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FIRSTS ARE BEST B BEGINNINGS. JENN TO ALL THE BOYS I BEFORE. MOST THI T H E G R E AT E S T M E A R T H , HAVE THE IN SOMETHING SMA QUAKE THAT SHAT T MIGHT BEGIN WITH TREMBLE, A BRE AT WITH A VIBRATION L AUREN OLIVER, D 2

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BECAUSE THEY ARE NY HAN, I’VE LOVED INGS, E V E N MOMENTS ON EIR BEGINNINGS ALL. AN E ARTH TERS A CITY H A TREMOR, A TH. MUSIC BEGINS N. DELIRIUM. S TAY B O O K I S H Z I N E

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BRIGHT BEGINNINGS

Dear Reader, It’s amazing how things like books could inspire so much–a blog, a magazine, a community. Even more amazing? That there is a certain category of books out there that we have all grown so passionate about. I’m talking about YA, of course. Stay Bookish Zine is all about promoting YA books. We created this magazine to boost our favorite YA novels and you’ll observe once you peruse the pages of our zine’s first issue how much we love to talk about underrated YA that we think deserve more love. Nevertheless, we’re just as fond of several incredibly hyped YA books and authors so we’ll be sharing why they’re making huge, impactful waves in our community. More importantly, aside from talking about our bookish recommendations and discussing crucial bookish matters, we also have a cool piece about the history of YA and how it all began. After all, if books have taught us anything, it’s that beginnings make an impact. Like when you pick up a new book to read, the beginning of a story can determine whether you’ll join a character on his or her journey. I hope that as you read our very first issue, you’ll consider joining us at Stay Bookish as we begin our endeavor to fall further in love with YA through this magazine.

Hazel Ureta EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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CONTENTS N E WS

F E AT U R E S

L I F E ST Y L E

10 Adaptations The Darkest Minds Casting Simon vs. News Shatter Me TV Show Everything, Everything Trailer

16 Staff Current Reads Recently on the Stay Bookish staff’s bookshelves...

64 Travel A Bookish Tour of Paris

11 Reading & Publishing Goodreads Reread Feature Kristen Ritter Book Deal Black Girl Magic Book 12 The Contemporary Shift Portraying Issues in YA

18 Featured Author Becky Albertalli 24 Debut Author Slambook Ira Bloom, Wendy Jo Brant & more 32 Bookish Articles Under the Radar books, Cover Lovin, If You Like _ Try This Underrated Book, History of YA, Four Elements, Feminism Spotlight, The Hate U Give Hype, 38 More Interviews Read Diverse Books Aimal A Book Eater As Reader‘s World Fairy Loot OPINIONS 60 Writing in English Inclusive or Not?

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66 YA Column How to Fit Reading in a Busy Schedule 70 Online Booktube & Blogging Basics 74 Music YA Releases Mixtape Zine Playlist


BEGINNER GUIDES FOR BLOGGING & BOOKTUBE

FE ATURING YA AUTHORS: BECKY ALBERTALLI, SANDHYA MENON, LAURA SILVERMAN & MANY MORE!

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BOOKISH NEWS: ADAPTATIONS, GOODRE ADS, PUBLISHING & MORE! B Y A N A VA ZQ U E Z

The Darkest Minds Casting

Simon vs. News

Fans of Alexandra Bracken’s New York Times best-selling series The Darkest Minds have been patiently awaiting casting news ever since it was announced late 2016 that Amandla Stenberg will be playing the lead role, Ruby Daly. Luckily for fans, the team behind the movie announced three more cast members, completing the squad!

News surrounding the movie adaptation of the best-selling novel Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli has been kept to a minimum until February. It was already announced that Nick Robinson, who will also be starring in the Everything, Everything adaptation, was cast to play the lead role of Simon in December 2016. On February 16, Albertalli broke the months long silence by tweeting a teasing picture of a sign that says “Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda Production Office.” Although she didn’t hint at any news, the picture reassured and excited fans about the progress of the film. Not too long after, Jennifer Garner was announced to be attached to the film as none other than Simon’s mother, much to fans’ and Albertalli’s excitement.

