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UNIVERSIT Y MAGAZINE

FALL 2017

PHOTO/MICHAEL WERNER

Giving Nature a Chance

Living Laudato Si’ PAGE 4


LET’S RACE, MAMA!

Congratulations to Dorothy Lerma MAED’18 and the 92 other racers on Team Katie! See YWCA Women’s Tri photos: flickr.com/stkates/albums

BOARD OF TRUSTEES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MARGARET AROLA FORD ’82 JEAN WINCEK, CSJ, ’62

KATHLEEN O’BRIEN ’67 KATHRYN CLUBB ’79 MEG GILLESPIE, CSJ, ’65 SUSAN HAMES, CSJ, ’68

JEAN DELANEY NELSON ’80 MICHAEL O’BOYLE SANDY VARGAS ’91 ROBERT WOLLAN

BRENDA WOODSON ’80

MAGAZINE ADVISORY BOARD ANNE BERG ’81 ELIZABETH RIEDEL CARNEY ’82 RAFAEL CERVANTES

LISA DUTTON ALAN SILVA HELEN WAGNER ’69 KELSEY WHALEY

EDITOR PAULINE OO MAOL Cert’14, MBA’17

ADDRESS CHANGES 651.690.6666 alumnae@stkate.edu

Full list of board members at stkate.edu/trustees

ONLINE mag.stkate.edu


UNIVERSIT Y MAGAZINE

FALL 2017

F EAT U R E S

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Living Laudato Si’ The Pope’s encyclical on the environment was a call to action. Here’s how four members of St. Kate’s community are responding. BY JULIE KENDRICK

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Degrees of Excellence Is a graduate degree your key to success in the new economy? BY ANDY STEINER

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In a League of Their Own First-generation students form club to navigate college together. BY PAULINE OO

PHOTO/HILARY STEIN ’14

St. Catherine University Magazine is published three times a year by the Office of Marketing and Communications with the St. Kate’s Mag Advisory Board. No part of this publication may be reprinted without permission. St. Catherine University was founded by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. Learn more: stkate.edu/ourhistory mag.stkate.edu/advisoryboard

INSIDE

Pastry chef Maddie Brehm ’15 loves a good macaron (not maca-ROON; think French president!). See page 8 for her story. PHOTO/REBECCA ZENEFSKI, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

TH E CO M M O NS 2

FROM THE PRESIDENT

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READERS WRITE

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KATIES IN ACTION

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OFFICE HOURS

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MY ST. KATE’S

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BY THE NUMBERS

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CLASS NOTES

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BEHIND THE SCENE

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DONOR TRIBUTE


FROM THE PRESIDENT

FROM THE PRESIDENT Fall is the season of renewed focus and new beginnings. Since January, we’ve engaged more than 600 individuals in focus groups — including students, faculty, staff, alumnae/i, Sisters of St. Joseph, Archbishop Hebda, and 11 corporations and large nonprofits — to help us with our strategic planning process. We’re calling this plan “Setting our Sails for 2028,” and we hope to have it approved by the Board of Trustees in February 2018. Additionally, 2,350 students, faculty and staff participated in three surveys. We asked many difficult, but important, questions. Among them: What is our mission? What is our vision? What values do we practice in our daily work? And what are the opportunities we have to be even stronger? While there’s still more refining to be done, we have a framework in place. Our refreshed mission statement is: We educate women to lead and influence. We educate at all degree levels through valuing and integrating the liberal arts and professional education within the Catholic intellectual tradition, emphasizing scholarly inquiry and social justice teaching as lived by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. We welcome a rich diversity of students, with a baccalaureate college for women at the heart of the university and graduate and adult colleges for women and men. Committed to excellence and opportunity, St. Catherine University develops leaders who act with integrity. Our revised vision statement is: St. Catherine University is respected globally for educating women who transform the world. Since 1905, strong and deep values have been our foundation. We proudly proclaim our enduring values: Academic Excellence, Community, Integrity, Social Justice, Reflection. With clearer articulation of our mission, vision and values, we have begun the important work of focusing on the key initiatives that will help us deliver even greater impact for our students, and the successful alumnae/i they will become. I look forward to sharing these strategic priorities in the spring edition of the magazine. Thank you for reflecting St. Kate’s values in who you are and how you impact those around you. You are our dearest treasure as you are the living endorsement of how we EDUCATE women to LEAD and INFLUENCE. ReBecca Koenig Roloff ’76, MBA

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Don’t live in the Twin Cities? Here are a few opportunities to catch me on the road: • November, Rochester, Minn. • January, Southern Calif. • March, Naples, Fla., and Phoenix, Ariz. More details: stkate.edu/alumnaechapters


READERS WRITE

READERS WRITE Editor’s note: In June, we invited you to take Mother Antonia on the road. Many of you did and your images are still coming in! See more photos at mag.stkate.edu or search #WheresAntonia on Twitter and Instagram. My name is Kathleen McLean Kinkead, Class of 1973. Attached (top left) is a picture of Mother Antonia with her niece, Antonia McHugh McLean ’48 (my mom), and Antonia Kinkead Barcel, Mother Antonia’s great, great, great niece (my granddaughter). This photo was taken about three months prior to my mother’s death on July 4, 2016. — Kathleen McLean Kinkead ’73, St. Paul St. Catherine University Magazine never fails to inspire and move me, representing as it does a very special place with a particularly kind approach to education. Thanks for sending it my way. — Carol DeBoer-Langworthy, former staff, Providence, RI I always love receiving the magazine. So many good stories and features that make me proud to be an alumna! — Molly Davy ’12, New York City I’m writing to commend you for the article “Switching Gears” (summer 2017). I am surprised more is not written about this topic as I imagine many St. Kate’s graduates could tell similar stories of switching vocations at least once — or more — in their lives. I have young adult daughters, all navigating their routes to careers. What I have consistently reminded them is that a liberal arts degree — in any major — trains one in the basic abilities of thinking, communicating, analyzing. Skills applicable to many fields of work. My daughters look at the road of my vocations as if they were inevitable, logical. Of course not! It’s been an unpredictable and fulfilling journey. I hope I have modeled to them that no matter the field they are drawn to — and what that is will likely change over their lifetime — they have the skills to succeed. Having a passion for what you do is critical to succeeding at it. The path of vocation may well be crooked — but oh, so interesting. — Louise Healey Henderson ’86, Indianapolis, Ind.

@stkateBIO June 21 Nice to see alum Bridget Newman ’08 on cover of @StKate mag. @mjmyersaries June 21 Cool to see what Dr. Pasricha and her students are doing with 3-D printing! (above, middle)

In “Portraits of Growth” (summer 2017), we asked: Do you remember your first year at St. Kate’s? bookmjeno I met the two best friends of my life. Still in close contact even though we live 4–5 hrs apart! mnjenrn I brought my comforter from my bed at home. And for my birthday in January, my crafty roommate made me matching pillows!

Write to us: St. Catherine University Magazine, 2004 Randolph Ave., Mail 4122, St. Paul, Minnesota 55105 or email: mag@stkate.edu. Letters may be edited for length or clarity.

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FEATURE

Living Laudato Si’ The Pope’s encyclical on the environment was a call to action for citizens of the world. Here’s how members of St. Kate’s community are responding. BY JULIE KENDRICK KATIE CAMPBELL ’02 TOOK THIS IMAGE OF HER COLLEAGUE AMELIA TEMPLETON WHILE REPORTING ON NEWLY DISCOVERED GLACIER CAVES ON OREGON’S MOUNT HOOD.

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“Our abuse of the Earth hurts the poorest among us. — Colleen Carpenter, theology professor

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cience and religion are often seen as opposing forces. But in 2015, Pope Francis created a union between the two in unprecedented ways, sparking new dialogue and understanding among scientists and people of faith. Nowhere is this more evident than in his messages about climate change. When climate-related natural disasters occur, none of us are immune — but those who are economically disadvantaged suffer the most. They’re least equipped to respond to droughts or escape widespread famine. The poor are less able to flee to safety or establish new lives in more secure regions when violent conflicts erupt as temperature rises and plants wilt. Faced with this situation, Pope Francis — who trained as a chemical technician before entering the priesthood — responded with Laudato Si’, the Catholic Church’s first-ever encyclical dedicated entirely to the environment. Its opening lines are taken from St. Francis of Assisi’s Canticle of the Creatures: “Be praised, my Lord, through our sister Mother Earth, who feeds us and rules us, and produces various fruits with colored flowers and herbs.” St. Kate’s faculty and alumnae share their reflections on this dialogue that intersects faith, science and hope.

Sarah Compton ’05, MAED’07 TEACHER, AUSTIN CAREER EDUCATION CENTER, CHICAGO

PHOTO/KATIE CAMPBELL/KCTS 9

Teaching science at a charter school for non-traditional high school students on the west side of Chicago has allowed this alumna to gain insights into the everyday reality of a population living with the challenges of poverty and violence. “They have incredibly difficult personal lives, and their lives are filled with stress,” she says. As Compton seeks ways to illustrate the importance of conservation and environmental protection to her students, she finds inspiration in the science-friendly approach illustrated in Pope Francis’ encyclical and in his wider-ranging public speeches. “What I appreciate about this pope is that he has a scientific background, but he focuses on the humanity of the issue,” she says. “He’s spoken out about how climate change inordinately affects economically disadvantaged populations.” In Compton’s classroom, she looks for examples from her students’ everyday lives to illustrate environmental lessons. “We’ve taken up issues like the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, which has a population

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STUDENTS LEARN THE IMPORTANCE OF BIODIVERSITY IN CLASSES TAUGHT BY SARAH COMPTON '05, MAED'07.

PHOTO/SARAH COMPTON ’05, MAED’07

throwaway culture or turn toward a lifestyle of moderation and the ability to be happy with less.” She says: “I find resonance in the encyclical’s call for ‘a return to that simplicity which allows us to stop and appreciate the small things, to be grateful for the opportunities which life affords us, to be spiritually detached from what we possess.’”

Katie Campbell ’02

similar to theirs,” she says. “When Chicago instituted an initiative that required shoppers to pay for plastic bags, the students were irritated, so we talked about the pros and cons.” Responding to her students’ lack of access to green space, Compton provides camping opportunities twice each year for students, along with other outdoor experiences. “We took a group of students on an overnight camping trip in the Cook County Forest Preserve, made possible in part through access to the Preserve’s Gear Library, which allowed them to borrow equipment like tents and sleeping bags,” she says. “It was a great opportunity for community building. Some of my students even handed me their phones and said, ‘Please take this; I want to enjoy this experience as much as I can.’”

