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Ocean City May 2013

Shopping•Dining•Events•History and More in America’s Greatest Family Resort


The region’s most convenient healthcare. Prompt care when you need it.

• For any minor medical emergency • Professional services include X-rays, stitches and splints on-site • Board-certified doctors • No appointment needed • Same-day laboratory testing • Personal callbacks – because we truly care about our patients • Speedy electronic prescribing to your pharmacy

• Exceptional primary care for your whole family

• Minimal wait times with no appointment necessary

• Convenient hours

• Skilled and caring staff

• Specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of various illnesses and chronic health conditions

• Horizon preferred provider

• Most major insurance plans accepted • New patients welcome Somers Point 235 Shore Road, Suite C

• Follow-up care coordinated through our Preferred Provider Network of primary care physicians and specialists

Marmora Hope Medical Commons 210 South Shore Road, Suite 201

• Most major insurance plans and credit/debit cards accepted

~ Reopening in June ~ Ocean City 201 West Avenue

• AtlantiCare Fast Pass service offered at all locations (call 609-407-7770 to pre-register) Somers Point 443 Shore Road, Suite 103 Sun. – Sat.: 9 a.m. – 8 p.m. Memorial Day Weekend: Fri., May 26 – Mon., May 27: 9 a.m. – 10 p.m. Marmora Hope Medical Commons 210 South Shore Rd, Suite 201 Mon. – Fri.: 5 p.m. – 9 p.m. Sat. & Sun.: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. 609-407-2273 Call for holiday hours.

www.atlanticarephysiciangroup.com

1-888-569-1000

• Hospital expertise Somers Point 443 Shore Road, Suite 105 Mon. – Fri.: 7:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Marmora Hope Medical Commons 210 South Shore Road, Suite 200 Mon. – Fri.: 7 a.m. – 3 p.m. ~ Reopening in June ~ Ocean City 201 West Avenue 1-888-569-1000


Notes from the Beach

from the editor’s desk

Letter to the editor

Ocean City Tide Over

I just renewed my subscription to Ocean City magazine, sort of my “hometown paper.” I subscribed to the actual newspaper, the SentinelLedger for years. For me, this magazine subscription will once more be as close as I get to my beloved “home” resort town for yet another year. Ocean City magazine issues, each online of issue Patch and my daily

stop at the online beachcam sites help tide me over – pun intended – in the absence of an actual visit! - Sherry Thompson via Facebook What’s on YOUR mind? Send a Letter to the Editor, editor@ ocnjmagazine.com or P.O. Box 63, Marmora, NJ 08223 or post on our facebook page, www.facebook.com/oceancitymagazine.

photo caption contest

T

Hello Spring

here’s a moment every spring when I remember that I live at the beach. That might sound silly to many of you (how can you forget), but when it’s cold and windy, the beach seems far far away. Until that one day, when the sun’s rays warm your skin to the point of a smile. When you walk up those famed wooden planks on that spring day and see the Atlantic waving hello, you remember. I live at the beach. How lucky. The best part is no matter where you live, the beach welcomes you and the people of Ocean City welcome you because we want everyone to feel our warm sea breezes and soft sands. The beach inspires calm, laughter and relaxation and we all need those more often than we think.

Ocean City is ready for your stay. Almost all businesses affected by Sandy are primed, primped and pleased to welcome customers back. Stop in and visit the shops, restaurants, and service businesses you see in this issue. Many worked hard to be able to say hello to you this spring. In this issue, there are a couple new things (I love new!) and a few returning faves. Meet the family behind Big Bad Dad’s Jams and Jellies, see what inspires local Eric Reich to be a Big Brother, and read the first chapter of Olive and Bean, an epistolary story from our writer, Kelly Tjoumakaris. Let us know your thoughts about OC during or after your visit, and on this issue. Send an email to editor@ ocnjmagazine.com or follow us on Facebook: Ocean City Magazine.

Ocean City

Editor Stefanie Godfrey, editor@ocnjmagazine.com sales director Bill Godfrey, localocean@comcast.net editorial assistant Kelly Tjoumakaris artist Marie Natale Photographer Pam Leypoldt Published by Gone Native Communications, Inc.

Tell us what you think the caption should be for a chance to win! Send your answer for a chance to win a free subscription to OC magazine and a 2013 Ocean City Guidebook! Please send your caption (no more than 30 words) to editor@ocnjmagazine.com or P.O. Box 63, Marmora, NJ 08223. All answers must be received by May 15. Winner will be chosen on May 16 and published in the June 2013 issue.

Ocean City magazine is published six times a year. 4,000 copies are distributed all around Ocean City and its surrounding communities. To get an annual subscription for $21.40, call (609) 675-0867 or visit www.ocnjmagazine.com/subscribe. Copies are available at many island locations: Please visit us online at www. ocnjmagazine.com for the list.

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Contents

Letter to the Editor 3 Notes from the Editor 3 Photo Caption Contest 3 In the Kitchen 5 Food Wars 7 Down Home 8 The Dining Guide 10 Famished Foodie 12

Rock on Climbing up on the jetty is part of so many kids coming-of-age story. It’s classic OC and it’s captured here perfectly by Laura Kiniry, whose lovely writings have been on these pages and are now seen in Travel & Leisure, Popular Mechanics, Nat Geo and Oprah’s blog to name a few. Photo by Laura Kiniry

Snapshots 14, 16, 20 Say What? 15 Six Questions 17 Events Calendar 18 It’s History 21 Stars of the Shore 22 Ocean City Style 25 The Look 25

OC Must Haves 26 The Shopping Guide 28 Trends 30 Piering into the Future 34 Olive and Bean 38 OC Beach Guide 40 Books by the Beach 41

Activities Guide 41 Word Search 42 Ocean’s Eleven 44 Volunteer 45 Artisan 45 Real Tours 46 Health and Beauty 47 Last Shot 50


Shore Eats Food Wars 7 / Down Home 8 / Dining Guide 10 / Famished Foodie 12

in the kitchen

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nitially, it was the man’s name that intrigued me. Philippe Chin – those three syllables contained more gastronomic intrigue than the dinner menu aboard the Orient Express. I knew that I needed to interview this chef at the first available opportunity. Luckily, the May issue of Ocean City magazine rolled around and I was on the phone like hollandaise on benedict. I beat feet over to his place on Bay Avenue - 800 Bay by Philippe - and I got what I expected. His accent was thick

Philippe Chin of 800 Bay by Philippe and his black hair was thicker. A giant diamond glittered in his left ear and his pores oozed the essence of a classically-trained French chef. And in case you’ve never heard of the man, Chin is an awardwinning, Parisian-trained chef who attended L’Ecole Hoteliere de Paris, Rue Mederic (Google it) and graduated with honors before working at some of the finest restaurants in the world. And he rides a Harley. But he assured me that “there’s no need to fear” his menu (admit it, true French restaurants can be intimidating),

after all this is the Shore and you need to relax. “There’s something for everyone here, kids too.” OC mag: I can tell you weren’t born in Jersey. Chef Philippe: I was born in France, in Paris. I’ve been in the states for 25-26 years. OC: How long have you been in Somers Point and where were you previously? CP: I’ve been in Somers Point about a year. We opened for Bay Fest last year so it’ll be a year at Bay Fest. Just before that I was in upstate New York, in Saratoga

may 2013

Springs. OC: And how did you wind up here? CP: I spent 15 years in Philadelphia so when I sold the restaurant in Saratoga Springs I was looking for either two things – coming back to Philadelphia or be somewhere near the ocean. This place came up and I thought “it’s an hour from Philly and it’s on the ocean so why not.” OC: What were you doing in Philly? CP: I first came here and started in West Chester. A friend knew a friend that was starting a place and

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In the Kitchen I heard he was looking for someone so I came to check it out. I was supposed to stay for six months and I’ve been here 25 years. I used to be at the Rittenhouse Hotel – I opened the Rittenhouse. Then I had Chanterelles at 13th and Spruce. Then I had Chin-Chin, Philippe on Locust at 16th and Locust and then I moved south, to Augusta, Georgia in 2001. OC: Chef ’s have a reputation as wanderers. CP: I love travelling and discovering new places and you have to go where the opportunity is. OC: How did you come to be a chef ? CP: One day I was 12 years old and taking the subway in Paris, going to a movie. I saw a friend of mine – he was 16 or 17 and had a big suitcase and was in a suit and I said “where you going?” He said “I’m going to school.” I asked what kind of school you go to all dressed with that big suitcase. He said “I’ve got my knives, my chef ’s jacket – I’m going to restaurant school.” That night I went home after the movie and told mom and dad I’m going

to be a chef. They said “yeah right, yesterday you were going to be a fireman.” But I never changed my mind. OC: So your training is… CP: Obviously classic French. But I do infuse Asian influences because of my influences. Both my mom and dad cooked. My mom

summer I saw so many people I hadn’t seen in ten years. It’s been great. People come in and say “Hey! Do you remember me?!” and it’s just “Ahhhhhh!” OC: And how’s it going? CP: So far so good. Last summer was great. This first winter was a little rough – it was rough for

We’ve got everything from a great burger to Chilean sea bass and lobster. And great steaks too. There’s a little bit for everybody. - Chef Philippe, 800 Bay by Philippe

cooked – as a mom – and made the classic country-French dishes. My dad was Chinese and he was in the Vietnam War, so he did a lot of Chinese and Vietnamese cooking on the weekend. There’s French and southeast Asian ingredients in my cooking. I do food that I grew up with. OC: So did you see some old friends from Philadelphia after you arrived here? CP: Absolutely. It’s been fun. Last

everybody and the weather didn’t help at all, so right now we’re just waiting for the season to start. OC: So is the menu classic French? CP: No. You know, this is a good American restaurant. It’s down the Shore, so I wanted to create simple food with some Asian influence and a little French influence. We’ve got everything from a great burger to Chilean sea bass and lobster. We’re on the ocean and we use what we’ve got. The best scallops

in America come from the Jersey Shore, so we’ve got great scallops. And great steaks too. There’s a little bit for everybody. Down here you’ve got a lot of families, so we’ve got stuff for kids. It’s not a place to be afraid of. It’s a beautiful restaurant that’s down-the-shore casual and fun. OC: I know chefs work long hours but what do you do when you’re not working? CP: My favorite is the ocean. I’ve got a jet-ski, I go fishing, I go clamming, I ride my bike on the Boardwalk in Ocean City. I enjoy the sun. It’s great. OC: Have you tried the local fare? Pizza, popcorn? CP: Of course! I’ve had all that, it’s fun. 800 Bay by Philippe is open seven days in the summer. For reservations, call (609) 926-3500.       

