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FANTASTIC OFFERS INSIDE! JUNE 2017

STYLISH HOMES AFFORDABLE IDEAS

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£1.99

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at Dotcomgiftshop The White Company & Bloomon

REAL HOMES

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(+ 1 cute garden!) all packed with ideas GARDEN SPECIAL

Best barbecues Tables and chairs Stylish planters Hanging baskets

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EASY MAKES FOR A CRAFTERNOON

9

HOW TO USE CORAL PINK THE NEW SHABBY CHIC SMOOTH SCANDI STYLE

STEPH SAYS: ‘My place is a little quirky, with lots of handmade things’

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JUNE 2017 £1.99

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Recall date 07/06/2017

The Style Book

TWO MAGAZINES FOR THE PRICE OF ONE!

SMART STORAGE

BIFOLD DOORS

KITCHENS & BATHROOMS

REAL MAKEOVERS & EXPERT ADVICE

YUMMY CURRIES

DIY TRICKS


ONE-BED FLAT

Love it

COME ON IN! ABOUT ME I’m Steph Durrant, 30, a magazine journalist, and I live with my ragdoll cat, Cece. MY HOME I live in a one-bedroom flat in Chelmsford, Essex, which I bought in February 2014. WHEN I BOUGHT IT It’s a groundfloor flat in a converted 1930s semidetached house. It was just renovated when I moved in and I was the first to live there, so needed to select flooring and put my stamp on the place.

IDEA TO STEAL

‘Hang a brightly coloured macrame pot holder to brighten up French doors’

AND NOW I didn’t need to do any decorating, but I’ve brightened the place with plenty of colour, using art, furniture, and handmade accessories.

STYLE TIP I prefer to keep walls and furniture white, then introduce vibrant pieces that can be swapped about when I get the itch for change.

YELLOW FEVER ‘The yellow chest of drawers is my most colourful piece’

HANDSOME PRINTS ‘I love clashing prints and patterns – Liberty London fabrics are my favourite’

‘Handmade touches

MAKE IT MINE’

Steph filled her renovated flat with handcrafted pieces and vintage finds to create a feminine sanctuary that’s full of personality <#A#> | JUNE 2017

I

chose to live in Chelmsford as it’s an up-and-coming town that lots of my friends have gradually gravitated to, due to the excellent shops and a good main line to London,’ says Steph. ‘My flat is in a perfect position, as it’s within walking distance of the town and the station. It was newly renovated, which appealed to me as I wasn’t in a position to take on a project. It had fresh white walls, ready for me to unleash my passion for colour, plus fitted white goods, so I didn’t have to fork out to buy my own. The bathroom was brand new, too, with a Jacuzzi bath (a big selling point for me!). I liked that it was on the ground floor with its own

JUNE 2017 | <#B#>


ONE-BED FLAT

Love it

SOCIABLE SPOT

3 of the best

‘As the kitchen and living room are open plan, it’s a perfect space for entertaining’

TEAPOTS

Invite your pals for afternoon tea

PiP Studio floral teapot in pink, £40, Amara

Buy it

Shop our pick of vintage brights on PAGE 30

Abstract teapot, £25, Oliver Bonas

SNAZZY SHADE ‘My lampshade is wacky, but I love it! I used the original shade to carefully make the pattern pieces, then used remnants of quilt fabric to create the patchwork’

Ashdown Rose teapot, £28, Cath Kidston

TRINKET TROVE ‘I got my craft shelf for £30, painted it, and put wrapping paper on the back’

front door off the street, so it didn’t feel like a flat. It also has a quiet, southfacing shared garden and I have my own patio to put a table and chairs and pot plants on. The garden is scarcely used, so it often feels like it’s just mine. When I moved in, the first thing I had to do was pick flooring, which was fine as I knew a little independent shop that had fitted the flooring in my previous house. I chose a cream carpet for the bedroom and the same laminate flooring that was in my old property for the rest of the house, as I liked its rustic look and it was great value. The service was so much more helpful than in bigger chain stores.

Style inspiration

I’ve always had a strong idea of what I wanted my home to look like. I used to have an inspiration folder where I stuck magazine clippings of décor I loved and made notes of shops I liked. Nowadays,

<#A#> | JUNE 2017

Stylist

at Home ANDREA SAYS

‘Why not try making a pom pom garland like the one hanging over Steph’s patio doors? You can buy an easy-to-use pom pom maker from Hobbycraft.’

IDEA TO STEAL

‘Pair a curvy antique chest of drawers with linear kitchen units to create a freestanding look’

JUNE 2017 | <#B#>


ONE-BED FLAT

Stylist

at Home ANNE SAYS

Love it

CUTE POTS ‘I like collecting succulents and planting them in unusual containers like a golden syrup tin’

‘Vintage finds and handmade items work so well together. It’s a great idea to keep the walls and large pieces of furniture neutral, so the pops of colour stand out.’

‘PAINT UP AND MOUNT A SHELF TO KEEP TINY COLLECTABLES AND HOBBY ITEMS IN ONE PLACE’ PERSONAL TOUCH ‘The kitchen is the standard design put into all the flats, so I used some colourful canisters and crockery to put my own stamp on it’

Make it!

DECOUPAGE MONOGRAM

1 2

WINGING IT ‘There’s a bit of a bird theme in my flat, representing freedom and independence’

<#A#> | JUNE 2017

Buy an MDF letter, from £1, Hobbycraft. Use acrylic paint to colour the edges, and leave to dry. Spread a little PVA onto the letter front and stick on a piece of printed wrapping paper. Smooth and leave face down to dry. With paper face down, cut round the letter with a craft knife. Repeat steps 2 and 3 on the back. Cut out smaller motifs from the wrapping paper and glue onto the front. Finish with layers of PVA.

3 4

I like using Pinterest to gather ideas and working on interiors magazines, I get the serious ‘I-want’s’ every time a company brings out a new collection. The open-plan kitchen/living space is ideal for when I have friends over and the big patio doors are a treat to have open in summer. It’s such a light space and a cheerful place to be. My first house was styled a little like this one, but now I live alone, I have ramped up the girliness. It’s a little quirky, with plenty of handmade features and my friends say there’s always something new to see each time they come over. It’s often described as ‘very Steph’, but I’m still never sure if that’s meant to be a compliment or not!

Handmade home

Most of my accessories are from boot sales or vintage fairs. My mum is a

boot-sale sleuth and always finds a bargain. There is something handmade everywhere you look in my house, from my oven gloves and bedroom bunting to decoupage picture frames and the macrame plant hanger. I’m particularly proud of my quilts stitched in Liberty fabric and my rather jazzy handmade lampshade. The embroidered hoops featuring sassy song lyrics by Beyoncé and Taylor Swift are a new little business venture (@spinsterandspool) and a great pick-me-up to have on the wall. The dream catchers in the living room and bedroom are handmade by my mum. I was also really pleased with the stacking tables I revamped in the living room. They belonged to an ex-boyfriend’s grandparents, who were going to throw them away. I rescued them, painted them up and added PiP Studio wrapping

KITCHEN KITSCH ‘I’m a big fan of bright kitchenalia, especially from Rice DK, PiP Studio and Cath Kidston’


Love it

Love it

ONE-BED FLAT

Do it!

EASY WAYS TO ADD SOME COLOUR

1

Jazz up a beige sofa with printed cushions and throws. They can easily be swapped about or moved from room to room if you get bored of the look. Artificial flowers will never wilt or fade, and they require zero maintenance – apart from an occasional dusting. Pop individual stems into jugs, bottles or jars for a country feel. A vibrant rug adds instant impact, breaking up floor space and helping to zone areas. Give drab walls a boost with fun artwork. If a big print is too much of a commitment, try hanging smaller plaques and frames using Command strips so they can be moved around without peeling off the paint. If coloured curtains are too heavy for your space, brighten windows with bunting or a fun garland. Steph has strung felt balls on fishing wire to adorn her patio doorway.