Kate Barrett DIRECTOR, MYSER INITIATIVE ON CATHOLIC IDENTITY “Our tripartite mission in Catholic, liberal arts and women’s education demands that we work toward creating a healthier planet,” says Barrett, who helps the University’s faculty and staff infuse the Catholic identity in their day-to-day work. “Caring for our earth through our actions on campus, and in our homes and our communities is an expression of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondolet’s mission to ‘love God and the dear neighbor without distinction.’” Barrett finds applicable meaning in the encyclical’s urging to “take up an ancient lesson, found in different religious traditions and also in the Bible. It is the conviction that ‘less is more.’” In these words, she realizes an important choice: “We can either contribute to the

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ENVIRONMENTAL JOURNALIST, EARTHFIX When an inspiring St. Kate’s professor helped her find deeper meaning in a familiar story, Campbell began the journey that launched a 15-year journalism career covering the environment beat. “I had an Old Testament theology class with Chris Franke,” she recalls. “We spent a lot of time on the creation story and the idea that we humans have ‘dominion,’ which many interpret as ‘control.’ In fact, the way it was originally written meant something more like ‘sharing the responsibility to care for.’” Campbell notes that the encyclical draws attention to that misinterpretation: “We must forcefully reject the notion that our being created in God’s image and given dominion over the earth justifies absolute domination over other creatures.” Campbell is managing editor for video and a seventime Emmy-award winning producer/photographer at KCTS 9, the public television station in Seattle, Washington. She reports for EarthFix, an environmental journalism collaboration of public media stations in the Pacific Northwest. “In my job, I read a lot about climate change to understand its impact and what can be done to deal with it,” she explains. “So often, religion and science have been at odds. I never felt that way because of my St. Kate’s education, which made it possible to see the complexity and understand there are a lot of ways these things are in alignment. You don’t have to have one without the other. You can have faith and science at the same time.”

Colleen Carpenter ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND CHAIR, THEOLOGY DEPARTMENT Encyclicals have traditionally been written to a Catholiconly audience, but Laudato Si’ opens a wide embrace to every person living on the planet, not just Catholics or even Christians. “It’s exciting that this message is intended


ON THE COVER: CAMPBELL IN THE CASCADE MOUNTAINS OF WASHINGTON STATE.

for the rest of the world,” Colleen Carpenter says. “Pope Francis wants to talk to everyone.” And not only is he talking, he’s also listening, Carpenter says, as evidenced by wide-ranging citations, including one from a Sufi mystic. “This shows a willingness to embrace knowledge, wisdom and religious insight from well beyond the church.” The St. Kate’s community has evidenced a strong interest in what Carpenter terms “ecotheology,” the intersection of theology with ecology and environmental issues. “I recently taught a class called ‘Women, Earth, Creator Spirit.’ The class filled up, and many of the students weren’t necessarily interested in theology, but wanted to understand how faith can intersect with the problems of our age.” Catholicism’s traditional concern for social justice is at the foundation of the care for our common home, she says. Because environmental upheaval has a deeper impact on the crops, houses and land of those who have less to begin with, the poor are more likely to suffer the first and most lasting effects of climate change. “Pope Francis says that if we talk about caring for the Earth, we’re also talking about caring for the poor,” Carpenter explains. “Our abuse of the Earth most hurts the poorest

among us. So, if you’re serious about social justice, you also need to care for the Earth.” Appreciating the beauty of our natural world is often a key first step in creating a desire to preserve and protect it, Carpenter notes. When teaching a class on “Catholic Traditions,” she asks students to go around the campus and look for things of beauty — flowers, trees, duck pond and works of art. “One of the hallmarks of the Catholic tradition is an attention to sacramentality and the ways we meet God in all the things of the world. When we’re here on campus, we’re surrounded by beauty and goodness and can connect with the Divine One who created the world.”

DID YOU KNOW? Pope Francis’ encyclical was released with a medieval Italian title, rather than a formal Latin one. Laudato Si’, from a famous St. Francis of Assisi prayer, means “praise be to you.” Read the papal letter at stkate.edu/laudato-si.

PHOTO/REBECCA ZENEFSKI, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

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KATIES IN ACTION

Healing and happiness, one pastry at a time BY PAULINE OO It’s 3 a.m. and Maddie Brehm ’15 is ready to get her hands dirty. Over the next eight hours, this young and earnest pastry chef will create dozens of edible art — macarons, chocolate éclairs, petits fours, chouquettes — that will end up enticing customers at both Patisserie 46 and Rose Street Patisserie in Minneapolis. To say this longtime home-baker is living out a dream is an understatement; baking saved her life. For most of her childhood, Brehm went undetected with Lyme disease. She fought brain fog, chronic fatigue and stomach cramps that practically shackled her to the bed. She avoided dairy, gluten, soy, sugar — anything she thought could potentially make her feel ill. “I got

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sick when I was five,” she recalls, “and I was finally diagnosed correctly at 16 or 17.” To keep her mind off the persistent malaise, she spent hours sifting flour, beating eggs and measuring sugar. “For so long, I was really just living one day at a time,” says Brehm, who grew up in Eagan, Minnesota and earned a bachelor’s degree in Asian Studies and Language Studies. “I was anxious a lot and had trouble connecting with other people. Baking became my way to communicate. I was creating versions of all the things I couldn’t have because of food sensitivities. And that was OK. I was content just watching someone eat and truly enjoy what I made.” By the time she started at St. Kate’s — her health finally in check after a year of antibiotic treatment — Brehm began to flourish. She made the dean’s list and the prestigious Phi Beta Kappa honor society. She founded a club for commuter students and served as its president. She became a Senate member, orientation leader, writing tutor and teaching assistant for two English as a Second Language (ESL) courses. And through it all, she continued to turn out delicious confections for family and friends.


MADDIE BREHM’S PASSION FOR BAKING BRINGS TO MIND THE 1950 HIT SONG “IF I KNEW YOU WERE COMIN’ I’D’VE BAKED A CAKE…” HERE SHE IS WITH A FRIEND, ALEX KENNEDY ’15 MSN’19.

PHOTOS/REBECCA ZENEFSKI, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

But she never intended baking to be her career. She was set on being an ESL teacher. Things changed after a fall semester in Japan. “I was living with a family in a very old, traditional house with one burner on the stove and no oven,” she says. “I felt like I had lost my voice, that I couldn’t fully open up and share myself through what I knew best. I missed baking so much that when I returned to the United States, I think I baked 12 hours straight!” Brehm decided baking wasn’t just a pastime. It would be her work. After graduating, she entered a pastry program at Gastronomicom in Cap d’Agde, France. What followed was an internship at La Passagère, a Michelinstar restaurant in Juan-les-Pins with a staggering view of the French Riviera. “I had no experience in a professional kitchen and I barely spoke French, but there I was — because France was on my travel bucket list — and I held my own,” she says. “My time at St. Kate’s definitely helped me navigate a kitchen full of men, including a chef who didn’t speak English. The University’s supportive, womencentric environment taught me how to be a leader, how

to communicate, how to organize myself, how to help other people and, most importantly, how to stand up for myself.” Back in the Land of 10,000 Lakes, it’s 11 a.m. and Brehm’s ready to call it a day. She sleeps when most people are awake, and she labors away (Friday to Tuesday) when loved ones like her mom, Barbara O’Toole-Brehm ’83, are tucked in bed. Yet, even with an unorthodox schedule, Brehm finds solace in the art of baking. “Sometimes in today’s political climate, I feel guilty for just wanting to make cake,” she says. “But I think that it’s very important to have those little pieces of happiness in your life.”

TRY THIS! For her signature matcha raspberry macaron, see maddiebrehm.com More about Maddie: stkate.edu/brehm

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FEATURE

Degrees of Excellence Is a graduate degree your key to success in the new economy? BY ANDY STEINER

ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2017

PHOTO/REBECCA MCDONALD ’07, BFRESH PRODUCTIONS

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MERDI RAFIEI, WHO LEADS ST. KATE’S NEW HEALTH INFORMATICS PROGRAM, WITH MICHELLE WIESER, DIRECTOR OF THE MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA) PROGRAM, AND DR. AMY KELLY, PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT STUDIES MEDICAL DIRECTOR.

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generation ago, earning an undergraduate degree was all anyone needed to build a successful, lifelong career. Now, as job descriptions increasingly include a growing list of specialized skills and technical training, many employers consider a graduate degree a standard requirement for their most highly sought-after positions. You — or someone you care about — may be mulling over the decision of whether to take the next step, to pursue education beyond a four-year degree. Recently, we sat down with the directors of three of St. Catherine’s graduate programs — Amy Kelly, medical director of the Physician Assistant Studies program; Merdi Rafiei, assistant professor and Health Informatics program director; and Michelle Wieser, associate professor and MBA program director — to find out what they think: Will an advanced degree soon be required for most jobs? Is graduate school best for everyone? Who are the top candidates? Can a grad degree be affordable? And — what is the return on investment? Their answers were insightful — and surprising. Read on to find out where they stand: Question: What’s a graduate degree worth in today’s economy? Michelle Wieser: From an MBA perspective, I would say a graduate degree is invaluable. There are many situations in which an advanced level of education is absolutely essential for career advancement and changing your career. And then there’s the question of the economic impact of graduate education. I recently completed my dissertation research on the impact of the MBA on women and men, and found that earning an MBA was shown to increase total annual compensation for women by 208 percent, and for men by 80 percent. The quantitative benefit is very obvious in terms of compensation and career growth — and there is also the qualitative benefit of a boost in self-confidence and career satisfaction that these degrees give graduates. Merdi Rafiei: The world is moving in this direction. America has moved away from being purely a manufacturing economy to an intellectual property, digital

and service-oriented economy. Back in the ’80s and ’90s, a four-year college degree was sufficient to find gainful employment. Now, the world is a much more technically complex place, and you need to be able to solve complex problems — and provide expert insight on how those problems occurred in the first place. You can’t easily learn how to do that in four years. There’s a vast difference between a graduate degree and an undergrad degree. Undergraduate programs build a foundation based on existing knowledge. In graduate programs, we teach students to be creators of knowledge — leaders of the new economy. Question: Some observers have made the case that a four-year college degree isn’t right for everyone, that some people can build a successful career with a two-year degree or certificate-level training. Does that perspective undermine the worth of a graduate-level education? Rafiei: But not everybody wants to go to graduate school, nor are they a good candidate for graduate school. I’m not saying there is anything wrong with two-year and fouryear programs. But I am saying that graduate programs offer a higher level of education for those who are prepared to take on new intellectual challenges required to advance their careers. Amy Kelly: I do think that anyone who has a master’s degree could clearly articulate the difference between the depth of their knowledge and that of someone who hasn’t earned a master’s degree. The reality is that in many cases having a master’s degree sets you apart in the workplace. If you have a graduate degree, it signals to a potential employer that you are valuable because of your experience and expanded knowledge base and your willingness to take the next step. In the end, it makes you more competitive in the marketplace. Question: How would you describe the best candidates for graduate studies? Wieser: It’s going to differ by program, of course, but I think that consistently across disciplines the best-qualified candidates are people with a love of lifelong learning and

