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T H E F U T U R E S TA R T S H E R E

Penn Engineering M A K I N G H I S T O RY T H R O U G H I N N O VAT I O N


“ If I could come back for another life, I would not want to be Bill Gates or Brad Pitt. I would want to be an engineering student, with the whole world open before me.” EDUARDO GLANDT Dean

Imagine

I M A G I N E YO U R G R A N D C H I L D R E N ’ S F U T U R E

How different their lives will be from ours! That pill you just swallowed? Your grandchildren won’t need it. A nanodevice residing inside their bodies will deliver its life-saving payload at exactly the right spot without damage to other tissues or organs.

Your grandchildren will be safer, too, as they go to work in intelligent cars that react more quickly than human drivers to avoid accidents. Their cars, like their other forms of transportation, will use efficient fuel-cell technologies to lessen the energy crisis that once threatened the world. And those police officers you saw this morning? They are wearing bulletproof vests even stronger and tougher than the Kevlar that protected earlier generations. Meantime, robots that can smell and feel their surroundings perform some of the dangerous tasks that once fell to the people who keep us secure. Imagine such a future, and know that many more advances — ones we can’t even imagine — are possible. All because of engineers.

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“ If I could come back for another life, I would not want to be Bill Gates or Brad Pitt. I would want to be an engineering student, with the whole world open before me.” EDUARDO GLANDT Dean

Imagine

I M A G I N E YO U R G R A N D C H I L D R E N ’ S F U T U R E

How different their lives will be from ours! That pill you just swallowed? Your grandchildren won’t need it. A nanodevice residing inside their bodies will deliver its life-saving payload at exactly the right spot without damage to other tissues or organs.

Your grandchildren will be safer, too, as they go to work in intelligent cars that react more quickly than human drivers to avoid accidents. Their cars, like their other forms of transportation, will use efficient fuel-cell technologies to lessen the energy crisis that once threatened the world. And those police officers you saw this morning? They are wearing bulletproof vests even stronger and tougher than the Kevlar that protected earlier generations. Meantime, robots that can smell and feel their surroundings perform some of the dangerous tasks that once fell to the people who keep us secure. Imagine such a future, and know that many more advances — ones we can’t even imagine — are possible. All because of engineers.

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REVOLUTION PENN PRODUCES “The deep analytical toolkit I developed as an engineering student has been the cornerstone of my success. What I really do for a living is help people structure problems, and I use that toolkit all the time. There may be other schools that deliver breadth and depth as well as Penn Engineering, but there can’t be a school that does it better.” MICHAEL ZISMAN, GEE’73, GR’77 Managing Director, Internet Capital Group Pioneer in commercializing electronic mail technology

Campaign Goals To make history in technology, Penn Engineering has set these goals: • Students – To open our doors, and the doors of the world, to the most gifted students from all walks of life: $40 million • Faculty – To recruit and retain faculty who will collaborate with colleagues across the campus, revolutionizing research and education: $50 million • Facilities – To build a new nanoscale research center and modernize spaces in the Moore School and Towne Building: $50 million • Unrestricted Funds – To sustain the quality of schoolwide programs, gifts to the Dean’s Discretionary Fund and Engineering Annual Giving: $10 million

ENGINEERS ARE MAKING HISTORY AS NEVER BEFORE. They are building it, looping it, networking it, connecting it with nanowires and assembling its molecules into new structures. They are affecting the quality of life in every sphere across every inch of the planet. And the engineers leading this technological revolution will be here, at Penn Engineering — with your help. Never before have our distinctive strengths been so perfectly attuned to the times. The future depends on a new breed of technologists, firmly grounded in engineering’s fundamentals but able to work hand in hand with physicists and chemists, biologists and physicians, finance gurus and economists of the first rank. No other school of engineering places faculty and students in such close proximity to powerhouses in so many fields. As part of the University of Pennsylvania’s Making History campaign, Penn Engineering seeks to raise $150 million by 2012. The infusion of support from a successful campaign will take us to the next level as leaders in technology. We invite you to join us in making history at Penn Engineering.