On January 17, Deadline announced that Sundance Beach Rats star Harris Dickinson will be playing opposite Stenberg as Liam. Less than a month later, Deadline revealed that American Horror Story: Roanoke and American Housewife star Miya Cech will be making her film debut as Zu. Most recently, Skylan Brooks announced on Instagram that he will be portraying the beloved Chubs. You can catch Brooks on Netflix in The Get Down. The Darkest Minds film will be directed by the talented Jennifer Yuh Nelson, with the screenplay by Good Behavior’s Chad Hodge. There is no set premiere date at this time. 10

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Simon vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda is being adapted by Fox 2000. Greg Berlanti is set to direct the movie while Wyck Godfrey, Marty Bowen, and Pouya Shahbazian are attached as producers. There is no set premiere date at this time.

Shatter Me TV show is in the works Tahereh Mafi, author of the beloved and best-selling Shatter Me trilogy, announced in June 2015 that ABC Signature Studios optioned Shatter Me for a TV show adaptation for which she will be a consulting producer. News of the show’s progress was minimal until February 10, when Mafi shared an image of the cover page of the pilot episode’s script. Based on the image, readers learn that Mike Lee has adapted the story and that the episode will be titled “Pilot: The End, The Beginning”. The strikethrough in the title coupled with the fact that Mafi is a consulting producer reassured many fans that the show is in good hands. In her tweet, Mafi did not reveal any other details, but promised to share more news soon.

Turn to Page 18 to read our feature on Simon vs. author, Becky Albertalli, and her interaction with the cast!


Everything, Everything movie trailer released This Valentine’s Day, fans of Nicola Yoon’s New York Times best-selling novel Everything, Everything were gifted with the first official trailer for the movie. Starring Amandla Stenberg and Nick Robison, the trailer shows promise to be faithful to the book while surprising fans with a Beyoncé track that perfectly fits the trailer’s mood. The release of the trailer resulted in the novel’s return to the #1 spot on the NYT best-seller’s list. Everything, Everything is being adapted by MGM and Warner Bros. The movie was directed by Stella Meghie with a screenplay by J. Mills Goodloe. The film is set to release May 19.

Readers React: Goodreads Adds Reread Feature While most can agree that nothing can compare to the Goodreads website, many longtime Goodreads users are able to point out some features the site lacks.

For many years, Goodreads users requested a reread function that counts already-read books toward reading challenges. The folks over at Goodreads were excited to announce on February 7 that they had heard the people’s requests and had delivered. Prefacing their announcement with tweets regarding the rereading options, the Goodreads team then shared a blog post detailing how to utilize this new tool. Users rejoiced and shared their excitement in many tweets, but still many asked, “When are we getting our half-star rating system?”

Krysten Ritter Jessica Jones star Krysten Ritter announces her debut psychological thriller, Bonfire, that is set to be published by Crown Archetype on November 7 of this year. The story follows Abby Williams, an environmental lawyer who returns to her hometown to investigate a local company’s illegal dumping

of chemicals into local water. But then she stumbles across something much darker.

Black Girl Magic Book Marley Dias, a 12-year-old girl, began a book drive one year ago to collect books with black girls for protagonists. Naming this campaign #1000BlackGirlBooks, Dias captured the attention of the world and managed to collect over 9,000 books [to show the wide range of children’s stories that’s “not just [about] white boys and dogs” (Dias).] On February 2nd, Scholastic announced that they would be publishing Dias’s non-fiction book that will show kids ten and up how to make their dreams come true. In this “keep it real guide,” Marley Dias discusses her passion and how it became a success. It will also include tips on social justice and how to pay it forward. This book is set to release spring of 2018.