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a real passion to be a leader in an economy that depends on the knowledge and experience of highly trained workers. Kelly: In the Physician Assistant Studies program, applicants must meet basic requirements, including undergraduate prerequisites, performing well and meeting GPA standards. They should also have some life experience and specifically previous healthcare experience, as this allows them to be confident of their decision to enter our program. But, most importantly, the most competitive candidates have a strong sense of social responsibility and an inner desire to become a culturally competent global citizen. Rafiei: I think the best candidates for advanced degrees are seekers and adventurers: Christopher Columbus was inquisitive — but he stopped at the shores of the Bahamas. Lewis and Clark went all the way across America and mapped it out. You could say that Christopher Columbus is a four-year degree, and Lewis and Clark are a graduate degree. Question: When is the best time to enter a graduate program? Right out of college? A few years after entering the workforce? Wieser: Students must come to this decision in their own time. We have a woman in our program in her 50s,

A ST. KATE’S MBA CLASS IN SESSION.

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and she has over 30 years of work experience. Earning an MBA has been a lifelong goal for her, and she wants to switch careers and do something different. And then we have younger students with fewer years in the workforce. People have these “a-ha” moments, where they realize, “I really want to accelerate,” and that happens at many different points in their lives. Kelly: Our most competitive applicants have had some experience in the workplace, specifically in a healthcare environment. We have accepted students right out of undergraduate school, but there is a certain requirement for clinical hours, which takes time. In addition, seeing the world and being certain that this is what you want to do with your life is very important. This is a significant investment, so you want to be sure. Question: What about your applicants’ undergraduate backgrounds? Are liberal arts grads particularly appealing? Kelly: I am a strong proponent of a liberal arts education. It builds a good foundation of knowledge and prepares well-rounded students who are curious intellectually, and ready to take the next step into a master’s program. Rafiei: America needs more liberal arts graduates. The liberal arts help transform a person into a critical


PHOTOS/REBECCA ZENEFSKI, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

THIS EXAM LAB, LOCATED ON THE FOURTH FLOOR OF WHITBY HALL, IS USED BY STUDENTS IN BOTH THE PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT STUDIES AND NURSE PRACTITIONER PROGRAMS.

thinker. Unfortunately, too many schools are moving away from this and instead educating their students to simply be employable rather than future leaders. To me, the value in education is not having all the answers. Coming up with answers is easy — you can just use Google. A liberal arts education encourages a person to generate questions, and that’s what the world needs. Wieser: We are looking for curious minds. A liberal arts education breeds curiosity. Question: Do you think earning a graduate degree has a particular benefit for women? Wieser: It does help to close the income gap. When men and women enter an MBA program, the average income gap is 32 percent. In their first post-MBA job, the income gap has dropped to 14 percent. Men still make more, but the gap has been cut in half. Another good way of thinking about graduate education for women is that it builds confidence. And with increased confidence comes increased marketability. Kelly: Most graduate programs have a component related to leadership, including requirements for public speaking and leading small groups. I think these skills help build a woman’s confidence to lead, as well as to take on and achieve challenging goals. With a graduate degree, you are clearly more marketable in the workplace. If you are a female applying for a job with an MBA, you will stand out in a positive way from applicants who do not have a master’s-level degree.

Question: Graduate programs are expensive. How do your students make their education affordable? Wieser: Most of our students receive some form of financial aid while they are completing their degree. Plus, many continue to work full time, and quite a few employers provide financial support for their education. Rafiei: With a master’s degree in informatics, graduates can expect to make around $80,000 a year, if not more, right out of the gate. So there is a great return on investment. Say you’re making $50,000 or $60,000 a year now. You can earn back the cost of your tuition in less than one year. It’s a great investment. And because our program is 100 percent online, students can work at their current job while earning their degree. Kelly: St. Kate’s Physician Assistant Studies program is full time. You can’t work while you’re getting your degree. But after completing our program in 28 months, job security is remarkable and average annual starting salaries are impressive. In terms of future earning and career stability, the return on investment for this degree is absolutely guaranteed.

MORE INFO St. Kate’s offers more than 20 graduate degrees and certificate programs. Learn more at: stkate.edu/graduate

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FEATURE

In a League of Their Own First-generation students form club to navigate college together. BY PAULINE OO

ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2017

PHOTO/RYAN JOHNSON ’19

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FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: CARINA ISABEL RUIZ ’20, ELIZABETH JUAREZ DIAZ ’18 AND MIRNA SERRANO BARAHONA ’18 ON THE STEPS OF DERHAM HALL.

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ollege wasn’t a given for Mirna Serrano Barahona ’18. In fact, nobody in her family ever got an education past high school. Her parents would have been perfectly happy if their youngest daughter landed a full time job in her late teens. For Serrano Barahona, finding her way to St. Kate’s was only half the struggle. The other problem was not having loved ones truly understand her life as a university student. In 2014, she decided to establish the First Generation Scholars League so Katies like her never felt alone. “My mom’s from Honduras and my dad’s from El Salvador, and they didn’t finish high school,” says Serrano Barahona, a legal studies major. “So, I never had anyone close telling me, ‘you’re going to go to college’ or even asking me ‘what do you want to be when you grow up?’” Nearly 50 percent of U.S. college students are considered first generation, reports the National Center for Education Statistics. At St. Kate’s, they make up one-third of the student body — and mirror the nation’s growing racial, ethnic and socioeconomic makeup. “The interesting aspect about the first generation identity is that it includes students from all backgrounds, incomes and ethnicities,” says Roslyn Udairam, assistant director of Multicultural and International Programs and Services. “Typically, we don’t know who these students are unless they self-identify.” In addition to weekly meetings, in which networking, scholarship and internship opportunities are shared, the First Generation Scholars League organizes a variety of activities. Past events include “Homework and Chili Nights” that encourage its 50-plus members to study together, a bra drive for a local shelter, and a conversation about “Mental Health and the First Generation Experience.” “Our club is a great addition to many of the resources already offered on campus,” says cofounder and copresident Elizabeth Juarez Diaz ’18. “It’s a safe space for students to connect on an informal level and feel free to be completely honest.”

This future doctor, who came to the United States speaking no English at age 6, jumped at the chance to help run the club. “I saw this as an opportunity to share my story,” recalls Juarez Diaz, “and to inspire other students to be actively engaged and to take the most advantage of being in college.” According to The Postsecondary National Policy Institute, students are at a higher risk of dropping out if their parents don’t hold at least a bachelor’s degree. “Although my parents are supportive, they’re still a bit detached from my experience because they don’t know what it’s like to attend college,” Serrano Barahona notes. “And that’s hard on me. You know how there’s always someone at dinner asking you, ‘Honey, what did you learn in class today?’ Well, that conversation really doesn’t happen at our dinner table. To cope, I’ve come to terms with the fact that I receive emotional and financial support from my parents, and academic and career support from mentors.” Last fall, Cassie Nelson, assistant director of admission for the College for Women, invited Serrano Barahona and former club secretary Ikram Koliso ’17 to present at the Midwest Association of College Admission Counselors conference. “I wanted to share one of the things we were doing at St. Kate’s to help first generation students adjust to life in college,” says Nelson. In return, Serrano Barahona asked her to advise their club. “I’m also the first in my family to go to college,” Nelson explains, “so I was very excited to help this crew!” Serrano Barahona hopes the First Generation Scholars League can serve as a model for other colleges. “Starting a club wasn’t even on my to-do list at St. Kate’s,” she says. “But I’m so glad of what it offers today: A community of students who will encourage each other to see their potential for greatness.”

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OFFICE HOURS

Inside the Exhibition BY KRISTEN WUNDERLICH After nearly a decade in the art world, Nicole Watson returns to St. Kate’s as director of the Catherine G. Murphy Gallery. Here, she speaks about the gallery’s impact on the community as well as her own journey in determining its future.

write them into the history of art and offer a lens that illustrates how women interpret social issues such as race, gender identity, socio-economic politics, etc.

Q:

Q:

What’s it like to be back on campus?

I love it! I attended Montessori school here, and I graduated from St. Thomas in 2001 but majored in art at St. Kate’s through the Associated Colleges of the Twin Cities partnership program. I’ve always felt like an honorary Katie, and my mom (Patricia Wolff Sirek ’77) is very proud I’m back here — I am, too.

Q:

What has your first year looked like?

My main objective was to strengthen our online presence. We created a

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2017

new website (gallery.stkate.edu) and launched our social media profiles on Facebook and Instagram. I am also working towards a paperless communications system that will inform people about the gallery’s events and exhibitions, and support the University’s spirit of social responsibility to the environment.

Q:

How does the gallery reflect the values of St. Kate’s?

The most significant representation of St. Kate’s values is through our examination of women’s perspectives through art. Two thirds of our shows are by women artists. We want to

What role does it play in the community?

For students, I think of the gallery as an extension of the classroom. The gallery is an excellent opportunity for them to expand their education and perspectives, regardless of their area of study. They get to see how artists tackle challenging issues, including social justice and activism, through visual mediums. For emerging women artists, we bring exposure to their work; their exhibitions provide our visitors with context for women’s contributions to art. Our reputation for museum-quality exhibitions is also a huge draw


PHOTO/REBECCA ZENEFSKI, BY REBECCA STUDIOS

for our neighbors and the larger Twin Cities community. Our ability to offer them engaging exhibitions and events is a great way to give back.

carpenter, so reading, writing and creative work was always a part of my upbringing, and that definitely contributed to my lifetime love of art.