2

3 4

GLASS HOUSE

5

‘The grey tiled panel adds texture and the green bottles are part of the vintage theme’

BEAUTY SPOT

STYLING LAURIE DAVIDSON FEATURE STEPHANIE DURRANT PHOTOGRAPHS LIZZIE ORME

‘I was lucky enough to inherit the gorgeous 1950s dressing table that’s in my bedroom’

Where to buy her style

LIGHT ‘IF YOU HAVE A TIRED -LOOKING CHANDELIER-STYLE FITTING THAT NEEDS UPDATING, ADD SOME COLOURFUL GLASS DROPLETS IN YOUR CHOSEN COLOURS FOR A PRETTY NEW LOOK’

BERRY RED When it comes to eclectic homewares, you never know what you’ll find here. From bright textiles to quirky accessories, there’s a wealth of choice that will give your abode an artisan feel.

Stylist

at Home HAYLEY SAYS

BOMBAY DUCK For lovers of kitchenalia, online boutique Bombay Duck is a mustvisit. Beautiful china tea sets in candy colours are impossible to resist, alongside darling cake stands and kitsch melamine designs from Rice DK. DEBENHAMS Matthew Williamson is known for his bold use of colour and eclectic designs, and his new Butterfly Home range for Debenhams doesn’t disappoint. Take a look at his tropical motifs and intricate patterns in holiday hues both in the shop and online.

<#A#> | JUNE 2017

PEACEFUL SLEEP ‘Pretty pastel shades and ornate French furniture make this the ultimate girlie boudoir’

‘I like the mix of vintage and eclectic styles in this modern interior. The airy rooms and bright accessories create a really welcoming atmosphere.’

paper to the centres. Years later, I found the matching coffee table at an antiques centre and gave it the same treatment to make a complete set.

shelves – although Command picture strips come in pretty handy, too!

Troubleshooting

I think my main decorating advice is not to be afraid to express yourself. You don’t have to follow a trend to the letter – take inspiration from magazines, Pinterest and the high street, then surround yourself with pieces you love. Stick to a few key colours per space, then experiment with objects, textures, print and pattern. If you bring together the things you love, they will all work somehow. I think your home should be an exhibition that celebrates you and your story.’

Storage can be a bit of a bugbear in this apartment. I only have a small understairs cupboard to store away all those occasional things like the vacuum cleaner and the Christmas tree (I’d like to point out, the vacuum does come out more than once a year, though!). I’ve inserted drawers and cabinets into every available nook – I think it’s just an occupational hazard of being an avid crafter! Since I’ve been living alone, I grew tired of trying to find someone to do my DIY and, considering it’s called ‘do it yourself’, I thought it was about time I learned to do just that. I invested in an electric drill, watched a few YouTube videos, and now I put up all my own pictures and

Follow your heart

Find more tips on creating a vintagelook bedroom at idealhome.co.uk

JUNE 2017 | <#B#>


CRAFT KITS

Gift kits for

£19.95

Stitch a patchwork cushion in gorgeous Liberty fabrics, ALICE CAROLINE

CRAFTERS

Buy it

Knit your own foxy wall art with this faux trophy head kit bag, £35, Sincerely Louise, ETSY

Treat a friend to a creative gift to keep them busy ’til New Year – or put one on your own wish list!

£27

Weave an on-trend wall hanging with a personalised starter pack from The Squid Ink Co, ETSY

£37.50

Learn to knit cosy bed socks with this Stitch and Story kit, LIBERTY

£19.95

WEAVE YOUR OWN

Finish a room with your own fabric lampshade complete with lace and pom-pom trim, THE MAKERY

Make a set of industrial chic concrete votives with a geo finish, £25, BHS

£9.95

Cross stitch is cool, as proven by The Make Arcade’s More Gin Please hoop, ETSY

Sleep soundly with a handmade dream catcher, £19.99, Making Things Happen, NOTONTHEHIGH STREET.COM

HIGH RES REQUESTED

£19.95

£13.95

Find all you need to stitch five felt cuties in the Make and Sew suitcase, DOTCOMGIFTSHOP

Try the art of felting to make tree, heart and snowman decorations using the I Believe kit, GILLIANGLADRAG

STITCH & SIP

Style

Maker

FEATURE STEPHANIE DURRANT

DANIELLE SAYS

<#A#> | JANUARY 2018

£3.95

£10

Craft a cheery sock unicorn to pop in the top of a Crimbo stocking, AMAZON

MAGIC MAKE

For an iconic stocking filler, grab this foam-card model Routemaster kit, DOTCOMGIFTSHOP

£8.15

Cut, sew and stuff a Percy Pug or keep as a cute cotton tea towel, ULSTER WEAVERS

‘Gifts are extra special when you’ve made them – my favourites are the concrete votives, the weaving kit and the sock unicorn!’


Do it

TIME AT HOME

Personalise your space

Grab a can of paint to make this dreamy looking vase

Bowls made by Amy Isles Freeman

DISCOVER CRAFT

MAKE IT

yourself Check out the latest workshops, books and making must-haves

LOVE LETTERS

Go along to London Craft Week between 9 and 13 May and discover a whole world of hidden workshops and makers. This annual event showcases the skills of independent craftspeople, plus the teams behind luxury brands such as Mulberry and Burberry. The week-long programme also offers you the opportunity to experience talks and workshops about a broad range of crafts. You can book tickets at londoncraftweek.com.

Weaving loom starter kit, £15, Wool Couture Company at Etsy

Wooden letter tiles, £4 for 114, Hobbycraft

Three of the best WEDDING DECS PAPER POSY Chrysanthemum paper flowermaking kit, £7, The Village Haberdashery

SAFE KEEPING

Heart box, £3, Paperchase

<#A#> | MAY 2018

TRY YOUR HAND AT... WEAVING

It’s official, weaving is cool! It may go back as far as the Ancient Egyptians, but this technique is back in a whole new way, with high street giants and small suppliers getting on board with the trend. Try it yourself by picking up a starter kit that includes a basic loom, like this one from Wool Couture Company, £15, Etsy. Weaving is associated with mindfulness, too, so you can make gorgeous things while eliminating stress – win!

Woven cushion, £15, Sainsbury’s

TRY ETSY FOR WEAVING SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS, INCLUDING COOL KITS, MUST-HAVE TOOLS AND PRETTY YARNS APLENTY

FEATURE STEPHANIE DURRANT PHOTOGRAPHS JULIA WADE, AMY ISLES FREEMAN

If you’re looking for new ways to make, A Well Crafted Home by Janet Crowther (photographs by Julia Wade, £19.99, Clarkson Potter) offers an anthology of taster projects. Whether you fancy crafting something yourself from scratch or just want to give a preloved piece a quick revamp, choose from 60 inspiring projects, presented by room. There are plenty of techniques to try, too, from woodworking to simple sewing, or have fun with spray paint to make this ombre vase.


SIMPLE SOLUTIONS

STORE & ORGANISE CRAFT KIT Creativity can be an untidy business, so take control of your stash with these clever solutions for getting crafty at home or on the move THE OPEN STORAGE Hardcore handicrafter? Create your own storage solution with the Elvarli open units, an array of adjustable flat and display shelves, drawers and hanging rails. Great for dressmakers! £308 for two sections as shown, Ikea

THE GO BAG Take your un-put-downable project with you in this cute sausage dog craft bag. It has plenty of pockets for all your kit, whenever and wherever the mood for making takes you £22, John Lewis

FEATURE STEPHANIE DURRANT

THE NEEDLE CASE Keep sewing essentials to hand wherever your stitching takes you with this chirpy bird-shaped needlecase, readystocked with five needles £8.50, Cath Kidston

Ideal Home Tip

THE DISPLAY SHELF Paint this wooden house shelf to hang in a craft corner and fill it with bobbins, jars of buttons and your creations £15, Hobbycraft

Glue jam jar lids to the underside of a shelf, fill the jars with ribbons, buttons and threads, and screw into place THE VERSATILE TROLLEY This 12-drawer utility cart has lots of storage to help organise tools and kit for all kinds of crafts. Its locking castors and worktop make it extra useful £111.99, Wayfair

THE PRETTIEST SEWING BOX Modelled on that familiar storefront and with a choice of lining in Liberty’s iconic fabric prints, this sewing box contains removable compartments that will ensure your haberdashery is always organised £59.95, Liberty

THE DESK TIDY Declutter your creative space with a giant thimble tidy. We can’t think of a more fun way to house your scissors, brushes, tape measure… £9.90 each, Red Candy

THE STORAGE BASKETS Place these pretty and practical Fluorspar baskets next to the sofa to drop your projects into after a crafting session in front of the TV Short, £40; tall, £45; both Amara

NOVEMBER 2017

<#R#>


OFF SALE 11/11/2016

ISSUE 07 £5.99

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gorgeous projects to make

FIVE IDEAS WITH… a checked blanket

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Make our Olivia Cardi in two styles & sizes XS-XL

SASHIKO QUILT

Beautiful hand stitching

EASY HOW-TO TUTORIALS

Follow our expert guides to improve your skills patchwork denim

top to stitch

DRESS UP FUN!

