.A.M.S. class! Jazz, Acro, Music, and Surprises! For children 2.3 to 4 years old!

The Caterpillar Lab. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. & 1-4 p.m. Drop-in and be introduced to a huge variety of New England caterpillar species, as we check out some little-known native critters munching on their food plants right in front of you and learn about these slinking bugs. Through Friday. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. WAM Stroller Tours. Worcester Art Museum, 55 Salisbury St., Worcester. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Enjoy a docent guided tour to look at the art in our galleries, before enjoying an age-appropriate story and light refreshments. Recommended for ages up to 3. Free. worcesterart.org.

30 Thursday Make a Mess: Paint Like Seurat. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-11 a.m. Drop-in as we learn about- and find inspiration by George Seurat’s special style of painting using lots of little dots, called pointillism. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org. Castle Hill Picnic Concert: Orville Giddings Band. Castle Hill on the Crane Estate, 310 Argilla Rd., Ipswich. 7-9 p.m. Join us as enjoy a walk around the grounds, play with frisbees and balls, enjoy delicious food from local vendors, and settle on the lawn for a boogie blues performance. Member carloads $20, walk-ins $8; nonmember carloads $30, walk-ins $10. thetrustees.org.

31 Friday Backyard and Beyond: Forest Fridays. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 10-10:45 a.m. Join a nature-based activity based on the weather and season, as we head outside no matter the forecast. Recommended for ages 2 to 6. Free with admission. Members free; nonmembers $14.50, ages under 1 free. discoveryacton.org.

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Now enrolling infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Central Massachusetts

Westborough: 508-366-8005 Worcester: 508-579-2505 ywcacm.org

Summer Friday Nights Free. Discovery Museum, 177 Main St., Acton. 4:30 p.m.-8 p.m. Join us for a night of exploration as we gratefully accept food donations for Open Table of Concord and Maynard and the Acton Food Pantry. Free. discoveryacton.org.


Kathleen Real Benoit 12th Grade Tantasqua Regional Sr. High School, Sturbridge Favorite Subject: Study Hall

Paula Monette Ethier 9th Grade Providence St Jr. High, Worcester Favorite Subject: Art

22 24 25 26

MAKING THE GRADE with our staff throwbacks!

Regina Stillings 4th Grade Naquag Elementary School, Rutland Favorite Subject: Math

Stephanie Renaud Mallard Kindergarten St. Anna School, Leominster Favorite Subject: Everything

Muddy Hands, Budding Minds: Nature the Backdrop for Learning in Tinkergarten Backpacks for Every Age & Stage Tips for Lightening the Backpack Load The World is Her Classroom: Meet Leila

28 30 32 35 36

Amanda Collins Bernier 2nd Grade Standiford Elementary School, Modesto, California Favorite Subject: Reading

Kathleen Kelly Puffer 3rd Grade Valley View Elementary, San Jose, California Favorite Subject: Art

The Gender Divide at Tech Schools Easing the College Transition for Students with Disabilities Captured: Readers’ Back to School Throwbacks How a Boston Teacher is Using Art to Connect with Foreign Students District Report Card

BAYSTATEPARENT 21


MAKING THE GRADE

Muddy Hands, Budding Minds

In Tinkergarten, Nature is the Backdrop for Learning BY TRACEY PROHASKA CARROLL Does nature provide a perfect backdrop for early childhood education? Thousands of families with children ages 18 months to 8 years old say yes. Tinkergarten, a self-proclaimed movement, brings play-based outdoor classrooms to parks across the country. The classes meet weekly and tackle activities that allow participants to carefully explore nature and play at their own level. Each class follows a loose structure that includes an opening circle, main activity, closing circle and snack. The main activity focuses on open-ended exploration and play where kids actively engage in imagining, exploring and/or problem solving. While this activity is planned and guided by an adult, the interests of the children play a large role in shaping the way it unfolds. Meghan and Brian Fitzgerald, an educator and tech product leader, hatched the idea 8 years ago when their first child was just a few months

old. The Fitzgeralds saw playful learning in nature as an ideal way to connect communities and while youngsters learn and thrive, explained Ryan Stansky, Tinkergarten Marketing Director. In four years the organization has grown to include 1,803 leaders, with nearly 120,000 children taking part in the nature-based learning program. Andrea Pancholi, a local Tinkergarten leader who runs her “classroom” out of Coggshall Park in Fitchburg, is gearing up to begin another session this coming fall. “I stumbled upon the program when searching for an outdoor activity for my 4-year old son,” she said. “I knew he needed some preparation socially before entering kindergarten. I also knew he would prefer an outdoor setting, learning through play rather than sitting in a circle indoors. Unfortunately, there weren’t any Tinkergarten classes in our area, so I decided to bring the program to us.”

Pancholi lives in Lunenburg and graduated from Johnson and Wales University with a Bachelor’s degree in Business Management. While her college experience didn’t lead her directly to working with children, the Tinkergarten Immersive Training course she completed at the start of this year has. It’s enabled her to connect with kids, including her own, in an educational, natural environment. The training course is mandatory for all Tinkergarten leaders. “I love that our classroom is a mixed age group. The children, we call them explorers at Tinkergarten, are wonderful problem solvers and creative thinkers and really do learn so much from each other,” she said. Pancholi describes a highlight from last session where explorers planned and executed a party to celebrate Mother Nature. “They made delicious mud pizza for their party guests (a.k.a. earthworms). Their mud birthday cake

was decorated with flower petals and candles made from sticks,” she said. Pancholi watched the event unfold with pride and was struck by the creative skills and ideas the children managed to bring together. She says a staple of the party was a piñata the children came up with. Using a pulley and rope, they attached a pail to the end, threw it over a branch and filled the bucket with petals, leaves and grass. “They had the best time hitting the pail with a stick,” she laughed. Jessica Cintron, mother of 4-year-old Olivia, who attended class this past spring, says she was thrilled when she saw on Facebook that the class was being offered. She says since participating, Olivia plays differently than she had before. “She has no fear when it comes to handling bugs and worms,” Cintron said. “Her favorite experience was that she was able to play with the mud and use her imagination.”

“The children, we call them explorers at Tinkergarten, are wonderful problem solvers and creative thinkers and really do learn so much from each other.” 22 AUGUST2018


According to Pancholi, a Tinkergarten philosophy is that there is no such thing as bad weather -- only bad clothing. She encourages going outside in all conditions unless the weather poses a threat like extreme temperatures, flooding and lightning. In those cases, classes are rescheduled. “I guess the only downside would be having to dress appropriately for tick season. That really wasn’t even that big of a deal because being in nature was by far a greater positive,” said Jennifer Brideau, mother of Luke, who also participated in Pancholi’s spring class. Brideau who grew up in Germany and now lives in Western Mass. said her childhood was filled with outdoor play and exploration. Now a mother of three, she wants to model her children’s learning around the same love and respect for nature she had growing up. “Luke loved that it was his time with us, where he got our undivided attention. He loved exploring and learning outside of a book. I learned to be a little more relaxed with dirt and overall messes,” she said. Brideau homeschools Luke and chose to

incorporate Tinkergarten into her curriculum. Most Tinkergarten classes run about 75 minutes and are usually open to about a dozen explorers. The format consists of a welcoming activity to allow children to get comfortable in their outdoor space. Then class moves into a circle time to share stories, sing songs and recite poems. The main activity of the day is then introduced, sometimes including a book to get imaginations going and build excitement. The leader then presents the activity, tailored to each age, which provides a rich sensory experience that nurtures empathy, collaboration, creativity, persistence and problem solving. The end of each class is a gathering to enjoy food, sing songs, and reflect on the experiences of the day. Costs to attend depend on the area, number of sessions and length of each class. Most sessions run anywhere from 5-to-10 weeks, giving children and parents the chance to get to know one another and develop friendships. “We loved meeting the same group of children every week, exploring Mother Nature, and learning to think outside the

box,” said Kelly Stone, another parent of a child in Pancholi’s most recent session. “It’s a great way to get outdoors, explore, and let your children lead with their imagination and creativity, have fun and of course get dirty.” Locally, sessions average anywhere from $140-$225, with the first class free for newbies, and a discounted rate for siblings. Children can join mid-session at a prorated rate. To learn more about Tinkergarten, find an upcoming program near you or about becoming a leader, visit tinkergarten.com. There you will find sample activities you can do at home with your child and register for a free trial class. Tracey Prohaska Carroll is a freelance writer, wife and mother of one from Athol. She enjoys spending time with her family at the lake home they’re fixing up. When she’s not writing, filling the roles of wife or mother, you’ll find her listening to music, reading or boxing for fitness. You can reach her by email traceywrites@ mass.rr.com.

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add to CART

The coolest bags and backpacks for all ages and stages.

Made especially for preschoolers and elementary age children, EGGKIDS backpacks are more than a bag -- each character on this backpack has its own story of where they were born, where they live, and more. Your little one will have their special friend with them to ease their nerves on their day back to school! Made from dirt-resistant and water-resistant Vinylon, the bags have a two-way zip-around closure, front pocket, and open side pockets. Sleeve for separate storage inside and a pocket holding card with child’s contact information. Comes in four different motifs and four base colors. $40. eggkids.com.

Teens and tweens looking for a more understated bag will love Joggo backpacks. The versatile canvas material not only washes easily, but ages beautifully. There is a padded slot for their laptop and added pockets inside and out. They can go ahead and carry their thesis final draft and the turkey avocado sandwich they packed for lunch — there’s a spot for all of it. $59.99. joggobag.com.