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The Contemporar y Shift: Portraying Issues in YA WRITTEN BY SHANTI M P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y H A Z E L

Why do people read YA? It’s entertaining, sure; it can be escapism; and there are often wonderfully nuanced characters and detailed plot. But often young adult literature is worth reading because it portrays contemporary issues that affect teenagers—and, of course, adults. Some books that have been recently receiving praise for portraying contemporary issues are The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas, which gives light about the Black Lives Matter movement, and History is All You Left Me by Adam Silvera, which talks about grief and mental health issues (obsessive-compulsive disorder, or OCD).

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There are also those that focus on the immigrant experience, such as The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon and Something In-Between by Melissa de la Cruz. These stories have been lauded for their ability to simultaneously entertain and reflect the lives of people in different countries. Yet, there are contemporary issues that don’t seem to get nearly the same amount of attention. Climate change, arguably the most pressing problem on the planet, gets limited representation in YA books, as does exploitation of child labourers in developing countries.

According to YA author Jenn Marie Thorne, “the basic makeup of the lives of refugees and immigrants is identical to our own, whether we choose to admit it or not.” She added that these people are “striving for peace, stability, happiness, safety and abundance for their children, just like us.” This is why she has decided to write about stories “of people who find themselves to some extent displaced.” Her first two books, The Wrong Side of Right and The Inside of Out, touch on the tension between family and politics, and sexuality and friendship respectively. The matter of economic status is also something to think about. As Thorne said, “the vast majority of YA protagonists are economically privileged.” This may reflect to, some extent, the background of both readers and writers of YA, which can be addressed by putting more diversity in the forefront by writing more about different experiences. Majority of protagonists in YA books come from middle or upper class backgrounds, which may reflect to some extent the background of both readers and writers of YA—but, as has often been argued, the best way to promote diversity is to write it. Jeann Wong, a book blogger (of HappyIndulgence.com) said “If the current book community is anything to go by, there are a lot of misunderstandings with the marginalisation that immigrants have, and still experience especially

in Western countries.” Immigration is clearly a issue that matters a lot to the YA community, and the books that are published reflect that. Representation of various issues in YA probably has a lot to do with the intended audience—mostly middle class teenagers in developed countries. The advent of the internet, e-readers, better education across the world, and companies like Amazon and The Book Depository, however, means that YA books now go across the globe—and are read by adults and teenagers alike.

“It wasn’t until I was in my 20s when I came to appreciate who I was, and which at my parents had done for me,” said Wong, adding “I’m glad that YA fiction has progressed a lot since I was at school.” Ultimately, that’s why YA needs to have representation of contemporary issues, because as teenagers grow up, the problems don’t disappear, and YA offers a way to explore these long term issues at a younger age. In some ways, it seems like the publishing industry has yet to catch up with this, and so, while books about immigrants to developed nations are common, there are fewer about teenagers who live permanently in a nation different from their passport country (like, say, me). Even within the “immigrant narrative” there are thousands of different stories, such as Wong’s. “Growing up, I didn’t know many people in real life who had the same experience as me moving countries twice, dealing with traditional Chinese customs at home, while trying to fit in with my Aussie classmates at school,” she said. As for climate change, well, many YA readers are privileged enough that it does not affect their lives greatly—compared to, say, a South Sudanese farmer currently coping with drought. Representation of contemporary issues has a lot to do with who’s going to read it. Of course, if reading is to build empathy, it must encompass a broad range of experiences, and the only way for this to happen is for readers to ask for it and writers to write about it. As Thorne said “I think we’ll see [these issues come up] more and more, given what’s been in the news.”