Q:

Q:

Who is the gallery’s namesake?

Catherine G. Murphy was a student of French and art at St. Kate’s in the late 1920s. Her aunt left her an inheritance after passing away in 1978 and, the following year, Murphy used that money to establish an endowment for the gallery, which was later renamed in her honor. The ongoing support of that endowment has allowed us to become the powerful artistic voice we are today.

Q:

Speaking of Katies, your mother was a graduate — did she help foster your love of art?

My mom studied English and journalism while she was at St. Kate’s. She is a writer and my dad is a

What are your future plans for the gallery?

I’m grateful to follow in the footsteps of Kathleen Daniels ’73, who led the gallery for over 20 years and established its reputation as a space that highlights women-centered visual arts. I want to continue this work by featuring artists who reflect our wonderfully diverse student body and who investigate current cultural, political and social themes that engage our viewers intellectually and emotionally. Art can be a pathway to knowledge, understanding, tolerance, empathy, beauty and empowerment; I’d like to see the gallery remain a leader in its exploration of these ideas within our community.

CATHERINE G. MURPHY GALLERY VISUAL ARTS BUILDING OFFICE HOURS Monday–Friday 8 a.m–8 p.m. Saturday noon–6 p.m. Sunday noon–6 p.m. 651.690.6644

Q:

What’s your favorite part of the job?

Seeing our students engage with the art in the gallery, either through discussion within a class visit or when they wander through quietly on their own, is very rewarding. We also have a lot of regulars from the general public who attend every show. It’s nice to get that kind of community support for the work we do.

Sign up for the latest gallery news and special events: stkate.edu/cgm-emails Become a friend: gallery.stkate.edu/friends

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MY ST. KATES PHOTO/UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

VETERANS GIVE BACK TO NURSES When the Minnesota chapter of La Societe des Quarante Hommes et Huit Chevaux, more commonly known as The Forty & Eight, decided to help future nurses, it turned to St. Kate’s. Recently, the group transferred the remaining balance of its scholarship fund to the University. The $32,000 gift will benefit two senior students in the nursing program each year. “The chapter is not active anymore but the funds are still available, and Donald Schroedl, who chaired the chapter’s scholarship program and is now in assisted living, wanted to make sure we continued our annual contribution,” says longtime member Nick Kakos. “This is a gift that goes back many years, and St. Kate’s was picked because of its outstanding reputation for training nurses.”

ON THEIR WAY TO THE CHAPEL, 1944. MORE THAN 170 ST. KATE’S NURSES SERVED IN MILITARY HOSPITALS FROM 1942 TO 1948. SEE ANYONE YOU KNOW? EMAIL: MAG@STKATE.EDU

The Forty & Eight was formed by World War I veterans returning from France. The name comes from the boxcars stenciled with “40/8” — 40 soldiers or eight horses — that carried the American soldiers, and over 10,000 nurses, to the battlefields. Both Kakos, age 92, and Schroedl, 95, served in the Second World War. Although neither can say for sure if they met a St. Kate’s nurse while serving with the United States Army Air Corps — Kakos in the Pacific Islands, Schroedl in England — both know their value. “Nurses were very important in World War II, and there’s still a great need for them,” Kakos notes. St. Kate’s officially became a part of the United States Cadet Nurse Corps training in fall 1943. The corps was established by Congress that year to ensure the country had enough nurses to care for its citizens at home and abroad during World War II. On campus, the students wore gray wool uniforms with red epaulets on their shoulders and insignia on the caps. The University enrolled its last class of nurse cadets in fall 1945.

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2017


AMY MARS MLIS’12 STOCKING THE ST. KATE’S FOOD SHELF. FRESH PRODUCE WAS HARVESTED FROM THE CSJ CELESTE’S DREAM COMMUNITY GARDEN.

PHOTO/RYAN JOHNSON ’19

WHEN HUNGER STRIKES Tucked away in the kitchen at Carondelet Center is a pantry largely filled with canned food and other non-perishable items, such as dried beans, pasta and cereal. The building’s owners, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet (CSJ), however, don’t use it to feed themselves. Instead, they welcome Katies who may face bare cupboards and empty fridges. The St. Catherine University/Sisters of St. Joseph Food Shelf was formed as a pilot project earlier this year. Most items were purchased from The Food Group, a Minnesota-based nonprofit food bank, with funding by Campus Ministry and multiple student advisory groups. “We were open only three days, but the number of visitors grew as word got out,” says Joshua Haringa, faculty advisor for St. Kate’s Food Justice Coalition. “We ended up distributing 779 pounds of food to 31 students.” Haringa oversees the food shelf with CSJ Celeste’s Dream co-director Jennifer Tacheny, St. Kate’s librarian Amy Mars and humanities coordinator Anh-Hoa Ngyuen. According to the College and University Food Bank Alliance, the lack of reliable access to affordable, nutritious food is actually quite common at two-year and

four-year institutions. In 2016, the group surveyed 3,765 students across 12 states and found that close to 50 percent faced challenges covering food and other living costs. “I experienced food insecurity for a time when I was an undergraduate,” says Mars. “I can relate to the financial stress that students have to deal with and how that can make it hard to focus in the classroom. I definitely would have appreciated the relief that a food shelf can provide. I’m glad we have a chance to offer that option to St. Kate’s students.” The St. Kate’s/CSJ food shelf is open on the first and third Wednesdays from noon to 4 p.m. this semester. Visitors in need are allowed to fill one grocery bag, or two if shopping for a family. Fresh fruit and vegetables are now available as well, thanks to a partnership with BrightSide Produce. To help with this project, or learn more, email Joshua Haringa at jjharinga@stkate.edu.

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BY THE NUMBERS

ST. KATE’S BY THE NUMBERS

With soaring costs of higher education and increasing student debt nationwide, there’s no shortage of skepticism about whether a college degree is worth the expense. University staff are frequently asked questions about price, financial aid and post-graduation success. In this issue, we crunched the numbers and broke down the stats for St. Kate’s. Keep in mind, though, there’s always more to the data than meets the eye. That’s why we approached Dan Thompson, senior vice president of enrollment management and athletics, to provide better understanding. Take a look at the figures and his analysis below. Thompson’s ties to St. Kate’s, by the way, run deep: his grandmother (Eileen Welch Donahue ’26), mother (Colleen Donahue Thompson Michels ’60) and sister (Eileen Thompson Armitage ’88) are Katies!

ENROLLMENT

DIVERSITY

COLLEGE FOR WOMEN

1,956

36% students students of color

COLLEGE FOR ADULTS

1,220

47% parents

GRADUATE COLLEGE

1,610

Average Aver age age 35

IT’S IMPORTANT TO KNOW...

This chart reflects number numberss for fall 2016. Of the 1,220 adult students, studen ts, 671 are on track to earn an associate associate degree or a certificat cer tificate, e, 318 are working toward a baccalaureate degree and 231 are registered nurses enrolled enr olled in our hybrid or fully online RN-to-BSN degree completion program. program.

St. Kate’s Kate’s campus is one of the most diverse of any in in Minn Minnesota, esota, and we’re proud of how that shapes our community.

WHAT ARE KATIES DOING 6 MONTHS AFTER GRADUATING FROM THE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN?

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2017

64% Employed full time 16% Pursuing a graduate degree while employed part time

13% Pursuing a graduate degree full time 7% Traveling or pursuing other interests


“I’M OFTEN ASKED ‘what is a typical financial aid package for students?’ and my answer is: there really isn’t one. Aid depends on the student’s academic credentials and economic position.” — Dan Thompson, senior vice president of enrollment management and athletics

COST

FINANCIAL AID

$1,253/credit—or $40,096/year

100% receive financial aid

$348–$696/credit*

Nearly 75% receive financial aid

$510–$1,131/credit*

Varies by program

These are rates rates for 2017–18. There’s There’s a substantial difference between between “sticker price” and what studen students ts actually pay. St. Kate’s Kate’s is more affordable affordable than you think. think. The cost for an undergrad undergrad living living on campus and taking 32 credits per year year before financial aid breaks down to:

For undergraduat undergraduates es who begin at St. St. Kate’s Kate’s and complete college, it’s not unusual unusual to owe between $30,000 $30,000 and $40,000. To put this into context, however however,, it’s important to note that studen studentt default on loans in the United States States is highly highly concentrated concentrated among students studen ts with low balances. balances. According to College Board, 65% of loan default is among borrowerss with under $10,000 borrower $10,000 in debt, debt, which correlates correlat es with individuals who did not finish their degree. (source: tinyurl.com/stats-cb)

Tuition

$40,096

Room Ro om & Meal Plan Plan

$ 9,196

Fees

$

Total

$50,051

759

When you you take into account financial aid, students end up paying less than that. On average, aver age, institutional scholarships scholarships and needbased University, University, federal federal and state state grants will cover about about $27,500, bringing the average average amount to $22,551 for students students taking 16 credits per semester semester and and living on campus.

While student student debt debt is a real issue for our country, the fact fact that that often often gets gets lost lost is that that those those who who complete their degree — though they often carry debt — have have the creden credentials tials needed for meaningful employment employment and are generally enjoying en joying a return on their investment. investment.

* varies by program stkate.edu

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One day. One gift. You can change a student’s life.

15 Make your gift at stkate.edu/gokatiegive

Institutional Advancement | 651.690.6976

HALEY MUELLER ’18


CLASS NOTES

CLASS NOTES 1950–59

FREE ONLINE LEARNING

2017–18 topics include “The Global Influence of St. Kate’s Graduates,” “Understanding Structural Racism,” and “The Need for Public Health.” More info: stkate.edu/lifelonglearning

MARY ANN HANLEY, CSJ, ’53, professor emerita of music, celebrated 75 years as a Sister of St. Joseph. Her Jubilee Reception at Carondelet Village was attended by many of her former St. Kate’s music students, who shared happy memories of their student days. Sister Mary Ann taught at St. Kate’s from 1961 to 1995.

1970–79

CLAUDIA L. HUOT ’79 presented at Lehigh University’s 45th Annual Special Education Law Conference. She is a partner at Wisler Pearlstine, LLP, and primarily represents

became a Little Free Library steward in 2012 and placed her library at Freedom Park in Prescott, Wisconsin. Stassen had a 33-year career as a librarian, finding particular joy in school libraries.

