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DISCOVER

ST. CHARLES COMMUNITY COLLEGE MAGAZINE | VOL. 1, ISSUE 1

WHERE ENTREPRENEURS

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PA R T N E R S H I P S ARE FORMED

Jared Arms SCC ALUM


ON THE COVER: Thanks to the relationships Rex McKanry, assistant professor of computer science, has helped forge over the years, St. Charles Community College students and alums like Jared Arms are now benefiting from a shared space at OPO Startups on Main Street in St. Charles. The incubator space for digital startups is available to SCC students and alumni on Wednesdays at no cost to them. To learn more about Jared’s story and SCC’s relationship with OPO, see p. 8.

JUNE 2017

IN THIS ISSUE 3

President’s Message

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A Community College Workforce

Development Network Is Born

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SCC Expanding the Digital Classroom

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Startup Space Offers New Opportunities

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Air Force Veteran Finds Comfort in Art

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Recent Grad Reflects on Growth at SCC

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SCC Knows STEM

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In the News

SCC BOARD OF TRUSTEES

SCC LEADERSHIP

PRESIDENT MS. JEAN EHLMANN

PRESIDENT DR. BARBARA R. KAVALIER

VICE PRESIDENT MR. WILLIAM PUNDMANN

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AND STUDENT AFFAIRS DR. JOHN BOOKSTAVER

TREASURER MS. SHIRLEY LOHMAR SECRETARY MS. PAMELA CILEK TRUSTEE MS. ROSE MACK TRUSTEE MS. MARY SCHNARE STODDEN

VICE PRESIDENT FOR HUMAN RESOURCES MS. DONNA DAVIS VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES MR. TODD GALBIERZ VICE PRESIDENT FOR ENROLLMENT & MARKETING SERVICES MS. HEATHER MCDORMAN VICE PRESIDENT FOR COLLEGE ADVANCEMENT AND PLANNING MS. KASEY MCKEE CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER MR. CHAD SHEPHERD


A letter from the SCC

PRESIDENT Dr. Barbara Kavalier

As I complete my one-year anniversary as President of St. Charles Community College, I can reflect on the rewarding experience of getting to know the people, programs, partners and community that define this extraordinary institution. One way I want to inform constituents like you about the college is through the pages of this new publication, Discover. I encourage you to read and learn about the stories that are making an impact on our students and area residents. Throughout the last year, the college has enhanced its focus on workforce development and STEM-related programs and training to help meet the needs of employers and transition students to well-paying jobs in high-demand careers. One example includes the work of the SCC Computer Science Program and the entrepreneurs leading the charge at the Old Post Office at the OPO Startups – providing affordable workspace and access to our students. Another example points to the expansion of our Nursing and Allied Health programs. While you will learn about our standout faculty and students, also featured inside is the exciting work done by the Missouri Community College Association in creating the Workforce Development Network which allows businesses to work with community colleges, like SCC, that offer training in focused areas of industry regardless of service area boundaries. I am encouraged by the partnerships that have been strengthened in recent months and hopeful as new partnerships and programs take shape. Thank you for taking the time to review this inaugural issue of Discover and for your support of St. Charles Community College.

Sincerely,

Barbara R. Kavalier, Ph.D. College President

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SCC joins state-wide network to take on top issue facing Missouri

BUSINESSES BY BRYNNE CRAMER

When Missouri businesses called for a stronger workforce, the state’s community colleges answered by joining forces to help ensure the availability of just that. St. Charles County leaders joined St. Charles Community College March 14 at RK Stratman, Inc., a screen printing company located in Wentzville, Mo., to sign a proclamation affirming the college’s role in the new Missouri Community College Workforce Development Network and its ongoing commitment to SCC’s workforce partners. This proclamation came less than a week after a joint announcement was made by all 12 of Missouri’s community colleges at the state capitol establishing the Missouri Community College Workforce Development Network to address this long-standing challenge facing Missouri businesses. The network tackles what groups like the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry and other economic developers have said for years, namely that the state’s workforce system needs to change in order for Missouri to compete with other states for job creation.