With many schools implementing clear bag policies, Clearware Bags offers a fashionable choice. These bags come in two size options: classic and crossbody. Both have interchangeable straps to change up the look with nylon, leather, solid color or pattern. Hand-crafted in the U.S. with high-grade PVC, the bags are welded, not sown, so they won’t leak. The phone pockets can also be used to store a game or concert ticket, so it can be scanned without being taken out. $59-$89. shopclearwarebags.com.

Little ones will adore the whimsically-designed, ridiculously cute Animal Packers backpacks. Made from eco-friendly, BPA-free materials, parents will love them, too! The backpacks are lightweight and adjustable with a roomy fully lined interior. Animal Packers includes a removable name tag to use for school, and the perfect hiding spot for lunch or treasures (in the animal’s mouth). And because they are bound to get dirty, each one comes with a “care bag” -- just put the backpack in and toss the whole thing in washer! Various animals and colors to choose from. $38. animalpackers.com. 24 AUGUST2018


Backpack MAKING THE GRADE

Safety:

Tips for Lightening the Load and Finding the Right Fit BY DR. BRITTANY FALCONE AND DR. VITO GIACALONE

Choosing a backpack is about more than finding the right color or cool design. An incorrectly fitted school backpack can cause

In 2013, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission cited 5,415 backpack related injuries at emergency rooms. Heavy backpacks can result in acute and chronic back problems, among other painful conditions. The maximum capacity for a backpack should be 10 percent of body weight, so a 50-pound child should carry a bag no more than five pounds. A 2001 study at Simmons College discovered that 55 percent of students carry a backpack that is heavier than the recommended guidelines. While some sources suggest a 15 percent maximum capacity body weight, we encourage a conservative approach. Regardless of a child’s weight, a backpack should never exceed 25 pounds. Omitting items to meet weight requirements may seem challenging or unrealistic. Consider a few suggestions: purchase a small-to-medium

size pack (a smaller pack will ensure a lighter load); have two textbooks – one at home and one at school, or eliminate books by accessing an online version; and make it a habit to empty out your child’s pack each week to ensure unwanted items are removed. It is also possible to avoid using a backpack altogether and opt for a rolling suitcase-type pack instead. This style of bag almost eliminates the need to carry anything at all while allowing your child to transport required school items. However, many schools do not allow suitcases in the classroom. Look for a backpack/suitcase hybrid like the AO King Rolling Wheeled backpack. It has wheels and a retractable handle that allows it to be pulled behind or carried by straps over the shoulders. When selecting a backpack for your

Free Back to School Backpack Clinics

early spinal damage. Picking the right backpack is important to a student’s health and to having a successful school year.

child, it is important to choose comfort and fit over fashion (hopefully you’ll find both). The top features to look for in an ergonomically appropriate backpack are: • Wide, padded shoulder straps • Adjustable straps • A padded back region • Multiple compartments • Chest and/or waist straps • Appropriately sized (no wider than the student’s chest) Once you have selected a backpack using theses guidelines, the fit and position of the pack on your child is equally important. While backpacks vary, they are made with two straps for a reason. Encourage your children to use both straps, all the time. Once on both shoulders, tighten the straps so the pack is firmly against the shoulder blades and mid-back.

Still feel like you need a little help in selecting or fitting your child’s backpack? You’re in luck! The doctors at Back to Health Chiropractic have organized three backpack clinics this month in Worcester. Come ask questions and bring your child (with their backpack) to be fitted by a Doctor of Chiropractic. If you can’t make it to a clinic, feel free to contact Dr. Brittany at falconebc@gmail.com or Dr. Vito at vitogiacalonedc@ gmail.com.

The pack should always be worn at or above the hollow of the lower back. Lastly, to help with proper weight distribution, place heavier items at the base of the bag and closer to the spine (this is where those extra compartments come in handy). Rounded shoulders or a pack that falls below the level of the pelvis are indicators that the straps need to be adjusted to a tighter position. Look for the visual signs of an improperly fitted backpack in your child to prevent injury. If your child complains of pain, fatigue, or that their pack feels too heavy, there is likely a problem. Your first steps should be to reduce the weight of the backpack, adjust the fit, or consider purchasing a new bag. If pain persists, an evaluation by your child’s pediatrician/family doctor or a chiropractor that specializes in treated children may be warranted.

Monday, August 13 9-11 a.m. Worcester Fitness 440 Grove Street Friday, August 24 2-4 p.m. Back to Health Chiropractic 82 Park Avenue Wednesday, August 29 3:30-5:30 p.m. Worcester Jewish Community Center 633 Salisbury Street

BAYSTATEPARENT 25


MAKING THE GRADE

The World Is Her Classroom

How Modeling Gigs are Allowing Fitchburg Youth to Travel & Learn

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GIANNA NICOLE MEDIA

At

just 10 years old (11 later this month), Leila HammadTherrien has already been “working” for 8 years. From gracing the pages to Babiekins Magazine to walking the runway in New York Fashion Week, the Fitchburg resident lives the life of a child model -though she’s quick to say that might not mean what you think it does. “I think people have many misconceptions about modeling,” says the sixth grader, who one day wants to be a brain surgeon. Leila explains that modeling, even at her tender age, is about more than posing and pretty pictures. In a sense, a set can be like a reallife classroom -- a place where she gains people skills and work ethic, and even copes with rejection. Modeling has also opened up opportunities for travel and hands-on learning. In April, Leila journeyed 4,500 miles away to Girdwood, Alaska, a small mountain town just outside of Anchorage that’s surrounded by seven glaciers. The scenery made for stunning photoshoot backdrop, but also for the experience of a lifetime. Leila, this month’s cover model,

26 AUGUST2018

first appeared on the cover of baystateparent in June 2014. When she’s not traveling or “working,” Leila is just like any other 10-year-old: she likes to hang out with her 5-year-old twin brothers, draw or play street hockey. She volunteers for Haitian Outreach, has participated in helping feed the less fortunate, and she gives gifts to the less fortunate during the Christmas season. “She knows that being a good person -- and school -- comes first, and will take precedence over anything else,” said her mom, Dina Hammad. We talked with the pair about how Leila first got her start in the industry and all the adventures along the way. When and how did Leila get her start? Dina: Leila started off doing little pageants and it was clear to see after winning titles that she loved the stage and camera, so we decided to try out modeling. Her first big break was in April of 2012. She shot for Babiekins Magazine, an internationally-recognized print publication, with global circulation. She did fantastic and started booking jobs immediately after. What are some of the campaigns/ companies Lelia has modeled for?

Where have her images been? Dina: Leila has worked for a number of large companies and campaigns including Barney’s New York, Zara, BHLDN, Urban Outfitters, Anthropologie, Party City, Rockets of Awesome, Agatha Cub and Zulily to name a few. Her images have been continuously in circulation through the web with larger campaigns such as Zulily and Party City, to name a couple. She has also been in Babiekins Magazine, Child Model Magazine and La Petite Magazine. She has walked in NYFW (New York Fashion Week) for many years now and has walked for large companies like Diesel. She absolutely loves to be on the runway! How busy does it keep her? Dina: Leila is usually busy with modeling, but the work does fluctuate. There are “slow” times in the industry where she doesn’t work as much, but during the busy months, she is in NYC three to four times a month.

ing adventure, I got to go parasailing for the first time! It was lots of fun and I was surrounded by a lot of friends. Do you think people have any misconceptions about modeling? Leila: Yes, I think people have many misconceptions about modeling. Some people think is just taking photos, or that I may not be happy doing it. And I think some people may think it’s not a safe industry to be in. I love what I do, and I love seeing the outcome of some of the campaigns and knowing I helped create it. Modeling is also extremely safe. I’m always with my mom and I am signed with two reputable agencies. I am signed with City Model Talent New York, and Dynasty Model and Talent in Boston. What has modeling taught you? About yourself, hard work, other people?

Leila: I love going in to New York City, and I loved going to Miami, Florida for a magazine shoot. But my favorite place so far was definitely Alaska! It was so beautiful. It was so much fun and I had so many friends there with me!

Leila: Modeling has helped to teach me to be confident in myself. It boosted my self-esteem and has taught me to work hard and follow through with goals that I have set. It has taught me that strong bonds with people are important, and that modeling is more than just pretty pictures. It gives me a stage to talk about things that are important to me.

What’s your favorite memory from modeling?

What advice would you give to aspiring models?

Leila: I have a lot of amazing memories, but one time on a group model-

Leila: Always have fun. Don’t take yourself so seriously, and never give

Leila, where is your favorite place modeling has taken you?


up. Sometimes you will not get a job because someone else is a better fit. You have to have a positive attitude and understand that the right job will come for you. Dina, do you have any advice for parents who are interested in getting their children into modeling? Dina: My advice is to make sure you are working with a reputable agency. Do your research. And if they are asking you for money, they are probably not a legit agency. You may have to pay to have good pictures taken, but other than that, don’t pay anyone for your child to model. What kind of adventures and opportunities has this allowed for your daughter? Dina: Modeling has has allowed Leila to travel and see different parts of our country. It has taken her to the west coast, down south, and all around the east coast. She has learned that she loves to travel and would like to continue to do so. She has made many connections and bonds both in her personal and professional life. What do you think she’s learned through these opportunities? Dina: Leila has learned so much: compassion for people, how to have a voice for herself, and how to persevere. It has taught her that you have to work hard for the things that you want and that things do not come easy unless you do so. BAYSTATEPARENT 27


Clockwise: Silvana Reid, a recent graduate of BVT's Automated Manufacturing Technology shop; Andrew Macowiecki, a student in Bay Path's Business Tech shop; Katelyn Paquette, a student in Bay Path's Cabinet Making shop; Anna Israelian, in Bay Path's Machine Tool Tech shop; Brian Lavoie, a Health Tech student at Bay Path.