Among CEOs in the Fortune 500, 23 percent hold degrees in engineering. In fact, engineering degrees are this group’s most common undergraduate degree.

T H E F U T U R E S TA R T S H E R E

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REVOLUTION PENN PRODUCES “The deep analytical toolkit I developed as an engineering student has been the cornerstone of my success. What I really do for a living is help people structure problems, and I use that toolkit all the time. There may be other schools that deliver breadth and depth as well as Penn Engineering, but there can’t be a school that does it better.” MICHAEL ZISMAN, GEE’73, GR’77 Managing Director, Internet Capital Group Pioneer in commercializing electronic mail technology

Campaign Goals To make history in technology, Penn Engineering has set these goals: • Students – To open our doors, and the doors of the world, to the most gifted students from all walks of life: $40 million • Faculty – To recruit and retain faculty who will collaborate with colleagues across the campus, revolutionizing research and education: $50 million • Facilities – To build a new nanoscale research center and modernize spaces in the Moore School and Towne Building: $50 million • Unrestricted Funds – To sustain the quality of schoolwide programs, gifts to the Dean’s Discretionary Fund and Engineering Annual Giving: $10 million

ENGINEERS ARE MAKING HISTORY AS NEVER BEFORE. They are building it, looping it, networking it, connecting it with nanowires and assembling its molecules into new structures. They are affecting the quality of life in every sphere across every inch of the planet. And the engineers leading this technological revolution will be here, at Penn Engineering — with your help. Never before have our distinctive strengths been so perfectly attuned to the times. The future depends on a new breed of technologists, firmly grounded in engineering’s fundamentals but able to work hand in hand with physicists and chemists, biologists and physicians, finance gurus and economists of the first rank. No other school of engineering places faculty and students in such close proximity to powerhouses in so many fields. As part of the University of Pennsylvania’s Making History campaign, Penn Engineering seeks to raise $150 million by 2012. The infusion of support from a successful campaign will take us to the next level as leaders in technology. We invite you to join us in making history at Penn Engineering.

Among CEOs in the Fortune 500, 23 percent hold degrees in engineering. In fact, engineering degrees are this group’s most common undergraduate degree.

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CONNECTION Penn Engineering Innovates Penn Engineering has: • Built ENIAC, the world’s first all-electronic, large-scale, general purpose, digital computer. • Established the first endowed chair at Penn in 1877. • Developed the first continuously offered curriculum in chemical engineering. • Created the first integrated undergraduate program in management and technology.

TODAY PENN ENGINEERING STUDENTS CRISSCROSS THE CAMPUS, pursuing double majors, taking courses that connect engineering to business, the environment and health. They pursue independent studies and conduct original research with faculty mentors. They clamor to enroll in joint-degree programs, such as Digital Media Design and the Jerome Fisher Management and Technology Program. Their professors form study groups of graduate students from different schools and create multidisciplinary teams for research. Founded to reinforce the practical side of Ben Franklin’s vision for a university that would teach “all things useful and ornamental,” Penn Engineering has always benefited from its position within a great teaching and research university. Now our connections to Penn’s intellectual resources open up still greater possibilities. Penn Engineering has worked smart and grown strategically to build on its special strengths. Every faculty appointment and every building over the last decade have carried us toward very specific goals in our strategic plan. The investments we can make through this campaign’s success will allow us to realize the power of this new and wonderfully connected world.

Among other achievements, Penn Engineering graduates have invented the liquid crystal display, engineered a fresh-water system for Los Angeles, and led the first mission to the outer planets.

CHANCE ENCOUNTERS Vijay Kumar thinks about robots: how they share information, how they cooperate to complete tasks, how they can be controlled and coordinated to better serve human purposes. Kumar, the UPS Foundation Professor and Chair of Mechanical Engineering, had already done a lot of thinking about these topics when a chance encounter changed his professional life. “Understand that I knew nothing about biology, except what I learned in high school,” says Kumar. “Then, in the halls of the medical school, an infectious disease specialist named Harvey Rubin said something about how millions of molecules cooperate in a cell. I realized we engineers could build better robots if we understood how molecules work together.” Kumar and Rubin have since attracted millions in research funding and created curricula now taught in both schools. Kumar’s experience, repeated constantly by his colleagues, says volumes about why Penn is the perfect place to lead advances in engineering today. On Penn’s compact campus, encounters — formal and informal — change history.