1980–89

MARY FRISTAD ’81 spent two months in Christchurch, New Zealand, as an Erskine Visiting Fellow. Fristad is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral health and vice chair at The Ohio State University. PAMELA STEGORA AXBERG ’85 is senior vice president for network operations at UnitedHealthcare.

ST. CATHERINE ALUMNAE

CELEBRATING 100 YEARS

1917–2017

SUBMIT A CLASS NOTE CONTACT US Online: stkate.edu/alumnae Phone: 651.690.6666 Email: alumnae@stkate.edu facebook.com/katiealumnae @StKatesAlums

CLAUDIA L. HUOT ’79 school districts and other educational management organizations, particularly in the areas of special education and student rights. HELEN CRARY STASSEN ’79 is serving on the Little Free Library National Board of Directors. She

PAMELA STEGORA AXBERG ’85 stkate.edu

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MICHELLE MORGAN ’86 NICOLE ONGIE HEDMAN ’91 has been named the head coach of the girls swimming and diving team at Centennial High School in Circle Pines, Minnesota. She is also a sixth-grade teacher at Northdale Middle School.

MCKEIG ’89 KUBES ’86

MICHELE H. MORGAN ’86 has a new position as rector of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C.

KRISTINE A. KUBES ’86 and Minnesota Supreme Court Justice ANNE MCKEIG ’89 attended the Annual Meeting of the Minnesota State Bar Association Appellate Law Section in June 2017. Kubes is an attorney at Kubes Law Office, where she serves as counselor, litigator and mediator for clients in the design and construction industry.

IN MEMORY

ALEXANDRA & ISABELLA

1990–99

KRISTINA HASH ’90 was recently named a West Virginia University Foundation Outstanding Teacher. The award honors exceptional professors who go above and beyond to inspire their students.

JOSEY BECKER BARTON ’98 welcomed twin daughters Alexandra Grace and Isabella Rose in June 2016.

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Our deepest sympathy to the families of the following graduates, faculty members, staff and trustees: Jay Schrom, former Security Office staff

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January 30, 2017.

Ruben Haugen, former adjunct faculty in music

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July 15, 2017.

Mary Frances Cox ’44

January 7, 2017.

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Arline Reuter Ringdahl J’45

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Marjorie Kay Shelley ’45

April 2, 2017.

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Laura Smith Barron M’45 Gertrude Heinisch Sonnen ’38

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December 9, 2015.

Charlene Blassingham Zukaitis ’40 Evelyn Marie Brick Kautzer M’40

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October 10, 2016.

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December 19, 2016 (at age 100). Marcella Cannon Miller ’41

April 14, 2017.

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Emmeleen Conway Mezera ’42 Molly Murphy Pettinger ’42 Rose Leach Dingels M’43

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April 28, 2017.

June 16, 2017.

December 30, 2016.

ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2017

Ida Bonicelli Trigiani ’46

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May 31, 2017.

February 28, 2017.

August 9, 2017.

Elaine Jungers McRaith J’46

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May 30, 2017.

Dorothy Kanegaye Sawada ’46

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Renee Metzroth Hansen J’46

July 24, 2017.

Jean Nermoe Lathrop M’46 Florence Pinzka Wilfahrt J’46 Marian Welte Becker ’46 Beatrice Meko Sieber J’47

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April 7, 2017.

May 7, 2017. May 14, 2017.

May 9, 2017. August 1, 2017.


MARGOT IRENE SUSAN MATHISON-YOUNG MANU’98 recently joined Good Samaritan Hospice in Nisswa, Minnesota, as a nurse practitioner. DANA DEMASTER ’99 was promoted to manager of the Research and Evaluation Unit at Ramsey County Health and Wellness Administration. Her department assesses the county’s social services needs, including child and adult protection, mental and chemical health, disability services, and financial assistance programs.

2000–09

JULIE CLINEFELTER MLIS’01 is the new Austin Public Library director in southeast Minnesota, as of May 2017. She worked there from 2003 to 2013, and returned as a technical services librarian the following year.

Bette Cincera Kiland ’48

BRIDGET RACH ’01 welcomed daughter Margot Irene Pease in June 2017. HEATHER RACHEL ’02 published a book for small business owners entitled The B.I.G. Plan — Growth Strategies Toward Success. CYNTHIA GROTHE WEST MAED’02 earned a doctorate in education from the University of Minnesota– Duluth in 2017. Her dissertation

May 8, 2017.

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Margaret McNevin Ruhme ’48

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Helen Culligan Bumgardner ’49 Lorraine Muellner Schroeder J’49

Joanne Schuler ’52

March 28, 2017.

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June 25, 2017. August 11, 2017.

Therese Quinn, HM (Sister Mary Nicholas) ’49

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June 20, 2017. Jane Blunt Commers ’50

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June 28, 2017.

Rita Corcoran Kolars ’50

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May 2, 2017.

Patricia Linnihan Bourdon ’50

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June 25, 2017. (see p. 30) w

October 15, 2016.

was titled “Millennial Instructional Preferences in Post-Secondary Business Programs.”

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March 15, 2017.

Patricia Costello Hermes ’53 Betty Lou Evans Hinker ’53 Virginia Jensen Taglia ’53

July 24, 2017.

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October 5, 2016.

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July 14, 2017.

Patricia Kelly McGough ’53

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August 10, 2017.

Suzanne Regnier Luger ’53

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November 8, 2016.

John Christine Wolkerstorfer, CSJ (Marianne) ’53

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August 3, 2017. (see p. 30)

June 26, 2017.

Mary Eileen Thompson, CSJ (Sister Gertrude) ’50 Patricia Patton O’Toole ’52

CYNTHIA GROTHE WEST MAED’02

Jacqueline Laliberte LaPlante M’55 w

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December 1, 2015.

Carol Sebald Mader ’55

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June 6, 2017.

Carol Farrell Cooney ’56

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April 23, 2017.

Marilyn Murphy Keating ’56

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April 18, 2017.

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KATRINA SANDE OTT ’09 was married on April 22, 2017. JESSICA HAGAMAN ’03 received an Alumni Outstanding Teaching Award from the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) Alumni Association for distinguished teaching in the classroom. She is an assistant professor in UNO’s College of Education. CABRINI JABLON MAOL’06 received the St. Norbert College Beloved Community Social Justice Award, which honors a staff member who has worked to make the community more just and equitable, fulfilling the vision of Dr. King’s “Beloved Community.”

ANNE KATHLEEN

HEIDI WOLFORD PARROW ’09 welcomed her third child, Logan Mark Parrow, in March 2017.

LINDSAY BUTTERFIELD WHIPPLE ’09 is assistant dean for student support and outreach at St. Kate’s. She welcomed daughter Anne Kathleen Whipple in August 2016.

LOGAN MARK

2010–PRESENT

KELSEY DELANDER ’10 is the CEO and executive director at Adoray Home Health and Hospice in Baldwin, Wisconsin. ELIZABETH BERNHARDT ’11 received a master’s degree in physics from Washington State University and will continue to a Ph.D. She studies

HILARY NOVACEK BUNDT ’08 welcomed son August Eugene Bundt in January 2017.

IN MEMORY

Jane Nicolai ’56

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April 25, 2017.

Mary Belford Healy ’57

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Julie Noonan, CSJ (Sister Peter Damian) ’59

June 4, 2017.

Grace Maertens, CSJ (Sister Mary David) ’57

August 17, 2017. w

April 26, 2017. Mary Ann Scanlan Fitzpatrick ’57 Molly Egan Commers ’58 Karen Horak Gallahue ’58

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Eileen Moran ’61

August 3, 2017.

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June 8, 2017.

Mary Margaret Flanagan Nordlund ’62

March 18, 2017.

Theresa Nistler Brummer ’67

Darlene Engbarth Wheeler ’59

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May 28, 2017.

July 10, 2017.

April 6, 2017.

March 28, 2017.

Annette Fortier Fellbaum ’59

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Patricia Wendel ’64

Marilyn Donovan Lundberg ’59 w

June 19, 2017.

Sara Ann Sexton ’59

April 7, 2017.

Jeanne Moosbrugger O’Leary ’58

Karen Eustice ’59

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April 9, 2017.

ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2017

w

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October 21, 2016.

November 15, 2015.

Kenneth M. Olson M’67

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July 1, 2017.

July 24, 2017.

Kathleen Elliott ’68

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Diane Patry ’72

May 5, 2017.

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April 11, 2017.

Margaret Catherine Wagner McDonald ’81 Eve Marie Christianson M’84

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June 27, 2017.

May 13, 2017.


ELIZABETH BERNHARDT ’11 NATALIE NAKASONE CREMENS ’12 was married on June 17, 2017. KATHLEEN LAMOTTE ’13 graduated from the Iowa State School of Veterinary Medicine and has joined Southview Animal Hospital in Inver Grove Heights, Minnesota. She is a TripliKate, the granddaughter of Elizabeth Glennon McIntire ’50 and daughter of Nancy McIntire ’78. RENEE CREPEAU VOLK ’13 was married on June 24, 2017. photomechanical materials for medical device applications.

MARY ELLEN ANDERSON ’15 was a 2017 Women’s Health Leadership TRUST Forum award winner in the consumer empathy category. Anderson is responsible for leading the strategic direction and overall management of Comprehensive Care Services, Inc. She was selected for her joint work with the Tribal Community in Minnesota, in particular, the Mdewakanton Sioux in Shakopee.

JULIA TERK WILKE ’11 was married on July 22, 2017. AMY MARS MLIS’12 won the 2017 Minnesota Academic Innovators Award, from the Minnesota Library Association. She works as a University research and instruction librarian, and helps with the St. Kate’s/CSJ Food Shelf (see page 19).

Theresa Cook ’85

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May 1, 2017.

Judith Keller M’87

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April 1, 2017.

Emily Pierce Horner ’89

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Sue Francis Arrell ’90

July 3, 2017.

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August 3, 2017.

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July 29, 2017.

Cynthia Jeanne Nicosia-Eskandary ’92 Jone Welch See ’92

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Denise Redman ’97

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June 14, 2017.

May 2, 2017.

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April 30, 2017.

Martin Christensen CERT M’04

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Jolene Scheidt Laurence ’07

April 21, 2017.

Margaret Archer ’13

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June 16, 2017.

May 20, 2017.