The Gender Divide MAKING THE GRADE

Tech School Students Escaping Career Stereotypes BY AMANDA COLLINS BERNIER

When Anna Israelian applied to Bay Path Regional Vocational Technical High School, she intended to study Health Technologies, following in the footsteps of several young women in her family who trained at the school for careers in the nursing field. That was the plan, at least. 28 AUGUST2018

“Right away I knew it wasn’t the shop for me,” she said of the first week she spent in the program. “I liked being able to see what I’m making. I liked being hands-on.” Two years later, she’s traded medical for metal. Israelian is one of four female

students taking up Machine Tool Technology at Bay Path, a field that is ultimately responsible for every product manufactured – and one that is dominated by males. In learning to operate a lathe and getting to know the ins and outs of a machine shop, Israelian is among what’s

called “non-traditional” vocational students, teens who are readying for careers that typically employ less than 25 percent of their gender. There’s a concerted effort at technical high schools to entice students to programs that fall outside of what could be considered “traditional”


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fields for their gender, said Bay Path Vocational Director Don Montville. “It’s absolutely a goal,” he said. In fact, since the mid-’70s, federal education policies have made encouraging “non-traditional” students a national target. Before the passage of Title IX, which ensured equal opportunity in education, the vocational education system was purposefully sex segregated; education institutions could, and did, legally deny girls and women entry into training deemed “inappropriate” for females, and visa versa for males. Title IX made these restrictions illegal, and decades later, several other initiatives and performance measures have been put in place at the state and federal level. At most schools, it’s a work in progress, with the gender divide in vocational shops often still mirroring the career world. It can be even harder to encourage males to enter into the traditionally female-dominated shops, said Montville. At Blackstone Valley Tech in Upton, about 25 percent of students are enrolled in non-traditional placements, a figure that administrators say has remained pretty steady in recent years. Like Israelian, many of them are surprised to find themselves defying what’s “traditional.” Freshman students rotate through several different programs during an exploratory period, allowing them to spend time in different shops and sometimes find an unexpected passion. “It’s not uncommon for a student to come here thinking they want one thing and end up finding that they are more interested in something totally different,” said Cyra Hathaway, Vocational Coordinator at BVT. Silvana Reid, for example, a 2018 graduate and the Massachusetts Vocational Association Non-Traditional Student of the Year, almost never discovered her passion for manufacturing. She went to BVT intending to study culinary arts.

“I dropped three plates, got burned by the dishwasher and yelled at over Parmesan cheese,” she laughed. The kitchen wasn’t the place for her, but she felt surprisingly at home in the machine shop. “Of all the shops I explored, that was the place where I could take something that had no value to it – a hunk of metal – and make it something useful. I loved the problemsolving behind it; the challenge of getting it perfect,” she said. Andrew Macowiecki, of Oxford, had a similar experience in the plumbing shop at Bay Path. Though it’s what he thought he wanted to pursue, he realized he couldn’t actually imagine himself as a plumber. He ended up in Business Tech, where there are three other male students. “I enjoyed it and thought I was best at it,” he said. Students who take the non-traditional route are able to look past stereotypes and settle on a shop that fits their interests and career goals. Sometimes, it’s their parents who are harder to sell. “A lot of it is getting that parent support; having the parents buy-in,” said Kimberly Elder, Vocational and Data Specialist at BVT. “It’s funny how old-school the mentality can be sometimes.” Exposure to role models of the same gender as students is important, too, whether it’s teachers or older students who can serve as mentors. Many schools have clubs for non-traditional students that arrange speakers and conferences, or provide a forum for conversation around what it means, socially and academically, to be on a non-traditional path. “You may not get people to change their perspective, but maybe you will. The biggest thing is encouraging students to realize if they have a passion in a certain area, it’s OK – it good!” said Reid. “You’re going to work for the rest of your life. You have to do what you like.”

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MAKING THE GRADE • VERY SPECIAL PEOPLE

Easing the High School to College Transition for Students with Disabilities College is a new world for students with disabilities. A guide from learning specialist Elizabeth Hamblet serves as a stepby-step resource to receiving accommodations at the post-secondary education level. BY JOAN GOODCHILD

ur nar ck o or our Semi e h C ite f ing s ous web 29th H t. Sep

If

you’re the parent of a child with a disability who is considering college, there are a lot of unanswered questions. Perhaps you have heard that colleges have to follow the student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP), which has possibly been in place for years. Or perhaps you have heard that colleges don’t have to follow an IEP, but they do have to follow 504 plans, which mandate certain accommodations for stu-

dents with disabilities. Unfortunately, neither is true. This is one of the many misconceptions and confusing pieces of information that students with disabilities, and their parents, must navigate when they transition from high school to college. That’s because college is a different world from high school, and the laws, expectations, and culture around disability services are different, too. Enter Elizabeth Hamblet, a

learning specialist at Columbia University, who has written From High School to College, Steps for Success for Students with Disabilities to help families navigate the process, and surprises, of going to college. The guide, according to Hamblet, is a step-by-step resource that provides everything students and their families and education team need to know about registering for accommodations at the higher-education level.

We’re Here to Help Whether your loved one with special needs is an adult or a child, we can help with: • Special Needs Planning • Transition Planning & Adult Services • Advocacy • Guardianship & Alternatives Contact Frederick M. Misilo, Jr., Esq. 508.459.8059 or fmisilo@fletchertilton.com

Art by Dominic Killiany, an artist living with autism

30 AUGUST2018

WORCESTER | FRAMINGHAM | CAPE COD | PROVIDENCE


“Families understandably think it is going to be the same level of service they experienced in high school when they go on to college,” she explained. But that is not the case. Take the questions around IEPs and 504 plans, for example. The law does not hold colleges and universities to the same requirements as secondary schools and students’ plans essentially expire after high school. Post-secondary schools may look to previous plans in helping them may decisions about new accommodations for disabled students, but they are not obligated to follow a previous 504 plan or IEP. This is often an unpleasant and upsetting surprise for incoming students. Which is why the inspiration for the guide came from Hamblet’s background working as a learning disabilities specialist at Rutgers University several years ago. “The bulk of the job was reviewing student requests for accommodations and making recommendations,” said Hamblet. “I was seeing requests for things we don’t do. Requests such as ‘I need to meet with a learning specialist. I need one-on-one tutoring. I need my professors to email me the assignments.’ What I took from that was that they are asking for these things because no one has prepared them for the reality.” With the book she aims to dispel the many misperceptions students with disabilities and their families often have when applying for and attending college in order to set them on a path for early success. Young adults need an understanding of the postsecondary disability services system, and they need to have well-honed self-advocacy skills, know when to disclose a disability, and be able to build and nurture support, Hamblet notes. It is a mistake to expect a previous-level of accommodation in many cases, she says, and information is key when applying to schools. “If students, parents, and professionals assume that students can just walk into the college disability services office, hand in their IEP, and receive the accommodations they have received in the past, how do

we get people to go looking for information they need to make sure that students get the proper preparation for college?” said Hamblet. Transitioning to college is often as much of an adjustment for parents as it is for their children in the best of circumstances, but it can be particularly challenging for families of students who are disabled and sometimes not ready for total independence. However, as legal adults now, the onus is on the student to register for accommodations, and parents cannot force their child to do so. It is important to prepare and discuss expectations before even getting to campus on day one, she said. “The most important thing you can do for a student with disabilities is try to work them toward the greatest independent-level of functioning that you can,” said Hamblet. “Encourage them to register as insurance and make sure they have the skills to complete the paperwork. Make sure they understand how to fill out a registration form. Download that form from the college site and see just how much they can fill out.” While, at first, receiving accommodations at the college-level can seem daunting, it is important not to let it panic you, said Hamblet. For some students, the change and move toward more independence comes with rewards and satisfaction, too. “For the kids, let them know this isn’t special education anymore,” said Hamblet. “Because for some that is encouraging. They are not going to special classes anymore, or having an aide check in. For some students, that is refreshing because they are now anonymous in ways that they desire. They can be the only ones that know about their disability if that is what they choose.”