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CONNECTION Penn Engineering Innovates Penn Engineering has: • Built ENIAC, the world’s first all-electronic, large-scale, general purpose, digital computer. • Established the first endowed chair at Penn in 1877. • Developed the first continuously offered curriculum in chemical engineering. • Created the first integrated undergraduate program in management and technology.

TODAY PENN ENGINEERING STUDENTS CRISSCROSS THE CAMPUS, pursuing double majors, taking courses that connect engineering to business, the environment and health. They pursue independent studies and conduct original research with faculty mentors. They clamor to enroll in joint-degree programs, such as Digital Media Design and the Jerome Fisher Management and Technology Program. Their professors form study groups of graduate students from different schools and create multidisciplinary teams for research. Founded to reinforce the practical side of Ben Franklin’s vision for a university that would teach “all things useful and ornamental,” Penn Engineering has always benefited from its position within a great teaching and research university. Now our connections to Penn’s intellectual resources open up still greater possibilities. Penn Engineering has worked smart and grown strategically to build on its special strengths. Every faculty appointment and every building over the last decade have carried us toward very specific goals in our strategic plan. The investments we can make through this campaign’s success will allow us to realize the power of this new and wonderfully connected world.

Among other achievements, Penn Engineering graduates have invented the liquid crystal display, engineered a fresh-water system for Los Angeles, and led the first mission to the outer planets.

CHANCE ENCOUNTERS Vijay Kumar thinks about robots: how they share information, how they cooperate to complete tasks, how they can be controlled and coordinated to better serve human purposes. Kumar, the UPS Foundation Professor and Chair of Mechanical Engineering, had already done a lot of thinking about these topics when a chance encounter changed his professional life. “Understand that I knew nothing about biology, except what I learned in high school,” says Kumar. “Then, in the halls of the medical school, an infectious disease specialist named Harvey Rubin said something about how millions of molecules cooperate in a cell. I realized we engineers could build better robots if we understood how molecules work together.” Kumar and Rubin have since attracted millions in research funding and created curricula now taught in both schools. Kumar’s experience, repeated constantly by his colleagues, says volumes about why Penn is the perfect place to lead advances in engineering today. On Penn’s compact campus, encounters — formal and informal — change history.

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T R A N S F O R M AT I O N PENN ATTRACTS SOME OF THE SMARTEST, most imaginative undergraduates in the world; and within that selective pool, some of the best choose to major in engineering. Their experiences at Penn transform them, and some will in turn transform their chosen fields. We must recruit students from every walk of life and then help them experience the power of technology. Today, Penn students spend their summers building a water system in Honduras and computer centers in Africa. They help students in Philadelphia’s K-12 classrooms share their excitement about the technologies that will shape all of their lives. To achieve these goals for access and engagement, Penn Engineering seeks increased endowment for both undergraduate aid and student programs. We also seek increased fellowship support for the graduate students who play a critical role in every aspect of Penn Engineering. They are the professors of the future and the engines that run our research programs now. They are essential to the recruitment of strong faculty, who are deeply concerned about the quality of the graduate students with whom they will work. As teaching assistants, graduate students support the faculty in delivering hands-on, personalized education to our undergraduates.

IDEAS IN ACTION

Campaign goal for student support: $40 million

Chrysta Irolla, ’08 A born entrepreneur, Chrysta Irolla won an Audience Pick Award at the Weiss Tech House’s Idea Slam for her invention, the SmartSock, which aids lower-limb amputees. Using a combination of sensors and dielectric elastomers to redistribute forces in the amputated limb, the SmartSock relieves pain caused by a prosthetic. Irolla got her idea from working with amputees in China during a Penn Engineering summer program that takes students into the field. Irolla says her part in the program “inspired me so much because I actually saw the results of my work, doing something really helpful for someone else.” Now, she combines her focus on biomechanics with business courses that will help her take her idea to market. Irolla says none of this would have been possible without the financial aid she received. “My financial aid package is the reason that I could come to Penn. It had to be a pretty persuasive package for me to afford that choice.”