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STA F F C U R R E N T R E A DS Recently on the Stay Bookish staff’s bookshelves… Sophie Bergeron Egg and Spoon by Gregory Maguire // Ketchup Clouds by Annabel Pitcher // Suicide Notes from Beautiful Girls by Lynn Weingarten

Stacy Nguyen Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo // The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton // Roomies by Sara Zarr & Tara Altebrando Stacy Nguyen

Sophia Lin The Rule of Mirrors by Caragh M. O’Brien // Cage of Darkness by Jennifer Anne Davis // The Bone Witch by Rin Chupeco

Bella Cavicchi The Heartbeats of Wing Jones by Katherine Webber // How to Break a Boy by Laurie Devore

Erica Miller Kiss of Deception by Mary E. Pearson // Crank by Ellen Hopkins // When Dimple Met Rish by Sandhya Menon

Pamela Alvarado Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor // All of Our Yesterdays Cristin Terrill // Wintersong by S. Jae-Jones

Marie V. When the Moon was Ours by Anna-Marie McLemore // The Forbidden Wish by Jessica Khoury // When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon

Joséphine The Inexplicable Logic of My Life by Benjamin Alien Sáenz // Gem & Dixie by Sara Zarr // The Bands of Mourning by Brandon Sanderson

Keanna Lewis Find You in the Dark by Meredith Walters // First & Then by Emma Mills // Genius by Leopouldo Gout

HalaThe Heartbeats of Wing Jones by Katherine Webber // Goodbye Days by Jeff Zenter // Rebel of the Sands by Alwyn Hamilton.

Ana Off the Ice by Julie Cross // Love Me Never by Sara Wolf // Lost Girls by Merrie DeStefano

JM Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo // Beginner’s Guide: Love and Other Chemical Reactions by Six De Los Reyes // Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentner

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Hazel A Psalm for Lost Girls by Katie Bayerl // Written in the Stars by Aisha Saeed // P.S. I Still Love You by Jenny Han

Emily Rasmussen Geekerella by Ashley Poston // The Weight of Feathers by Anna-Marie McLemore // The Female of the Species by Mindy McGinnis

Shanti This Amazing Book is Not on Fire by Dan Howell and Phil Lester// The Careful Undressing of Love by Corey Ann Hadyu// Persuasion by Jane Austen

Shelly Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli // The Edge of the Abyss by Emily Strutskie // Girl Out of Water by Laura Silverman

Nihaad Caraval by Stephanie Garber // The Forbidden Wish by Jessica Khoury // A Tragic Kind of Wonderful by Eric Lindstrom // Wonder by R. J. Palacio // Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo

Inah #famous by Jilly Gagnon // Radio Silence by Alice Oseman // Of Heads and Hearts in the Metro by Thessa Lim

Tiffany Overdrive by Dawn Ius // Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo // Things I Should’ve Known by Claire LaZebnik

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THE UPSIDE OF WRITING YA: A CHAT WITH

BECKY ALBERTALLI BY HAZEL URETA

For many YA writers, the dream is to get published and have our stories reach readers. But when you’re an award-winning author like Becky Albertalli, writing YA takes publishing dreams to new heights–an upside like no other. In our conversation with Becky, she talks about her writing life, her newest book and her debut novel’s movie adaptation. Stay Bookish: To start, let‘s talk about your beginnings as a writer. Who or what inspired you to start writing? When did you feel like you were meant to write a novel? Becky Albertalli: I‘ve been writing as long as I can remember, though I never thought I‘d be able to turn it into a career. I pursued clinical psychology straight out of college, and I thought I‘d do that forever. But I left my job when my older son was born, and when he was about one, I decided to give writing for publication one shot. The book I drafted turned out to be SIMON.

for when you need to get in the writing zone? If so, can you share a snapshot or describe your writing area? Also, do you have any writing essentials? I actually almost always write in my bed! Most of my essentials are on my computer—I tend to keep lots of documents open (working drafts, outlines, and a place to cut and paste “murdered darlings“ in case I want to repurpose them for later scenes). And here is a pic of my laptop screen. The background picture is a commission of Molly from UPSIDE, by Elvishness!