Easy kids’ costumes

quick felt dog brooch


SLUG HERE…

pleated POUCH

print love!

Use your favourite prints and trims to make a pretty and practical zip-up purse

i

f you’re fanatical about fabrics and find it tricky picking only a few for a project, you'll love this handy little bag as it sneakily hides an extra print in its clever inverted pleats. Simply choose three contrasting cottons and get pleating, then indulge a love of trims by combining bobbles and ribbon. It stitches up in a jiffy, too, making it an ideal gift for storing make-up, stationery, or even stitchy notions.

pleated make-up bag

a

YOU WILL NEED Notes (1); Midnight (2); * Sweet Barefoot in the Park (3), all

* * * * *

Cotton Candy fabric, £3 per fat quarter, purple-stitches.com Mini pom pom trim Pink grosgrain ribbon, 5mm wide 8in navy zip Zipper foot Basic sewing kit (see page 66)

Cut eight 7 x 18cm rectangles from fabric 2 and six from 3. Pin a light piece to a dark piece (a), right sides together. Sew a 1cm seam on one long edge and press open. Alternate three more dark and two light (b). Repeat to make a second patchwork piece.

1

Lay one right side up and mark the centre of each light panel at the top and bottom with a chalk pencil. Fold the right-hand edge of the first dark panel to the mark on the first light piece and pin. Repeat on the left-hand side to create an inverted pleat. Do the same across both pieces, top and bottom (c) and hand sew to secure.

PROJECT & STEP PHOTOS STEPH DURRANT PHOTO CLAIRE LLOYD-DAVIES

2

Cut two 6 x 24cm pieces from fabric 1. Tack pom pom trim, bobbles pointing down, along the top of one pleated piece. Pin a fabric 1

3

rectangle right side down on top. Sew with a 1cm seam, then press open. Pin pink grosgrain ribbon along the join (d) and stitch down both long edges. Repeat for the other patchwork panel. For the lining, cut two 22 x 24cm rectangles from fabric 3. Lay one right side up with the zip on top, teeth side up, aligning the top edges. Place a patchwork outer right side down on top and pin. Stitch close to the teeth using a zipper foot. Press the fabrics away from the zip. Repeat to attach the other piece. Topstitch 3mm from the seam in coordinating thread.

4

b

c

Open the zip slightly, then fold the fabrics so the lining and the outer panels are right sides together and pin. Sew a 1cm seam around the outside, leaving a 5cm gap in the lining.

5

Tweak one corner of the lining so the seams are on top of one another. Stitch across 3cm from the point then snip 1cm from the stitches. Repeat for the other corners. Turn the bag out through the gap in the lining. Press the opening seam and slipstitch closed. Push the lining inside the bag. Make a ribbon bow and sew in place.

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d

SHARE YOUR MAKE post your make-up bag on instagram @sewingnetwork sewing THE CRAFT NETWORK <#B#>


SLUG HEREâ&#x20AC;¦

mermaid tales While away the hours snuggled up in a fantastical quilted mertail

sea shades

quilt your tail with a fishy scalloped design <#A#> THE CRAFT NETWORK sewing


SHOW ME…

l

ittle ones can lose themselves in an underwater world with our magical mermaid blanket. With its glistening tail, quilted outer and soft lining, it’ll be their favourite story time cosy-up. For an adult version, follow the pattern using your own measurements.

Lay a tail piece right side up and place the waist fin wrong side down on top, aligning the top straight edges. Add a lining piece right side down, pin and stitch with a 1.5cm seam allowance (c). Trim the seam to 5mm. Sew the remaining quilted tail and lining right sides together, and press.

6

mermaid blanket YOU WILL NEED 2.5m marbled batik quilting fabric, £8.99 per m, minervacrafts.com 2m cotton winceyette in lilac, £4.99 per m, minervacrafts.com 1m crystal organza in purple, £3.99 per m, minervacrafts.com 2.5m Vlieseline medium loft wadding H280, £8.60 per m, crafts@stockistenquiries.co.uk Pattern paper and pencil Your basic sewing kit (see page 62)

* * * * * *

Measure your child’s hips and divide by two. Add 16cm ease and 3cm seam allowance. Divide total by two. For the blanket length, get your child to lie on a flat surface and measure from their waist to the tips of their toes. Add 3cm seam allowance, 10cm ease. Draw a rectangle on pattern paper to these measurements.

1

On the bottom edge, measure and mark 10cm along from the left-hand corner. From the top right-hand corner, draw a gradual curve down to the bottom mark. Cut out the tail. Place the straight edge on the fold of turquoise batik fabric, wadding and lining, and cut two of each.

2

Lay a piece of turquoise fabric right side up on the wadding and draw a scallop design every 20cm down the

3

Press open a tail piece, right sides up. Open the other piece and place on top, right sides down, waist fin facing the outer tail. Pin around the edges (d) and sew from the bottom of the outer tail, around the lining and to the other bottom outer edge, leaving the narrow tail base open. Trim the seam allowance to 1cm all round and clip the curves. Carefully pull the quilted outer tail over the lining so it’s right sides out. Topstitch around the waist edge, 3mm from the seam (e).

7

‘tack the organza to the quilting cotton if it’s easier to sew’ blanket (a). Quilt in coordinating thread. Repeat for the other pieces. Trim 1cm from the wadding at the bottom edge. For the waist fins, measure 5cm down from the top left-hand corner of your pattern. Do the same 12cm down from the right-hand corner. Join the two points with a gradual curve. The narrowest straight edge is the fold line.

4

Use the template to cut two each, on the fold, from turquoise and iridescent fabrics. Place a turquoise piece right side up, then an iridescent one right side up on top. Layer an iridescent then a turquoise piece, right sides down. Pin and stitch around the curves and sides only, using a 1cm seam allowance. Notch the curves and turn out (b). Press well.

5

To make the tail fin, on a 31cm x 34cm sheet of paper, measure 26cm down from the top left-hand corner. Draw a curve from this mark to the bottom right-hand corner. Measure 9.5cm along from the top left-hand corner. Draw a curve to the bottom right-hand corner. The left-hand straight edge is the fold line.

8

Place the tail pattern on the fold of turquoise and iridescent fabrics; cut two of each and one wadding. Layer the wadding with a turquoise and iridescent piece, right sides up, then iridescent and turquoise, right sides down. Sew around the curves using a 1cm seam allowance. Clip, trim the seams to 5mm and turn out.

9

around the tail 2cm in from the 10 Quilt seam, then another 2cm in. Press 1.5cm under at the tail opening. Slide the tail in the gap, pin (f) and topstitch.