Europe graduates three times as many engineers as the United States, and Asia five times as many.

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T R A N S F O R M AT I O N PENN ATTRACTS SOME OF THE SMARTEST, most imaginative undergraduates in the world; and within that selective pool, some of the best choose to major in engineering. Their experiences at Penn transform them, and some will in turn transform their chosen fields. We must recruit students from every walk of life and then help them experience the power of technology. Today, Penn students spend their summers building a water system in Honduras and computer centers in Africa. They help students in Philadelphia’s K-12 classrooms share their excitement about the technologies that will shape all of their lives. To achieve these goals for access and engagement, Penn Engineering seeks increased endowment for both undergraduate aid and student programs. We also seek increased fellowship support for the graduate students who play a critical role in every aspect of Penn Engineering. They are the professors of the future and the engines that run our research programs now. They are essential to the recruitment of strong faculty, who are deeply concerned about the quality of the graduate students with whom they will work. As teaching assistants, graduate students support the faculty in delivering hands-on, personalized education to our undergraduates.

IDEAS IN ACTION

Campaign goal for student support: $40 million

Chrysta Irolla, ’08 A born entrepreneur, Chrysta Irolla won an Audience Pick Award at the Weiss Tech House’s Idea Slam for her invention, the SmartSock, which aids lower-limb amputees. Using a combination of sensors and dielectric elastomers to redistribute forces in the amputated limb, the SmartSock relieves pain caused by a prosthetic. Irolla got her idea from working with amputees in China during a Penn Engineering summer program that takes students into the field. Irolla says her part in the program “inspired me so much because I actually saw the results of my work, doing something really helpful for someone else.” Now, she combines her focus on biomechanics with business courses that will help her take her idea to market. Irolla says none of this would have been possible without the financial aid she received. “My financial aid package is the reason that I could come to Penn. It had to be a pretty persuasive package for me to afford that choice.”

Europe graduates three times as many engineers as the United States, and Asia five times as many.

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PA S S I O N Penn Engineering Accelerates Research projects at Penn Engineering include: • Petaflop-scale computer simulations to advance our understanding of platelet aggregation, which will impact heart and stroke patients. • Molecular imaging that will provide unparalleled detail for detecting the earliest changes in cells that eventually become cancerous. • Polymer-carbon nanotubes, leading to new materials for enhanced heat removal for miniaturization and better performance in high-temperature electronics. • Optical circuitry, using nanoparticles as components to develop nanoscale optical devices and leading to the possibility of optical information processing at nanometer scales.

IMAGINATIVE THINKERS, INVETERATE TINKERERS, Engineering faculty follow their passions into the lab and the classroom and out to the field. Today they marry strength and flexibility in molecular structures that have never existed before, create search engines that scan biological material, and expand the boundaries of virtual reality. They undertake research difficult to accomplish on the short timelines demanded in the corporate world, and yet successfully bridge science and application. Talented and committed teachers, our faculty also delight in satisfying the growing appetite of Penn students for an education in technology. Enrollment in engineering courses has risen 36 percent in just two years, and nearly 1,500 students major in engineering every year. Penn Engineering has been as strategic in its faculty appointments as in its physical growth. We hire leading researchers who will reinforce our interdisciplinary strengths. Recent additions to the faculty tell the story of top-ranked professionals and rising stars, who feel the excitement at Penn Engineering. In addition to endowed support for faculty positions at senior, mid-career and junior levels, Penn Engineering welcomes term gifts to advance faculty research. Campaign goal for faculty support: $50 million