Open Year rOund! Gluten Free Menu Available

E Y ME X

BAKED FRESH EVERYDAY

Get for Breakfast

FAIR TRADE ORGANIC COFFEE

Bearclaws, Cheese Danish, Apple Turnovers, Scones, Cheesecakes Catering any size events or Individual Desserts parties • Wholesale restaurants • custom cakes, cookies, shortbreads, cupcakes, & pies • 24hr notice for specialty birthday cakes & pies

Monday 8-5, Tuesday Thursday 8-5:30, Friday & Saturday 8-6, Sunday Closed www.baked-pastryshop.com

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609 390.0515

J

32 Tuckahoe Rd Marmora, NJ

S ER C A F E

) ojo’s rly R 004 e m r 2 (Fo lished b Esta

Tacos, Burritos, Platters, & More

Great Jersey Fresh Mexican Cuisine Fresh Salads Vegetarian Dishes Seafood

eat in, take Out, Free parking, Free deliverY WIFI

Cash Only ATM

11th St. & Haven Ave • 609-399-2272

w w w. r e d s j e r s ey m ex . c o m


Food Wars

Battle Ice Cream Johnny B Goode

George’s Candies

1363 Asbury/34th & west

700 boardwalk

She said

There’s something to be said about an ice cream parlor that makes you feel like you should be wearing a poodle skirt and cherry red lipstick. Okay, perhaps that’s going a little too, she doop shooby doop, far, but Johnny B is a destination, a place to bring the entire family where you can sit, relax and enjoy an entire menu of ice cream treats. There are two locations, and both are off the Boardwalk. Read – no further distractions if you are looking to just sugar up and relax afterward at home. Johnny B offers entertainment all summer - good stuff, like magic shows and karaoke, so the kids are engaged and you can be too. Either in that version of “My Boyfriend’s Back” or in the waffles and ice cream sitting right in front of you. Ayyyyy. (that’s my Fonz, for those of you who were, like, born yesterday or something.) - Jill

He said

The ice cream experience at George’s begins the moment I step onto the Boardwalk on warm summer night. Hey, it’s summer, I’m on the boards – does it get better? But before I even get to 700 Boardwalk there’s some fun to be had. First pizza. Or perhaps Huli Fries. This is followed by kettlekorn or popcorn – this portion of my gastric journey depends on which amusement pier I’m closest to. Then it’s on to the ice cream, to finish what a friend has dubbed “the trifecta” – any three Boardwalk treats of your liking. And the stroll towards George’s is filled with anticipation. Often they have a storybook character out front – Cinderella perhaps. Finally there’s the ice cream. George’s makes some mean ice cream and I look forward to it every summer. Try my recipe for “the trifecta” and finish at George’s. You’ll thank me. - Jack

Serving dinners on weekends starting May 3

Monday-Saturday 7:30aM-3pM

(609) 399-3377

Open 7 Days a Week

637 asbury ave may 2013

Sunday 7:30aM-2pM

www.jonandpattys.com

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Down Home Pasta party Stefanie Godfrey takes on fresh ingredients, fun friends, and delish dishes

Pasterity Clockwise from left: fresh spinach pasta laid out in ribbons; forming little pasta nests helps save space (use lots of flour to prevent sticking); Amy Rihl rolling the dough out in sheets; Strawberries drizzled in balsamic vinegar; Kiesha Bond about to taste; The finished product; Shrimp on the stove simmering.

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ometimes a little luck comes your way. And come my way it did when I thought about having some friends over for a pasta-making party. Yes, these are actual thoughts I have. Hey, I’m the product of two Italian parents. I speak loud and with my hands, I get, he hem, a little heated sometimes, and I think about pasta. But not just any pasta. Homemade pasta, or as my red, white, and green clan simply calls it: homemades. So, how exactly did lady luck shine on me? In the name of Amy Rihl. Amy is my neighbor, friend, foodie extraordinaire and the co-owner of the Hula Restaurant and Sauce Company with her husband Dave. And if you’ve ever eaten at Hula, you know they are over achievers when it comes to preparing delish dishes. When I asked Amy to come over and make pasta that day, I thought we would literally do just that. Crank out some dough, roll it through the machine - end of story. Not bloody likely. Amy walked through the door on time and with a shopping bag in tow. “I brought our lunch,” she said. I was dumbfounded. “Well, what were we going to do, just make pasta and not eat it?” she asked. Well, clearly not. Cue lips pursed to the left with an eye roll to the right. A few minutes later, our mutual friend, photographer Kiesha Bond came through the glass door, a whirlwind of general mommy, businesswomanness. Kiesha runs both a photography business, Oceanbleu Photography and a jewelry biz, called

Simply Vintage. Oh and she has three kids. Three. Since we all only had a couple hours, we got straight to work. We had two pasta doughs happening. I made a typical dough and Amy brought a spinach dough she had made at home. We went with the green. I use a hand-crank pasta machine. So, we bolted it to the kitchen island and started to roll. Soon enough, there were bright green sheets covering the entire island, like an aerial view of bright fields. Amy picked a fettuccine cut, so we ran it through after a quick debate over the thickness. If you speak pasta machine, we chose #5. As Kiesha and I cranked and cut the pasta into pretty ribbons, Amy began to saute the fresh shrimp. There are plenty of spots in and around OC to pick some up, such as Spadafora’s on 9th. Pretty soon, the water was at a rollin’ boil, the pasta took a dive, and the shrimp met with the tomatoes and garlic. Once the meal was complete, it looked like it belonged in a magazine. Isn’t it ironic? Dontcha think? Actually, it was decided a little after Amy came over that we should cover this as a new feature in Ocean City magazine. Cooking at home with friends, using fresh, local ingredients is really fun. And when you alternate between going out, it’s the best of both worlds. For dessert, I sliced up strawberries and drizzled them with a strawberry balsamic vinegar I picked up on my last trip down south. “Those are the best things ever.” said Kiesha. I couldn’t agree more. Till our next Down Home Date, happy eating!

Shrimp & Pasta Spinach Pasta 1 cup fresh baby spinach, washed and dried completely 1 tsp salt 2 tbsp olive oil Using a food processor pulse first three ingredients until pureed. Add 5 eggs and pulse again until combined. Add 3 cups of flour and pulse. Remove from processor and add more flour to your counter or board and knead until it is no longer sticky, adding more flour as needed (about 7 to 10 minutes.) Form into a smooth ball, wrap in plastic wrap and let rest at room temp for at least 30 minutes. Using a hand crank pasta machine, run a small portion of the dough through several times on the #1 setting. Use the #5 setting for the final pass. Once all the dough is sheeted, run through the fettuccine cutter. Lay out the strands to dry. Dust them with flour. Shrimp, Spinach Fettuccine, and Tomato Pasta 2 gloves garlic, minced 3 tbsp olive oil 1 cup whole cherry tomatoes 1 cup fresh baby spinach leaves 1 dozen cleaned shrimp, tail intact 1/2 cup reserved pasta water 3/4 cup pecorino romano, or parmesan cheese Saute shrimp in olive oil, add tomatoes and garlic. When shrimp are finished cooking and pink add pasta water and cook 1 more minute. Remove from heat and add cheese and spinach leaves. Toss sauce over pasta and season with salt and pepper. Serve and enjoy!

- recipe courtesy of Amy Rihl, Hula Restaurant & Sauce Company

daily specials cheesesteaks, hoagies, burgers wraps pick up or delivery 44 route 9 MarMora, NJ

kirkspizza.com

609-390-1845

OPENING MAY 10 AT 4:30PM! Serving Friday and Saturday: 4:30-9:30pm Sunday -Thursday: 4:30-9pm Fresh seafood at terrific prices! Serving daily specials & chowders. A bayside restaurant with waterfront views and a nice breeze. The Clam Bar is a great place to sit, but there’s room inside too. Great for families.

Personal Care and Companion Services Hourly and Live In Specialists

910 Bay Avenue, Somers Point may 2013

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Shore Eats The Dining Guide Oh happy day... it’s May! That means the restaurant scene in OC is happening. pizza/bread/rolls BENNIE’S BREAD AND ROLLS Magnificent bread, Italian pastries, cakes, and tomato pie. 1159 Asbury Avenue, 398-9450. See ad page 7. Kirk’s Pizza This pizza place is always busy. We love the chicken cheesesteak with mushrooms and the white pizza. 44 Route 9, Marmora. 390-1845. See ad page 9. MANCO & MANCO PIZZA OC icon. Three locations on the Boards. 7th, 9th, and 12th Streets, 399-2548. PREP’S PIZZERIA AND DAIRY BAR Great thin-crust. Sandwiches and salads too. Plus an ice cream bar! 1004 Boardwalk, 398-0636. Call for hours.

GLOBAL CUISINE/ SEAFOOD Cinco De Mayo Awesome authentic Mexican food. B, L, D. Try the Chiles Rellenos. 1039 West Avenue, 399-0199. Fajita pictured to the right. The Clam Bar Fresh seafood right on the bay. 910 Bay, Somers Point, 9278783. See ad page 9. cousin’s Varied and sophisticated menu. Outside dining, catering too. 104 Asbury, 399-9462. Emily’s Ocean Room High tea all summer long, Breakfast and lunch year round. 11th & Boardwalk, 398-5700. HULA Restaurant and Sauce Company Tasty Hawaiian cuisine. One of the best in town. 940 Boardwalk, 399-2400. See ad next page. jon & patty’s Healthy, creative bistro fare. 637 Asbury Avenue, 3993377. See ad page 7. THE PINK PARROT GRILLE Great ocean views, good food, kid friendly. 1510 Boardwalk, 399-8812. RED’S JERSEY-MEX Superior Mexi/ Southwest food. Gluten-free menu. 11th and Haven, 399-2272. See ad page 6.

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UNCLE BILL’S PANCAKE HOUSE Legendary breakfasts, lunches. 2112 Asbury, 40th and West, 398-7393. voltaco’s You know a place is good when you count down the days until it opens again for the spring. Amazing Italian food. 957 West Avenue, 399-0753. YIANNI’S CAFE Fresh, delicious and Greek-inspired. 841 Asbury & 1735 Simpson, 391-1113.

COFFEE/sweets Aunt Betty’s Ice Cream Shack Seriously fresh ice cream. Even treats for your doggies. 2100 Asbury; 40th & West. 398-4001; 398-4005. BAKED Pastry SHOP Our fave? The Coreo. It’s a supersized, superdelished hand-crafted Oreo. 32 Tuckahoe Rd, Marmora. 226-6859. See ad page 6. Cathy’s 14th Street Bakery Crazy good donuts and yummy cakes. 838 Asbury, 525-2100 Donuts pictured to the right. Crazy Susan’s Cookies She’s crazy but that’s good for us cookie lovers because her crazy means a rock and rollercoaster for your tastebuds. 1345 West, 391-1919. GEORGE’S Fantastic breakfasts, even better macaroons. Ice cream too. 700 Boardwalk, 398-4444. Johnny B Goode Waffles, ice cream, family entertainment. 14th and Asbury, 525-0646 & 34th and West, next to Hoy’s, 525-0648. Johnson’s Popcorn Part of the original OC Trifecta. This corn is legend. This year try something other than the caramel. Actually, in addition to. C’mon, we know you can’t resist the caramel. 1368 Boardwalk, (800) 842-2676. KB’s Kettle Korn Sometimes you feel a little sweet, sometimes a little salty. Now you can be both. 600 Boardwalk, Wonderland Pier, 646-7069. Pictured to the right.

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OCEAN CITY COFFEE COMPANY The perfect cup of coffee. Fresh noshes too. 928 Boardwalk, 917 Asbury, 399-5533. Wards Pastry Butter cookies and some delish sticky buns! 730 Asbury, 399-1260. Who’s on First Cafe Scones, breads, delightful lunches and coffees. 100 Asbury, 399-0764 Yoasis The inside of this Downtown eatery looks as good as the froyo tastes. 838 Asbury, 525-2100. Froyo pictured to the right.

BURGERS/FRIES/CRABCAKES/CHEESESTEAKS CHATTERBOX RESTAURANT Legendary. Great burgers and shakes. 500 9th Street, 399-0113. See ad page 13. DEL’S OCEANSIDE GRILL Menu is time-tested and sure to please adults and kiddies alike. 934 Boardwalk, 399-3931. Flippers Grill Outside at PortO-Call Hotel. Burgers, etc. 1510 Boardwalk, 399-8812. JAY’S CRABSHACK Awesome crabcakes, kid friendly. 737 Asbury, 399-4022. Year round. Jilly’s With an ice cream and a french fry factory you can’t go wrong. Ice cream, 1172 Boardwalk. Fries, 1034 Boardwalk. READY’S COFFEE SHOP Really good old school diner. 415 8th Street, 399-4418.