REBECCA VIENS CASALENDA ’15 was married on May 13, 2017. ANGELA LORENZEN FLAKE ’16 was married on July 29, 2017. MICHELLE MULLOWNEY ’17, who graduated in May, is in Les Sables d’Olonne, France. She is working in high school English classes as a teaching assistant.

MEMORIAL MASS

Beverly Cory ’91, licensure ’95 and MAT’97, suddenly and tragically

CARMEN ATTIKOSSIE ’15 is a facilitator of entrepreneurial leadership at the African Leadership University. She joined the ALU campus in Mauritius in January 2017, then moved to Kigali, Rwanda, in April, where she is helping to launch a new campus.

Sunday, October 29, 10:30 a.m. Our Lady of Victory Chapel WOULD YOU LIKE TO MAKE A MEMORIAL OR TRIBUTE GIFT? PLEASE CONTACT 651.690.6516 giving@stkate.edu CONTACT US WHEN YOU HAVE NEWS OF A DEATH 651.690.6666 inmemory@stkate.edu

Key to abbreviations: mag.stkate.edu/abbreviations

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1

3

2

More Reunion photos at stkate.edu/reunion. See Homecoming photos of the Classes of 2002, 2007 and 2012, at stkate.edu/homecoming.

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2017

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7

6

Reunion 2017 1 It was a milestone year for the Class of 1967. Happy 50th Reunion! 2 Helen Boening Bambenek ’49 and granddaughter Karalyn Snyder Koskela ’02 joined the music alumnae party in The Pulse. 3 Teri Parker-Brown ’88, DeAnne Boeltl Sherman ’67, Kay Marshall ’72 and Martha LaPlace Simms ’57, theater alumnae, acted in Instant Theater.

8

4 Artists learned to paint a campus scene at Katies & Canvas. 5 The President’s Luncheon gave alumnae the chance to catch up and hear the latest University news from Becky Roloff ’76. 6 Megan Campbell Lagas ’02, MAED’09 played founding president Mother Antonia McHugh in a one-woman show about St. Kate’s early days.

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7 Mary Anne Duevel Schulte ’47 chatted with President Roloff.

10

8 1997 classmates (left to right) Jessica Freeman Lane, Jennifer Auger, Rebecca Robinson and Mandi Struxness Block enjoyed their 20-year Reunion. 9 Choir alumnae at their morning rehearsal for a Reunion musical performance. 10 1952 classmates Pat Dwyer Kuklock (left) and Judy O’Malley Catton at their class party. 11 Katie Cat joined the Class of 1992 for a souvenir photo!

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MARY THOMPSON, CSJ

JOHN CHRISTINE WOLKERSTORFER, CSJ

FACULTY LEGENDS The St. Catherine University community lost two faculty emeritae this summer, each contributing significantly to St. Kate’s strong academic reputation. Mary Thompson, CSJ (Sister Gertrude), chemistry, died on June 25 at age 89; John Christine Wolkerstorfer, CSJ, history, died August 3 at 86. Both received bachelor’s degrees from St. Kate’s and served a combined 61 years of teaching at their alma mater. “We have gained tremendous benefit from their legacy, the other outstanding faculty members who went before, and our current wonderful and inspiring faculty,” says Ruth Haag Brombach ’60, alumnae liaison. Sister Mary Thompson earned her doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley. She returned to St. Kate’s and served as a professor of chemistry from 1964 to 2000. Recognized by students and colleagues as a superb role model for women pursuing science careers, Sister Mary challenged students to engage in demanding research projects and to continue their education at the graduate level. Under her leadership, chemistry at St. Kate’s was strengthened through grant-funded acquisition of modern scientific instrumentation, the inclusion of undergraduate research as an integral part of the curriculum, and American Chemical Society verification of the major. Recognized by professional organizations, Sister Mary was a finalist for the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education Professor of the Year award in 1984 and, in 1997, received the American Chemical Society’s Award for Encouraging Women into Careers in the Chemical Sciences. She gained additional status through summer work in the Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago — when achieving the position was an enormous feat for a woman and a religious sister.

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2017

Sister Mary was very active in the campus chapter of Phi Beta Kappa and the national PBK organization. An accomplished musician, she played the cello and did beautiful work in calligraphy. Sister John Christine completed master’s and doctoral degrees in American history at the University of Minnesota. She taught for 10 years in the archdiocesan parochial system and nine years in Catholic secondary education. With her doctorate, she taught history from 1973 to 1998 and was involved in several innovative programs at St. Kate’s. She was an early faculty member in the Weekend College, team-taught honors courses and was among the first to offer a history course on computer for the Distance Learning Program. In the 1980s, she chaired an oral history project at St. Kate’s for 11 years and in 1992 co-authored with Rosalie Ryan, CSJ, the history of the college, More Than a Dream. She also wrote a history of the Catholic Aid Association in St. Paul, and, in 1999, You Shall Be My People, a history of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. A gifted teacher, Sister John Christine received Excellence in Teaching awards, in 1998, from the St. Catherine Alumnae Association and, in 2008, from the Myser Family Foundation. To make a gift in honor of either faculty legend, visit stkate.edu/giveonline.


DONOR TRIBUTE

FOREVER A KATIE (FROM LEFT): BAOMI PHUNG ’19, HANNAH KLESCHULT ’19, JEANNINE ERICKSON ’19, ADDY CROSS ’20, CAITLYN HOLM ’18 AND MADELINE BOSER ’18

Thank you. We appreciate you, our loyal and generous

supporters, who make an immeasurable impact at St. Catherine University. Our donors share a deep commitment to St. Kate’s mission and demonstrate exactly what it means to lead and influence. Your generosity provides the resources for current and future Katies to flourish and succeed. Your gifts inspire and change lives. See our complete list of 2016–2017 benefactors and volunteers online at stkate.edu/tribute. Here we take a moment to recognize our leadership donors who have given gifts of $1,500 and greater.

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DONOR TRIBUTE

“I’m so grateful for the education and the friendships I made at St. Kate’s, and I want that to continue for others.” — Karen Sherlock Middleton ’64

Donors are listed in alphabetical order by last name. † indicates deceased as of August 1, 2017

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PRESIDENT’S FORUM honors exceptional donors who support St. Kate’s with annual fund gifts of $1,500 or more in a fiscal year. $50,000 + Brenda Grandstrand Woodson ’80 and Wade Woodson

$25,000 — $49,999 Margaret Arola Ford ’82 and David Ford Lois Gross Rogers ’63 and John E. Rogers

$10,000 — $24,999 Anonymous Nancy JP Anderson ’01 Marilyn Branchaud Beddor ’55 Sandra Kamman Butler ’56, MLS’57 † and Peter M. Butler Janine Kelble Dodson ’86 and Robert Dodson Mary Jo Emfield MPAS’15 Ruth Blong Haggerty ’63 and Daniel J. Haggerty Renee J. Koziol ’89 S. Anne McAlpin Lohmann ’63 and John G. Lohmann, Jr. Anne Ward Miller ’63 and Eldon Miller Joanne Jirik Mullen ’83 and Brian E. Mullen Lorraine Majerus Nadler ’53 and Michael D. Nadler Ann Ryan ’75 and Patrick Ryan Beatrice Meko Sieber ’47 Allison Kehle Sriver ’97 and Joseph Sriver Sunny Bach Wicka ’55

$5,000 — $9,999 Anonymous Ellen Bendel-Stenzel ’88 and Michael Bendel-Stenzel Laura Bufano, CSJ Brenda Haram Canedy ’71 and Norman Canedy Mark and Jane Chronister M. Kathryn Clubb ’79 and Linda M. Reid Patricia A. Dietz ’87 Barbara Dreher, CSJ Mary Jo Deutz Eichler ’52 William and Bonita Frels

Linda M. Funk ’81 Margaret Mary Gillespie, CSJ, ’65 Theresa Villers Griep ’63 and John G. Griep Virginia and John McCain Corrine McCarthy ’51 Virginia Claessens McDonald ’57 and William J. McDonald Donna B. McNamara, Ph.D., ’68 Catherine T. McNamee, CSJ Mary Virginia Micka, CSJ, ’43 Jane Hird Mortell ’78 and Paul Mortell Jean Delaney Nelson ’80 and David L. Nelson Mary M. Nicol ’76 Kathleen O’Brien ’67 Colleen O’Malley, CSJ, ’63 Margaret R. Otte ’81 Teresa Rolling Radzinski ’86 and Michael Radzinski ReBecca Koenig Roloff ’76 and Mark H. Roloff MAT’88 Judith Dalglish McCartin Scheide ’59 Patricia Shea ’51 Kathleen Brandes Shearon ’60 Therese Sherlock, CSJ, ’62 DeAnne Boeltl Sherman ’67 and Dudley M. Sherman Mary Rogers Sluka ’66 and Peter Sluka Jean McIlquham Stalcup ’72 Mary McGrath Tonkin ’71 and Simon Pediel Tonkin Helen M. Wagner ’69 Deb Wilfong and Chris Lienert Jean Wincek, CSJ, ’62

$2,500 — $4,999 Anonymous Pamela Stegora Axberg ’85 and Joseph E. Axberg David and Mary Jo Bangasser Therese Beaudette ’55 Kay Sullivan Bendel ’56 and Richard P. Bendel

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DONOR TRIBUTE

“I give because I value the educational opportunities that are available to the diverse student population at St. Kate’s.” — Ellen Biales ’91

LuAnn Schumer Berg ’99 Rebecca and Thomas Bergman Lynda Hechinger Bisanz ’67 and Robert S. Bisanz Brian and Carol Bruess Ellen M. Coffey ’77 Lori Kremers Commerford ’82 and Thomas P. Commerford Margaret Conlin-Duevel ’80 and James Duevel Chip Connelly Maureen Baumgartner Curran ’67 John A. Daniels Carol A. Delage ’80 Charles M. Denny, Jr. Catherine Nigon Dienhart ’75 and Mark Dienhart Pat Running Drew ’64 and David P. Drew Barbara Kueppers Fitzpatrick ’57 Kathleen Wooden Flanagan ’73 Kathleen Kennedy Gannon ’66 and William J. Gannon Eileen Raidl Gordon ’60 and Edward J. Gordon Caroline L. Gunther ’04 Mary Jane Kinoshita Hashisaki ’47 Colleen and Steven Hegranes Mary Jane Garry Hellyar ’75 and Kenneth D. Hellyar