PROJECT & STEP PHOTOS STEPH DURRANT PHOTOS CLAIRE LLOYD DAVIES

STEP BY STEP a

b

c

d

e

f

sewing THE CRAFT NETWORK <#B#>


SHOW ME…

t

diamond ribbon. Repeat to add a line of running stitch 5mm to the left of the 1.5cm pink ribbon (c). Sew on six beads at the centre of the floral motifs on the 4cm wide trim (d). 

he global interiors trend is still hotter than the Moroccan sun, so what better way to embrace the vibrancy of faraway lands than by stitching your own ethnic-inspired cushion? Scatter cushions are an easy way to instantly give a room new life. For this cover, we’ve combined geometric Ikat prints and linen with embellished ribbons and fringe trim, resulting in a riot of jewel-like colour and rich texture.

global cushion

team with a hot-, pink plain cushion to pick out the bold tones

YOU WILL NEED Ikat fabric in pink, £19.05 * Kesahar per m, zazzle.co.uk Essex linen in natural, £11 per m, * sewhot.co.uk braid, £1.35 per m, * Diamond bedecked.co.uk trim, £4.95 per m, * Lozenge bedecked.co.uk of woven ribbons * Selection embroidery thread * Turquoise gold beads * Small Tassel fringe, £4.95 per m, * bedecked.co.uk * Your basic sewing kit (see page 66)

1

For the front of the cushion, cut 27 x 30cm from printed fabric and 20 x 27cm from linen. Pin and sew together using a 1cm seam allowance (a), then press the seam towards the printed fabric. Pin a length of 2cm wide mirrored ribbon to the left of the printed fabric, join (b) and machine stitch down both sides using coordinating thread, close to the ribbon edges. Repeat to attach a length of 4cm wide ribbon to the left of the mirrored ribbon

2

add trims

Be transported to exotic lands with our cushion that’s embellished with ornate ribbons, gold beads and contrasting tassels

‘pick your trims in similar tones and balance with a contrasting thread’ and a piece of 1cm diamond braid, 1cm to the right of the fabric join. Measure 3cm in from the righthand raw edge of the linen fabric and stitch a length of 2cm wide purple ribbon down both sides. Leave a 5mm gap, and attach a 1.5cm wide piece of pink lozenge ribbon in the same way. Trim the overlapping ribbon ends level with the fabric and press the whole piece on the reverse with a warm iron.

3

Using two strands of turquoise embroidery thread, work a line of running stitch 5mm to the right of the

4

Lay the cushion front, right side up on a flat surface. Measure and mark a line 1cm in from each short edge. Place the tassel fringe on top, tassels facing inwards, and pin the weave of the trim where the tassels are joined at the line (f). Tack in place. Repeat at the other end.

6

With the cushion front still facing up, place the rectangle with the trim right sides down on the left-hand side so that the pink panel is on the right and the raw edges are aligned. Next, place the linen rectangle on top, right side down, so the hem is on the left and raw edges are aligned. Pin around the edges, then sew with a 1cm seam allowance, catching the trim in the end seams. Turn it out through the envelope back and gently press.

7

SHARE YOURS #cushionmake on instagram & tag @sewingnetwork

STEP BY STEP PROJECTS & STEP PHOTOS STEPH DURRANT PHOTOS SIMON WHITMORE

spice trail

Cut 8 x 27cm of printed cotton and 11 x 27cm of linen. Pin and stitch together using a 1cm seam allowance, then press the seam towards the printed fabric. Sew a length of purple ribbon across the join. Turn a 1cm double hem along the short edge of the printed fabric, pin and sew in a coordinating thread (e). Cut 27 x 43cm of linen and hem one short edge in the same way.

5

a

b

c

d

e

f

sewing THE CRAFT NETWORK <#B#>


CRAFT

Sew Beautiful

Emily’s Tip

You can make a matching bracelet using the same technique – just attach a small press stud to the felt to secure

✿ Easy-peasy Bit More ✿ ATricky ✿ Hard–ish A ✿ Quite Challenge

Stitch yourself an on-trend geometric necklace using simple satin stitch Home Editor, Emily

Time taken: 1 day or 2 evenings

2

YOU WILL NEED ✤ Cream felt ✤ Carbon paper and pencil ✤ Embroidery hoop (optional) ✤ Embroidery thread: mint, coral, charcoal, black, beige ✤ Embroidery needle ✤ Fabric scissors ✤ Fabric glue ✤ Two jump rings ✤ 3mm-wide coral ribbon

1

Trace off the template (below) then, using carbon paper, transfer the shapes on to cream felt. Secure in an embroidery hoop, if desired.

Fill in a triangle at a time using satin stitch and two strands of embroidery thread to correspond with the key provided. Satin stitch is created by working parallel lines of thread sewn closely next to each other. For a varied effect, work the stitches in different directions for each triangle, using the picture as a guide. When every triangle has been filled in, work a line of backstitch around the outside of the shape with two strands of beige thread. Measure 5mm around the motif and mark a border lightly with a pencil. Cut out using fabric scissors. Add a thin line of fabric glue 5mm around the edges of

3 4

the back of the stitched necklace and adhere to another piece of cream felt. Leave to dry. Cut around the shape. Once dry, work blanket stitch around the edge of the necklace using two strands of mint embroidery thread. Sew a jump ring to each top point of the felt. Thread 60cm of narrow ribbon through each jump ring and fold to make a double length. Tie a knot in the end and snip the ends into neat diagonal points. Add a little fabric glue to prevent fraying.

5

B

NECKLACE TEMPLATE

M B

C

N

N

M

G

M

B C

C

G

Make: Stephanie Durrant. Photos: Barry Marsden

32 womansweekly.com

B

B

N

G

G

M C G

N

M

STITCH GUIDE Satin Stitch Work straight, parallel stitches closely together – there should be no gaps between stitches Blanket Stitch Bring the 2 needle out 1 3 at 1, reinsert at 2, then – trapping the thread under the 4 needle – out of 3. Gently pull the loop taut, then reinsert needle at 4, ready for next stitch

TESTED BY US So It Works For You

HERE ARE SOME YOU CAN BUY IF YOU PREFER!

C Key for embroidery template C = coral thread M = mint thread B = black thread G = grey (charcoal) thread N = natural (beige) thread

Origami leather pendant, £24, Fleur de Carotte at etsy.com

Toni angular shapes collar necklace, £28, Oliver Bonas (oliverbonas.com)

Statement necklace, £6, George at Asda (direct.asda.com)

K EEox W T tF

X el NEFun F

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INSPIRE ME

# craftdayout

Stitch

LONDON s

Sew Over It WHERE? Clapham and Islington WHY VISIT? Beautiful decor According to the letters on one wall of Sew Over It s Clapham shop, Sewing soothes the soul , and we couldn t agree more. Opened by sewing mini celeb Lisa Comfort in 2011, the sewing caf is a vibrant sanctuary for crafting enthusiasts. Shelves are lined with cheerful fabrics and trimmings, along with Lisa s own beautifully packaged patterns and kits. For those visiting North London, be sure to pop in to Sew Over It s sister store in Angel, with the same stitchy delights, plus dressmaking classes. Find out more at sewoverit.co.uk

Heading to the capital? We ve mapped out our favourite stitchy stores, workshops and events

o you ve been up the Shard, taken a trip on a red bus and ridden the Eye? But if you haven t taken time out to explore London s fabric laden gems, we re here to show you what you ve been missing. Rich in fashion and textile history, there s plenty to discover for the haberdashery hungry. However long you ve got to spare, here are our highlights for stitching in the city...

Liberty WHERE? Regent Street WHY VISIT? Lovely fabrics

oner or a whether you re a Lond plenty of stitchy day tripper, you ll nd l pleasures in the capita

This iconic department store is rich in history and was founded in 1875 by Arthur Lasenby Liberty, who had a vision of setting up an Eastern bazaar to bring London society exotic wares. Today, Liberty fabrics have an identity all of their own, with classic floral designs in a rainbow of colourways sitting prettily next to brand new seasonal ranges, depicting everything from zoo animals to storybook prints. Head inside the stunning mock Tudor building just off Regent Street to marvel at the floor to ceiling rolls of Tana Lawn soft cotton, along with Liberty print haberdashery and gifts. You can also shop Liberty s fabric range online at liberty.co.uk

Savile Row WHERE? Mayfair WHY VISIT? A piece of history

Goldhawk Road Berwick Street WHERE? Soho WHY VISIT? Endless choice To Londoners and those in the textile industry, Berwick Street is synonymous with fine fabrics. In the early 20th century, it was popular with young working women looking for affordable fashion, but now the street retains its identity as a destination for seamstresses on the look out for

<#A#> THE CRAFT NETWORK sewing

colourful textiles and haberdashery in the many specialised stores. Borovick Fabrics, for example, has been famous since the Seventies for being the place to go for exotic fabrics, such as furs and sequins. Cloth House, meanwhile, offers splendid natural fibres and is a wonderful resource for beautiful sewing accessories and vintage haberdashery in an inspiring setting with timeless appeal. Other shops to visit include Misan Fabrics, The Silk Society and The Berwick Street Cloth Shop.