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Famished Foodie katina’s gyro restaurant

I

could say “opa!” But I won’t. What I will say is that the family - Apollonia, Michael, Sonny and I went to Katina’s Gyro Restaurant at 9th and Central and had a meal fit for Zeus himself. I’ve always considered Katina’s as being cut from a different cloth than most OC eateries. It’s no secret that we’re famous for our Boardwalk fare, but there are several little hidden jewels on the island and Katina’s is one of them. Katina’s has a Greek flare to it with gyros, kabobs and falafel and such. But if you’re thinking this is an exotic menu meant for adventurous eaters, relax. Katina’s has built a big following, especially among the locals, by simply making delicious meals. It pays to know your way around Ocean City and I know two things about Katina’s: they’re open year round and the locals really like the food. So I knew that it would

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Al Dente gets to the Greek be a good idea to get there early for dinner, before the rush, if we wanted time to explore the place (sure enough, the place was filling up as we finished. On a Tuesday. In April. That says something). Katina’s storefront is modest and easy to miss if you’re not looking. Inside it’s clean with big windows offering nice views of the street (which I like). The seating is intimate. The dining room is not very big, but there’s enough elbow room if you’re dining in as we did. But I also noticed a brisk take-out business as we were eating. We got our choice of seats and our server Matt Stark was as friendly as could be. We were all pretty hungry though and got right to business ordering hot dogs and french fries for the kids (what else). Apollonia and I started with the baba ghanoush. Before I go any further let me express how fun it is to order at Katina’s. We all had no problem repeating baba ghanoush over and over (until it got old).

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Later we had fun with the baklava, but more on that later. Baba ghanoush (hehe – it just rolls off the tongue so comically) is an eggplant-based dish with the texture of paté. It reminded me of hummus, but it had a delicate spice to it that made it very flavorful. Served with warm pita bread it was gone shortly after its arrival. “It’s so light,” remarked Apollonia. “Like a fluffy little cloud.” On to the entrees. I ordered a gyro (is it Jai-ro or hero?) – a Greek sandwich served with the contents wrapped in a pita and delivered to your table enclosed in foil to keep it warm. Apollonia order a full-on falafel platter, which was another Greek sandwich but with side dishes including stuffed grape leaves, spinach pie, calamata olives and feta cheese served on a bed of greens (we shared the side dishes. Apollonia is much too delicate to eat all that herself ). I’ve had Katina’s Greek sandwiches before

and I’ve never been disappointed. They’re packed with meat (I had the chicken), the lettuce and tomatoes are fresh and I adore the sauce that they drizzle on top. The falafel sandwich consisted of deep-fried balls made from ground chick-peas that Apollonia described simply as “delicious.” We had a lovely time. The boys were (mostly) well-behaved and ate almost their entire meal (which is somewhat surprising because there’s always the possibility they’ll turn the food into ammunition for a food fight at any moment). The fries were crispy and goldenbrown, and the hot dogs must have been good because they both ate them right up. Conversation flowed, the boys colored, compliments about the food flowed and we all smiled. I consider that a nice success for a family dinner in a restaurant. On to dessert! Did we order ice cream? We could have, but c’mon, we were on


a roll with the Greek dishes so we went with the baklava. We were back to repeating baklava over and over (until someone asked for it to stop). Poor Apollonia was unsure saying, “I don’t think I like baklava.” But when in a Greek restaurant… To her great surprise Apollonia loved the baklava. It’s a sweet combination of honey, brown sugar, ground walnuts and spices ensconced in delicate phyllo dough that sent Apollonia over the moon (or at least over the Parthenon). “Awesome” was her description. We sat for a moment in a full-bellied silence before we realized that diners were streaming in and we should make room for the next soonto-be-happy crew. Don’t wait till you’re tired of Boardwalk fare. Put Katina’s near the top of your dining list and I think you’ll be happy you did. And when you walk away happy, please don’t say “opa.” Although we did. We couldn’t help it. (Baba ghanoush!)

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Snapshots by the Shore

Having an OC event? Share your pics with Ocean City magazine! Email editor@ocnjmagazine.com for details.

nssa north east conference championships

Larry Schmidt and Nick Bricker

Ryland Bricker

Charlie and Caroline Bowman

Lisa McGuigan and Cheryl Edwards

Cool competitor catching a wave

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Group making their way in


Local Ocean say what? OC mag investigates local claims to fame

E

Jackey Daily, Jilly’s Arcade

very town has a few cool people who can do cool things. In Aspen for instance, you’ll definitely find some folks who can do wild things on skis and snowboards. In Hawaii, you’ll find big-wave surfers who risk life and limb on super-sized swells. So what kind of cool person would you expect to find in Ocean City? Someone who’s rolled a perfect game in skeeball, that’s who. Jackey Daily, a money-changer and resident skee-ball aficionada at Jilly’s Arcade on the Boardwalk, got my attention years ago when I happened to spy her playing skee-ball and racking up big scores, all while using a most unusual technique: Jackey launches her skee-

good skeer

Top: Jackey Daily just after one of her rapid-release skee ball throws. Bottom: Jackey pauses between games. Got a cool claim to fame? A fabulous hidden talent? Let OC magazine know by sending an email to editor@ocnjmagazine.com.

balls in rapid-fire succession, one after the other. I found this strategy to be utterly fascinating, totally at odds with more traditional players who pause to aim before releasing the ball, and utterly impossible for me to master. Regardless of her technique, she’s really good. Good enough to roll a perfect 900 – that’s nine straight skee balls into the 100-point hole (and witnessed by a colleague at Jilly’s). And good enough to school Stefi “Boardwalk Games” Godfrey, the editor of this mag and a pretty fair player in her own right. To get a free game, you need to score 280 points. Jackey was averaging about 420 or so the night we chatted and was easily getting a free game every time she played. Chew on that for a bit. Ocean City magazine : How long have you been playing skee-ball? Jackey: About ten years. I’ve been working here at Jilly’s for about 14 years. OC: Do you have any secrets you can share with us for skee-ball success? Jackey: No (laughs). OC: You can’t share ANY secrets? Jackey: No (laughs again). OC mag: How did you get so good? Jackey: Lots and lots of practice. OC mag: So what’s with that rapid-fire technique? Jackey: I don’t know, it’s just the way I do it. OC mag: Do you always aim for the 100-point hole? Is that a good strategy? Jackey: I do. I don’t always make it but I usually get a pretty good score anyway. OC mag: Do you ever lose? Jackey: Of course. Sometimes. OC mag: Do you have a favorite machine? Jackey: Not really, I can play on any of them. OC mag: Do you get strangers who come in and want to play you? Jackey: For sure. Sometimes people will see me playing… OC mag: and they want to take you on? Jackey: And they’ve lost. OC mag: What do you like to do when you’re not playing skee-ball? Jackey: Play Bejeweled.

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Snapshots by the Shore

Want to purchase one of the photos on our pages? Go to ocnjmagazine.com/shop or send an email to editor@ocnjmagazine.com.

downtown at the doo dah parade

16

The Mollusk himself - Martin Z.

Hannah Knapp with Emily

Samantha Vigliotti with Buttercup

John Lepore, John Pflugfelder, Suzanne T, and Samantha Brydges with Emma and Mysabella

Karen with Buddy Kohl

Billy, Casey, and Morgan McLees with Eddie

ocnjmagazine.com may 2013


Six Questions Gam broadley Kelly Tjoumakaris meets up with the local legend

ooh rah

Gam Broadley, the founder of Broadley’s Plumbing, is a former Marine with deep ties to Ocean City. His parents arrived in OC in 1907.

I

n a jam, call Gam!” This is the mantra of Gam Broadley, now 88 and a local champion, formerMarine, community philanthropist, business leader and just an all around helper of humanity. One of the greats, if I may say so. I met him at Broadley’s, the plumbing business he built. When I showed up to meet him, he was in his well decorated uniform and spoke of how he would spend his Memorial Day; like every other with the Color Guard of the Dramis Marine Corps League at the Memorial Day Service at Veterans Memorial Park. Your roots to Ocean City are deep, how far do they go back? My parents came to Ocean City from England in 1907. I was born at 731 Asbury Avenue on September 7, 1924. I graduated from Ocean City High School in 1942. From a very young age, I worked many jobs all around town. What is your favorite memory regarding Ocean City? We lived across the street from Wards Bakery and my brother worked there. At the end of each day Wards would give out a bag of leftover baked goods and my brother and I would

distribute it to those who could use it. That felt good. But Ocean City is also where I met Betty, my wife. She worked at a photo shop on Asbury and later told me the first time she saw me, she said to herself, “Your fate is sealed.” I met her at the Playland skating rink on 6th and the Boardwalk, where I worked. Her initials were B.O. and my nickname was Feet, so on my skate box, it said, “Feet B.O.” You are a former-Marine and long standing member of the Marine Corps League. What is your fondest Marine memory? It was early summer in 1942 and I was stationed at 3rd and Constitutional Avenue in Washington D.C. when Prime Minister Winston Churchill came to meet with President Franklin Roosevelt. The British Marines stayed with us at the barracks. That was something. On the contrary, on transport to Pacific, I was on guard duty on a troop ship- well, not being a sea-bearing man and weighted down with equipment, I got sick. In my helmet. But there was a fellow Marine who helped me out. You have done so much for the community. Your civic engagement is a long and distinguished list. What drives you to give back to the community?

When I was growing up, we got a lot of help from a lot of local people. It is the reason we are in business. With all the help I have had in my life, from the help getting jobs to the boy scouts… it is what should be. How did you come to follow in your father’s footsteps in the plumbing business? My father came to Ocean City in 1907 because he was told there was plumbing work. He found work with the Hans Burkardt Co. but passed away in 1928. When I returned from service I got a job with the Ocean City Police Force, but my wife, Betty, did not like the hours I spent away from home. So, I became an apprentice for Hans Burkardt. When I completed my time, I got my plumbers license, bought a truck for $50 and opened up Broadley’s Plumbing in 1953. (looking very shy) I am proud. Those people downstairs (reffering to his children and grandchildrenmuch of the staff at Broadley’s)…I told them at a very young age “You want to eat, you gotta work”. The rest is history. Do you really have a collection of chamber pots? Oh, yeah, I do [have a collection of chamber pots]. When they outlaw indoor plumbing, everyone will have to come to me.

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mayevents 2 Martin Z. Mollusk Day Come and find out if summer is coming early, 11am at the 9th Street Beach. For more information, call (609) 525-9300.

18 American Heart Association HeartWalk Registration begins at 9am at the Sports & Civic Center, 6th & Boardwalk, walk begins at 10:30am.

2 Open Mic Night Presented by the OC Repertory Theater every Thursday in May at 7pm in the Ocean City Library. Come to perform or listen, relax and have a cup of coffee or tea.