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2017

Betty Lou Evans Hinker ’53 † and Edward B. Hinker John S. Huberty Patricia Black Huberty ’59 and Robert J. Huberty Patricia A. Hvidston ’67 † and Roger A. Opp Donna Drew Incaudo ’58 and Claude J. Incaudo † Mary Kay Lorbiecki Kelly ’69 and Daniel M. Kelly Debora A. Lance MAOL’03 and Charles J. Lance Kathleen F. Leary ’74 Joan E. Madden ’67 Jacquelyn L. Mammen ’03 Martha Mangan ’76, CERT’88 Susan and Thomas McGuire Margaret Ann Mahoney McMahon ’55 and John A. McMahon Carol Sims McNamara ’69 and Richard W. McNamara Marilee Woehning Miller ’67 and John W. Miller Kathleen McNamara Mucha ’66 and Joseph R. Mucha Catherine L. Murray ’81 Michael P. O’Boyle

Patrick J. O’Connor MAT’11 and Kerin McTeigue O’Connor Patricia A. O’Gorman ’68 Christine Ford Olson MAT’99 and Timothy W. Olson Anita M. Pampusch ’60 Nancy Parlin ’56 Jane Persoon ’72 Donna M. Pink ’88 Muriel T. Quinn ’91 and Robert Pasin Karen and Mark Rauenhorst Mary Ann Goodman Reilly ’61 and R. William Reilly Susan Denzel Reinders ’56 Stephen and Cynthia Roszell Paula A. Ruhland ’75 Mary M. Russell ’78, CERT’13, MAOL’13 Mary Catherine Ryan ’47 Ellen Malone Salter ’47 Shannon Schottler-Hasty ’08 and Nathaniel Hasty Mary Anne Duevel Schulte ’47 Kathryn A. Seng ’84 Mary Jo Kisch Skaggs ’61 and Richard H. Skaggs Mary Margaret Vukelich Skenzich ’65 and Anthony Skenzich


Mary Kuth Skoien ’75 and Michael W. Skoien Sheila Strobel Smith ’79 Tracy A. Steele ’69 Minda M. Suchan ’95 Judi Druke Teske ’66 Elizabeth Thornton ’57 Carol and Lynn Truesdell Marcella Flaten Wartman ’49

$1,500 — $2,499 Anonymous Mary Absolon ’77 and William C. Herber † Roberta Ganas Ackley ’64 and Richard A. Ackley Judith Nielsen Adams ’62 and John S. Adams LeAnn D. Anderson ’78 Jeanne Arth ’56 Darcy O’Brien Ashley ’80 and George H. Ashley Jennifer Jensen Austin ’90 and Kevin Austin Joann Bangs and William Glahn Gloria Krautkremer Barry ’47 Richard A. Beens Suzanne Norberg Begin ’87 Catherine M. Bendel ’81 and Joseph L. Nuñez Mary Bendel-Simso ’86 and Paul Bendel-Simso Mary Hurrle Bennett ’78 and Bryan D. Bennett Ellen L. Biales ’91

Marietta E. Booth Theresa Bailey Boyden ’71 and Alan K. Boyden M. Catherine Molyneaux Brain ’80 and David M. Brain Monica Shepherd Brandl ’79 Jean Sausen Brazelton ’52 † and Robert S. Brazelton Catherine Clifford Brennan ’70 and Gerald D. Brennan Elizabeth J. Brine ’84 and Alistair S. McVey Ruth Haag Brombach ’60 Mary Kappel Burch ’79 and Robert R. Burch Patricia Carroll Byrne ’64 and Kenneth Byrne Patricia Gavin Bailey Campion ’60 and Martin E. Campion Mary Carey ’63 Beth Riedel Carney ’82 and Richard Carney Marina Ho Cheung ’68 Nancy Aberg Christensen ’62 and Robert D. Christensen, MD Patricia Giessel Coleman-Vecchie ’50 Annette Pampusch Conklin ’60 Marie Sauro Conlin ’47 Patricia A. Connelly ’65, CERT’90 Kathleen Hayes Coppo ’64 and Val T. Coppo Joan Kuzma Costello ’65 Ann M. Coulston ’63 and Robert A. Marcus, MD

J. Kevin and Kathryn Oakes Croston Kristin Kalstad Cummings ’91 Dolores Kickels Curns ’63 Catherine Davies ’77 and Lawrence R. Johnson Mary Dolan Delaney ’58 and John P. Delaney Angela Dockendorf ’16 and Grant Dockendorf Cheryl Doucette ’81 Jennifer K. Driscoll ’88 and Steven B. Lundeen Pat Connolly Durkin ’55 Kay Hinker Ehardt ’68 and John Ehardt III Kay Elliott ’68 † David E. Emerson Susan Wollan Fan ’84 and Albert Wollan Fan Janet DeZurik Faulhaber ’57 and Eugene Faulhaber Judith Martens Flahavan ’60 Mary Grace Hastings Flannery ’62 Linda Bakeberg Flynn ’72 Genevieve Everson Freier ’81 and David H. Freier Mary Kay Tregilgas Fuhrmann ’78 Margaret Coleman Gadient ’69 and Stephen E. Gadient Curt and Dawn Galloway Frances Culligan Galvin ’54 and Michael J. Galvin, Jr. Judith Larson Gamboni ’98 and Donald J. Gamboni

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DONOR TRIBUTE Helen R. Gavin ’69 Sara Hietpas Gavin ’77 and Thomas C. Gavin Kathryn Gerber ’71 Mary Borgerding Gerding ’62 and Dale Gerding Winifred Wurm Gleason ’62 and Thomas Gleason Azela Gohl-Giese ’59 Lucille Ryan Gravelle ’49 and John A. Gravelle Debby Gray ’66 Joan Gregoryk ’66 Kathleen McGraw Gretsch ’58 and Gerald A. Gretsch Patricia Simms Gries ’69, MAT’89 and John R. Gries Mary Ann Leininger Gross ’60 and Loren E. Gross Osiris Guzman ’93 Mary Ochsner Haeg ’68 and Lawrence Haeg Edna Worthington Halloran ’59 and Michael H. Halloran Elizabeth Halloran and Danette Roach Joy Bergeron Hammer ’52 Marva Livingston Hammons ’69 Barbara Pankonie Harding ’78 Ann Dougherty Harens ’84 and Thomas L. Harens

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2017

Mary Colleen Quirk Healy ’58 and Robert H. Healy Suzanne Hendricks Luz Maria Hernandez ’83 and Teresa Hanratty Gingi Talbert Hickey ’79 and William J. Hickey Nancy Bowman Holden ’61 Amy Schmit Hope ’86, MAOL’01 and Gerald T. Hope Carol Otte Hopkins ’79 and John P. Hopkins Yvonne Houle-Gillard ’91 and Gary W. Gillard Kathryn McDonald Hughes ’73 and Douglas C. Hughes Adelaide McGuigan Ingebrand ’50 Mary Beth Muellerleile Iverson ’85, CERT’89 Faye James ’03 Kristin Hogquist Jameson ’83 and Stephen C. Jameson Nancy L. Jamieson ’80 Kristin A. Johnson ’74 Susan Laufer Johnson ’76 Karen G. Jothen MAOL’06 and Erik M. Jothen Mary Hoodecheck Joyce ’67 Donna Busch Kasbohm ’55 and Robert K. Kasbohm Mary Heinen Kelly ’71 and Thomas C. Kelly Margaret Bastien Kelsch ’58

Maureen O’Connell Kent ’73 and Thomas M. Kent Marjorie A. Kight ’50, MLS’56 Annearle Morris Klein MAOL’05 and James A. Klein Jean Krusemark ’72 and Neal H. Engel Donna M. Krzmarzick ’62 Beverly Hesse Lachenmayer ’92 and Richard R. Lachenmayer Denise L. Lamb ’70 Gertrude Schoolmeesters Landgren ’72 Paula Bendry Larsen ’64 Ann M. Larson ’58 Karen Rohling Larson ’75 and Lauren J. Larson Lahens Lee-St. Fleur ’05 and Jenna Madden St. Fleur ’07 Shannon Collins Levang ’88 Sheila Clifford Lind ’69 and Peter E. Lind Roberta Meyer Lombardino ’53 and Joseph G. Lombardino Margaret and Herman Louters Elizabeth L. Maloney ’80 and Ralph Magnusson Betty Sobeske Malovey ’62 Charlotte and Stephen Mardell Patti Cassady Marrinan ’77 and Timothy D. Marrinan


“I give because I value women’s education and want to ensure that St. Kate’s continues.” — Catherine Clifford Brennan ’70

Margaret Johnston Marvin ’64 and Frank R. Marvin Marjorie Mathison Hance ’70 Mildred Haviland McCoy ’52 and Robert F. McCoy Kathleen McDonough ’80 and Melanie Ruda ’77 Lawrence J. McGough Nancy J. McMullen ’57 Christine L. Meuers ’80 and Steven E. Rau Mary Albright Michel ’71 and Charles J. Michel Karen Sherlock Middleton ’64 and Rolf Middleton Kelly M. Milkus ’01 and Ryan Setterholm Katherine A. Mills ’04, CERT’12, MAOL’12 Patricia A. Mullen ’61 Mary Alice Muellerleile ’60 Fran Rusciano Murnane ’65 Elizabeth Schrang Murphy ’76 and Timothy R. Murphy Jane Randolph Murphy ’62 and Michael E. Murphy Roberta Noack Murphy ’63 Rosemary Gage Murphy ’62 and Philip J. Murphy Maureen Kelly Neerland ’62 and Charles S. Neerland

Laura J. Nelson ’09 Maria Nhambu ’67 Patricia Moudry Norusis ’71 and Ralph N. Norusis Carole A. O’Byrne ’70 Veronica (Bonnie) O’Connor ’60 and Ronald E. Hopfensperger Marilyn Holly O’Dea ’67 and Robert F. O’Dea Betty Gray Olson ’77 and Lee F. Olson Donna Benson Olson ’87 Virginia Buckley Orth ’62 Natalie Whitcraft Pacholl ’01 Thomas J. Pacholl G. Richard and Peggy Palen Molly Rumsey Park ’71 and H. William Park Monica Dillon Peace ’88 Daralyn Berg Peifer ’71 Patricia Perell ’78 Mary Kay Donahugh Perron ’64 and William P. Perron Helen Litchy Perry ’52 Margaret Dexheimer Pharris Margaret Fesenmaier Pierpan ’58 and Henry J. Pierpan Ann L. Piotrowski ’73 Diane Sandretzky Pruett ’72 Carol Quest ’67 Catherine Epple Quinn ’58