WHERE? Shepherd s Bush WHY VISIT? Bargain buys Situated in West London, Goldhawk Road is home to over a dozen fabulous textile shops now that s a whole lot of yardage to peruse. If you can t find what you re after here, it probably doesn t exist! It s a great place for grabbing a deal, too, so don t forget to hunt around in the bargain bins for some leftover remnants for just a few pounds each.

Just off Regent Street in the well to do Mayfair area lies the home of bespoke tailoring, Savile Row. It s known around the world as the most prestigious place to have a suit handmade, but even without a few thou to spare, the historical street is still worth a meander. It was built in 1731, and the oldest surviving tailors is Henry Poole & Co, whose clients included Queen Victoria and Edward VII. These days, though, you re more likely to spot Sewing Bee judge, and owner of Savile Row tailors Norton & Sons, Patrick Grant, making his way to work. Look out for events such as London Craft Week, where stores open their workshops to give the public a chance to watch these skilled craftsmen and women, such as Savile Row s first female tailor, Kathryn Sargent (left), at work. sewing THE CRAFT NETWORK <#B#>

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INSPIRE ME

RayStitch

Kleins Opened in 1936 by Mary Kleins, this Aladdin s cave of sewing wonders is now run by Mary s grandson, Raymond. In this Soho store, you ll find everything from pins and needles to an array of unusual zip fastenings and specialist interfacings. Plus, if you re not sure what you need or how to use a product, all staff have a background in fashion or sewing, so will be able to assist. See kleins.co.uk

se or go shopping, do a cour you ll take in an exhibition be spoilt for choice

John Lewis This quintessential British department store, located on Oxford Street, is well known for its sizeable haberdashery department. Ride the lift past womenswear and lingerie, and you ll step into a haven of contemporary fabrics, own branded sewing machines in candy colours (for less than ÂŁ100!) and whimsical accessories fox pincushion? Yes, please! It s also home to The Makery s workspace collaboration, running all kinds of exciting sewing courses for beginners. Visit johnlewis.com

The Cloth Shop

The Village Haberdashery If you re fanatical about fabric, then The Village Haberdashery on Mill Lane is a must visit. With wall to wall rolls of quilting cottons in dazzling designs, quilters and dressmakers alike will be satisfied by the extensive selection. Putting a modern spin on traditional craft , the Sublime Stitching embroidery patterns include robots and unicorns (essential motifs, we re sure you ll agree!). For more info, go to thevillagehaberdashery.co.uk <#A#> THE CRAFT NETWORK sewing

Well known for its antiques market, Portobello Road is also home to The Cloth Shop. Prepare to be amazed by linens in more than 50 shades, hand block printed textiles and colourful woven trims. What s more, the rustic homewares, including blankets and pottery, are beautifully displayed on vintage wooden shelves and crates, as well as a large farm table in the centre of the shop. See theclothshop.net

Take a trip down the Essex Road to Ray Stitch, a one stop shop for modern fabrics, indie sewing patterns plus trims and fastenings galore. Have a rummage through patterns by lots of independent brands including Papercut and Grainline Studio, and if getting the perfect fit is a constant headache, take one of owner Rachel s pattern cutting classes. You ll learn how to create a block to your measurements, which will ensure a great fit each and every time you sew. Visit raystitch.co.uk

3 MUST VISIT PLACES

FASHION & TEXTILE MUSEUM Founded by iconic fashion designer Zandra Rhodes, the Fashion and Textile Museum in Bermondsey showcases a programme of changing exhibitions as well as creative courses. Find out more at ftmlondon.org ANGELS COSTUMES Take a tour behind the seams of the world s largest costume house, Angels Costumes. With over eight miles of rails, you ll explore clothes from TV, stage and cinema, including Game Of Thrones and Downton Abbey. See angels.uk.com

NOT TO BE MISSED EVENTS THE HANDMADE FAIR 16 18 September Hampton Court Palace LONDON FASHION WEEKEND 16 20 September Saatchi Gallery, King s Road MADE LONDON 20 23 October One Marylebone THE STITCHING, SEWING & HOBBYCRAFTS SHOW 17 19 November ExCel

ROYAL SCHOOL OF NEEDLEWORK Based at Hampton Court Palace, once the residence of Henry VIII, the Royal School of Needlework holds an equal level of prestige. An international centre of excellence for hand embroidery, there are over 160 short courses, along with bespoke services. Head to royal needlework.org.uk

For a comprehensive guide to London s best sewing and knitting shops, pick up a copy of London Stitch And Knit by Leigh Metcalf (Black Dog, ÂŁ16.95).

WORDS STEPH DURRANT PHOTOS LEIGH METCALF, CLOTH HOUSE, REUBEN PARIS

MORE PLACES TO SHOP

sewing THE CRAFT NETWORK <#B#>

0


INSPIRE ME… WHAT'S NEW?

victory patterns

# sewingtricksand tips

pattern picks This month’s party dress patterns are perfect for a festive fiesta

Trina, $14, victorypatterns.com Hot off the drafting table at Victory Patterns is this classic wrap dress with a Japanese flavour in its kimono-style sleeves. The cross-over bodice creates a flattering V-neckline with gathers above the bust line. There is also a second option in the form of a versatile wrap tunic. For a slinky show-stopper, make up the dress in silk charmeuse in a striking plain or bold print. Newbies might want to opt for a more stable fabric, such as voile or double gauze. The pattern is available as a pdf in sizes US 2-16.

colour block

‘Feeling brave? Take on this chic wrap dress in a luxe silk’ ESME CLEMO, CONTENT PRODUCER

seamwork Catarina, $12, seamwork.com

sew over it Rosie, from £8.50, sewoverit.co.uk

Vogue 8944, £12, sewdirect.com From well-renowned brand Vogue Patterns, style 8944 is a true classic. The colour block panels create an ultra-flattering style and are easy to personalise – why not create an on-trend ombre effect? The dress is lined, with a yoke front and back zipper, and has a neat narrow hem. It can be made up in sizes US 6-22, making it great for all figure types. For winter outings, try the sleeved option or stitch in ponte knits for a casual finish. If you’ve a more glam do in mind, try a printed crêpe instead.

vintage vibe

Learn this...

TOPSTITCHING This literally involves stitching on top of the seam, either for decoration or to add strength. Use contrasting topstitching thread or an all-purpose variety. You can also buy specific needles for the job – twin needles create a lovely hem detail. Avoid backstitching to keep the front of your project neat and keep stitching parallel to the seam – an edgestitch foot will help with this.

Learn this...

2-hour make

V

ROULEAU CORD Rouleau straps or loops are very fine tubes of fabric that create a length of cord. They are often used with buttons instead of buttonholes but also make delicate straps. Start by cutting fabric on the bias and fold in half lengthways, right sides together. Stitch close to the fold. Trim close to the seam and turn out using a loop turner or bodkin. Press flat, or steam to keep the loop rounded.

WORDS STEPH DURRANT

Learn this...

SIZES/T

The latest pattern from sewing goddess, Lisa Comfort, the Rosie dress has everything we’ve come to expect from Sew Over It patterns. Flirty, feminine and with a vintage feel, Rosie is the ultimate party dress, complete with a fitted bodice and full skirt. There are three versions to choose from, too: the first has a retro collar and wide straps, while the second has a pretty sweetheart neckline and dainty rouleau straps. Option three is a versatile skirt taking you through all the seasons – stitch it in printed cotton for summer or cosy wool crêpe for winter. The pattern is available as a printed or pdf version in UK sizes 8-20.