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“It can be difficult to recruit employees with the skill sets we need already in place,” said Heather Schneider, training and communication coordinator at RK Stratman. “Fortunately, we have been partners with SCC for more than 15 years now. This partnership has allowed us to invest in manufacturing targeted training.” With this network, college officials say SCC will be able to continue strong partnerships, like that of RK Stratman, as well as expand and establish new ones to better serve the state of Missouri. “We feel proud of the work we have done, with the help of SCC and the state of Missouri, to invest back into our local workforce with skills training that benefits our employees and the state’s economy,” Schneider said. “I want people to understand what an extraordinary agreement this is,” Todd Richardson, Missouri Speaker of the House, said at the statewide event held March 9. “If you look at the economic development activity that happens in our state, community colleges are an essential component of the state’s economic engine, and this agreement today is only going to improve their ability to serve the needs of the state and help us develop the type of trained, educated workforce that today’s employers need.”

The most significant change resulting from the creation of the network is that through their local community college, businesses – regardless of their location – will have access to resources at every college in the state. Previously, procedural and geographic barriers prevented colleges from working outside of their mandated service areas. This meant that if a business approached a college with a specific training need but that college didn’t have expertise in that field, then the business may not have been able to get the workforce training its employees needed. Businesses can now establish partnerships with community colleges that have the programs they are seeking even if that college is out-of-district. “This change will allow us to better focus on meeting the needs of businesses and industries at no additional cost to the state,” said SCC President Barbara Kavalier, Ph.D. “Together, we will leave no stone unturned when serving businesses and students in the state of Missouri.” “By breaking down these barriers and drawing upon our collective resources, each college is going to be able to play to its strengths,” said Rob Dixon, Missouri Community College Association president and CEO. The agreement couldn’t have come at a better time.

ST. CHARLES COUNTY LEADERS JOINED SCC MARCH 14 AT RK STRATMAN IN WENTZVILLE TO SIGN A PROCLAMATION AFFIRMING THE COLLEGE’S ROLE IN THE NEW MISSOURI COMMUNITY COLLEGE WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT NET WORK AND ITS ONGOING COMMITMENT TO ITS WORKFORCE PARTNERS. FROM LEFT: DR. BARBARA KAVALIER, SCC PRESIDENT; TONY MATHEWS, WESTERN ST. CHARLES COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE CEO; HEATHER SCHNEIDER, TRAINING AND COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR AT RK STRATMAN; DR. JOHN BOOKSTAVER, SCC VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AND STUDENT AFFAIRS; AMANDA SIZEMORE, SCC DEAN OF CORPORATE AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT; AND ROB DIXON,

After weeks of back and forth over the budget this May, both Missouri chambers passed the Conference Committee’s final proposal for the budget including a 6.58 percent cut to community colleges – down from the initial proposal of a 9 percent reduction. The budget is expected to be signed by Governor Eric Greitens before the fiscal year start on July 1. According to Dixon, making the most of resources is going to be incredibly important given the budget cuts that community colleges and workforce development will experience in the coming years.

PRESIDENT/CEO OF THE MISSOURI COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASSOCIATION.

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SCC’S VIRTUAL CAMPUS GROWS BY BRYNNE CRAMER The number of students enrolled in at least one distance learning course tops out near 6 million annually, the most recent year in which full data is available, and 12.5 percent of those students took online courses exclusively, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Hanan Hasan stands among the crowd. “Online learning is more convenient for me,” Hasan said. “I have four children and cannot afford to put them in daycare. Without online learning, I would not have had the chance to

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continue my education. It saves me money that I was able to put towards a laptop and books instead of daycare. It also saves me time and effort – I don’t have to wait for a ride or walk to the bus stop.” With off-campus learning shifting to the forefront of higher education, St. Charles Community College is taking steps to meet students where they are – anywhere and everywhere. “The shift to online learning is due to access, flexibility, affordability and efficiency,” said Chad Shepherd, SCC chief informa-


tion officer. “Changing our educational model from lecturebased instruction to active learning utilizing technology and introducing an online program are the primary ways we are addressing this shift.”