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34 AUGUST2018


MAKING THE GRADE

How a Boston Teacher is Using Art to Connect with Foreign Students For many of Jennifer Dines’ ESL students, learning English is the easy part. It is past trauma, anxieties, or emotional stress that can be real work. She’s leveraging art to help. BY JOAN GOODCHILD

Jennifer Dines, an English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher at Lilla G. Frederick Pilot Middle School in Dorchester, says her students come from all over the world, and have often dealt with many challenges before arriving in the United States and in her classroom. “I’ve had several students who are dealing with homelessness, who have witnessed violence,” said Dines, who teaches students in 6th, 7th and 8th grade. “Several of my students are refugees. Many people think when someone arrives here as a refugee, they move here with their whole family, but that is often not the case. They are split up with one sibling or parent in another country. That is a lot to deal with at their age.” Mindful of this, Dines aims to make their classroom time educational, stress-free and nurturing. “I am always thinking of ways to show support with love and caring through our work,” she said. As part of this effort, Dines guides her students through a series of therapeutic projects that help calm anxiety. One project saw the students create sensory bottles, which contain water, glitter, sand and other objects and can be used as a stress reliever. “I have them paint them with their home country flag, or a butterfly design, or polka dots, or something to look at when they need to focus,” said Dines. The students have also learned more about mental health with reports that delve into topics such depression, schizophrenia and eating disorders. It is because of work like this that Dines was recently honored by a large educational grant. Dines was alerted earlier this year she is the winner of a $5,000 grant from the Born This Way Foundation, which was founded by music star Lady Gaga and her mother Cynthia Germanotta,

in 2012. The grant was the result of a Born This Way Foundation and DonorsChoose.org challenge focusing on mental health and emotional wellbeing. Dines was one of six people chosen by the Born This Way Foundation for her efforts to “support the wellness of young people and empower them to create.” She plans to use the money to buy a SMART board for her classroom. “I thought it would be $250 grant,” said Dines. “When I got the email (that I won) I almost started crying. People don’t realize how serious the need is here. My classroom is going to be so much more interactive.” Dines also participates in the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum’s Thinking Through Art education program, which is a year-long graduate level-course on teaching and learning through visual art for Boston Public School teachers. The program empowers teachers and students to practice critical thinking and communication skills through innovative discussions about visual art. Dines says she uses what she’s gained from the program to create programs and expose her students to new artistic opportunities. She takes them to the museum twice a year. “I like to take them for field trips and show them the Egyptian art. It’s breathtaking there, like being in a totally different world. And it makes the students feel good, too. When students feel accepted into the community, it contributes to their mental health.” Joan Goodchild is a veteran writer and editor and mom of two living in Central Massachusetts.

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Join the Tribe: To register go to http://jointhetribe.us/contact.html The Worcester JCC is now enrolling Tribes for fall 2018 for children entering grades K, 1, 2, or 3 and their parent or caregiver!

Contact Talia Mugg to learn more about the Tribe. 508.756.7109 x 245 or tmugg@worcesterjcc.org 633 Salisbury St., Worcester, MA, 01609, worcesterjcc.org BAYSTATEPARENT 35


District Report Card As students prepare to head back to school, baystateparent did a little homework on the numbers behind each district. From test scores to drop out rates and student-teacher ratios, here’s a look at how more than 85 public school districts in Central Massachusetts and Metro West are performing. We’ve also included figures on

per pupil spending and average teacher salaries, and other important district-wide statistics. This information from the 2016-2017 school year was provided in the Massachusetts Department of Education’s School & District Profiles at profiles.doe.mass.edu.

Superintendent

Superintendent's email

Enrollment

Grades

Level

MCAS*

Total

William H. McAlduff

wmcalduff@abschools.org

5,605

PK-12

2

SCI: 80; ELA: 71; MATH: 75

371.8

Sara Pragluski Walsh

spragluskiwalsh@nsboro.k12.ma.us

1,471

09-12

2

SCI: 94; ELA: N/A; MATH:N/A

114.8

Ashland

James E. Adams

jadams@ashland.k12.ma.us

2,756

PK-12

1

SCI: 64; ELA: 59; MATH: 60

199.9

Attleboro

David A. Sawyer

dsawyer@attleboroschools.com

5,948

PK-12

2

SCI: 54; ELA:50; MATH: 46

373.8

Maryellen Brunelle

mbrunelle@auburn.k12.ma.us

2,610

PK-12

2

SCI: 62; ELA: 61; MATH: 54

178.9

Ayer- Shirley

Mary E. Malone

mmalone@asrsd.org

1,706

PK-12

2

SCI: 58; ELA: 47; MATH: 43

136.5

Bellingham

Peter D. Marano

pmarano@bellinghamk12.org

2,283

PK-12

No Level

SCI: 56; ELA :45; MATH: 49

171.3

Belmont

John P Phelan

jphelan@belmont.k12.ma.us

4,592

PK-12

2

SCI: 81; ELA: 75; MATH: 78

273.2

Berlin

Jeffrey Zanghi

nekstrom@bbrsd.org

183

PK-05

No Level

SCI: 53; ELA: 58; MATH: 61

18

Allen W Himmelberger

ahimmelberger@bmrsd.net

1,713

PK-12

2

SCI: 41; ELA: 45; MATH: 41

134.1

Andrew Bott

andrew_bott@psbma.org

7,801

PK-12

2

SCI: 70; ELA: 72; MATH: 72

626.1

Boston

Tommy Chang

superintendent@bostonpublicschools.org

52,665

PK-12

No Level

SCI: 27; ELA: 31; MATH: 31

4,196.5

Boylston

Jeffrey Zanghi

nekstrom@bbrsd.org

299

PK-05

No Level

SCI: 59; ELA: 69; MATH:68

19.6

Burlington

Eric M. Conti

conti@bpsk12.org

3,520

PK-12

2

SCI: 55; ELA: 41; MATH: 50

322.2

Cambridge

Kenneth N Salim

ksalim@cpsd.us

6,914

PK-12

2

SCI: 56; ELA: 54; MATH: 49

670.7

Charlton-Dudley

Gregg J Desto

gdesto@dcrsd.org

3,925

PK-12

No Level

SCI: 59; ELA: 55; MATH: 52

270.1

Clinton

Steven Meyer

smeyer@clinton.k12.ma.us

1,883

PK-12

2

SCI: 43; ELA: 40; MATH: 26

151.3

Concord

Laurie Hunter

lhunter@concordps.org

2,113

PK-08

No Level

SCI: 76; ELA: 80; MATH: 79

169.4

Concord-Carlisle

Laurie Hunter

lhunter@concordps.org

1,273

09-12

2

SCI:96; ELA:N/A; MATH: N/A

102.6

Kevin G. Maines

kmaines@douglasps.net

1,329

PK-12

No Level

SCI:52; ELA: 51; MATH: 44

92.3

Dover

Andrew W. Keough

dayall@doversherborn.org

492

PK-05

No Level

SCI:67; ELA: 71; MATH: 75

41.8

Dover-Sherborn

Andrew W. Keough

mcalduffw@doversherborn.org

1,192

06-12

1

SCI:87; ELA: 82; MATH: 51

106.5

Fitchburg

Andre R Ravenelle

ravenellea@fitchburg.k12.ma.us

5,349

PK-12

3

SCI: 28; ELA: 31; MATH: 28

366.5

Foxborough

Amy A Berdos

spinellid@foxborough.k12.ma.us

2,596

PK-12

1

SCI:68; ELA: 46; MATH: 62

202.5

Framingham

Robert A Tremblay

rtremblay@framingham.k12.ma.us

8,739

PK-12

2

SCI: 46; ELA: 37; MATH: 36

661.9

Franklin

Sara Ahern

aherns@franklinps.net

5,291

PK-12

2

SCI: 67; ELA: 63; MATH: 63

401.4

Gardner

Mark J. Pellegrino

pellegm@gardnerk12.org

2,326

PK-12

No Level

SCI:31; ELA: 27; MATH: 20

172.6

Grafton

James E Cummings

cummingsj@grafton.k12.ma.us

3,155

PK-12

2

SCI:68; ELA: 63; MATH: 63

241.6

Laura Chesson

lchesson@gdrsd.org

2,417

PK-12

1

SCI:78; ELA: 63; MATH: 69

176.9

Harvard

Linda Dwight

ldwight@psharvard.org

1,095

PK-12

No Level

SCI:86; ELA: 74; MATH: 71

88.8

Holliston

Bradford L Jackson

jacksonb@holliston.k12.ma.us

2,905

PK-12

2

SCI:69; ELA: 68; MATH; 63

214.4

Hopedale

Karen M Crebase

kcrebase@hopedaleschools.org

1,133

PK-12

No Level

SCI:65; ELA: 69; MATH: 66

88.2

Hopkinton

Carol Cavanaugh

ccavanaugh@hopkinton.k12.ma.us

3,518

PK-12

1

SCI:80; ELA:79; MATH: 79

256.2

District Acton-Boxborough Algonquin (Northboro & Southboro)

Auburn

Blackstone-Millville Brookline

Douglas

Groton-Dunstable

36 AUGUST2018


# of teachers

S/T Ratio*

Expenditures P. P.