<#A#> THE CRAFT NETWORK sewing

Only got a few hours to stitch your dream party dress? Enter Catarina. It takes just two hours to construct this midi-length marvel, which features a gathered skirt and elasticated waist, combined with a figure-skimming top. The pattern is pdf only and can be made in US sizes 0-26. Catarina is stunning in silk charmeuse, or try rayon for a more dressed down look.

vogue patterns

V8944 SIZE / TAILLE

VERY EASY VOGUE

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®

A

GATHERING This is a simple way to make a circle skirt fit a bodice. Divide the skirt top into sections and machine two or three rows of long tacking stitches. Leave the thread tails long and pull up the bobbin thread to gather, making sure they’re even before pinning and sewing.

sewing THE CRAFT NETWORK <#B#>


hZl A>K>C<

AT AN EXCLUSIVE VISIT TO HER PENTHOUSE, THE ICONIC FASHION DESIGNER SHARES THE INSPIRATION BEHIND HER NEW FABRIC COLLECTION, LACE MOUNTAIN


Finding time The Lace Mountain


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Our top picks

5, Midnight

3, Tribal

4, Midnight

To inspire, and be inspired

2, Solar

1, Solar


We took a sneak peak around the designerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s London apartment, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what we found...


sew feature

Sew meets

PATRICK GRANT

AT AN EXCLUSIVE SEWING SESSION AT SINGERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LONDON HQ, DEPUTY EDITOR STEPH AND EDITOR LORRAINE TALK TO THE TAILORING ENTREPRENEUR ABOUT BUSINESS, THE BEE AND BISCUITS!

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PATRICK AND CO-JUDGE, MAY

LORRAINE AND STEPH – THE NEW MAY AND CLAUDIA, PERHAPS?

Sew meets

PATRICK GRANT

ON THE DAY

Several months later, the winning stitchers had been informed, and we were delighted to head to Singer HQ in London to meet one of the fortunate groups. When we arrived, the ladies were already at work and appearing surprisingly calm – not at all like the frantic buzz of the Sewing Bee workroom. This was a casual session, with the individuals bringing a garment to customise or refashion under the expertise of Mr Grant and two helpful seamstresses. “It’s not a competition, just relax and have fun,” reassured the Sewing Bee judge, who was dressed in a slightly crumpled shirt and turned up chinos from his bike ride in. Of course, we are more familiar with his trademark sharp suit and trousers, but ‘off duty’ there’s no sign of media fame and adoration going to his head. Patrick is perfectly at home circulating round the room chatting to the excited sewers and talking candidly about the Bee and other projects.

people,” Patrick explained. “Alex was great, but she wouldn’t stop chatting! Claudia is brilliant at pepping up the contestants, although when Tamara got the glue gun out in the series two final, she ran back with her head in her hands!” So, do the contestants really have the set time to complete their challenges? “Absolutely!” Patrick assured the group. “It’s the BBC! They’re total sticklers for time. If they have three hours, they have exactly three hours, and if they’re allowed extra time, the viewers are told. However, in the made to measure challenges, the model’s measurements are given in advance to allow the stitchers time to adapt the pattern.” So that clears that one up!

When Sew was invited to an exclusive workshop at Singer head quarters, hosted by Sewing Bee judge and master of tailoring, Patrick Grant, I cleared my diary SERIES FOUR Several hours, and a number of Bourbon the very same day! Owner of Savile biscuits – Patrick’s favourites – later, the ladies Row tailors, Norton & Sons, and at were given their 10 minute warning. Keeping their cool more than many previous Sewing Bee least two other fashion brands, the finalists, the last hems were sewn and buttons handsome 6ft-something is a tricky attached, and the winners gathered excitedly PATRICK ON THE CONTESTANTS man to track down, so this was not “When Neil was winning all the challenges for the judging to begin. One by one the ladies leading up to the final of this year’s Sewing Bee, placed their garments on a mannequin, while an opportunity to be missed.

Guess what!

MEN CAN STILL ACHIEVE SAVILE ROW STYLE WITHOUT THE BESPOKE PRICE TAG WITH PATRICK’S HAMMOND & CO. COLLECTION AVAILABLE AT DEBENHAMS. 30

sewmag.co.uk

the fastidious master tailor provided kind and encouraging words, alongside constructive feedback for improvement.

Courtesy of Harry Branch

During the last series of the Sewing Bee, if we weren’t glued to our TV screens, we were rushing out in our thousands to buy stitching supplies, with many of us treating ourselves to a sparkly new sewing machine. Leading brand, Singer, offered the ultimate incentive, hosting a competition for Singer sewing machine purchasers to win a prestigious sewing session with Patrick himself.

May [Martin] and I thought, ‘this is going to be boring’”, Patrick openly revealed. “Like most of the nation, we thought he was going to win, but Matt simply excelled in the final.” “Ann is still the best contestant we’ve had! She’s classically trained, so she’s as efficient as some of my tailors,” he declared of the series one winner. “But when it comes to personality, Ann and Stuart Hillard couldn’t be more different – when the camera was on, he was there! Ann, however, used to turn her hearing aid right down so she wouldn’t be disturbed.” “But the pressure is just too much for some


sew feature

Quick-fire

questions

WE TURNED THE TABLES AND PUT PATRICK UNDER THE SPOTLIGHT

HOW DID YOU GET INVOLVED IN THE SEWING BEE? I was put forward by now former BBC commissioner Emma Willis, who had produced several documentaries I’d been involved in. WERE THERE OTHERS IN THE RUNNING TO BECOME JUDGES? I was invited to take part in several screen tests with four different ladies and one bloke. I can’t tell you who, though! HAVE YOU EVER COMPLETED A SEWING BEE CHALLENGE? They’ve never actually made me do a task yet! WILL THERE EVER BE A KIDS’ VERSION? It’d be great, but the rules around kids on TV are super strict. DO YOU EVER GET TO SEW YOUR OWN CLOTHES? Not very often! The last thing I stitched was a pair of trousers I customised for an ’80s fancy dress party.

Naturally, we couldn’t resist getting the scoop on series four. “I haven’t seen the finalised cast,” Patrick admitted. “It’s a long process! I’ve only seen the sewing tests, where around 50 people take part in a timed, filmed task to see how they cope under pressure. They have to be able to stay calm in front of the cameras. When filming begins and the contestants first walk into the sewing room, they are visibly nervous, but by the second week people have largely forgotten about them.” So when should we clear our diaries for the next series? Unfortunately Patrick and Love Productions are unable to confirm just yet, but we’re predicting spring 2016, so watch this space!

glancing surreptitiously in recognition of the TV personality. It’s impossible not to be compelled by his charisma, as he casually speaks of his fortunate upbringing and career in a way that makes it sound wonderfully everyday; from racing to the canteen of his Durham boarding school to ensure he got the best biscuits, to his time with The Prince of Wales and other wealthy investors supporting a programme of sewing courses at Dumfries House. As the afternoon sewing session was scheduled to begin, Patrick was summoned back to his duties. Wearing a homemade skirt myself, I couldn’t help but take the opportunity and tentatively request an auspicious critique of my own. “I thought you’d made it, it’s very good,” he reassured me. I’m not completely convinced, but at least next series, when some poor soul is under jurisdiction for an uneven hem or wonky zip, I can revel in my positive feedback from the infamous male Sewing Bee judge!