“(Online learning) saves me money that I was able to put towards a laptop and books instead of daycare. It also saves me time and effort – I don’t have to wait for a ride or walk to the bus stop.”

Although the college has offered bits and pieces of distance learning in the past, SCC is launching its first fully online degree and certificate programs this fall. Students will be able to earn an associate of arts degree entirely online as well as numerous other degrees and certificates.

them all the tools they need with a 24 hours a day, 7 days a week support team on standby.

Despite their busy lives – career, family or social life – students who opt for online learning aren’t bound to physical class sessions. They gain access to the same quality education but with flexibility that fits their lifestyle.

SCC’s online programs also implemented an Early Alert model. The college’s academic advisors receive an automated alert if a student starts to fall behind, so they get the extra support they need right when they need it most.

According to Shepherd, It’s just one way SCC is empowering students with freedom, and the benefits to students are endless.

“Our online campus will better serve our students using the modality that best fits their learning style and circumstances,” Shepherd said.

Aware the online environment is not for everyone, SCC has created an online orientation to help future students decide whether an online degree option is right for them. Students can enter the program with confidence they are making the best choice.

Whether those circumstances involve caring for a family, like Hasan, or something else, SCC’s online campus provides an ever-evolving student body a chance to continue their education. “I feel very blessed to have the wonderful opportunity of online learning,” Hasan said.

– Hanan Hasan, SCC student

“We are also building quality courses via Quality Measures and offering services to students to help ensure their success in online learning,” said Angie Hampel, learning system support specialist. SCC tutors are ready to work with students online. And forget the technical difficulties. Students at SCC also gain access to Canvas, a state-of-the art learning management system, giving

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OPO Startups space in Old St. Charles

A BOON FOR ALL BY BRYNNE CRAMER

Not everyone has what it takes to became an entrepreneur, but as Walt Disney, co-founder of Walt Disney Company once said, “The way to get started is to quit talking and begin doing.” Jared Arms decided to “begin doing” in July 2013 by creating Kylar.io, an Android app development company that helps people connect and share information and creates and sustains a global information technology environment. When Jared, a St. Charles Community College alum, heard about the partnership established in February between SCC and OPO Startups, he jumped at the opportunity to take advantage of the space. The partnership gives SCC students and alumni free access to the co-working center from noon-8 p.m. on Wednesdays. “The OPO Startups space is beneficial because I can build a network, the space is free and I have a variety of talents available at my fingertips,” Arms said.

OPO STARTUPS IS A SPACE THAT CERTAINLY INSPIRES CREATIVITY, HOME TO

He says he uses the space to take part in entrepreneurial activities that help him learn, launch and grow his own business as well as support others.

MORE THAN 50 SMALL COMPANIES. LOCATED AT 119 SOUTH MAIN STREET

“ One of my classes required students to complete a major computer science related project which they presented to their peers and business leaders from our advisory committee at the end of the semester” said Rex McKanry, SCC assistant professor of computer science. “Some students expressed an interest in using their project as a seed for a startup, which is how this sponsorship was born.”

building complex on Main Street in St. Charles. “Our members are focused on tech and design with some business-to-business services,” said Megan McKissen, OPO Startups community manager. “Most are in the startup phase, some are currently scaling and others are existing small businesses.”