Average SAT Scores

Drop Out Rate

Average Teacher Salary

15.1 to 1

$14,745.20

Reading/Writing: 642; Math: 665

0.5%

$79,900

12.8 to 1

$15,859.59

Reading/ Writing: 590; Math: 601

1.1%

$86,916

13.8 to 1

$13,091.58

Reading/ Writing: 591; Math: 609

1.2%

$76,899

15.9 to 1

$13,377.56

Reading/ Writing: 551; Math: 550

2.1%

$78,989

14.6 to 1

$13,371.14

Reading/Writing: 560; Math: 542

1.1%

$68,465

12.5 to 1

$13,974.81

Reading/Writing: 542; Math: 532

1.2%

$68,154

13.3 to 1

$14,351.30

Reading/Writing: 554; Math: 548

0.9%

$76,176

16.8 to 1

$13,348.83

Reading/Writing: 616; Math: 634

0.2%

$85,279

10.2 to 1

$19,319.74

No Data

No Data

$79,814

12.8 to 1

$13,330.26

Reading/Writing: 541; Math: 539

2.2%

$60,547

12.5 to 1

$18,866.23

Reading/Writing: 623; Math: 642

0.5%

$93,727

12.5 to 1

$20,247.05

Reading/Writing: 494; Math: 511

4.4%

$90,626

15.3 to 1

$13,076

No Data

No Data

$74,314

10.9 to 1

$19,865.87

Reading/Writing: 577; Math: 577

0.2%

$94,982

10.3 to 1

$28,077.20

Reading/Writing: 540; Math: 576

1.3%

$82,409

14.5 to 1

$11,749.78

Reading/Writing: 570; Math: 576

1.0%

$69,300

12.4 to 1

$13,215.01

Reading/Writing: 524; Math: 513

1.1%

$66,410

12.5 to 1

$17,517.12

No Data

No Data

$95,732

12.4 to 1

$21,518.71

Reading/Writing: 630; Math: 637

0.6%

$97,978

14.4 to 1

$12,646.35

Reading/Writing: 554; Math: 528

2.3%

$69,277

11.8 to 1

$23,232.55

No Data

No Data

$96,429

11.2 to 1

$18,998.56

Reading/Writing: 640; Math: 645

0.2%

$92,652

14.6 to 1

$13,936.60

Reading/Writing: 482; Math: 480

3.8%

$72,736

12.8 to 1

$16,057.56

Reading/Writing: 572; Math: 571

0.1%

$82,651

13.0 to 1

$18,088.21

Reading/Writing: 559; Math: 578

3.8%

$76,898

13.2 to 1

$13,310.36

Reading/Writing: 638; Math: 582

0.4%

$76,208

13.5 to 1

$12,530.13

Reading/Writing: 500; Math: 500

1.6%

$65,977

13.1 to 1

$11,376.65

Reading/Writing: 579; Math: 578

0.6%

$73,300

13.7 to 1

$14,247.22

Reading/Writing: 589; Math: 607

0.2%

$78,414

12.3 to 1

$16,216.26

Reading/Writing: 618; Math: 595

0.0%

$86,023

13.5 to 1

$13,186.32

Reading/Writing: 591; Math: 599

0.4%

$78,566

12.9 to 1

$12,822.34

Reading/Writing: 581; Math: 575

0.3%

$64,303

13.7 to 1

$14,127.44

Reading/Writing: 617; Math: 629

0.1%

$84,350 BAYSTATEPARENT 37


Superintendent

Superintendent’s email

Enrollment

Grades

Level

MCAS*

Total

Hudson

Marco Rodrigues

mcrodrigues@hudson.k12.ma.us

2,633

PK-12

No Level

SCI:47; ELA: 50; MATH: 50

234.0

Leicester

Marilyn A Tencza

tenczam@lpsma.net

1,569

PK-12

2

SCI:53; ELA: 34; MATH: 30

111.4

Paula L Deacon

james.jolicoeur@leominster.mec.edu

6,005

PK-12

2

SCI:53; ELA:41; MATH: 45

418.0

Mary Ann Czajkowski

mczajkowski@lexingtonma.org

7,246

PK-12

1

SCI:81; ELA: 79; MATH: 81

589.3

Rebecca E McFall

bmcfall@lincnet.org

1,189

PK-08

No Level

SCI:65; ELA: 62; MATH: 62

117.9

Bella Wong

suptprincipal@lsrhs.net

1,529

09-12

1

SCI:90; ELA: N/A MATH: N/A

127.2

Kelly Robert Clenchy

kclenchy@littletons.org

1,658

PK-12

2

SCI:70; ELA: 65; MATH: 60

119.5

Julianna Bahosh, Loxi Jo Calmes

lcalmes@lunenburgonline.com

1,641

PK-12

1

SCI:58; ELA: 49; MATH: 54

115.1

Teresa Murphy

teresa.murphy@mansfieldschools.com

3,856

PK-12

1

SCI:64; ELA: 59; MATH: 61

299.1

Maureen R Greulich

mgreulich@mps-edu.org

4,575

PK-12

3

SCI:43; ELA:36; MATH: 36

387.0

Maynard

Robert J Gerardi

rgerardi@maynard.k12.ma.us

1,398

Pk-12

3

SCI:46; ELA:41; MATH: 41

98.5

Medfield

Jeffrey J. Marsden

jmarsden@email.medfield.net

2,629

PK-12

2

SCI:71; ELA:71; MATH: 69

201.9

Medford

Roy E Belson

rbelson@medford.k12.ma.us

4,329

PK-12

2

SCI:50; ELA: 45; MATH: 36

404.3

Medway

Armand R Pires

apires@medwayschools.org

2,271

PK-12

2

SCI:62; ELA: 67; MATH:66

155.7

Milford

Kevin Mcintyre

kmcintyre@milfordma.com

4,186

PK-12

3

SCI:57; ELA: 48; MATH: 40

330.7

Millbury

Gregory Myers

gmyers@millburyschools.org

1,734

PK-12

No Level

SCI:51; ELA: 43; MATH: 40

127.3

Nancy L Gustafson

ngustafson@millisps.org

1,302

PK-12

2

SCI:57: ELA: 49; MATH: 57

92.4

Brooke Ann Clenchy

bclenchy@nrsd.net

3,343

PK-12

2

SCI: 74; ELA: 69; MATH: 71

260.5

Anna P Nolin

anolin@natickps.org

5,507

PK-12

1

SCI:73; ELA: 63; MATH: 63

403.9

Daniel E Gutekanst

dan_gutekanst@needham.k12.ma.us

5,666

PK-12

1

SCI:76; ELA: 72; MATH: 74

408.2

District

Leominster Lexington Lincoln Lincoln-Sudbury Littleton Lunenburg Mansfield Marlborough

Millis Nashoba (Bolton, Lancaster & Stow) Natick Needham

38 AUGUST2018


# of teachers

EW ur N

S/T Ratio*

Expenditures P. P. Average SAT Scores

Drop Out Rate

Average Teacher Salary

11.3 to 1

$15,528.96

Reading/Writing: 564; Math: 543

2.6%

$74,710

14.1 to 1

$13,093.76

Reading/Writing: 550; Math: 530

0.4%

$74,797

14.4 to 1

$13,301.96

Reading/Writing: 538; Math: 540

1.4%

$61,264

12.3 to 1

$18,002.58

Reading/Writing: 639; Math: 658

0.1%

$78,776

10.1 to 1

$21,798.63

No Data

No Data

$89,757

12.0 to 1

$19,282.33

Reading/Writing: 626; Math: 637

0.1%

$92,859

13.9 to 1

$14,349.14

Reading/Writing: 603; Math: 595

0.0%

$72,868

14.3 to 1

$12,982.32

Reading/Writing: 562; Math: 547

0.5%

$76,147

12.9 to 1

$14,456.97

Reading/Writing: 578; Math: 585

0.5%

$80,248

11.8 to 1

$14,889.33

Reading/Writing: 542; Math: 529

3.8%

$78,940

14.2 to 1

$14,325.24

Reading/Writing: 557; Math: 531

2.0%

$73,398

13.0 to 1

$17,043.82

Reading/Writing: 601; Math: 607

0.1%

$81,710

10.7 to 1

$13,876.64

Reading/Writing: 546; Math: 544

2.0%

$76,179

14.6 to 1

$13,883.19

Reading/Writing: 575; Math: 580

0.3%

$85,410

12.7 to 1

$15,268.32

Reading/Writing: 552; Math: 543

2.1%

$74,924

13.6 to 1

$14,989.37

Reading/Writing: 529; Math: 539

0.2%

$75,339

14.1 to 1

$14,336.61

Reading/Writing: 558; Math: 540

0..0%

$74,694

12.8 to 1

$14,838.07

Reading/Writing: 596; Math: 605

0.8%

$72,673

13.6 to 1

$14,290.64

Reading/Writing: 587; Math: 591

0.6%

$70,293

13.9 to 1

$16,546.96

Reading/Writing: 610; Math: 608

0.1%

$89,622

y!

m useu

ad is re

m

Yo

Storytime

AT THE LIBRARY

FIRST and THIRD TUESDAY of each month 10:30-11:15 AM

“…Mary was a bookworm. Sometimes when her siblings went out to play, she’d stay at home reading. Other times when she joined them, as often as not she’d eventually slip away to a secluded spot where they’d find her later, engrossed in a book.” — From A World More Bright: The Life of Mary Baker Eddy by Isabel Ferguson and Heather Vogel Frederick

The ALL-NEW Discovery Museum combines the best STEAM exhibits from our original museums—for little kids, big kids, and their adults —and many exciting new ones!