Mary Joan Clarity Quinn ’54 Elizabeth Jones Reichert ’66 and John A. Reichert Craig A. Roger Carla Jean Link Rose ’89 Patricia Bohen Rowley ’66 and Stephen J. Rowley Carol M. Russell ’58 Barbara Flacksbarth Ruuska ’00 Mary L. Ryan ’66 Julie Mies Sachs ’59 Mary Anne Savage ’62 Margaret Sykes Savelkoul ’63 and Henry J. Savelkoul Lisa Wenzler Savin ’90 Lynne Schriver-Sheedy ’73 and Patrick D. Sheedy MaryFrances Schurb ’82 Mary Emery Shearen ’75 Marla Schumacher Simmet ’77 and John P. Simmet Angela Hall Slaughter ’97 Eric and Leslie Stacey Elizabeth J. Stevens Michael and Marilyn Sullivan Rebecca Greene Taylor ’77 and Philip C. Taylor

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DONOR TRIBUTE Jane E. Tenquist ’82 Katherine Bakula Tinker ‘94 and Steven J. Tinker Ana and Gary Theisen Patrick and Jane Rafferty Thiele Linda Theis Thrasher ’88 and Richard Thrasher Annemarie Tobin ’77 Bonnie Hyland Umeh ’62 and Fidelis Umeh Sandra L. Vargas ’91 Carol Lamphere Vasatka ’54 and Richard Vasatka Barbara K. Veath MAOL’89 Jenifer Wagner ’82, MLIS’94 Sheri J. Weber ’02, MAOL’05 and Mark D. Weber Todd C. Weber MAOL’96 E. Theresa Byrne Westine ’67 Anne F. Weyandt ’83 Jean M. Whaley ’80 Marianne Wheelock ’80 and Scott Kajer Julie Belle White-Newman and John Newman Barbara Kinney Winters ’63 and John C. Winters Carolyn Self Wollan ’91 and Robert E. Wollan

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ST. CATHERINE UNIVERSITY • FALL 2017

DESIGNATED GIFTS

These generous donors embody the spirit of philanthropy by supporting an array of institutional priorities, programs and initiatives with gifts of $1,500 or more. Anonymous (9) Nancy JP Anderson ’01 Beth A. Baumann MAOL’99 Mary Hurrle Bennett ’78 and Bryan D. Bennett Patricia Morgan Block ’66 and Kenneth W. Block Cornelius and Catherine Borman Donald B. Borman Irene Bossenmaier ’48 † Richard M. Brown Joseph R. Cade Mary Pat Ferron Canes ’67 M. Kathryn Clubb ’79 and Linda M. Reid Sally Thornton Conroy ’41 † Mary Ellen Priebe Conzemius ’65 and Norbert J. Conzemius Mary Lucas Dakan ’47 † Kathleen M. Daniels ’73 Patricia A. Deiman, CSJ, ’53 †

Joan M. Demeules ’87, MAT’01 Charles M. Denny, Jr. Catherine Nigon Dienhart ’75 and Mark Dienhart Mary Crosby Dolan ’75 Mary Jo Emfield MPAS’15 Pam and Mike Enz Robert L. Findorff Barbara Kueppers Fitzpatrick ’57 Margaret Arola Ford ’82 and David Ford Joan Biales Frankel ’92 and Kevin A. Frankel Margaret Borman Gaines ’96 Azela Gohl-Giese ’59 Stephanie Goodman ’83 Joy Bergeron Hammer ’52 Marva Livingston Hammons ’69 Susan Vukmonich Hasselle ’65 and James E. Hasselle Joanne Kucera Hense ’60 and Peter P. Honsa Marguerite Hessian-Gatz ’49 and Robert Gatz Kristeen and Michael Hickey Karen Nelson Hoyle Sharon Alexander Jensen ’68, MAOL’05 Nasrin and Brian Jewell Margaret Conzemius Judge ’68 Susan Lohmann Kellerman ’64 William Jacob Kirchgessner and Deborah R. Wuerffel


“St. Kate’s gave so much to me when I was at school, and they keep giving to me to this very day.” — Paula Bendry Larsen ’64

Paula Bendry Larsen ’64 Thomas and Sigrid Gotthardt Laughlin Stephen and Jill Leenay S. Anne McAlpin Lohmann ’63 and John G. Lohmann, Jr. Teresa K. Looney MAOL’93 Marjorie Mathison Hance ’70 Helen Chao Lo Matteson ’50 Kimberly R. McDonald ’09 and Daniel W. McDonald Virginia Claessens McDonald ’57 and William J. McDonald Burt McGlynn † and Rosalyn McGlynn Lawrence J. McGough Donna B. McNamara, Ph.D., ’68 Louise Miner and Robert Wilcox Susan Schmid Morrison ’60 and John M. Morrison Sharon Bayer Mrocek ’63 and Richard J. Mrocek Mary Alice Muellerleile ’60 Liana and Dale Muller Henry G. Nachtsheim † and Ruth O’Donnell Nachtsheim ’39 † Stephen and Jami Nachtsheim Michael P. O’Boyle Lorraine F. O’Connor

Patrick J. O’Connor MAT’11 and Kerin McTeigue O’Connor Helen R. Olson MAOL’04 and Vern Olson Lawrence and Bonnie O’Shaughnessy Thomas J. Pacholl Evelyn Kinney Pallas ’62 Marie A. Proulx ’39 † Karen and Mark Rauenhorst Mary Ann Goodman Reilly ’61 and R. William Reilly Mary E. Reuder ’44 Lois Gross Rogers ’63 and John E. Rogers ReBecca Koenig Roloff ’76 and Mark H. Roloff MAT’88 Patricia Bohen Rowley ’66 and Stephen J. Rowley Valerie G. Rudolph ’52 † Margaret Claire McNevin Ruhme ’48 † Ann Ryan ’75 and Patrick Ryan Gertrude E. Scheller ’50 † Susan T. Schmid Gerald M. Schugel MaryFrances Schurb ’82 Jo Anne Shekleton ’50 † Mary Louise R. Sirignano Mary Rogers Sluka ’66 and Peter E. Sluka Penny Donovan Stenger ’63 and Bill Stenger Joan Beyer Swanson †

Mary Jane Tauscheck ’56 † Judi Druke Teske ’66 Patricia Bluml Timmons ’63 and Lawrence Michael Timmons Katherine Bakula Tinker ’94 and Steven J. Tinker Gretchen Risinger Toman ’81 and Marshall B. Toman Catherine L. van der Schans Mary M. Wagner ’69 and William Moore Kristi and Lawrence Waite Janice Buckley Walsh ’57 Mary B. Pearson Walsh ’60 and James P. Walsh Kristine Lamm West Mary Lee Whiting ’54 † Sunny Bach Wicka ’55 Barbara Kinney Winters ’63 and John C. Winters Carolyn Self Wollan ’91 and Robert E. Wollan Brenda Grandstrand Woodson ’80 and Wade Woodson Jeanine and Stuart Zook

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DONOR TRIBUTE

See our complete list of 2016–17 benefactors online: stkate.edu/tribute

To all who inspire, change and give. Thank you!

Become a leadership donor today! Contact Institutional Advancement 651.690.6976 giving@stkate.edu

MOTHER ANTONIA MCHUGH SOCIETY

MOTHER SERAPHINE IRELAND SOCIETY

Thank you, 2017 Reunion donors!

NEW MEMBERS

NEW MEMBERS

• At the President’s Luncheon, Jean

Anonymous Patricia Morgan Block ’66 and Kenneth W. Block Patricia Bohen Rowley ’66 and Stephen J. Rowley Jo Anne Shekleton ’50 † Katherine Bakula Tinker ’94 and Steven J. Tinker Gretchen Risinger Toman ’81 and Marshall B. Toman Mary B. Pearson Walsh ’60 and James P. Walsh

Anonymous M. Kathryn Clubb ’79 and Linda M. Reid Shirley Mann Gilles ’63 Mary Haskamp Hurley ’64 and Donald G. Hurley Angela K. Leigh ’02, CERT’09, MAOL’09 and Thomas H. Leigh Diane Sandretzky Pruett ’72 Sheryl Stehn-Klouda ’00

honors notable donors who establish endowed funds for our students in perpetuity.

recognizes distinguished donors who include St. Kate’s in their estate planning.

McIlquham Stalcup ’72 presented a giant check to President Roloff representing all annual, designated and planned gifts, totaling $585,094.

• Nearly 20% of reunion celebrants

honored their special milestone with a gift to St. Kate’s.

• The Reunion Planning Committee

included 54 dedicated alumnae who helped to organize activities for the 355 Katies who attended Reunion.

To see fundraising totals by class, visit: stkate.edu/reunion-giving For the complete list of Mother Antonia McHugh Society and Mother Seraphine Ireland Society members, see stkate.edu/tribute.

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BEHIND THE SCENE

Alms for the Poor BY AMY MULLOWNEY ’19

T

his cast-iron donation box was dredged out of Dew Drop Pond in winter 2014. To whom it belongs and how it got there is still a mystery. But our facilities management folks cleaned the artifact up and gave it a more solid base. Today, this alms box stands in Our Lady of Victory Chapel. If you know more, tell us: mag@stkate.edu PHOTO/RYAN JOHNSON ’19

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Marketing and Communications, Mail 4122 St. Catherine University 2004 Randolph Ave. St.Paul, MN 55105-1750 CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE

PAID TWIN CITIES, MN PERMIT NO. 822

Chapel

OUR LADY OF VICTORY

Monument • Mystery • Mission MARY ANN BRENDEN

For your holiday gift giving... A lavishly illustrated story that brings our historic chapel to life. Buy it at St. Kate’s Bookstore or stkate.edu/chapelbook. Proceeds support the preservation of the Chapel.

St. Catherine University Magazine Fall 2017  

Published three times each year, St. Catherine University Magazine tells the stories of the programs and people of St. Kate's.

St. Catherine University Magazine Fall 2017  

Published three times each year, St. Catherine University Magazine tells the stories of the programs and people of St. Kate's.