“In the spirit of collaboration and networking, giving our students and alumni the ability to connect with these entrepreneurs and experts in a common space is truly invaluable to our community,” said Lauren Dickens, interim dean of business, science, education, math and computer science at SCC. “The OPO attracts brilliant entrepreneurs. Pairing those minds with our exceptional students at SCC – I am genuinely excited to see the great work that comes from this,” Dickens said. Located in the newly renovated Old Post Office (OPO) building in St. Charles, the 10,000-square-foot facility provides regional startups with affordable workspace and access to mentors, potential investors, programming, educational resources and a community of local entrepreneurs. OPO currently hosts more than 50 companies over a five-

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IN ST. CHARLES, OPO STARTUPS IS EASILY ACCESSIBLE TO SCC STUDENTS AND ALUMNI THROUGHOUT THE AREA.

Members have access to weekly events where members can collaborate and network. Educational events include OPO Tech Talks, which are open to the public, and bi-annual demo days. Outside groups such as LaunchCode and Ice House have presented as well. “Notable OPO graduates, who have outgrown our space, include Switzer Creative and Liviara, a luxury lingerie company whose underwear was recently worn by Beyoncé in her pregnancy announcement,” McKissen said.

The OPO Startups is a tech-centric joint venture between the Economic Development Center and private investor Randy Shilling. Membership starts at $75 per month for a drop-in membership and progresses to co-working offices and suites. For more information, visit opostartups. com or contact Rex McKanry at rmckanry@stchas.edu.


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SCC’s art program serves as

HEALING OUTLET for STUDENT VETERAN BY AMBER PETERSON He’s now a nationally showcased artist and a “model student.” But Gregory Miller’s journey at St. Charles Community College didn’t start out all that different from other high school graduates. He initially took a few classes after graduating from Francis Howell High School, but he didn’t fully commit. Then, in 2003, he joined the Air Force. At first, he was attached to the 507th Civil Engineering Squadron at Tinker Air Force Base (AFB), Okla., but subsequently transferred to the 932nd Civil Engineering Squadron at Scott AFB, located in Illinois, which enabled him to pursue a career in art when not performing Reserve duties. In 2005, Miller deployed to San Vicente, El Salvador, on a humanitarian mission for the construction of an education complex. He worked alongside El Salvadorian troops, ensuring foundations were correctly laid, masonry walls properly erected and 3,000-plus blocks were precisely placed. In May 2008, his unit was called up to serve a six-month tour in Kirkuk, Iraq. The effects of daily mortar rounds and bombings quickly took their toll on Miller, especially when an officer was hit by a sniper on base, and he witnessed the aftermath of several people injured by a gate bombing. “When I came home in September of 2008 I was an angry person,” Miller said. “By February 2009, I had attempted suicide for the first of many times. I was then diagnosed with PTSD and medically retired from the Air Force in 2010. That’s when I decided to come back to SCC and finish the classes I had started.”

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“SCC is an ideal starting point for veterans who want to further their education but who sometimes struggle to find their feet after the military,” said Andrew Gates, financial aid officer and veteran services coordinator. “We allow veterans to work at their own pace and offer a safety net for them while they’re here,” Gates said. “Student veterans at SCC are never far from personal help and peer support, whether it be through the dedicated office of Veterans Services or through our active Student Veterans Organization.” During Miller’s service, he was often found graffitiing the base with art from the different squadrons. His detailed work in El Salvador also spoke to his artistic ability. Gregory has since decided to turn his longtime passion of art into more


than just a hobby and is now working toward an Associate of Fine Arts degree in Studio Art at SCC. “Greg is the model student,” said Curt VanGeison, SCC professor of communications. “He doesn’t cut corners or take the easy way out; he is professional, hardworking and inspiring to others.” “I was impressed with him from the first day of class,” VanGeison said. “He disclosed to his classmates that he is a veteran who suffers from PTSD and that art has been therapeutic in managing it.” Greg works in many different mediums, from paint to woodcraft. He currently assists the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program with an art therapy program called “Painting With a Purpose,” which teaches Wounded Warriors the skills they need to paint a picture and, invariably, gives them skills they need to aid their own personal recovery. “As a wounded warrior myself, I was afforded the