✴ ✴

177 Main Street, Acton, MA discoveryacton.org • 978-264-4200

In this children’s program, young visitors will not only listen to stories but also engage in playful activities. Recommended for bookworms 5 years old and younger with adults. No registration required. 200 Massachusetts Ave., Boston MA 02115 For more information, please contact our Educational Programs Coordinator 617-450-7203 | palladinom@mbelibrary.org BAYSTATEPARENT 39


Superintendent

Superintendent’s email

Enrollment Grades

Level

MCAS*

Total #

Joseph P Maruszczak

jmaruszczak@mursd.org

2,262

PK-12

1

SCI:71; ELA: 64; MATH: 61

158.8

North Attleborough

Scott C Holcomb

sholcomb@naschools.net

4,282

PK-12

2

SCI:68; ELA: 60; MATH: 59

285.9

North Brookfield

Richard A. Lind

rlind@nbschools.org

557

PK-12

No level

SCI: 30; ELA: 27; MATH: 26

44.7

Northborough

Christine M Johnson

cjohnson@nsboro.k12.ma.us

1,648

K-08

No level

SCI:63; ELA: 61; MATH: 62

113.6

Northbridge

Catherine A Stickney

cstickney@nps.org

2,175

PK-12

2

SCI:46; ELA: 46; MATH: 42

164.1

Norton

Joseph F Baeta

jbaeta@norton.k12.ma.us

2,473

PK-12

2

SCI:58; ELA: 54; MATH: 49

194.7

Norwood

David Thomson

dthomson@norwood.k12.ma.us

3,403

PK-12

2

SCI:58; ELA: 51; MATH: 51

270.8

Oakmont ( Ashburnham & Westminster)

Gary F Mazzola

superintendent@awrsd.org

2,384

PK-12

2

SCI: 59; ELA:51; MATH: 50

159.9

Kristine Nash

knash@oxps.org

1,685

PK-12

No level

SCI:43; ELA: 48; MATH: 41

123.1

Plainville

David Paul Raiche

draiche@plainville.k12.ma.us

706

PK-06

No level

SCI:44; ELA: 52; MAH: 48

48.3

Shrewsbury

Joseph M Sawyer

jsawyer@shrewsbury.k12.ma.us

6,214

PK-12

2

SCI:72; ELA: 68; MATH: 69

398.5

Almudena G Abeyta, Mary E Skipper mskipper@k12.somerville.ma.us

4,868

PK-12

1

SCI:52; ELA: 46; MATH: 47

427.6

SCI:63; ELA: 76; MATH: 82

93.0

District Nipmuc

Oxford

Somerville

Christine M Johnson

cjohnson@nsboro.k12.ma.us

1,320

PK-08

No level

Jeffrey Villar

Jvillar@southbridgepublic.org

2,003

PK-12

5

SCI:20; ELA: 21; MATH: 19

187.5

Jodi M Bourassa

bourassaj@sebrsd.org

1,366

PK-12

2

SCI:43; ELA: 40; MATH: 39

112.0

Sturbridge

Erin M Nosek

noseke@tantasqua.org

900

PK-06

No level

SCI:60; ELA: 57; MATH: 63

67.6

Sudbury

Anne Wilson

anne_wilson@sudbury.k12.ma.us

2,696

PK-08

No level

SCI:68; ELA:73; MATH:71

208.0

Theodore F Friend

friendt@suttonschools.net

1,421

PK-12

2

SCI:53; ELA: 58; MATH: 53

99.1

Erin M Nosek, Sean M Gilrein

noseke@tantasqua.org

1,788

07-12

1&2

SCI:67; ELA: 48; MATH: 60

135.6

Southborough Southbridge Spencer-East Brookfield

Sutton Tantasqua (Brookefield, Brimfield, Holland, Sturbridge & Wales)

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Visit us at all four locations 40 AUGUST2018

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# of teachers

S/T Ratio*

Expenditures P. P.

Average SAT Scores

Drop Out Rate

Average Teacher Salary

14.2 to 1

$11,648.11

Reading/Writing: 582; Math: 572

0.7%

$78,705

15.0 to 1

$15,032.77

Reading/Writing: 584; Math: 579

0.4%

$74,761

12.5 to 1

$13,492.73

Reading/Writing: 550; Math: 531

2.4%

$62,990

14.5 to 1

$15,978.85

No Data

No Data

$81,775

13.3 to 1

$12,772.53

Reading/Writing: 532; Math: 513

0.7%

$69,511

12.7 to 1

$13,949.62

Reading/Writing: 546; Math: 513

0.0%

$70,276

12.6 to 1

$16,254.70

Reading/Writing: 556; Math: 546

2.0%

$77,303

14.9 to 1

$12,713.48

Reading/Writing: 561; Math: 545

0.3%

$70,290

13.7 to 1

$13,437.57

Reading/Writing: 531; Math: 528

3.0%

$65,114

14.6 to 1

$15,099.23

No Data

No Data

$71,002

15.6 to 1

$13,372.35

Reading/Writing: 590; Math: 605

0.0%

$77,043

11.4 to 1

$18,843.12

Reading/Writing: 521; Math: 522

2.2%

$74,698

14.2 to 1

$17,763.41

No Data

No Data

$84,043

10.7 to 1

$14,120.63

Reading/Writing: 472; Math: 471

3.7%

$72,502

12.2 to 1

$13,944.81

Reading/Writing: 538; Math: 522

2.4%

$63,401

13.3 to 1

$13,369.44

No Data

No Data

$76,357

13.0 to 1

$15,258.96

No Data

No Data

$83,234

14.3 to 1

$12,867.68

Reading/Writing: 560; Math: 561

0.7%

$71,689

13.2 to 1

$13,480.76

Reading/Writing: 566; Math: 585

0.6%

$78,911

Summit Montessori School

SUMMIT PROGRAMS Through a challenging, individualized, and innovative Montessori curriculum, children cultivate their strengths to reach their unique potential and become active global citizens. The Beginners Program is designed to meet the unique developmental needs of children ages 21-36 months. Children’s House offers 2.9-to-six year-olds, a dynamic learning environment that addresses their social, emotional, cognitive, and physical needs. Lower Elementary engages students in first through third grades in a wide range of academic subjects with a focus on building critical thinking, problem-solving, and research skills. Upper Elementary guides students in grades 4 to 6 through greater academic challenges and toward emerging adolescence with an

emphasis on organization, independence, responsibility, curiosity, and rigorous investigation of the greater world. SUMMIT STUDENTS ENGAGE... in the classroom and global community, with peers and teachers, and with learning itself. EXPLORE...concepts through the curriculum and beyond, using an experiential approach that builds a concrete foundation and evolves into abstract and critical thinking. Summit educates the “whole child” from academics and the arts, to conflict resolution and global responsibility. EXCEL...in academic learning and as leaders among their peers. Summit graduates are well prepared to meet the challenges and expectations that lie ahead.

OPEN HOUSE DATES Wednesday, November 14 (9-10:30am) and Saturday, February 2 (10am-1pm)

283 Pleasant Street, Framingham, MA 01701 Tel: 508-872-3630 • Fax: 508-872-3314 www.summitmontessori.org School is accredited by The American Montessori Society The Association of Independent Schools of New England BAYSTATEPARENT 41


District

Superintendent

Enrollment

Grades

Level

MCAS*

Total #

Jeffrey Zanghi

594

06-12

No level

SCI: 36; ELA: 60; MATH:57

45.5

Uxbridge

Kevin M Carney

1,765

PK-12

2

SCI:51; ELA: 51; MATH: 48

108.1

Wachusett (Holden, Paxton, Princeton, Rutland & Sterling)

Darryll A McCall

7,147

PK-12

2

SCI:66; ELA: 67; MATH: 64

462.3

Walpole

Lincoln D Lynch

3,804

PK-12

2

SCI:68; ELA: 65; MATH: 64

284.7

Waltham

Drew M Echelson

5,600

PK-12

3

SCI:51; ELA: 47; MATH: 41

502.4

Ware

Marlene A Di Leo

1,213

PK-12

No level

SCI:46; ELA: 33; MATH: 26

91.0

Watertown

Deanne Galdston

2,608

PK-12

2

SCI:48; ELA:47; MATH: 43

247.3

Wayland

Arthur Unobskey

2,702

K-12

1

SCI:82; ELA: 71; MATH: 74

217.6

Webster

Ruthann Petruno-Goguen

1,855

PK-12

3

SCI:27; ELA: 18; MATH: 14

137.9

David Lussier, Joan Mary Dabrowski

5,006

PK-12

1

SCI:73; ELA: 76; MATH: 71

391.3

Westborough

Amber Bock, Daniel P Mayer

3,926

PK-12

No level

SCI:71; ELA: 72; MATH: 72

321.1

West Boylston

Elizabeth A Schaper

907

PK-12

2

SCI:58; ELA: 60; MATH: 57

83.4

Matthew T.Crowley

4,598

PK-12

2

SCI:55; ELA: 49; MATH: 45

374.6

Maureen F Binienda

25,306

PK-12

No level

SCI:37; ELA: 33; MATH: 28

1,785.2

Tahanto(Berlin-Boylston)

Wellesley

Woburn Worcester

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10 Irving Street (All Saints Church), Worcester, MA 01609 42 AUGUST2018

Conveniently located in Shrewsbury 138 North Quinsigamond Ave. • 508-755-3922

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# of teachers

S/T Ratio*

Expenditures P. P.