18 Saturday Afternoon Movie Come watch Les Miserables in the Ocean City Library at 2pm.

4 Spring Block Party 9am-5pm from 5th – 14th Street on Asbury. Over 350 crafters, food vendors, music and more. Asbury Avenue merchant sidewalk sales May 5, 11am-4pm. 4 Saturday Afternoon Movie The Impossible, 2pm in the Ocean City Library. The Impossible: An account of a family caught, with tens of thousands of strangers, in the mayhem of one of the worst natural catastrophes of our time. 5 MS Walk Registration begins 9am at the Sports and Civic Center, 6th & Boardwalk. Walk begins at 10am. 5 Live Jazz Concert Also performed on the following two Sundays in May. Performance is at 2pm. Presented by Michael Pedicin and the Somers Point Jazz Society. Contact Karen G. Mahar at (609) 399-2434 x 5238 for more information. 7 Family Craft Time Every Tuesday in May from 6:30-7:30pm at the Ocean City Library. 10 meet the artist reception: Mary Ann Kline Come and meet Mary Ann Kline at the Ocean City Arts Center from 7-8:30pm.

18 & 19 “Four at the Shore” Treasure Hunt Join the Northeast’s largest treasure hunting club at the Ocean City Music Pier, Moorlyn Terrace and Boardwalk to compete in a series of metal detector hunts for great prizes. Special “kids hunt” on Saturday. No experience needed. Loaner detectors will be available for kids. Entrants can sign up at www.ecrda.net or at the Music Pier on Saturday. Registration starts at $95 for adults, kids (up to age 13) pay just $4. For more information, call (732) 276-8251. 19 Ocean City Triathlon/Duathlon Quarter mile swim, 2M run/16M Bike/2M run. Plus a kids course. Swim starts 6-8am. Run/Bike/Run starts 9am. 24 Unlocking of the Ocean and Business Persons Plunge Participants dress in business suits, carry brief cases and march into the ocean to the strains of Pomp and Circumstance to welcome the new season at noon, Moorlyn Terrace Beach. For more information, call (609) 525-9300. 25 StandUp4SEALs First Annual Beach Adventure Race begins 7:30am at 4th Street beach. Race includes a sand obstacle course for adults and a fun sand challenge run for kids under 10. Event will also highlight a Stand Up Paddle Ocean Challenge (SUP). Festivities and race event will begin and end at 4thStreet Beach. www.StandUP4SEALs.com. For more information, call Kristin Gallagher at (610) 401-1510.

7 Movie Night Finding Neverland, presented by the Ocean City Fine Arts League, will show at 6:30pm in the Ocean City Library. Contact Karen G. Mahar at (609) 399-2434 x5238 for further information.

26 Barks on the Boards Sponsored by the Humane Society of Ocean City. Registration 11:30am at 6th Street practice field (next to Civic Center) Noon walk, 1pm contest at practice field. For more information, call (609) 3989500 or visit www.hsocnj.org.

10 Open Mic and Live Entertainment Also May 17 and May 24 at 7pm at Ocean City Coffee Company, 917 Asbury.

26 Concert: Tenor John Taylor Ocean City Tabernacle, 550 Wesley Avenue. 7pm. Free. www.OCTabernacle.org.

18 4th Annual Miles for Melanoma 5k Registration begins 9am at 34th Street beach. Run begins at 10am.

27 Memorial Day Service 11am at Veterans Memorial Park, 5th & Wesley Avenue.


31 Ocean City Flower Show See beautiful commercial and amateur displays at the Music Pier, Moorlyn Terrace & Boardwalk. Show times are Friday 2-9pm, Saturday 10am-9pm and Sunday, 10am-4pm. For more information, call (609) 525-9300.


Snapshots by the Shore

Having an OC event? Share your pics with Ocean City magazine! Email info@ocnjmagazine.com for details.

around the Boardwalk

Kristen and Brayden Sinclair

Jodie, Cooper and Aaron Mazza

Ron Gifford, Heather Creamer, Jessica Creamer, Rachael Hoffman, and Ginny Gifford

Alison Hallam, Gabe Hallam, and Melisaa Bailey

Patty and Mary Miraglilo with Winnie, who has just increased this magazine’s cute factor ten fold. Thanks Winnie!

Ashley, Amy, and Jake Collo

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It’s History the strand theatre Fred Miller on Days Gone By

theatrics

T

he history of the Strand Theatre dates back to the early years of the 20th century when, for a nickel, patrons watched dramas, comedies, and live vaudeville acts. The original building was totally remodeled in 1919 to meet the demands of the growing numbers of movie-goers. An article in the June 26, 1919 Ocean City Sentinel began: “Only words of the highest praise have been heard from those comprising the large audiences which nightly have been filling the magnificently rebuilt Strand Theater, on the Boardwalk, near Moorlyn Terrace.”

The Strand Theatre, rebuilt in 1919, had a seating capacity for 1,100 people. The article continued describing in detail the movie palace: “The Prizma pictures, the latest development in color photography, are a source of delight to all who visit the house. The up-to-date machine gives perfect projection, and there is none of that flickering that so many people find objectionable. “The wide and prettily finished lobby prepares the visitor in a way for the enchanting, palacelike interior of the house with its subdued amber lighted effect. “There is seating capacity for 1,100 people, and everyone is delighted with the musical program provided by Prof. John

A. Queen, of the Locust Theater, Philadelphia, on the $10,000 pipe organ.” The informative article reported: “Every patron is assured by Manager Roy Bourgeois of the most courteous treatment.” The roaring twenties was a good time for the Strand Theatre. The movie house even survived the great fire of 1927 to become the flagship of the boardwalk theaters. “SHRIVER BUYS TWO THEATRES” was a headline in the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin dated March 19, 1931. The article began: “William F. Shriver, owner of the Moorlyn and Strand theatres, has just purchased the

may 2013

Hunt theatres, consisting of the Show Boat and Doughty’s Theatre, bringing all the theatre interests in Ocean City under one ownership.” The article ended reporting: “These theatres will be operated by the Strand Theatre Company, of which William F. Shriver is president, and will be under the management of D. Roscoe Faunce.” On October 27, 1937, fire destroyed the Strand Theatre. The following day a front page headline of The Daily SentinelLedger reported: “Firemen Stop

p Continued on page 24

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Stars of the Shore Ray Clark

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So many people helped in so many ways after Superstorm Sandy. One of them is Ray Cark. Here is his Sandy story.

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ehind the front doors of many Ocean City homes were people in need. Soon after Superstorm Sandy took its toll, Ray Clark developed a plan to knock on each door and reach the families in need behind them. There are 17,000 front doors. Ray is a fireman, vice president of the Ocean City Firefighters Mutual Benevolent Association (FMBA), member of the Ocean City School Board, real estate agent and a teacher of CPR and first aid. Yet it wasn’t difficult for him to find his own time to help the people of the island. He calls it a “feel good thing” and refers to his post-Sandy work as his most rewarding. Seconds after Sandy licked this island, Ray jumped into action as an Ocean City firefighter, but by the first intermission, he knew he needed to do more. His wife Sara, along with other firefighter’s wives, had already organized a cleaning supply drive and drove around the island seeking out people in need. Building on the wives idea, Ray suggested at an OCNJ C.A.R.E. (Cleanup and Recovery Effort) meeting to Chairperson Drew Fasy, that they conduct a search-andhelp mission canvassing the entire island. He offered his disaster relief experience – gained from his service to New Jersey Task Force One Urban Search & Rescue (USAR), a

specialized team of highly trained firefighters – to help develop a system to check on every dwelling on the island. Ray had experience in canvassing towns after disasters when he spent a month working for FEMA in Alabama after Katrina hit. He could lead this movement. And did. Ray lobbied the Tabernacle for space to run the temporary headquarters and it was granted. He reached out through the FMBA Local 27 to get trained volunteers. Armed with an innate drive to help his neighbors, maps of Ocean City broken up into grids, OCNJ C.A.R.E. volunteers and volunteer firefighters from all over the state, Ray formulated a plan. Groups of volunteers formed, each with a volunteer firefighter as the leader. Like radars detecting those who needed help, they dispersed and sprawled across the island with their assignments. Six to eight hours later, each door was knocked on. Questions were asked: What do you need? Do you have electric? Is your home wet? Do you have flood insurance? It did not stop at the knocking and questioning. Information was gathered and a database was formed. As deficiencies were learned, volunteers were dispersed with donated items in an attempt to help as many as possible. OCNJ C.A.R.E.’s efforts are ongoing as they continue to post the needs of residents and business owners on their site. Ray helped unlock the doors standing between those who wanted to help and those who needed help.

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It’s History Disastrous Blaze In Teeth of Northeast Gale” but a bigger headline across the top of the newspaper predicted the future: “New Theatre to Replace Burned Strand.” August 11, 1938, less than ten months after the fire that destroyed the original movie house, the new Strand Theatre opened with much fanfare a few hundred feet north of the old Strand. William F. Shriver, using architect Armand Carroll, spent over $150,000 to build an ultra-modern movie palace that seated 1,450 people. One feature was an air conditioning system which cooled the air by water drawn from an artesian well far below the surface. The first movie to be shown in Shriver’s newest theater was “Give Me a Sailor” starring Bob Hope and Martha Raye. An Ocean City publicity brochure in 1939 bragged about the Boardwalk movie theaters: “From the standpoint of motion picture theaters, Ocean City is one of the most fortunate resorts along the entire Jersey coast. Four modern, attractive and wonderfully situated movie houses are here. First-run pictures are the rule rather than the exception. “The theatres, all owned by the Strand Theatre Company, are: the Village, on the Boardwalk approach at 8th Street; the Moorlyn, a half block farther south, at Moorlyn Terrace and the Boardwalk; the Strand, at 9th Street and the Boardwalk; and the Showboat, on the Boardwalk near 12th Street. “Between them, they have a total audience capacity of 6,150: Village seats 900; Moorlyn seats 1,800; the Strand seats 1,450; and the Showboat seats 2,000. “D. Roscoe Faunce, manager of the four theatres, tries each year to make improvements in one of more of them to keep in constant step with the latest developments in sound amplification and decorative ideas.” After William F. Shriver died in 1945, and his wife Sarah in 1949, their daughter Helen Schilling and her husband Charles took over running the Strand Theatre Company along with other family-owned properties. The Strand Theatre remained unchanged for 50 years. In 1989, Helen Schilling sold the theatre to Frank Theatre Company for three million dollars. After the sale, the huge room was divided into five small theaters. The future of the 100-year-old Strand Theatre is unknown. It was sold last summer and the new owners are evaluating its development options. An article in the August 25, 2012 New York Times was titled “Resort Towns Face A Last Picture Show.” The article began: “There are nicer and newer movie theaters than the Strand 5 on the boardwalk here on the Jersey Shore. The sound is uneven, and the auditoriums haven’t been renovated in decades. “But the Strand does have history. It opened as a one-screen movie house in August 1938, and nearly 75 years later the cinema, now a five-screen multiplex is still serving exiled beachgoers. But for how long?”

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stranded

Clockwise from top: During the 1920s and 1930s, this beautiful, well-lit marquee advertised what was happening inside the Strand Theatre; The original Strand Theatre, between Moorlyn Terrace and 9th Street, was destroyed by fire on October 27, 1937; The new Strand Theatre opened on August 11, 1938 at 9th Street and the Boardwalk, and from the outside looks pretty much the same today.