opportunity to share my talents and expertise to help bring healing through art,” Miller said. “I currently attend six adaptive sports camps, at various USAF bases, where we provide art therapy in the evenings. The art projects consist of acrylic painting, in which the warrior can go freestyle or follow along as I guide them from beginning to end.” Each November, during Warrior Care Month, the Wounded Warrior Healing Arts Exhibit is hosted. The exhibit chooses service members from each branch of service to display their artwork inside the Pentagon. The warriors are chosen by a committee and invited to attend a viewing, educating all in attendance. In April 2017, Gregory was chosen. “Myself, along with a few other warriors from each branch, were invited for a special presentation as our work was displayed through a lithograph for an entire year.” What’s next for Miller? He plans to continue his education at SCC and broaden his abilities while continuing to bring healing through art.

Gregory Miller, SCC alum, assists the Air Force Wounded Warrior Program with an art therapy program called “Painting With a Purpose.” During Warrior Care Month, the Wounded Warrior Healing Arts Exhibit is hosted. The exhibit chooses service members from each branch of service to display their artwork inside the Pentagon. In April 2017, Gregory was chosen.

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Leadership role helps SCC

STUDENT BLOSSOM BY AMBER PETERSON Who comes to mind when you hear the term “go-getter”? At St. Charles Community College, one such person is Olivia Dinwiddie, 2016-2017 Student Government President. At Francis Howell High School, Dinwiddie was a member of the marching band, president of French Club and webmaster for the Drama Club. She was also a member of the National Honor Society and participated in the A+ Scholarship Program. Her hunger increased. When she came to SCC in 2015, she became a student worker for the Student Activities Office, which led her to join Cougars Activities Crew, Cougars Care, SCC’s Honors Program, Phi Theta Kappa and the Student Government Association. “I had built positive relationships with many of SCC’s students, faculty and staff while I was working in the Student

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Activities Office. Becoming involved campus-wide only seemed natural,” Dinwiddie said. Kelley Pfeiffer, associate dean of student success, applauds Dinwiddie for her ability to connect with others and allow all voices to be heard without judgment. “Not only is she extremely intelligent, graduating with a 4.0, but she’s also extremely empathetic, always concerned about others and making sure she does the best she can to help them.” Dinwiddie became such a staple in the campus community it seemed only fitting that she would take over the reigns of the Student Government Association (SGA) when the former president graduated. “Farhan (Babar) asked me if I was up for the challenge,” Dinwiddie recalled. “I remember feeling my stomach churn at the thought of it. I was anxious, yet excited. I felt


“Olivia accomplished a great deal during her time as Student Government president,” said Dr. Barbara Kavalier, SCC President. “She was a great representative for our college and community.” As president, Dinwiddie served both the SCC community as well as St. Charles County at large. She served on the Sts. Joachim and Ann Care Service Board of Directors as a Junior Board Member, acted as volunteer coordinator for the St. Charles County Mayors’ Charity Ball, led the Pledge of Allegiance at SCC’s graduation and more.

like I had just stepped out onto the precipice of something amazing and terrifying. Here was an opportunity to make a difference on the campus I had come to love.” Ultimately, Dinwiddie was nominated and voted in for the presidency. “I loved being Student Government president. Being in that position allowed me to build relationships with people I had never dreamed of getting to know. It was one of the greatest adventures of my life, while also being one of the most challenging.”

“I love SCC. I think it is incredible for the people and businesses in this community. I love to see how far it has come from its early days, and I think it has many more exciting things in store for its future.” Dinwiddie, who credits her SGA presidency with helping her grow and open up as a person, graduated with her Associate of Arts degree and is heading to the University of Missouri – St. Louis in the fall to work towards a bachelor’s degree in either social work or psychology. “I found out that once you say ‘yes’ to the things that scare you, the whole world opens up.”