“The best research is done by people who not only have great scientific and technical talent but also have passion. Penn has some of the best students, scientists and engineers in the country, and they are people with passion, who believe in what they’re doing.” DR. GEORGE HEILMEIER, EE’58, NATIONAL MEDAL OF SCIENCE (1991), KYOTO PRIZE (2005)

IT’S A NETWORKED LIFE What do game theory and the Paris subway have to do with Internet routing? How does your position in a social or economic network advantage or disadvantage you, and why? In his course, Networked Life, Michael Kearns and his students explore how our world is connected — socially, economically, strategically and technologically — and why it matters. They dip into the emerging field of network science, examining the structures of phenomena as unrelated as economic markets, social movements and the spread of disease. “Some of most exciting reasons to be in Computer and Information Science have come about in the last five years,” says Kearns, holder of the National Center Chair in Resource Management and Technology. “We constantly update the curriculum to reflect those developments.” As for Kearns’s students? They are learning from a researcher at the leading edge of artificial intelligence, the same one whom Lehman Brothers and Banc of America Securities have consulted as their big thinker on machine learning. Equally extraordinary as researcher and teacher, Michael Kearns is the kind of professor Penn Engineering wants at every level of its faculty.

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PA S S I O N Penn Engineering Accelerates Research projects at Penn Engineering include: • Petaflop-scale computer simulations to advance our understanding of platelet aggregation, which will impact heart and stroke patients. • Molecular imaging that will provide unparalleled detail for detecting the earliest changes in cells that eventually become cancerous. • Polymer-carbon nanotubes, leading to new materials for enhanced heat removal for miniaturization and better performance in high-temperature electronics. • Optical circuitry, using nanoparticles as components to develop nanoscale optical devices and leading to the possibility of optical information processing at nanometer scales.

IMAGINATIVE THINKERS, INVETERATE TINKERERS, Engineering faculty follow their passions into the lab and the classroom and out to the field. Today they marry strength and flexibility in molecular structures that have never existed before, create search engines that scan biological material, and expand the boundaries of virtual reality. They undertake research difficult to accomplish on the short timelines demanded in the corporate world, and yet successfully bridge science and application. Talented and committed teachers, our faculty also delight in satisfying the growing appetite of Penn students for an education in technology. Enrollment in engineering courses has risen 36 percent in just two years, and nearly 1,500 students major in engineering every year. Penn Engineering has been as strategic in its faculty appointments as in its physical growth. We hire leading researchers who will reinforce our interdisciplinary strengths. Recent additions to the faculty tell the story of top-ranked professionals and rising stars, who feel the excitement at Penn Engineering. In addition to endowed support for faculty positions at senior, mid-career and junior levels, Penn Engineering welcomes term gifts to advance faculty research. Campaign goal for faculty support: $50 million

“The best research is done by people who not only have great scientific and technical talent but also have passion. Penn has some of the best students, scientists and engineers in the country, and they are people with passion, who believe in what they’re doing.” DR. GEORGE HEILMEIER, EE’58, NATIONAL MEDAL OF SCIENCE (1991), KYOTO PRIZE (2005)

IT’S A NETWORKED LIFE What do game theory and the Paris subway have to do with Internet routing? How does your position in a social or economic network advantage or disadvantage you, and why? In his course, Networked Life, Michael Kearns and his students explore how our world is connected — socially, economically, strategically and technologically — and why it matters. They dip into the emerging field of network science, examining the structures of phenomena as unrelated as economic markets, social movements and the spread of disease. “Some of most exciting reasons to be in Computer and Information Science have come about in the last five years,” says Kearns, holder of the National Center Chair in Resource Management and Technology. “We constantly update the curriculum to reflect those developments.” As for Kearns’s students? They are learning from a researcher at the leading edge of artificial intelligence, the same one whom Lehman Brothers and Banc of America Securities have consulted as their big thinker on machine learning. Equally extraordinary as researcher and teacher, Michael Kearns is the kind of professor Penn Engineering wants at every level of its faculty.