“These Singer sewing sessions are always good fun. It’s great to meet people who are enjoying sewing and expressing their creativity”

A SPOT OF LUNCH

When the session was over and the happy sewers had set off home, the team stepped out to lunch with Patrick and several of the organisers from Singer. Upon leaving, Patrick walked into the corridor and came face to face with a gigantic cut-out of himself. I’m surprised this hasn’t been sneaked out of the building long since we first visited back in March, however, the modest Mr Grant wasn’t so keen, “It’s bigger than life size!” he exclaimed heartily. We visited a small bistro with a bustling lunchtime trade, and as we settled to look at the menu, I noticed several female diners

Meet the winners

JULIE USED A SINGER PROMISE TO TAILOR A PAIR OF WORK TROUSERS

THESE LUCKY STITCHERS WENT UNDER PATRICK GRANT’S TUITION TO CREATE A GARMENT OF THEIR CHOICE USING THE SAME SEWING MACHINE MODEL THEY HAD PURCHASED WHEN ENTERING THE COMPETITION

DESPITE HAVING NEVER TRIED DRESSMAKING, RACHEL REFASHIONED A JERSEY SHIRT INTO A BUTTON-UP SKIRT

“I chose a Singer Heavy Duty as I am turning my upholstering hobby into a career. I chose the Singer brand as it’s the one I knew. I haven’t done dressmaking before and I actually didn’t know who Patrick was until he walked in today and I recognised him from the TV.” Rachel Bailey, London

To find out more about Patrick’s Savile Row tailors, visit www.nortonandsons. co.uk, or for Singer sewing machines, www.singerco.co.uk

Did you know?

THE EDINBURGH BORN JUDGE STUDIED ENGINEERING AT LEEDS AND HAS AN MBA FROM SAID BUSINESS SCHOOL IN OXFORD.

“I was really excited to win as I love the Sewing Bee. My friend told me I should watch it and we usually spend two hours discussing it on the phone after every episode. I had to get up at 5am this morning to catch the bus, but I would have walked here!” Julie McGann, Swindon

“My daughters are aged six and eight years old and we absolutely love watching the Sewing Bee together! I’m often making them costumes, including the witch JOANNE STITCHED HER YOUNGEST from the children’s book Room DAUGHTER A TU-TU on the Broom.” USING A SINGER 9980 Joanne Panter, Harlow

SANDRA CREATED A PATTERN HACK OF A CAMI TOP FROM THE LATEST SEWING BEE BOOK

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“I was delighted when my husband bought me a brandnew Singer Tradition after my sewing machine blew up just after Christmas. As it turned out, it was just the fuse, so it’s now got a new lease of life with a friend” Sandra Dean, Leytonstone


©Walt Disney Co./Courtesy Everett/REX

]^hidgn >C;D8JH

WITH DISNEY’S CINDERELLA CAPTURING OUR IMAGINATIONS, WE TAKE A LOOK AT THE HISTORY OF THE CORSET


©Walt Disney Co./Courtesy Everett/REX LILY JAMES’ CORSET IS BREATHTAKING

Corsets or ‘stays’ become popular as an undergarment in Europe.

The use of metal eyelets means that tighter lacing is possible.

The sewing machine is invented, resulting in the mass production of corsets. 1851

1828

1600s

1693+

Occasional periodicals are printed aimed at women containing corset patterns and fashion advice.

1830s

Steel split-metal busk fastenings are invented.


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Burda 7088

Simplicity 1183

Butterick 5935

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‘—†ǧ‘”ƒŽ…‘––‘ „‹ƒ•„‹†‹‰‹’—”’Ž‡ʦ ȩȲʧȸȸ’‡”ȴʦ www.myfabric house.co.uk

‹‰‹„ƒ†„‘‹‰„Žƒ… Ȱȱʦȵȯ’’‡”‡–”‡ʦ www.abakhan.co.uk ✔ ‡ƒ……—”ƒ–‡ʧ—–›‘—”…‘”•‡–’ƒ––‡”‹–™‘ •‡’ƒ”ƒ–‡Žƒ›‡”•ƒ†ƒ”ƒŽŽ–Š‡•‡ƒŽ‹‡•ʧŠ‡ •‡™‹‰ʦ•–‹…–‘–Š‡•‡”ƒ–Š‡”–Šƒ—•‹‰–Š‡‰—‹†‡ ‘›‘—”•‡™‹‰ƒ…Š‹‡ʧƒ”–Š‡™ƒ‹•–ƒ† •–‹–…Š‹‰Ž‹‡•‘–Š‡™”‘‰•‹†‡‘ˆ‡ƒ…Š‘ˆ›‘—” …‘”•‡–’ƒ‡Ž’‹‡…‡•ƒ†ƒ–…Šƒ––Š‡™ƒ‹•–ʧ ✔ –‹•‡ƒ•›–‘‰‡–›‘—”’ƒ‡Ž•—’•‹†‡†‘™ƒ† „ƒ…–‘ˆ”‘–™Š‹Ž‡›‘—ƒ”‡ƒ‹‰ƒ…‘”•‡– „‡…ƒ—•‡™Š‡…—–ʦ–Š‡›…ƒƒŽŽŽ‘‘”‡ƒ”ƒ„Ž› •‹‹Žƒ”ʭƒ‡•—”‡›‘—‡‡’ƒŽŽ›‘—”’ƒ‡Ž•‹ •‡’ƒ”ƒ–‡’‹Ž‡•ˆ‘”‡ƒ…Š•‹†‡ƒ†ƒ”–Š‡•‘›‘— ‘™™Š‹…Š™ƒ›—’–Š‡›ƒ”‡ʧ‡‡’–Š‡™‘”‹‰ ’ƒ––‡”–‘Šƒ†‹…ƒ•‡‘ˆ‹š—’•ʧ ✔ •™‹–ŠƒŽŽ•‡™‹‰ʦ‹–‹•‹’‘”–ƒ––‘’”‡•• your seams aft‡”•–‹–…Š‹‰ʧŠ‹•„‡†•–Š‡•–‹–…Š‡• ‹ʦƒ†‰‹˜‡•ƒ…Ž‡ƒƒ†•‘‘–ŠǤ‹•Šˆ‘” ˆ—”–Š‡”…‘•–”—…–‹‘ʧ‡˜‡”—•‡•–‡ƒƒ•›‘— ƒ›•Š”‹’ƒ‡Ž•™Š‹…Š™‹ŽŽ”‡•—Ž–‹ƒ˜‡”› —‡˜‡Ǥ‹•Šʧ

✔ •‡ƒ–‡”‹ƒŽ•™Š‹…Šƒ”‡†‡•‹‰‡†ˆ‘”…‘”•‡–”› ƒ†–‘‘Ž•™Š‹…Šƒ”‡”‡…‘‡†‡†ʧƒ› “—‹Ž–‹‰–‘‘Ž•ʦ–Š‡Ž‘˜‡”ƒ†”›„”ƒ†•‹ ’ƒ”–‹…—Žƒ”ʦƒ”‡‰‘‘†ʧ‘”•‡–”›ˆƒ„”‹…‹•…ƒŽŽ‡† …‘—–‹Žƒ†‹•ƒ†‡•‡„—–Ǥ‡…‘––‘™Š‹…Š‹• •’‡…‹ƒŽŽ›ƒ—ˆƒ…–—”‡†ˆ‘”’—”’‘•‡ʧŽ–‡”ƒ–‹˜‡Ž›ʦ …‘––‘…ƒ˜ƒ•…ƒ„‡ƒ‰‘‘†•—„•–‹–—–‡ƒ•Ž‘‰ ƒ•‹–‹•‰‘‘†“—ƒŽ‹–›ƒ†Šƒ•‘•–”‡–…Šʧ ✔ ‘ʤ–„‡ƒˆ”ƒ‹†–‘‡š’‡”‹‡–ʧŠ‡”‡ƒ”‡‘ •‡–”—Ž‡•–‘…‘”•‡–”›‘”†”‡••ƒ‹‰ƒ†ƒ‰‘‘† †‡•‹‰‡”ƒŽ™ƒ›•†‘‡•™Šƒ–Š‡ʵ•Š‡–Š‹•™‹ŽŽ ™‘”–‘ƒ…Š‹‡˜‡ƒ…‡”–ƒ‹‡ˆˆ‡…–ƒ†ƒ”‡‡˜‡ ƒˆ”ƒ‹†–‘‹‘˜ƒ–‡ʧš’‡”‹‡–ƒ–‹‘ƒ†’Žƒ› ™‹ŽŽŽ‡ƒ†›‘—–‘‰”‡ƒ–†‹•…‘˜‡”‹‡•ʦ‡˜‡‹ˆ–Šƒ– ‡ƒ•ʦʥŠƒ–†‹†ʤ–™‘”ʦ ʤŽŽ–”›‹–ƒ†‹ˆˆ‡”‡ ™ƒ›‡š––‹‡ʤʧ ‘”‘”‡‹ˆ‘”ƒ–‹‘ʦ˜‹•‹–www.sewcurvy.com ‘”www.schoolofcorsetry.com