Tricia Vossenkemper

EDWARD JONES SENIOR ESTATES SPECIALIST, SCC ‘09 Tricia became very involved with St. Charles Community College when she started attending full-time in 2007. She began working as a secretary in the Child Development Center and was a member of Phi Theta Kappa. “My proudest memory at SCC was being named Business Student of the Year in 2009.” Tricia credits SCC for setting a great foundation for her education and career. “The professors are incredibly knowledgeable and supportive. You can tell they genuinely care.”

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SCC biology professor shines a light on

STEM BY AMBER PETERSON

Teaching has always been a passion of Dr. Felicia Emery, biology instructor at SCC, so much so that every facet of her professional career has involved some teaching component. “After undergrad, I taught high school biology and physical science at St. Michael the Archangel High School in Baton Rouge, La.,” Emery said. “I left secondary education to pursue my master’s degree full-time. Even though I was new to graduate school with a full class load and research schedule, I still had the urge to continue teaching.” While Emery pursued her master’s degree in microbiology at Southern University, she also began serving as a biology and chemistry enrichment instructor at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Science and Mathematics Research Academy at Louisiana State University. “Teaching is a profession that encourages you to keep on learning. I am always finding different ways to keep up with the forever-changing nature of science and learn new things.” Emery went on to earn a doctorate in microbial pathogenesis, immunology and inflammation from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Emery’s mentor during graduate school, Mark Miller, knew early on that she would become a successful teacher. “When Felicia rotated in my laboratory as an incoming student, it was clear she was smart and motivated,” Miller said. “However, when I really knew that she would have a suc-

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cessful academic career was during the summer she taught at Southwest Tennessee Community College (SWCC), while still maintaining her research project. The people at SWCC were so happy with her teaching work that they asked her to come back the following summer.” Toward the end of graduate school, Emery began applying for teaching positions and post-doctoral fellowships. She came across a job posting for St. Charles Community College and the rest is history. “After my first interview, I was impressed with the Biology Department and the college as a whole; and after being hired, I realized that SCC was not just a place to work but rather a place to have and build a career.” Since she’s been at SCC, Emery has played a role in the evergrowing field of STEM, not only by teaching science, but also by participating in events on campus, like the Women in STEM panel that was held during Women’s History Month. “The event was very insightful. The panel discussed positive and negative experiences as women in the STEM fields, how women are viewed in the science field and what sparked our interest to pursue our career in science.” The panel, followed by a screening of the film Hidden Figures,


was the most well-attended Women’s History Month event. “STEM is a vital part of the world we live in. As such, there is a high demand for skilled workers in science, technology, engineering and math. I take pride in helping my students understand the relevance of STEM in our everyday lives as we evolve into a more tech- and innovation-dependent world.” SCC has been in the news recently for other STEM-related achievements and partnerships. St. Charles County Executive Steve Ehlmann presented SCC with a proclamation recognizing SCC’s partnership and participation in the national Hour of Code initiative. The Hour of Code is a nationwide yearly event to interest students in computer programming and other STEM fields. In January, SCC and OPO Startups formed a partnership, giving SCC students and alumni free access to the coworking center. The facility provides regional startups with affordable workspace and access to mentors, potential investors, programming, educational resources and a community of local entrepreneurs.

technology, engineering and math to our younger generations through the Fort Zumwalt School District STEM Advisory Board. “The Advisory Board consists of STEM educators and administrators as well as individuals who work in different STEM-based industries. We discuss ways that the school district can enhance student interest and success in the STEM pathways, as well as plan for STEM programming in the schools.”

“In a nutshell, STEM disciplines are all about solving problems. Good problem solvers must have depth of knowledge in their subject field as well as breadth of knowledge, which allows them to look at problems from many different directions. The SCC approach is to respond to the needs of the community by continually supplying the depth of knowledge in areas needed by students and employers, which complements the breadth of knowledge we already do such a good job of delivering.” - Dr. John Bookstaver, Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs

However, STEM isn’t just important on the college level. Emery has been instilling the importance of science,

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“Dr. Emery not only wants to truly see you succeed, she is also extremely knowledgeable and has a terrific sense of humor.” Emery’s hard work has not gone unnoticed. She was recently competitively selected to serve as a faculty/peer mentor with the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB).