Average SAT Scores

Drop Out Rate

Average Teacher Salary

13.0 to 1

$13,925.87

Reading/Writing: 592; Math: 585

0.7%

$69,778

16.3 to 1

$14,77,71

Reading/Writing: 548; Math: 533

3.4%

$72,813

15.5 to 1

$11,895.60

Reading/Writing: 580; Math: 576

0.3%

$71,442

13.4 to 1

$14,243.88

Reading/Writing: 572; Math: 562

0.1%

$75,358

11.1 to 1

$20,242.29

Reading/Writing: 523; Math: 526

3.0%

$76,597

13.3 to 1

$13,030.64

Reading/Writing: 528; Math: 555

1.8%

$60,474

10.5 to 1

$20,720.05

Reading/Writing: 550; Math: 564

1.1%

$78,217

12.4 to 1

$17,426.23

Reading/Writing: 620; Math: 635

0.4%

$93,108

13.5 to 1

$13,937.23

Reading/Writing: 529; Math: 528

6.2%

$75,802

12.8 to 1

$18,635.99

Reading/Writing: 613; Math: 611

0.3%

$93,536

12.2 to 1

$15,554.65

Reading/Writing: 605; Math: 616

0.2%

$74,649

10.9 to 1

$15,085.15

Reading/Writing: 559; Math: 543

5.6%

$72,714

12.3 to 1

$16,153.85

Reading/Writing: 549; Math: 557

1.8%

$79,592

14.2 to 1

$14,492.18

Reading/Writing: 477; Math: 480

2.2%

$77,862

*Percentage of students who received “Meets Requirements” or “Advanced” scores in 2017. • **Student Teacher Ratio • ***Per Pupil Expenditures

Worcester JCC Early Childhood Center Ages 15 months - 5 years

Now Accepting Registrations • • • • • •

EEC Licensed Certified, professional teachers Pre-math & pre-reading Swim instruction Cooking , Music, Science, Gym Full-and part-time

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Contact Candace Callahan, ECC Director, x 258, ccallahan@worcesterjcc.org

Designed to meet the needs of the whole child! A great choice for the entire community!

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Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018 44 AUGUST2018


August’s Children Meet Jonathan and Violette

Finally Forever Jonathan and Violette, ages 5 and 6, are siblings of Caucasian descent who are looking to be adopted together! Those who know Jonathan best describe him as energetic and kind. He likes to be active outside, especially going for walks, playing in the sandbox, riding his bike and watering the

garden. Jonathan also likes to build with Legos and watch movies, and enjoys pretend play. He particularly likes to play “policeman” and “school bus driver.” Jonathan is starting to like to play sports and has recently tried basketball and soccer. Jonathan is doing very well at his

current program, and has made great gains in following directions and communicating his thoughts and feelings. He has built strong relationships with all of the staff and likes to tell them that he loves them. He also gets along well with his peers. He is in a separate classroom with a high teacher-to-student ratio. His teachers say that he is doing “amazing” in this setting and he has started to spend time in a mainstream classroom. Violette is described as a happy child who likes to please the adults in her life. She is engaging and funny but also enjoys playing independently. Her favorite activity is coloring and drawing, as well as building with blocks and playing with dolls. She also likes to go outside to play at the playground. She especially enjoys playing in the sandbox and at the water table. Violette is currently attending preschool, where she receives extra supports to help her follow directions. Jonathan and Violette are very much looking forward to finding a supportive and patient family

where they can live together again. An ideal family structure for them is an experienced two-parent family, either with no other children in the home or with children older than they are. Jonathan and Violette are ready for adoption and visit with their biological parents twice a year. Can you provide the guidance, love and stability that a child needs? If you’re at least 18 years old, have a stable source of income, and room in your heart, you may be a perfect match to adopt a waiting child. Adoptive parents can be single, married, or partnered; experienced or not; renters or homeowners; LGBTQ singles and couples. The process to adopt a child from foster care requires training, interviews, and home visits to determine if adoption is right for you, and if so, to help connect you with a child or sibling group that your family will be a good match for. To learn more about adoption from foster care, call the Massachusetts Adoption Resource Exchange (MARE) at 617-6273 or visit www.mareinc.org.

Circle of Friends Area Adoption Info & Matching Events Ready to learn more about adoption? Join an information meeting in your area to hear directly from social workers and experienced families, have your questions answered, and receive and application.

Story Time & Info Session: Wednesday, August 1, 1-2:30 p.m. Provincetown Library, 356 Commercial St., Provincetown. Join the Massachusetts Adoption Resource Exchange (MARE) for a live book reading at the Provincetown Library by Dr. Philip McAdoo, a former actor, Broadway performer, singer, LGBTQ activist and co-writer of the children’s book “Every Child Deserves…” Children of all ages and families are invited to listen and learn about children in foster care and the need for different types of families that can offer the love and joy all children deserve. MARE staff and experienced adoptive families will be present to answer questions and provide information about adoption from foster care following the reading. Light refreshments will be provided during and after the event. Please RSVP for planning purposes to dianet@mareinc.org or feel free to drop-in

if you are in the area. For more information, call Diane Tomaz at (617) 964-6273 x114. Northern Region Adoption Info Session: Monday, August 6, 6-7 p.m. Jordan’s Furniture IMAX Conference Room. 50 Walkers Brook Dr., Reading. Walk-ins welcome, RSVP encouraged. Contact: Fredia Torrence at (978) 557-2734 or fredia.torrence@state.ma.us. Springfield Area Adoption Info Session: Tuesday, August 7, 4-5:30 p.m. DCF Western Regional Office, 140 High St., 1st Floor, Springfield. Central Region Adoption Info Session: Wednesday, August 8, 6 p.m. Central Regional Office, 13 Sudbury St., Worcester. No registration required. Contact: Valerie Fluitt at (508) 929-2143.

Maynard Area Adoption Info Session: Sunday, August 11, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Maynard’s Farmer’s Market, Mill Pond Parking Lot on Main St. Walk-ins welcome. Contact: Elise Levine at (978) 557-2740 or elise.levine@state.ma.us. Boston Area Adoption Info Session: Wednesday, August 15, 4-6 p.m. Boston Regional Office, 451 Blue Hill Ave., Dorchester. No registration required. Contact: Marsha Donovan at (617) 989-9209. Ironstone Adoption Party: Sunday, August 19, 11 a.m.- 1p.m. 450 Lowell St., Andover. Join children, teens, their social workers, and friends for a day of therapeutic horseback riding. This small adoption party is open to any family who is interested in adopting or learning about adopting a child from foster

care with medical or developmental special needs. Children will have the opportunity to ride a horse and enjoy barnyard activities while families who are new to the process can learn about foster care adoption. All families can network with social workers and learn about waiting children and resources in the community available to support families parenting children with special needs. For more information, call Bridget Chiaruttini at (617) 964-6273 x 112. Canton Area Adoption Info Session: Monday, August 20, 6-8 p.m. Canton Police Department Conference Room, 1492 Washington St., Canton. RSVP: ADLU Line at (508) 894-3830.

BAYSTATEPARENT 45


Breastfeeding

500

The number of additional calories per day breastfeeding women are encouraged to consume

BY THE NUMBERS Check out these 10 stats and facts in honor of Breastfeeding Awareness Month

87.4%

The number of Bay State moms who ever breastfed. That’s above the national average of 81.1%

67.9%

By six months, percent of Massachusetts moms are breastfeeding, 19.9% exclusively

#8

87

The Bay State’s Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition & Care score (mPINC), which ranges from 1-100 and represents the level at which birth facilities provide maternity care supportive of breastfeeding

47:

Massachusetts’ ranking in states where mothers are breastfeeding at 12 months

The number of states (which includes Mass.) that have laws specifically allowing moms to breastfeed in any public or private location

67%

On average, babies remove of the milk mama has available—they eat until fullness, not until the breast is emptied

75%

The percent of women who produce more milk in their right breast Breastfeeding mamas sleep on average more a night, compared to those who formula feed

45 minutes

1 degree

A mother’s breasts can detect this small of a change in baby’s body temperature and adjust accordingly to heat up or cool down baby as needed

Sources: CDC, Mass Breastfeeding Coalition, Health Foundation Birth Center

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Sholan Farms

Good Old Fashioned Fun! August 25 & 26, 2018 10 am-5:00 pm Entertainment • Apple Picking Free Wagon Rides • Hiking U-Pick Apples, Raspberries, Blueberries and Seasonal Produce Check facebook, webpage or call for hours.

Sholan Farms

1125 Pleasant St. Leominster 978-840-3276 • www.sholanfarms.com Like us on facebook Summer Hours: Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday 10am-1pm


ask the

NUTRITI

NIST

Is There a Link Between Gluten and a Child’s Behavior?

Q: A:

I’ve heard that gluten could contribute to behavioral problems in children. Is there really a link? Are there any other diet modifications parents can make to help with things like ADD or ADHD? Current research shows mixed results as to whether avoiding gluten can help behavioral problems in children. Often symptoms of behavioral problems are similar to those symptoms seen in children with celiac disease gluten intolerance. These symptoms may include irritability, fatigue and poor sleep. If your child is having any of these symptoms or other behavioral problems, reach out to your child’s pediatrician to be checked for potential celiac disease or gluten intolerance. A diet high in nutrient-rich foods is the best approach, from a nutrition perspective, to helping with ADD and ADHD. Also, offering regularly timed meals and snacks ensures your child is getting the nutrients they need to nourish their brain and body. Foods that could potentially provide some benefit include fiber from whole grains, fruits and vegetables; folate rich foods like fortified breads, cereals and orange juice; poly-unsaturated fats from avocado, nuts, plant oils and fatty fish. Other nutrients to be aware of

are iron, magnesium and zinc, as consuming these nutrients may play a positive role in managing behavior. As always, food is the best source of these nutrients. Vitamin supplements can also be helpful, especially if there is a deficiency or low intake of these nutrients. Foods to be mindful of offering include those with additives like artificial food colorings, aspartame, MSG, nitrates/nitrites, and refined sugars, as a small amount of children with ADHD have sensitivities to these food additives. My suggestion is to offer whole foods most often and offer foods with additives occasionally. If your child does consume a food with one of the listed additives, be aware of any behavior changes. If you do become aware of changes in their behaviors, this may be a sign to avoid the noted additive completely.

Build, dig, climb and more! Connect with nature in 12 outdoor interactive play areas.