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I N N O VAT I O N TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO, engineering labs housed drafting tables and drill presses. Today they hold complex computer systems and the spaces for robots to fly overhead. They must encompass the wet labs and clean rooms essential to bioand nanotechnology. “Twenty-first century engineering is all about labs,” says Sue Davidson, the George A. Weiss Professor of Computer and Information Science. “You can’t do what we need to do in spaces designed for machine tools.” Penn Engineering’s strategic plan calls for new facilities to support each of its three strategic thrusts. Two of the buildings are magnificently completed: Levine Hall for information technology and Skirkanich Hall for bioengineering. Connected to the Towne Building and Moore School, these new facilities complete a core complex that also supports connections among the people within them. Still remaining is the Singh Center for Nanotechnology, a university-wide priority for Making History: The Campaign for Penn because of its importance to the University’s future. Penn Engineering also seeks funds to redesign spaces in the Towne Building, Moore School and Hayden Hall, each representing the best ideas of its day. Now all three need radical renovations to accommodate the computer labs and classrooms of modern engineering. Studio space for the program in Digital Media Design represents just one area of outstanding opportunity. Campaign goal for facilities: $50 million

THE FUTURE IS SMALL When Chris Murray moved from IBM to academia as the Richard Perry University Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science, he found the intellectual resources and the commitment to nanoscale research he sought at Penn. “Excellence in both the basic and applied sciences, the strength of the Medical School, and the partnership of Wharton and Penn Law to work on commercialization — it’s all here,” says Murray. “Plus, I saw the focus and energy that will drive leadership in research going forward.”

Today, human beings produce more transistors than grains of rice. We can keep up with our appetite for technology only if we innovate at the nanoscale.

But for Murray, the deciding factor was Penn’s readiness to tackle the challenge of a new facility. A joint project of Penn Engineering and the School of Arts and Sciences, the 80,000-square-foot Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology will provide clean rooms for fabrication of nanoscale devices and cutting edge tools essential to work at the nanoscale. The Center will also bring together faculty and students from many fields and serve as a catalyst for the growth of high-tech businesses that will support Philadelphia’s economic development. “Plans for this center embody the future of the university, focusing on interdisciplinary science and providing a portal that connects fundamental discoveries and technological impact,” says Murray. “Whoever does this most effectively will set the agenda for research over the next 25 years.”

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I N N O VAT I O N TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO, engineering labs housed drafting tables and drill presses. Today they hold complex computer systems and the spaces for robots to fly overhead. They must encompass the wet labs and clean rooms essential to bioand nanotechnology. “Twenty-first century engineering is all about labs,” says Sue Davidson, the George A. Weiss Professor of Computer and Information Science. “You can’t do what we need to do in spaces designed for machine tools.” Penn Engineering’s strategic plan calls for new facilities to support each of its three strategic thrusts. Two of the buildings are magnificently completed: Levine Hall for information technology and Skirkanich Hall for bioengineering. Connected to the Towne Building and Moore School, these new facilities complete a core complex that also supports connections among the people within them. Still remaining is the Singh Center for Nanotechnology, a university-wide priority for Making History: The Campaign for Penn because of its importance to the University’s future. Penn Engineering also seeks funds to redesign spaces in the Towne Building, Moore School and Hayden Hall, each representing the best ideas of its day. Now all three need radical renovations to accommodate the computer labs and classrooms of modern engineering. Studio space for the program in Digital Media Design represents just one area of outstanding opportunity. Campaign goal for facilities: $50 million

THE FUTURE IS SMALL When Chris Murray moved from IBM to academia as the Richard Perry University Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science, he found the intellectual resources and the commitment to nanoscale research he sought at Penn. “Excellence in both the basic and applied sciences, the strength of the Medical School, and the partnership of Wharton and Penn Law to work on commercialization — it’s all here,” says Murray. “Plus, I saw the focus and energy that will drive leadership in research going forward.”

Today, human beings produce more transistors than grains of rice. We can keep up with our appetite for technology only if we innovate at the nanoscale.