Shopping OC Must Haves 26 / Shopping Guide 28 / Trends 30

the look

ocean city style

Cool, Casual Style from Flying Carp Clothing Gallery

anna lincoln From Hammonton Jeans – Ann Taylor Sweater – Limited Scarf – Gap Shoes – Merrell Top – Tahari Shades - Revo

natalie coffman From Philadelphia Shoes – Forever 21 Jeans – American Eagle Top – Forever 21 Necklace – Tiffany

C

olorblocking, like this outfit from Flying Carp Clothing Gallery at 745 Asbury Avenue, allows you to be trendy, while still putting forth a timeless look. Pair up the simple long sleeveless top with the matching bottom. The materials of this outfit are so soft, you won’t be surprised to find they are a cotton silk blend - a go to during warm days. Grab a lightweight scarf to pull together the look, and viola, you are ready for a stroll in the park, on the Avenue or even on the beach. All components of the outfit can be found at Flying Carp. Clothes by Eileen Fisher, bag by Hobo.

chris abbott Shoes – Nike Shorts – American Eagle Hoodie – Pac Sub Watch - Suunto

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OC Must Haves

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OC Must Haves

312 Roosevelt Blvd Marmora, NJ 08223

4

609-390-1864

Family Owned for Over 39 Years

We Deliver!

Open Daily: 7am-6pm

Gift Certificates Available

Cape May County’s Largest Retail Greenhouse! FRESH JERSEY PRODUCE Herbs, Veggies, Hanging Baskets, Geraniums Fresh Squeezed Orange Juice (Squeezed Daily)

Perennials, Annuals, Pottery, Mulch, Shrubs, Wild Bird Supplies We PuMP PROPANe! Propane Tanks • Propane Filling Station

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We Have a Gift for Entertaining

1. HENRY’S JEWELRY, 1236 Boardwalk, henrysoc. com Henry’s shares its proceeds from the Restore the Shore jewelry with OCNJ C.A.R.E. The blue charm shown has little bits of sand inside. 2. ANIMAL HOUSE, 705 asbury, 398-3771 Let your pooch relax in style with a cozy dog bed and take back your couch. 3. RUTH’S HALLMARK, 733 asbury, 398-9623 Ruth’s underwent extensive renovations and is looking fabulous. These signs are a must for any beach home or wanna be. 4. OLD SALT, 1312 boardwalk, oldsalt-stingray.com These are fresh into the sea shanty that is Old Salt. Pick up the set for an elegant seaside tea. 5. SUN-N-FUN, 1212 boardwalk, 398-6800 This is the Falk’s 41st year at Sun-n-Fun and they recently took over the old Atlantic Books space. So the shop is large and filled with fun, friendly items for all ages, such as this set by Melissa and Doug for the wee ones.

733 Asbury Avenue, Ocean City, NJ (609) 399-5570 pfrancisgifts.com may 2013

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Shopping the Shopping Guide DOWNTOWN SHOP Ocean City! OC’s Downtown is ready for you! Shop. Dine. Unwind. See ad page 32.

Antiques/Collectibles The Gingham Whale 636 Asbury, 391-0996.

Apparel/shoes Alyse’s Shoes 951 Asbury, 3918859. Flying Carp Clothing Gallery Comfort, quality, timeless design. 745 Asbury, 391-1546. Gabrielle & Co. 715 Asbury, 399-1008. La Bottine Boutique Stylish shoes, accessories, jewelry, home accents. 1033 Asbury, 399-6400. Could Be Yours 716 Asbury, 703-4457. Colette 900 Asbury, 525-0911. Donna Gay Dillon Boutique 725 Asbury, 399-0082. Pappagallo 744 Asbury, 398-4009.

art galleries aCCENT gALLERY 956 Asbury, 398-3577. Fine arts league 608 Asbury, 814-0308.

Beauty salon Lindsy James Salon 945 Asbury, 525-9900.

Florist Spinning Wheel Florist 858 Asbury, 398-1157.

gallery stainton’s gallery of shops 810 Asbury, 545-8681.

home goods/Jewelry Artisans alcove Estate jewelry, diamonds, vintage timepieces. 714 Asbury, 399-2050. The Butterfly Boutique 1119 Asbury, 391-0812. P. Francis Heirloom-quality gifts and more. Mariposa. 733 Asbury, 3995570. See ad page 27. Ireland Imports 711 Asbury, 398-1948. potomac bead company 910 Asbury, 399-4400.

sports/athletic wear Harbor Outfitters 625 Asbury, 938-0175. Sneaker Shop 846 Asbury, 3915223.

sweets and treats rauhausers Incredible handcrafted chocaltes such as Chocolate Covered Caramel Filled Pretzels. 721 Asbury, 399-1465. Laura’s Fudge 935 Asbury, 3990616. cake studio A master cake craftsman. 1046 Asbury, 231-1851. See ad page 13.

Books/CDs/Office Sun Rose Words & Music Books, music, CDs, office supplies. 756 Asbury, 399-9190.

Department Stores B&B Department Store New styles, new look. Check out the home accessories. 827 Asbury, 391-0046.

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Things to do Glazed Over 854 Asbury, 3988880. See ad page 44. Kidz Creations 811 Asbury, 399-9922.

Variety/Beach Items Hoy’s 5 & 10 7th & Asbury, 398HOYS.

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Island Beach Gear Stop by on your way to the beach! 9th & Bay, 7883836. See ad page 29. Clam Drain Play the game that’s sweeping the beach in OC. Clam shell pitching! See ad page 29.

BOARDWALK apparel The Spot by Jilly’s Style, attitude, vintage tees, sunglasses and great brands. 762 and 1066 Boardwalk, 385-1234. Jilly’s T-Shirt Factory Get your Phillies at Jilly’s and lots more. 936 and 1048 Boardwalk, 385-1234.

home goods/JEWELRY Henry’s OC’s Landmark Jeweler. 1236 Boardwalk, (800) 214-4435. See ad page 32.

RENTALS Surf Buggy Centers Two locations; 8th & 12th Streets at the Boardwalk. Cribs, strollers, TVs, coolers, bikes. 976-5679.

SURF SHOP/SUNGLASSES By the Sea Surf Shop Sun, Sand, Surf. Private and semi-private surf lessons. 850 Boardwalk, 3980159. Sunglass Menagerie Sunglasses for every budget. 1124 Boardwalk, 391-8000.

SWEETS AND TREATS

Fudge kitchen Candy that melts in your mouth. 800 Boardwalk. 3987457. See ad page 30. Shriver’s Salt Water Taffy Ocean City icon. Taffy, fudge, candy. 9th and Boardwalk, 399-0100. Shriver’s Gelato Only gelato store on Boards. Good stuff. 9th and Boardwalk, 399-0100. Johnson’s Popcorn An OC classic. A great gift too. 1368 Boardwalk, (800) 842-2676.

VARIETY/beach items Jilly’s $1 Store One dollar! 1044 Boardwalk, 399-1234. Pessano’s Variety Stores Everything you need is here. Really. Two locations, 3rd and Atlantic; 11th and Boardwalk, 399-1889.

WEST AVENUE BIKES Tuckahoe Bike Shop Sales, service and rentals. Nice guys too. 1214 West Avenue, 398-9700. Relax Concierge Rent linens, and more online. Store front too. 1213 West, 601-5077. See ad page 49.

ON THE WAY TO OC sports tackledirect The finest in premium fishing tackle and value. 6825 Tilton Road, EHT, (609) 788-3819. Tuckahoe Bike Shop Modern bikes, Old-fashioned service. 2151 Route 50, Tuckahoe, 628-0101.

Home Design/decor Shutters to Shades Interior design, window treatments, area rugs. 2300 Rt 9, Ocean View, 967-5800. See ad page 26.

garden center vaughan’s farm & garden Jersey produce, flowers, barbecue hq. 312 Roosevelt Blvd., 390-1864. See ad page 27.

Did you find something you LOVE at one of the shops you see in this magazine? Email your find to editor@ ocnjmagazine.com.


the en in ! e s As ress AC P

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www.IslandBeachGear.com • 2 West 9th Street - Ocean City, NJ 08226 • 800.643.0474 • 609.788.3836 may 2013

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Trends the Flanders Hotel Bill Godfrey takes a sip of High Tea

W

hen a group of New Jersey businessmen met in 1922 to discuss building a seaside hotel in Ocean City, their goal was to erect something stately and elegant. These entrepreneurs wanted something that would rival the best hotels in America – something that would provide a comfortable resting place with modern conveniences, all while maintaining an air of graceful dignity. And so was born the Flanders Hotel, named for a WWI battlefield and a nearby American war-dead cemetery. The Flanders turns 90 years old this year and to celebrate, the staff is reviving a tradition that was a guest favorite some 40 years ago – High Tea. “This is an elegant tradition and it fits perfectly with the history of the hotel and the upcoming 90th anniversary,” said Deni Sammartino, the Flanders marketing coordinator. “The Flanders served high tea years ago and I thought it would be great to bring it back. I’ve been to several high teas with my nieces, my mother-in-law and sister-in-laws and we just loved. it I thought it would be great for the hotel.” “Tea was an integral part of the old Flanders tradition,” added Arlene Voudouris, who is the room standards coordinator at the Flanders. “We’re really looking forward to continuing this tradition. We want families to be able to experience this and pass it on to the next generation.” There are three high tea events in May, including May 11 which will be a distinctive Mother’s Day event with special desserts and a special gift for every mother that attends. If you’ve been to the Flanders Hotel then you know what a special place it is. The hotel is a historic piece of architecture and is an icon of the city’s skyline.

p Continued on page 32

The hardest part is picking your favorite...

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Kermit was wrong when he said it isn’t easy being green. At the Ocean City Municipal Golf Course, you’ll find easy access, a fun staff and beautiful green expanses right next to the marshes. It’s easy to spend a few hours on our 12-hole, par 3 course. Either in the morning before the beach or after a day of surf and sand. All yOu Rent clubs, hand carts and Need is A gOlf BAg. riding carts at the clubhouse. We welcome players of all ages • Recreation Summer Program Registration starts May 1st! Go on-line www.ocnj.us/recreation

Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult

26th & Bay Avenue Ocean City, NJ 609-399-5762

Memberships Available

may 2013

The course operates from 8am to 4pm off season • 7am to 7pm in summer

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It also has a certain magic that is common among historic buildings that are well-kept. And as if on cue, our conversation about Flanders high tea was interrupted by Francine St. Clare who, as she descended the steps in the Flanders lobby announced, “I used to serve the Flanders high tea 44 years ago.” Well then Ms. St. Clare, do sit down for a moment. “The Flanders is so lovely.” said Francine with a smile. “Years ago it was an old-fashioned hotel and the people would come and stay all summer. Everyone came for high tea. They would play piano and they were very interested in what was going on with younger people in the world – they would say ‘we hear all these stories about free love and drugs, you need to tell us all about it.’ Then they would tell me about growing up in the 20s and 30s. It was really grand.” Francine said serving the tea was quite a chore and she often had a cart stacked with cookies, scones and plenty of tea. “I loved doing it. I loved doing the tea,” she said. “The people were wonderful and very friendly.” Francine waxed nostalgic about

working at the Flanders and the norms of the times. “There was shuffleboard and the pool and the lifeguards. And there was tennis – the tennis pro was always the hot guy,” she said with a laugh. “Across the street was the girls dorm and you couldn’t live anywhere but the dorm. They were very protective of us and it’s the reason my mother let me come. That and there was no alcohol.” Francine was over the moon about the Flanders high tea and told story after story of her time at the Flanders in the ’60s. My only wish was that I had some tea. “I love high tea and it’s so wonderful that you’re bringing it back. It was all grandeur and it was a fascinating time,” said Francine. “I’m going to bring my daughter here. She doesn’t know what high tea is so we need to remedy that. I’m so glad you’re bringing it back. The Flanders had a definite style – high class.” Earl Grey anyone? The Flanders Hotel is serving high tea on May 2, May 11 (for Mothers Day) and May 30. They will also host the teas every Thursday throughout the summer. Call (609) 399-1000 to reserve.