Learn more at ecotarium.org

Lauren Sharifi is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and food blogger at biteofhealthnutrition.com. Lauren works in private practice in Brighton at ASFPeak Health (asfpeakhealth.com) and is passionate about helping individuals and families become competent eaters that find joy out of eating. SKY RIDER ROPES COURSE 26’ CLIMBING WALLS BATTLE BEAM WARRIOR OBSTACLE COURSE

Have a question for Lauren? Email editor@baystateparent.com

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A GOOD PARTY IS ALWAYS IN SEASON

Birthday Parties Bounce Houses Magic Entertainment Interactive Games and More

Walter Derosier, Mr. Magic 149 Memorial Drive, Shrewsbury, MA • 508-842-2177 • magicworldamuse.com

Presenting puppets, princesses, pirates, storytelling and much more! Call today for more information

Big Joe

the Storyteller

Storytelling fun for Birthday Parties, Schools, Daycare Centers, Library Programs, Special Events and TV Featuring: • Original & Classic Stories • Puppets, Props and Surprises For Bookings and Info Call: 617-713-4349 E-mail: BigJoe@BigJoe.com Visit me on the web at: www.BigJoe.com

Violet the Clown

All Ages. Birthday Parties, Schools, Fairs, Day Care Centers, Etc.

Specializing in birthdays, corporate events, libraries and schools. Face painting, magic shows and balloons sculpting.

www.rosalitaspuppets.com 617-633-2832

www.violettheclown.com 781-344-1852 violetheclown@gmail.com

48 AUGUST2018


August INDEX

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Serving Up Fun For 17 Years!

Applewild School.......................................................... 34 Barnes Portrait Design................................................. 38 Beechwood Hotel........................................................... 4 Big Joe Productions..................................................... 48 Big Y Foods, Inc............................................................. 9 Boston Paintball.......................................................... 49 Breezy Picnic Grounds.................................................. 18 Davis Farmland........................................................... 17 Discovery Museums..................................................... 39 Ecotarium............................................................... 16,47 Fidelity Bank............................................................... 46 Fletcher Tilton PC......................................................... 30 FMC Ice Sports............................................................... 5 Gerardo’s Italian Bakery.............................................. 40 Gymnastics Learning Center......................................... 23 Heywood Hospital.......................................................... 3 Karen Amlaw Music..................................................... 29 KidzExpo..................................................................... 32 Lowell Summer Music.................................................. 31 Magic World................................................................ 48 Mall At Whitney Field..................................................... 7 Mary Baker Eddy Library (The).................................... 39 Mike’s Moonwalk Rentals............................................. 49 Millbury Federal Credit Union....................................... 11 Notre Dame Academy.................................................... 2 Oak Meadow............................................................... 31 Pakachoag Community Music School............................ 42 Paula Meola Dance...................................................... 20 Reliant Medical Group.................................................. 19 Reliant Ready Med...................................................... 33 Rosalita’s Puppets........................................................ 48 Seven Hills Charter School............................................ 11 Sholan Farms.............................................................. 46 Shrewsbury Children’s Center....................................... 42 St. Peter-Marian C.C. Jr./Sr. School............................... 31 Summit Montessori...................................................... 41 The Bolton Fair............................................................ 15 The Children’s Workshop.............................................. 43 UMass Medical School.................................................. 44 UMass Memorial Medical Center......................... 11,14,51 Urban Air.................................................................... 47 Wachusett Mountain.................................................... 51 Winchendon School...................................................... 34 Worcester JCC......................................................... 35,43 YWCA.......................................................................... 20 BAYSTATEPARENT 49


TAKE EIGHT

with Terrence Burke Like lots of kids, Andover native Terrence Burke loved puppets while growing up… and he never outgrew that infatuation. Decades later, the lifelong passion culminated in Wump Mucket Puppets – a touring cast of puppets that Burke, a renowned puppeteer, brings to life on stage. Burke, who now lives in Cincinnati, has performed on PBS and tours around the nation. This month, he’s returning to his roots, bringing his new show “Tales From Bucket Gulch” to three Bay State libraries. The show features original songs and silliness and is geared towards children ages 3-10. You can take in one of these free shows: Townsend Public Library in Townsend on Aug. 1 at 11 a.m.; Flint Memorial Library in North Reading on Aug. 3 at 10:30 a.m.; Robbins Library – Edith M. Fox Brand in East Arlington on Aug. 8 at 3 p.m.

1

How did you become interested in puppetry? Has it been a lifelong passion? My interest in puppets began when I was a young boy in the 1960s, watching TV shows “Captain Kangaroo,” “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” and “Sesame Street.” After seeing Jim Henson and his fellow puppeteers I was hooked. My parents enrolled me in a puppet class at the YMCA and brought me to a puppetry festival in Boston in 1970. In middle school I began to explore other performing arts, such as choir, community theatre, and creating my own music. Years later, I revisited puppetry as a hobby. Upon becoming a father, I entertained our children. Years later, my daughter told her preschool teacher that her daddy is a puppeteer. The teacher invited me to perform a short show for the students, and I haven’t stopped since then.

What’s the process of creating a puppet? Where does your idea for a character come from, and how do go about bringing it to life? All of my puppet characters start as doodles in my sketchbook. As the drawing is refined and shaped, a proper character emerges. From there, the head is sculpted, using either clay or a block of foam which is then covered with paper mache or fabric. Then the puppet is then painted or covered with fleece or fur. Finally the body and costume are sewn, and attached to the head. Accessories such as jewelry or buttons are attached at the end. It typically takes a week or two. Character ideas come from everywhere. Lately, my audience have been a source, with young ladies asking me to create more female puppets. Bringing the character to life is probably the most difficult part. The voice has to be unique, and I must be able to sing in voice without hurting my vocal cords. I experiment with voices, phrasing, vocalizing, and work on making the character believable. I also ask for feedback from the audience. Children are very honest and helpful in this respect.

3

You create the puppets, write scripts, music and songs, build sets, voice characters… is there an aspect that’s your favorite? I enjoy wearing so many different hats throughout the process. If I had to choose one, it has to be performing. I love to hear children’s laughter and applause. The energy shared between a puppeteer and their audience is magic.

Your puppet troupe seems to be a family affair. How does your family contribute? It must be a fun household! My wife Lara, a talented artist, has built many of the puppets in the cast. She also helps me paint the stage props, sew costumes, and draws the coloring pages that I give out after the show. Our daughter and son have grown up with the puppets in their lives, with Eleanor performing with me a few years ago. These days, she and her brother Tiernan help by making suggestions with jokes, or songs that I am working on.

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When you look back on all your puppeteering years and performances, is there one experience that stands out? I regularly donate performances to The Ronald McDonald House, by sharing 30-minutes of fun with children and families. There have been several instances that I have almost started crying after meeting with the kids. It is my intention to help them forget what medical procedure that they are going through, and laugh at my characters and stories.

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What do you hope people take away from your show? Is there an overall message, or is it all about fun? I consider my puppetry to be my vehicle to share joy with. Children are exposed to so much negativity these days. I bring them pure, wholesome fun. There are some recurring themes, such as kindness, being yourself, and taking care of our planet. Yet, using gentle humor to tell a fun story is my goal as a puppeteer.

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So many children seem to be screen-obsessed these days. How do you get them interested in and excited about puppets? While the technology to share stories has changed, I find that children still enjoy a well told tale, with songs, catchy music, and silly jokes. The puppet stage is just a really big “screen,” and we are live! They are often surprised that it is performed by one man, which I hope inspires them to be creative, tell stories, even become a puppeteer.

What can people expect from your newest show, “Tales From Bucket Gulch?” I bring the audience to the Old West. The show opens with tall tale about biscuits, followed by a couple of the puppets trying to find gold, with silly results. We close with the story of two cowpokes, who acquire a cow who won’t moo, she wants to be an opera star. There are several songs, even a funky dance break that the audience is encouraged to join in. It is written for families to enjoy together, creating happy childhood memories that will last a lifetime. There are no guns in Bucket Gulch, since the sheriff cleaned up the town years ago. It’s a peaceful, friendly fantasy version of a Western town.

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th al 28 nu An Two days of music, food for the wh&olfun family! e

September 22-23, 2018 10am-5pm Maximum Velocity BMX Team

Rainforest Reptile Show

Kids’ Ski Deck

Sterling Gym presents

Flying High Frisbee Dogs

Ninja Challenge

INTERACTIVE GAMES & ACTIVITIES: SkyRide Moonwalk ✷ Obstacle Course ✷ Giant Slide Jugglers & Stilt Walker - Troy Wunderle Bungee Jump Magicians – Magic Steve Balloon Artists – Gramma Potts Clowns – Juggles & Glitter Face Painting ✷ Pony Rides ✷ Climbing Wall ADMISSION: Kids under 2 Free; Kids 3-12 $8 advance/$11 door; Adults $10 advance/$13 door SKYRIDE: (single ride, festival admission required) Kids 6-12 $8; Adults $10 All activities, FESTIVAL PACKAGE: (includes admission and SkyRide) e) (except SkyRid Kids 6-12 $13 advance/$18 door; Adults $19 advance/$22 door ith

included w admission!

Details & Tickets at www.wachusett.com 499 Mountain Road, Princeton, MA

978-464-2300

Wachusett Mountain operates in cooperation with the MA Department of Conservation & Recreation

BAYSTATEPARENT 51


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Profile for Stephanie Mallard

August 2018 issue of baystateparent Magazine  

August 2018 issue of baystateparent Magazine  

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