At SCC, Emery has also joined on as an Honors Program professor and is a member of the Research Approval Committee (RAC), which supports a culture of scholarly endeavors and strives to protect the safety of human subjects by enforcing best research practices. “I love being a part of the Honors Program. I feel that it’s a great opportunity for students to engage in concepts, topics or content that has an increased layer of complexity.” Elizabeth Cromer, a student in Emery’s microbiology lab and lecture, attests to the professor’s teaching outside of the Honors Program. “Dr. Emery made microbiology, a subject that can be overwhelming, easy to understand,” Cromer said. “She goes the extra mile to connect with her students and makes sure they are learning the material in a way they can apply it.”

“Through this network, I will have the opportunity to attend academic conferences and interact with undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to serve as a peer and/or faculty mentor. My hopes are that this opportunity will help me to become a better scientist, teacher and mentor, and that it will be invaluable in developing my academic and professional career.” SCC students will benefit from Emery’s involvement because of the great networking opportunities available. Having an instructor in the FASEB network gives SCC access to and firsthand knowledge about certain student mentoring opportunities, undergraduate conferences and training opportunities. Emery already has accomplished much in her time at SCC, but she’s just getting started. “I have grown so much as an educator since joining SCC’s Biology Department. Teaching both inspires and energizes me, and I feel lucky that every day I get to work with our outstanding students. In the coming semesters here at SCC, I look forward to growing as an educator and empowering our students to develop an appreciation for and understanding of microbiology and the fundamentals of science.”

Denise Hahs, another of Emery’s students, seconds Cromer.

Andrew Lozano

SCC STUDENT, BIOCHEMISTRY MAJOR “I cannot stress enough how amazed I am with not only the quality of the education at SCC, but maybe more importantly, the personal care and concern from the professors that every student does well. The one-on-one time I received with my professors went a long way in helping me with my success at SCC.”

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SCC IN THE NEWS

Missouri Governor Eric Greitens signs ridesharing bill at SCC

John Bookstaver, Ph.D., named SCC Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs

St. Charles Community College welcomed Missouri Governor Eric Greitens on April 24 to sign House Bill 130. The new law establishes state-wide regulation making it possible for ridesharing services like Uber and Lyft to operate in Missouri.

SCC has selected John Bookstaver, Ph.D., as the next vice president for academic and student affairs.

“Today is a great day for jobs in Missouri,” Greitens said, as he addressed the crowd in the auditorium of the Daniel J. Conoyer Social Sciences Building. “Ridesharing companies like Lyft and Uber represent opportunity for thousands of Missourians who are looking to work.” “Innovation is key to Missouri’s future,” Greitens continued. “I know that opportunities, like this, that we are creating today can make the difference for veterans, can make the difference for students, can make the difference in couples who are retired, moms and dads who are looking to make a little bit of extra money.” In addition to legislators and SCC leadership, the Governor was flanked by members of SCC’s Student Veterans Organization in support of Uber’s platform of hiring returning veterans as drivers for the ridesharing company.

Dr. Bookstaver has spent more than 30 years in education, both in the classroom and in various leadership positions. His connection to SCC began in 1994 when he took two classes as a student. He began teaching chemistry at SCC in the fall of 1994 as an adjunct. He was selected Faculty of the Year by the St. Charles Community College Faculty Association in 2010 and was honored with the Emerson Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2010 and the Governor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2011. Dr. Bookstaver was named dean of the division of Business, Science, Education, Math, and Computer Science in 2012. “Dr. Bookstaver brings to this position a wealth of knowledge and experience as both a faculty member and administrator,” said Dr. Barbara Kavalier, SCC president. “As his supervisor, I have been impressed by John’s leadership abilities, his integrity and his unwavering commitment to our college. He is the consummate professional, demonstrating a gentle yet skillful approach to teamwork and decision-making.”