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What’s better than summertime in Ocean City? Having a taste of Ocean City all year round

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Ocean City

ocnjmagazine.com


Piering into the future

Ocean City Fishing Club celebrates its 100th Anniversary (with no plans to reel it in anytime soon) By Kelly Tjoumakaris Photos by Stefanie Godfrey

may 2013

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T

he ancient art of fishing, also known as angling, is actualized by maestros of sport, recreation, livelihood and survival.

It is an activity that has long inspired poetry and prose by writers such as William Butler Yeats, Walt Whitman, Robert Frost, Henry David Thoreau, Ernest Hemingway, Benjamin Franklin, Herman Melville and Washington Irving, who once said, “There is certainly something in angling that tends to produce a serenity of the mind.” It seems all those orchestrating the fish, wind, and the sea with pole, agree. Fishing is an antiquated process, predating the A.D. calendar, in which the piscator’s philosophy, like poets, varies from transcendentalism to realism. Whether one finds a fish or truth on the end of their line, no one can argue it isn’t poetic. Ocean City is no stranger to the sport. For thousands of years, men have been fishing off her shores from the Lenni-Lenape (and beyond) to John Peck, the gentleman this fine barrier island was once named for, who used it to shelf his whales. In the latter part of the 19th century, facilitated by the railroad from Philadelphia, there was an exponential sports fishing boom on the Jersey Shore. The railroad ran day trips entitled “Fishermen’s Special,” that were packed like sardine boxes with Philadelphia sportsman wishing to fish from dawn until dusk, with rods fishing out the windows in piscine anticipation. It was a time when bluefish and red drum swam rampant; the blues were not just fished, but harvested for fertilizer. Eventually, automobiles helped to remove the “Fishermen’s Special” from the menu, but still the population of surf fishermen on the islands increased. Several fish lengths later, in the summer of 1913, a few of these surf fishing visionaries conceived The Ocean City Fishing Club (OCFC), with sportsmanship and fellowship in mind. It is the oldest continuously operated fishing club in our country and they are celebrating their 100th anniversary this year. At the time of conception, when clubmembers sported shirts and ties, a plan

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was made to consummate the club, and so a clubhouse and pier were erected at 14th Street and the Boardwalk in 1916. The iconic pier has been continuously postured with little pause and breaking from its duties only during casualties from breakaway barges and severe storms nevertheless successfully regenerating each time. The pier is in the font of a perfect “T.” The pier sprouts 635 feet from the base at the Boardwalk where members can access the gated community. The clubhouse reflects all the character of the club’s age with fishing poles suspended from the ceiling, wooden lockers paneling the inside perimeter, a kitchenette, Adirondack chairs, tables and photos of times past. Moving up the torso of the “t,” is a storage facility for equipment and refrigerator units for bait and fish. Further out to sea there are necessities such as fish cleaning tables and sinks and a tent shelter where refreshments and a venue for lunch await each member where they can hide from the song of the sirens and in the words of Shakespeare’s Juliet the garish sun. It was formerly a hard structure until it was descaled from the pier by a storm prompting the club to replace it with more forgiving material. Superstorm Sandy swiped only the roof of the tent from the club, possibly showing restraint to honor their century old presence. During an anglers tee time, one may not hear the warning fore, rather one heeds the calling “Going out!” from a fisherman on the pier. Though romancing the fish must be a part of the process, it indicates someone is casting their line. It was here, with the panoramic view of Ocean City, the expansive Atlantic Ocean and the pier narrative regarding decades past – they had me… Hook. Line. And sinker. Who are they you ask? These are the people in our neighborhood. They are the representative members of the Ocean City Fishing Club eager to share their maritime memories with us. Bill Daley, a member since 1976 and past president, fondly reminisced about Gene Lindacher, former financial secretary, one of the longest standing members dating back to 1972, hitting the plank in a shirt and tie, catching a few weakies and then heading off to work. Gene told of a day he had a whale of a time, when he spotted one

off the outer pier. Several decades later, a picture commemorating the prize vision, still hangs on his wall as well as in his lure. Margaret Feil was the first woman member of the club. Her husband, Fred, joined the club in 1988 and she frequented the pier with him. During one of his visits to the clubhouse, she pulled in a 28-inch striper. Before becoming a member in 2002, gender restrictions limited her to the pier’s lower extremity where there was often no water – today she is the secretary for the club. Member George Ingram, public relations chair and in charge of the Centennial Celebration, can not speak without poetry about his preference to beat dawn to the pier to fish during sunrise. Their stories vary like their philosophies. Some fish by the moon. Some by the tides. Some by the wind. Though the range of angler philosophy over the last century the fishing club has been in existence has not changed, other factors have. Poles have grown, strings evolved and one look at the club’s seal will show fish populations have changed. Suspended at attention in center seal is a red drum, or channel bass, telling of hearty populations past. This fish, once the most sought after fish of the club, no longer favors our shallow waters and moved south for their preferred food, temperature and salinity. Once the red drum avoided our shore, the club member’s interest turned to striped bass. When the number of stripers declined it prompted a moratorium on catching them which since has led to a resurgence in their population. Other fish fashions have cycled during the club’s time as well; club records show 549 weak fish caught in 1915, 3,087 in 2000 and 118 in 2011. There were big weak fish populations in the 1980s, but no stripers. Since limits have been cast on anglers; one weakfish per day with a minimum of 13 inches in length else the fish gets to return to the sea. The fickle fish populations have not changed the steady number of members of the OCFC. There is great spirit and brotherhood betwixt the club members (population 215). Many of these families are fathoms deep into the timeline of the club. Bill Daley has three children as part of the club and a grandson who is a junior member. Gene Lindacher’s son and grandsons are also members. They are a philanthropic lot; the club’s contributions


during the last year include a scholarship, donations to the Ocean City Community Food Cupboard post Sandy as well as cosponsorship of an annual Boys and Girls Surf Fishing Tournament for juniors between the years of eight and 16. The club milieu is so enjoyable, not just the newcomers are about. The old-timers like to hang out on the benches outside the clubhouse and some even come to the clubhouse to play pinochle. The club devotedly holds tournaments and sends teams to faraway shores to compete at such as the annual Invitational Cape Hatteras Tournament (and yes, they even have pinochle tournaments). OCFC is bringing in the centennial with terrific celebration and tournament.The year long festivities began with an art exhibit at the Ocean City Arts Center that displayed paintings of their pier and clubhouse and included a meet and greet with the artists. There will be an open house at the clubhouse and pier this summer, a special exhibition at the Ocean City Historical Museum throughout the summer and early fall where one can view the famous Ocean City Cup, a phoenix of sorts, having graced team supremacy since 1916, meeting a demise in 1920 from a fire, but granted a rebirth. Can you hear that? The sea is calling as well as the Ocean City Fishing Club for all east coast anglers to join their celebratory threeday centennial surf fishing tournament in October that is fit for one hundred teams. The poetry of Ichthyology is found between a fish and a man who is hoping to be connected to him by a line. Whether a calling, necessity or talent, a piscatory life is one of finesse and seduction. This old art has prompted brotherhood between many an angler. The challenges remain the same; where to fish, what bait to use, and how to approach. It is an undying art shared by the good people of the OCFC.There will always be more fish in the sea and opportunity for a heart to break over the one who got away.

whale tale On previous page: OCFC members Bill Daley, Gene Lindacher, Margaret Feil, Fred Feil, and George Ingram standing on the pier. This page from top: The ceiling of the OCFC Clubhouse is line with members’ fishing poles. Call “Going Out”. A whale in front of the pier in days past.

Courtesy of Gene Lindacher

may 2013

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Artwork by Talula Love Bottoms


Olive and Bean: a epistolary story by kelly tjoumakaris

The Beginning When one refers to the beginning of something, perhaps other than time, one can usually quantify. Quantify the year, month, day, sometimes minute, something began. There are those who know the time of the day of the month of the year where something or someone happened to them. And then there are those who just know something or someone happened to them. But some of those don’t really know what it was that happened. Naysayers believe everything has a definite beginning and end. Start and finish. Commence et La Fin. Why French? Well because there is Love in this story and being that it is a story regarding OLive and Bean, well there are many, many Las involved. So Nay, not! For you shall see the origin of OLive and Bean is, as everything is to our OLive, a gray area. So where does one set Act I, when there is no definite start to the topic at hand? When one cannot pinpoint the commencement of said topic, one starts with the origin of the individual subjects. And with this fine fruit and Lovely Legume, one must look back through the Lush garden of Life, Oh Life, and see it happened to be the trees and the vines fruitful with soul that gave sprout to an OLive and a Bean. OhLive Mort Rosenblum writes of the olive, “A closer look reveals a portrait in miniature of the richest parts of our world.” Who can argue with this? But not all olives are created equal. In point, this olive we speak of – she, beyond the closest of looks, beyond what 20/20 vision can afford us, beyond what any standard household Transmission Electron Microscope can observe, and what only a very few, and maybe even only one can see, is that this particular olive, and only this olive, is so rich in soul, so

fruitful and choc full of Heartiness. She is OLive. Her faculty for correspondence (and with her very own OLive vernacular) when moved, is the thing that sets her apart from other olives. She is only clever in written word and only when writing, does she find clever. Speaking in prose and writing in verse, she is challengingly cryptic and evasive, so she constantly escapes understanding. Her constitution can rival any nation. It is one of independence, indecision, indefinableness, and indecipherability. To the standard receiver that is. To you, most likely. For not many come with the Holy Grail of chemistry to prompt her most delicious nature. Her nature that could provoke a mouth slight of taste, to jockey her, an exceptional OLive, playfully around. “Oh what a tantalizing OLive!” the soulless, tasteless beast would mutter trying not to masticate or swallow her in fear she might be a Lost OLive. She is well versed in deciphering cartography and much prefers it to GPS. She is not a fan of things with acronyms. While words are crafted, the shortened versions are more or less word spit. She does not appreciate the efficiency they offer. Instant coffee offers that same thing. This OLive would not be caught imbibing a cup of such an imposter. She wants her beans percolated or at the very least brewed. Acronyms are never percolated or brewed and granted, the device which affords us letters from overstuffed lettery words does not need descaling. Where the gratuitous letters go, she does not want to know, but they aren’t clinging to the funnel that removed them. OLive has viewed acronyms as the owner words epitaph. Acronyms are word murderers. And who can trust them? They show up in places one doesn’t welcome them; paychecks, litigious documents, government agencies... And