But for Murray, the deciding factor was Penn’s readiness to tackle the challenge of a new facility. A joint project of Penn Engineering and the School of Arts and Sciences, the 80,000-square-foot Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology will provide clean rooms for fabrication of nanoscale devices and cutting edge tools essential to work at the nanoscale. The Center will also bring together faculty and students from many fields and serve as a catalyst for the growth of high-tech businesses that will support Philadelphia’s economic development. “Plans for this center embody the future of the university, focusing on interdisciplinary science and providing a portal that connects fundamental discoveries and technological impact,” says Murray. “Whoever does this most effectively will set the agenda for research over the next 25 years.”

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T H E F U T U R E S TA R T S N O W To learn how you can support the campaign, contact: George W. Hain III Executive Director, Development Penn Engineering 215-898-6564 ghain@seas.upenn.edu

PENN ENGINEERING IS A COMMUNITY ALIVE WITH CHANGE, exploring the ever-moving frontiers of technology. We have the leadership of a visionary dean and a Board of Overseers that encompasses not only engineers, but also business leaders and venture capitalists. We have faculty who share a deep passion for innovation. Together, all of them are driven by their belief that technology can help resolve every major problem confronting the world today. Penn Engineering’s time has come. Our society needs innovators who will pursue new knowledge across the boundaries of the old disciplines. Such leaders will hone their minds and harness them to great purposes at Penn. Benjamin Franklin, the first technologist, would indeed be proud of his heirs. By supporting Penn Engineering, donors who want to make an impact can do no better. We have assembled all the elements to lead engineering research and education in the 21st century. Now we need the facilities, endowment and unrestricted support to open a new era in our history. The future starts here, and the future starts now.

“Technology is the best investment. I'm very excited by what is happening at the Engineering School. We're tremendously focused and well-managed, and our rankings are elevated as a result of that. The campaign will give us the capital to continue building upon our leadership and breaking new ground.” PETER SKIRKANICH Founder and President of Fox Asset Management, Inc. Campaign Co-Chair

“I couldn’t be more thrilled with Skirkanich Hall, but what really excites me are the interactions going on inside. There’s vibrancy and momentum. The Engineering students just astound me every time I talk to them.” ANDREW RACHLEFF General Partner, Benchmark Capital Campaign Co-Chair

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Steege/Thomson Communications with GHI Design


T H E F U T U R E S TA R T S N O W To learn how you can support the campaign, contact: George W. Hain III Executive Director, Development Penn Engineering 215-898-6564 ghain@seas.upenn.edu

PENN ENGINEERING IS A COMMUNITY ALIVE WITH CHANGE, exploring the ever-moving frontiers of technology. We have the leadership of a visionary dean and a Board of Overseers that encompasses not only engineers, but also business leaders and venture capitalists. We have faculty who share a deep passion for innovation. Together, all of them are driven by their belief that technology can help resolve every major problem confronting the world today. Penn Engineering’s time has come. Our society needs innovators who will pursue new knowledge across the boundaries of the old disciplines. Such leaders will hone their minds and harness them to great purposes at Penn. Benjamin Franklin, the first technologist, would indeed be proud of his heirs. By supporting Penn Engineering, donors who want to make an impact can do no better. We have assembled all the elements to lead engineering research and education in the 21st century. Now we need the facilities, endowment and unrestricted support to open a new era in our history. The future starts here, and the future starts now.

“Technology is the best investment. I'm very excited by what is happening at the Engineering School. We're tremendously focused and well-managed, and our rankings are elevated as a result of that. The campaign will give us the capital to continue building upon our leadership and breaking new ground.” PETER SKIRKANICH Founder and President of Fox Asset Management, Inc. Campaign Co-Chair

“I couldn’t be more thrilled with Skirkanich Hall, but what really excites me are the interactions going on inside. There’s vibrancy and momentum. The Engineering students just astound me every time I talk to them.” ANDREW RACHLEFF General Partner, Benchmark Capital Campaign Co-Chair

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Steege/Thomson Communications with GHI Design


PENN ENGINEERING 123 TOWNE BUILDING, 220 SOUTH 33RD STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19104-6391

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Penn Engineering