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SCC’s purchase of One Academy Place building allows for new, expanded programming SCC made history when the college closed on One Academy Place in Dardenne Prairie in February. This property will serve as the college’s first satellite location, and its initial intent will be to expand nursing and allied health offerings and develop additional workforce and industry programs. The 69,000-square-foot building was the former site of Barat Academy. It was purchased by Lindenwood in September 2012, and SCC leased approximately 26,000 square feet of the building’s space for its Nursing and Allied Health program under terms of the colleges’ partnership agreement from 2012-2017. The SCC Board of Trustees approved the purchase contract at its Dec. 5, 2016, meeting, and SCC finalized the purchase of the property for $9.45 million on Feb. 24, 2017. SCC plans to utilize the space to create a world-class, innovative learning environment that expands access to higher education and professional and career development for students, businesses and communities served, according to college officials.

Two SCC students named regional Breaking Traditions Awards winners SCC students Evan Bettey and Marsha Delcour received regional Breaking Traditions Awards from the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. The Breaking Traditions Awards honor students, educators and employers for their achievements related to nontraditional careers.

THE COLLEGE’S NEWEST BUILDING IS LOCATED AT ONE ACADEMY PLACE IN DARDENNE PRAIRIE, MO., ALONG TECHNOLOGY BLVD. A DEDICATION CEREMONY IS PLANNED FOR SEPT. 13, 2017.

SCC welcomes Chad Shepherd as Chief Information Officer SCC named Chad Shepherd as the college’s Chief Information Officer on April 3. This position has responsibility for SCC’s Administrative Computing, Network Computing, Distance and Online Learning Support and Technology Support. “Chad is an accomplished IT leader with extensive experience in deploying strategic technology solutions that improve the teaching and learning environment,” said Todd Galbierz, vice president for administrative services. “He believes in collaborating with campus colleagues to reach emerging technologies and implement solutions that yield the greatest benefit to the institution.”

Bettey is an occupational therapy assistant student at SCC. “Evan demonstrates the best qualities of a candidate who has entered a field dominated by the opposite gender,” said Courtney Barrett, SCC associate professor. “One of the most significant traits that Evan demonstrates is a willingness to immerse himself in the projects and assignments in order to receive the maximum benefit from them.”

The position continues to serve as a member of the President’s Cabinet.

Delcour is an SCC computer-aided drafting student. “Marsha is at the top of our historical list of high performing, inspirational and deserving candidates,” said David Niermann, SCC professor. “She is prepared, poised, articulate and motivated.”

“Mr. Shepherd brings a vast array of knowledge and experience to SCC,” said SCC President Barbara Kavalier, Ph.D. “I look forward to working with him to continue strengthening technology at SCC.”

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With more than 25 years of technology and management experience, Shepherd holds a Bachelor of Science degree in electronics technology from the University of Central Missouri. Before joining SCC, Shepherd led the Information Technology Division at St. Louis College of Pharmacy for 15 years.


GRADUATES GATHERED TO CELEBRATE THEIR ACHIEVEMENTS AT ST. CHARLES COMMUNITY COLLEGE ON MAY 13 FOR THE COLLEGE’S 29TH ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES. OF THE 264 GRADUATES WHO RECEIVED HONORS DISTINCTIONS, 28 RECEIVED HIGHEST HONORS, 82 RECEIVED HIGH HONORS AND 114 RECEIVED HONORS DISTINCTIONS.

June 2017 | 19


DISCOVER

Angela Maxvill

SCC STUDENT, SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT AND ATHLETE “SCC’s soccer team taught me commitment, dedication, passion, acceptance and so much more. This is my team, my family, and the game will never be the same without having all of these incredible, unique women next to me on the field.”

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Discover – St. Charles Community College (Vol. 1, Issue 1)  
Discover – St. Charles Community College (Vol. 1, Issue 1)  

"Discover" is the official magazine of St. Charles Community College.