FCOL, though our OLive is 2G2B4G - FYI AIMB, you won’t catch her LOLing or BB4Ning. Even S.O.S., the day of May no one wants on their calendar, takes no less breath than the stating of the message. Acronyms sully the otherwise noble non-abbreviated expression (insert antonym of acronym). Given this, her disdain lies not with letters in general. In fact, she is quite smitten with one in particular. One in particular has style and grace. One in particular is dignified and can dress down for casual Friday or dress charmingly and scripted for a gala or ball. Her tongue flirts with it every time it fLicks on and off. The most orgasmic of the alphabet and there is an indefinite number of delectable words beginning (ones we can quantify) with the queen of all 26 characters. She is the Grace Kelly of all the Letters of the alphabet. If Jackie O. had only realized! Soft, curvy, voluptuous, and just the right amount of Loopy – her majesty L (in her formal wear). She is cLassy and LoveLee and needs no accessories Like Lowercase i or j. And no piercings Like capital Q. She is without the structural engineering of capital A, and has no conformity issues Like Lowercase b, d and p. Not too edgy like v or obnoxious like X. She does often wonder why this pearl of all Letters snubbed oyster – a most fantastic word and creature which is equally pleasing to the tongue and Loins. Perhaps the pearl left no room. Fully (and forever) redeeming such an oversight, is the fact that ∞ (the infinity symbol) shares genes with L and Let us not forget, Less is more because it starts with an L. Finally, L is for Love, which speaks for itself, or at least it speaks for this OLive. OLive is her name and Language Arts is her game. She takes artistic Liberties with it; painting out of the lines of spelling and sculpting syntax. Perhaps it is in protest to

may 2013

the ever greater used acronyms, in protest she will randomly, yet strategically, add letters to some words – even the one that names her. She is a master creator of affixes and their misplacement. She is an aid in the evolution of etymology. It is all rather unofficial, but it amuses her nonetheless. Aesthetically, OLive is not as regal as our favored letter L; she has features of no particular delicacy. Her shape is, well, not surprisingly, oLivary. Her color is that of a primary tint which gallivants at the mid-section of the light spectrum – not quite as vibrant and brazen as Roy, or as gothic as Biv. Green: the color of envy, the constant state which holds her hostage. Green: the sallow hue of yellow. Green: the color of oh, life and growth. Green: the color of Kelly. It suffice to say the noble fruit is plump, some say engorged, with eccentricities. And though she has trouble feeling normal, she has an affinity for a great many things. She is a tree worshipper of the nicest kind and surprisingly, not for their greenery. She adores trees without bias or discrimination. Be it maple, oak or redwood, deciduous or conifer, dignified or weeping, Lichen covered or bare barked, berried or blossomed, native or invasive, she cares for them all with a deeprooted Love. And whilst basking in the Light of her sun and her moon, she will gaze upon them in all her great green envy. She, herself, hung from a most Lithesome branch of a tree which bent ever so gracefully while she made her daily Limnetic observations. One day, with no trauma to speak of, and by Aphrodite herself, she was immaculately plucked from the Linguistic Limb of peace. (In the June issue: Stay tuned for post plucked Olive… and just who is this Bean?)

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Oc NJ

BeACH GUiDe Beach Rules • Lifeguards on duty 10-5pm on weekdays and 10-5:30pm on weekends • Dogs permitted October 1 through April 30 • No Alcoholic Beverages • No Open Fire • No Sleeping Overnight • Beach Tags required for beachgoers 12 and older June through Labor Day

KeY Boardwalk Handicap/Stroller Accessible Restrooms Guarded Beach First Aid Station Fishing Area Surfing Beach Parking Lots Beach Tag Sales Shower & Changing Room Foot Rinse Sailing Permitted Kayaking Area Designed By: Cassie Plunkett

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60


Activities Word Search 42 / Ocean’s 11 Trivia 44

Fun at the Shore? Check our Activities Guide! BayCats Kayaks and Catamarans HobieCat and kayak rentals, Sailing Camp. 316 Bay Avenue, OC, 391-7960. See ad page 44. Bayview Marina Waverunners, parasailing,. 312 Bay Avenue, OC, 399-5100. Gillian’s Wonderland Pier Tons of exciting rides/mini golf. 6th and Boardwalk, 399-7082. glazed over Create your own pottery, mosaics, and more. 854 Asbury, 398-8880. See ad page 44. Greate Bay Racquet and Fitness A premiere spot to workout. New boxing classes. 90 Mays Landing Road, Somers Point, 925-9550. Jilly’s Arcade Awesome arcade. Brand new ten cent skeeball machines! 1172 Boardwalk, 385-1234.

Ocean City Magazine’s Books by the Beach

A

new collection of essays from the #1 New York Times bestselling author who has been called “the preeminent humorist of his generation” (Entertainment Weekly). 

 From the unique perspective of David Sedaris comes a new book of essays taking his readers on a bizarre and stimulating world tour. From the perils of French dentistry to the eating habits of the Australian kookaburra, from the squat-style toilets of Beijing to the particular wilderness of a North Carolina Costco, we learn about the absurdity and delight of a curious traveler’s experiences. Whether railing against the habits of litterers in the English countryside or marveling over a disembodied human arm in a taxidermist’s shop, Sedaris takes us on side-splitting adventures that are not to be forgotten. -www.davidsedarisbooks.com

OC Aquatic & Fitness Center Newly-renovated center – state-of-the-art equipment. 1735 Simpson, 398-6900.

See ad page 44 and photo right bottom. GHOST TOUR Take a spooky walk around OC’s historic section. If you dare. ghosttour. com, 814-0199. CLAM DRAIN Where the beach meets the game and everybody wins. clamdrain.com. See ad page 29. OC THEATRE COMPANY Bring cool culture into your island time. Shows throughout the year. 854 Asbury, 525-9300. See photo below top. OC arts center Artist exhibits, lowcost membership. 1735 Simpson, 399-7628. OC POPS Summer concerts at the Music Pier. 525-9248, www.oceancitypops.org. OC golf course Twelve-hole, par three course along the marshes. 26th & Bay, 399-1350. See ad page 31.

Ocean City Library A fabulous place filled with DVDs, games, computers, and... books! 1735 Simpson, 399-2434. Ocean City Historical Museum Check out OC’s past through postcards, photos and exhibits. 1735 Asbury, 399-1801. Playland’s Castaway Cove Over 30 rides, two mini golf courses, and Go Karts. 1020 Boardwalk, 399-4751. Tuckahoe Bike Shop & Surf Buggy Center Rent bikes. Fun. 1214 West Avenue, OC, 398-9700. Zumba Fitness with Lynn Sooy Get shakin’ with Lynn with Zumba or Masala Bhangra, a Bollywood style workout. Balle Balle! In and around OC, 377-0982.

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Game On

Ocean City Word Search Find the words in this curiously difficult puzzle U

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BEACH OPENING BIG BAD DADS CLAM DRAIN FISHING CLUB GOLF HIGH TEA ICE CREAM

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LONGER DAYS down home MOTHERS DAY OCNJCARE OLIVE AND BEAN PARKING METERS ON PHILIPPE CHIN

SKEEBALL SAILING STRAND THEATre SUMMER BREEZE SUNBURN TRIFECTA WARMTH


THE SHORES R E T I R E M E N T

L I V I N G

I N

O C E A N

friendly

C I T Y

kindness

treasure

treasure

compassion

respect

THE CARE YOU WANT, IN THE PLACE YOU LOVE AT A PRICE YOU CAN AFFORD. The Shores is a true treasure in retirement living right in Ocean City. Inside the compassion of our staff and the friendliness of our residents mirror the warmth of a summer ocean breeze. For more information or to schedule a tour, call 609-399-8505 or visit theshoresretirement.org.

Great Care. Great Place. Great Price.

2201 Bay Avenue, Ocean City, NJ 08226 | 609.399.8505 | www.theshoresretirement.org


Game On

Ocean’s 11 How well do you know this island? 1. What song do spectators sing to encourage Martin Z Mollusk to look for his shadow?

8. George Koukoulis established George’s Candies at 700 Boardwalk in what year (it’s on the T-shirts)?

2. What happens if MZM sees his shadow?

9. The Ocean City Fire Department was organized when?

3. Who decides if MZM has seen his shadow?

10. The first meeting of the Ocean City Fishing Club was when?

4. What song do business people march to as they open the beach and plunge into the ocean?

11. The Flanders Hotel takes its name from a battlefield and American war cemetery in what European country?

5. The Boardwalk runs from…

10

6. The Sindia was sailing from where to where when she ran aground off Ocean City?

Monday

Wednesday

7. What are Ocean City’s geographic coordinates?

Zumba 6:30pm UTPS

Thursday

9

Zumba 9:30am Flanders

Tuesday

Zumba 9:30am Studio 18 Zumbatomic (kids) 5:45pm UTPS Masala Bhangra 6:30pm UTPS

Zumba 6:30pm UTPS

Zumba Gold (chair) 10am Body in Balance The Most Fun you can have for $5!

Friday

Zumba 9:30am Flanders sooyfitness.com

Ditch the W o r k o u t ... Join the Party! (609) SOOY 377-0982 fitness

1. Some Enchanted Evening 2. Summer comes one week early 3.Big Mama Llama 4.Pomp and Circumstance 5. 23rd Street to St. James Place 6. Kobe, Japan to New York

7. 39°15’49’’ N 74°36’ 17’’ W 8. 1954 9. December 22, 1898 10. August 15, 1913 11. Belgium

How much time will Y OU spend on the Bay this year?

glazed ver studio pottery, mosaics & more... created .

by you

854 Asbury, Ocean City • (609) 398-8880 • glazedoverstudios.com

On the Bay at 316 Bay Avenue, Ocean City 609-391-7960

• Kayaking • Sailing Camp - for kids and adults • Paddle Board lessons rentals and sales • Family sail rides on the bay • Season Passes for kayaks and Paddle Boards.

• Hobie Sales and Parts

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ocnjmagazine.com may 2013

• Walk in Art Studio • Downtown OC • Summer Art Camp • Workshops/Classes • Custom Work (see our art at Who’s on First Cafe, Steve and Cookies) Where Family Memories are Created


Services Real Tours 46 / Health & Beauty 47 / Last Shot 52

Volunteer of the month Eric Reich, Big Brothers Big Sisters

E

Photo by Chrissy Reich

ric Reich has three children, his business, Reich Asset Management, LLC, and still finds time to volunteer as a Big Brother. Why Big Brothers/Big Sisters? When I first started in the business, my mentor was Sidney Friedman, a guy famous in the life insurance world. Growing up in Sea Isle City, I never realized the extent of what was out there. Working with Sid completely opened doors I never saw before. I had a normal upbringing and we did okay, but there was so much more out there waiting. I wondered what it would be like for kids who did not have a mom or dad and felt every kid should get a chance to see what there is to see in the world. I’ve been involved with Big Brothers for five years. What is your “little” like? Seamus is a great kid and loves the Phillies. He is very athletic. Naturally athletic. He is very good at everything and on his first try; bowling and mini golf for example. He is great at chess. We are making a trade – he’s going to teach me to play chess I’m going to teach him to surf. What sorts of things do you and Seamus do?

I got him involved in karate. We have gone fishing and to a Phillies game. We go to the movies a lot and of course the Boardwalk in Ocean City. Seamus loves going bowling. Yesterday he came over the house to hang out and had dinner with us. My boys love him and monopolize all his time – I barely got to see him. With three children and your own business, how do you find the time to volunteer? People always say, “I don’t have the time.” It is difficult, but it isn’t a huge time commitment. We spend a few hours a week together, every other week. What do you and your “little” have in common? We are both Phillies fans for sure. I don’t hold it against him that he is a Steelers fan. What is the best thing about being a big brother? It is hard to say one thing. Just… seeing a difference. You really can see the difference. At first you just hope you are making a difference. But after a while you actually do see changes; how they act, think and how their goals change. It is nice to be able to have an impact on a person other than yourself. It’s a whole other level of satisfaction. -Interview by Kelly Tjoumakaris

Meet the artisans Jenn and Danny Freeman from Big Bad Dad’s Jams

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on’t Be a Schmucker. That’s the tag line for Big Bad Dad’s Jams and Jellies. And it’s one that gets big laughs whenever Jenn and Danny Freeman are out and about selling their product, small mason jars filled with homemade jams, butters, and jellies. I caught up with the entire Freeman family, he is “Big Bad DAD” after all, on a warm April day. As daughters Oona and Aoife played on the lawn, Danny and Jenn and I jammed on, so to speak. Ocean City magazine: How did Big Bad Dad’s begin? Danny: I lost my job in the spring of 2010 and we decided to start a business, though we didn’t know what. And we saw... Jenn, what were we watching? Jenn: Food Network. There was a show about

ladies who picked berries and started a jam business. I told Danny he should do that because he’s good with blending flavors and cooking. He’s really alive when he’s in the kitchen. I thought if he enjoyed his job, he’d be happy. OC: What were you doing when you were laid off? Danny: I was working for a chain restaurant as the bar manager. I’ve about 20 years experience in the restaurant industry. Jenn: After he lost his job, the girls were involved in ballet, gymnastics. We needed some extra income, so that was the driving force into starting

p Continued on page 48

may 2013

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Real Tours 5107 central, ocean city

beach beauty Best buy on the beach! Three bedroom, two bath, second floor condo featuring panoramic views from the living room, dining room and kitchen. Extra large bedrooms, two decks, new roof, new windows and appliances make this an awesome opportunity to own your dream house on the beach. Sunrises, sunsets and short walks to get on the beach... life is good. Offered at $879,000 by Kevin G. Redmond, Broker/Owner, NJ Realty-Ocean City, 210 E. 10th Street, Ocean City, Office (609) 398-6762, Cell (609) 513-6220, kgredmond@comcast.net, www.njrealtyoc.com.