If you are making a corset with a lace-up fastening, you will need to create eyelets in the fabric. 1 ƒ‡ƒ…Ž‡ƒŠ‘Ž‡‹–Š‡ ˆƒ„”‹…‹ƒ•‹œ‡•Ž‹‰Š–Ž› •ƒŽŽ‡”–Šƒ”‡“—‹”‡†ʧ •‡ƒ’—…Š’‘•–™‹–Š ƒŠƒ”†‡–ƒŽ•—”ˆƒ…‡ „‡‡ƒ–Š™‹–Š–Š‡”‹‰Š– •‹†‡‘ˆ–Š‡ˆƒ„”‹…—’’‡”‘•–ʧŽ–‡”ƒ–‹˜‡Ž›ʦ —•‡ƒ„‡Ž–Š‘Ž‡’—…Šʧ 2 —•Š–Š‡•Šƒ‘ˆ–Š‡ ‡›‡Ž‡––Š”‘—‰Š–Š‡Š‘Ž‡ ˆ”‘–Š‡”‹‰Š–•‹†‡ƒ†Ǥ– ‹–‘–Š‡…Žƒ’‹‰–‘‘Žʧ Žƒ’‘”Šƒ‡”‹’Žƒ…‡ †‡’‡†‹‰‘–Š‡–‘‘Ž–›’‡ ’”‘˜‹†‡†—–‹Ž–Š‡‡›‡Ž‡–‹••‡…—”‡‹–Š‡ˆƒ„”‹…ʧ 3 ””ƒ‰‡ƒ†Ǥ––Š‡ ‡›‡Ž‡–•ƒ•”‡“—‹”‡†‘ –Š‡’‹‡…‡‘ˆ…Ž‘–Š‹‰™‹–Š –Š‡•‘‘–Š•‹†‡‘–Š‡ ”‹‰Š–•‹†‡ʯ–‘’ʰʧ Complete Dressmaking Skills „›‘”ƒ‹‰Š– ʯȩȰȳʧȸȸʦ‡ƒ”…Š”‡••ʰ ‹•ƒ…‘’”‡Š‡•‹˜‡ ‰—‹†‡–‘‰ƒ”‡– ƒ‹‰–‡…Š‹“—‡•ʧ www.searchpress.com

The Rational Dress Society is formed in London, promoting less restrictive corsetry for women.

Whale boning became less plentiful and better quality steel is available.

Dior’s small-waisted ‘New Style’ sees the return of less extreme corsetry.

The corset challenge in the GBSB series three and the release of Disney’s Cinderella sees corset sales rise by 55%*

1881

1900s

1950s

2015

1860s

More emphasis on decoration including fine fabrics and embroidery.

1890s

Tight lacing becomes fashionable again and physicians release a warning about the harmful effects.

1920s

1980s

The boyish, waist-less fashion means corsetry is swapped for girdles and bras.

Madonna and fashion designer Jean Paul Gaultier bring corsets back in fashion.

ʷ‘—”…‡•ʨ™™™ʧ†ƒ‹Ž›ƒ‹Žʧ…‘ʧ—ƒ†Corsets Historical Patterns and Techniques „› ‹ŽŽƒŽ‡ʯȩȱȯʦƒ˜‹Ž‹‘ʰʧ


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Festive Finishing touches A Get ready to celebrate with these nifty and thrifty seasonal ideas

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t Homemaker we love nothing more then seeing something ordinary transformed into something beautiful, so imagine our excitement at the possibilities Christmas brings for getting all creative with the bits and bobs we’ve hoarded over the past 12 months. It’s time to raid the cupboards in search of the potential which lies within everyday finds. You might be surprised at what lovely things arise once you get to work with just a few store-cupboard materials and a little imagination! We certainly were when Kate Nicole presented us with their floating star garlands created from pages of a magazine, not to mention Jacqueline Tinney’s coordinating card and tag designs made using red and green paint sample strips. These simple ideas are perfect for preparing lots of cards and gifts at once, as they’re easy to recreate and don’t cost the earth. What’s more, they’ll give your gifts a homespun feel that’s personal to you and friends will love.

Big is Better

1 Bright Thinking Make little Christmas tree shapes by cutting triangles from paint sample strips, which you can pick up for free at most DIY stores. Do this by joining a triangle for the tree with a tiny rectangle for the trunk. Adhere onto brown card blanks and complete with a computer printed or rubber stamped greeting. To create a set of matching gift tags, make smaller tree shapes in the same way and glue onto blank luggage tags. Replace the existing string on the tag with striped bakers’ twine, or some coloured embroidery thread. 12

Using the template provided online or a paper punch, cut out 12 scalloped paper circles from a magazine, newspaper or old book pages. Pile the paper circles on top of the other and find the centre point. Using a craft knife, make a small slit through all the layers. Insert a split pin and open it out at the back to secure the layers together. Crumple and squash each layer in turn towards the centre. When all the sections are done, run your hands over the flower to open it out again.

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MAKE EASY DECORATIONS TO DRAPE FROM YOUR CEILING BY SNIPPING 'SNOWY' PAPER CHAINS FROM PLAIN WHITE PAPER

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Paper Star Garland

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Cut a star stencil out of stiff card. Select your paper and layer a few sheets together, making sure you are still able to cut through cleanly. Place your stencil on top, draw around and cut out. Repeat until you have approximately 30 shapes. Prepare your sewing machine with a festive thread. You will need to use a flat foot, so the shapes run through without puckering. Place a star under the foot and sew slowly, making sure the machine is running smoothly through the paper. Continue to stitch the stars, leaving a small gap between each one. Once you have sewn all the stars, cut two 20cm lengths of ribbon. Fold in half so that the ends are laying flat on the first and last motif, then sew the tabs into place.

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Washi tape is so versatile and comes in many brilliant colours and designs – you're sure to find a reel or two to match your festive scheme. Use it as you would ribbon to decorate everything from tags to gift wrap

QUICK MAKE Washi Tape Cards

Give Christmas a vintage twist by using old copies of your favourite books to make a quirky gift for a keen reader 14

“We never throw anything away, there is always something to be done with leftover and scrap pieces of paper! Use the remnants from your cut outs to create tiny flags, then sew together to make quaint paper bunting.” DESIGNER, KATE NICOLE

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Stick strips of red and green washi tape to a rectangle of brown card (from recycled packaging), then cut out simple Christmas tree shapes so that the washi tape strips runs horizontally. Glue the tree shapes onto the front of white card blanks and print or stamp a Christmas greeting below the motif.

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Secrets to a perfectly wrapped gift... Take heed of these top tips for professional parcels every time •Don’t leave wrapping until the last minute. Wrap gifts as you go, but leave the embellishments until later. Keep track of whose gift is whose by popping on sticky notes. •Select a colour scheme for all your wrapping materials so that the gifts you give will have your signature. •When it comes to wrapping gifts like a pro, double-sided tape is an absolute must as it sticks well and stays hidden. •Arm yourself with other essential tools including a rotary cutter for quick, even cuts, a sturdy ruler and a self-healing cutting mat. •When wrapping boxes, be careful not to use too much paper as it leads to bulky, unattractive folds.

Go online to find the instructions and templates for our paper stars at www.homemakermagazine.co.uk 16

Profile for Stephanie Durrant

Stephanie Durrant Craft Portfolio  

Style at Home / Ideal Home / Country Homes & Interiors / The Craft Network Sewing / Woman's Weekly / Sew / Homemaker

Stephanie Durrant Craft Portfolio  

Style at Home / Ideal Home / Country Homes & Interiors / The Craft Network Sewing / Woman's Weekly / Sew / Homemaker

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