Ocean City Ocean OceanCity City

Because real estate is local...

Because real Because realestate estateisislocal... local...

Ocean City

Celebrating 30 years of serving homeowners Celebrating years serving Jersey homeowners in theCelebrating Sea Isle City30 the of Southern Shore areas 30and years of serving homeowners in the Sea Isle City and the Southern Jersey Shore areas

Experience Ocean City’s newest motel

Only one block to beach & Boardwalk!

in the Sea Isle City and the Southern Jersey Shore areas

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Proud to to Announce Announce our our Proud Proud to Announce our New OCEAN CITY Location New OCEAN Celebrating 30 yearsCITY of servingLocation homeowners

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CORNER OF 10 . AND W EST A VE. areas in theC Sea Isle City andTHtheSTSouthern Jersey Shore ORNER OF 10TH ST. AND WEST AVE.

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CORNER OF 10TH ST. AND WEST AVE.

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Proud to Announce our 609-398-6762 www.njrealtyoc.com www.njrealtyoc.com Experienced Ocean City Agents New OCEAN CITY Location buy-sell-rent Experienced Ocean City Agents Locally Owned and Operated Locally Owned and Operated

Experienced Ocean City Agents NJ Realty Agents Sell Houses! Locally Owned and Operated Stop by to visit our new office with ALL your real estate questions Our sold over 2012 CbyAlways ORNER OF 10 TH STALL .$37 AND W EST you Ain VE . Stop toagents visit an ourexperienced new office with yourmillion real estate questions agent on-hand to assist Always an experienced agent on-hand to assist you

Stop personal by to visit our new office ALL your questions Where Service HaswithBeen the real Keyestate to Our Success! Broker-Owner Always an experienced agent on-hand to assist you Broker-Owner

609-398-6762

210 East 10th Street 210 East 10th Ocean City, NJStreet 08226 Ocean City, NJ 08226

Kevin G. Redmond Kevin G. Redmond

Broker-Owner Kevin G. Redmond

info@njrealtyoc.com info@njrealtyoc.com www. njrealtyoc.com njrealtyoc.com

www.njrealtyoc.com

210 East 10th Street Ocean City, NJ 08226

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info@njrealtyoc.com njrealtyoc.com

1116 Wesley Avenue, Ocean City, NJ 08226 609-399-1122 • Fax: 609-399-1127

www.seaportinnmotel.com


Health and Beauty Tips from atlanticare Staying safe on vacation at the Jersey Shore

N

othing says summer quite like a vacation at the Jersey Shore. When you’re enjoying our beaches, boardwalks and everything else that the shore has to offer, remember that having a great vacation also includes keeping everyone in your family safe from accidental injuries. Below are some helpful reminders from AtlantiCare Urgent Care: On the Road • Pack your vehicle so luggage, beach toys, coolers, and other items will not come loose in the event of a motor-vehicle accident. • If you are traveling with babies or small children, make sure their car seat is positioned correctly and your child is buckled in properly. • In New Jersey, it is illegal to text or talk on your cell phone while driving. Pull over your car to a safe place or use a hands-free device if you must make a phone call.

• Drive at posted speed limits, obey traffic signals and signage, and always wear your seatbelt. • Never leave your child, an elderly person or a pet in a hot, closed-up car even for a few minutes. On the Beach • Apply sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher at least 30 minutes before heading outdoors. Choose sunscreen products labeled “broad spectrum,” which protect your skin from both UVA and UVB rays. • Reapply sunscreen every two hours, even if it’s cloudy, and after sweating or swimming. • Avoid direct sun exposure between 10am and 2pm, when UVA and UVB rays are strongest. • Drink plenty of water if you are going to be outside in extreme heat and humidity. Also, avoid strenuous outdoor exercise or activities during the hottest parts of the day (between approximately 11am and 4pm).

In the Water • When swimming in the ocean, a lake, or public pool, make sure there is a lifeguard on duty. Follow all directions given by the lifeguard and all posted rules. • Don’t rely on lifeguards to watch your children. Always keep an eye on your own children when they are swimming or playing near the water. • Be alert for dangerous rip currents, which can take you by surprise. Alert the lifeguard if you see someone struggling in a rip current. Do not try to rescue anyone yourself.

• Be on the lookout for bees and wasps when eating outdoors, drinking sweetened beverages, or sitting near garbage cans. • To find the closest AtlantiCare Urgent Care Center, call (609) 407-CARE (2273). *If you are experiencing chest pain, symptoms of stroke, or a lifethreatening injury or trauma, call 9-1-1 right away.

In the Outdoors • To help prevent head injuries, pack helmets and other protective equipment for activities such as bike riding or rollerblading. • If your vacation plans include hiking, golfing or camping, protect yourself from mosquitoes, ticks and stinging insects.

Welcome Chris Monihan... The third generation of Monihans to serve your real estate needs!

Ocean City’s Most Trusted Realtor

M

onihan Realty, Ocean City’s longest family owned and operated real estate company since 1947, welcomes its third generation, Chris Monihan. Born and raised in Ocean City, Chris comes to Monihan Realty with great experience as a sales professional in New York City and Newport Beach, CA catering to financial services clients. Chris joins his father and owner of Monihan Realty, Michael Monihan, to form the Monihan Team. Combining over 55 years of real estate experience and expertise in sales, rentals, and investments, the Monihan Team is aggressively working to help clients reach their Real Estate goals. Please contact Chris or Michael for any of your real estate needs: 609-399-0998 or 800-255-0998.

On Top Since 1947 in

RENTALS & SALES Beach to Bay

3201 Central Avenue

609-399-0998 800-255-0998 may 2013

717 Battersea Road

609-399-1311 800-255-1311

ocnjmagazine.com

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Aoife and Oona Freeman

a business.To help keep our girls active. OC: What was your first flavor? Danny: Hot pepper jelly. It started out with ingredients I had in my garden. I pick peppers for their flavor profile. I use five different peppers and each one I use brings something else to the party. Jenn: You can taste the different levels of flavors of peppers as you enjoy it. OC: What flavor came next? Jenn: Orange Ginger Marmalade. Because you like marmalade. OC: What’s marmalade? Danny: It has peels in it. Jam is crushed fruit and jelly is liquid. Jenn: You don’t use any fruit in jelly, just the juice of the fruit. Danny: Then my third flavor was peach chipotle.

The jams and jellies

OC: And now how many flavors do you have? Danny: 16? Jenn: 16 with the addition of the pear chocolate. Oh wait, we do the gojis now. Eighteen. OC: That must be fun testing all those. Danny: That’s the aspect I like most. Doing the test batches. Coming up with the flavors and trying them. OC: Did you ever have a bad flavor? Danny: One. That was the citrus marmalade. Jenn: (laughing) It was disgusting. Danny: It tasted horrible. I used lemons, limes, oranges, and grapefruit. It just did not turn out. OC: Where do you get your inspiration? Danny: I just come up with ingredients

I think will work together well. Like the blackberry bourbon vanilla. OCM: What are your favorites? Jenn: On the spicy side, I’m going with peach chipotle. I can use it so many ways. Danny: You can do baked brie with it. I think we’ve done most of our flavors with the brie. Jenn: It’s easy. I tell people at farmers markets to do the brie. They look at me like it’s hard. I’m the five ingredient girl. Get your brie, throw your jam, flip your crescent rolls over it and bake it. You’re done. No one realizes how easy it is because it seems like a luxury. On the sweet side, I like the purple haze. I make icing with it. OC: Danny what’s your fave? Danny: On the sweet side I like pear

chocolate. Jenn asked me during testing what I’d eat it with and I said “a spoon.” You can also serve it over ice cream or cheesecake. Or dip strawberries in it. Jenn: Knowing something is handmade means there is also love in it. You can taste the passion. Ed. Note: The Freemans let me take home a jar of the pear chocolate to taste. Let’s just say it was half gone two hours later as was nearly everything in my pantry that could be covered in pear chocolate sauce. It’s that good. You can purchase Big Bad Dad’s Jams and Jellies at www.bigbaddadsjams.com or on their facebook page www.facebook. com/BigBadDadsJams. Also at events and farmer’s markets throughout the year. They are all listed on the website.

BERGER REALTY Leon K. Grisbaum #1 in ocean city sales and summer rentals 3160 Asbury Avenue Ocean City, NJ (888) 399-0076

17th & Boardwalk Ocean City, NJ (888) 579-0095

55th & Haven Avenue Ocean City, NJ (800) 399-3484

1330 Bay Avenue Ocean City, NJ (855) 399-1330

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ocnjmagazine.com may 2013


Services

OCEAN CITY

Through the eyes of an artist

MARIE NATALE

mariedezines@comcast.net www.marienatale.com FOR CLASSES, WORKSHOPS, COMMISSIONS CALL MARIE (609)-214-9905

Keller Williams 1 Atlantic Ave. Ocean City, NJ 08226 609-398-SOLD (7653) Direct 609-399-5454 Office 609-399-2264 Fax

Jack W. Zaborowski, Broker/REALTOR Resort Second Home Specialist Luxury Homes KW, Licensed Builder 609-602-7140 ocjack@me.com

Jill Perry-Zaborowski, REALTOR 609-892-0512 jackandjill@kw.com

www.TEAMOCJACK.com www.jackandjillattheshore.com Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated

bFamily Owned bGreat Rates bBeach Tags bSteps from Beach and Boards b40 Years in Business bFree Wi-Fi bOcean View Decks bGuest Rooms and Apartments

Osborne’s Inn 601 E. 15th Street, OC (609) 398-4319; (267) 419-8200 peggyannocnj@gmail.com www.osbornesinn.com

rediscover the Ocean City of your childhood may 2013

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Last Shot

free ride A surfer feels the waves during the NSSA North East Conference Championship. Photo by Pam Leypoldt

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“Don’t you love me?” asked the beach. How will you answer? Get a subscription to Ocean City Magazine and let the beach know just how much you care. $21.40 - Subscribe online at ocnjmagazine.com


Looking BackMoving Forward Artist Marie Natale’s paintings on show from July 2 - July 30, 2013 Bring home her Ocean City magazine covers and more at Ocean City Arts Center • Reception July 12, 2013, 7-8:30pm


May issue Ocean City magazine