Well your readers thank the gods for that one lucky shot. Why did you choose to write YA? I think because I love the immediacy of YA? I remember my own teen years pretty vividly, and I think that‘s a big part of it. Do you have a writing routine? Tell us what a typical writing day looks like for you. I actually do have a routine, though these days, it‘s a little hit or miss. In theory, I begin writing as soon as my kids leave for school. In practice, I‘m often juggling writing time with publicity commitments, edits, beta reading, phone calls and meetings with my film team, and political resistance work. And if one of my kids is home sick, all bets are off! Must be hard having to juggle so much along with writing! Do you have a space

Now we know where you write, do tell us— what is your writing and revision process like? I‘m finding it changes, depending on the book! But in general, I start with an outline, but change it a lot as I go along. I have to draft in order (it helps me keep my head in the right space, emotionally). I edit compulsively while drafting—to a point where it‘s almost unproductive. I think I prefer revisions! I find the blank page very overwhelming.

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BECKY ALBERTALLI‘S TOP 3 TIPS FOR WRITING

YA CONTEMPORARY

C

1 GET SPECIFIC WITH DETAILS. I like to know absolutely everything about my characters, including side characters. I flesh them out way beyond what makes it on the page.

2 BE MINDFUL OF INCLUSIVITY AND REPRESENTATION. The more research, the better, and always loop in sensitivity readers on the back end.

3 DECIDE HOW YOU‘RE GOING TO INCORPORATE TECHNOLOGY. It‘s such an important part of contemporary teens‘ reality that—unless there‘s a good reason not to—it probably needs to be included to some degree in your contemporary setting. I tend to incorporate lots of technology. Lots of books pull way back, and that works, too!

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Your second novel, The Upside of Unrequited is out in April and is such an anticipated release in the YA world! Can you describe the book to us in five words? Molly finally gets some action. Haha, I love it! So what do you love most about your main character, the finally-getting-some-action Molly Peskin-Suso? I don‘t know if this is something I should love, but I think I love the way her mind spirals. It‘s something I‘ve finally come to appreciate about my own brain, and it was really fun leaning into that while developing Molly‘s voice. Molly has a lot of crushes. Were you the same back in high school? What were you like? I was definitely the same— except I was really, really secretive about my crushes. I‘d say high school me was about 60% Molly, 40% Simon. I‘m sure writing characters that are like you must be quite a thrill as an author! But what was the hardest thing about writing UPSIDE? Oh man. Everything about writing UPSIDE was hard, honestly. I think a lot of authors have this experience with their second book. I was drafting UPSIDE while SIMON was releasing, which made it very hard to find space in my head sometimes.

And it definitely didn‘t help that I had a baby during the middle of all of that. Ah the second book slump strikes! But you pushed through and created such a beautiful book about a character who‘ll surely resonate with so many girls out there. Aside from Molly, who else is your most beloved character in this second novel? I always end up loving all of them! Except Evan Schulmeister. I‘ll never love him. I do have a pretty huge soft spot for Reid. Ew, Evan. How would you describe Reid and what do you think sets him apart from other YA love interests? He‘s just a big, sweet nerd. He‘s even nerdier than I am. It was really important to me that Reid be both fat/husky and Jewish. Sweet is exactly the word I‘d use too! I can‘t wait for readers to meet him. But I‘m also very fond of Cassie, Molly‘s twin sister. What made you want to write about siblings, specifically twins? It‘s funny—Molly used to have a younger brother named Jacob! I believe Cassie started off as a friend, and she somehow wormed her way in as a twin. I‘m not a twin myself (though I‘ve always wanted to be one). I do have a younger sister who I‘m really close to, and I poured a LOT of my relationship with her into Cassie and Molly.


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ty rare for an optioned book to be made into a film. So, it‘s only VERY recently that I‘ve come to understand that this movie will actually happen. It‘s utterly, completely surreal. A few days ago, I got to visit the art, costume, and prop departments, and I was blown away by the level of thought and care the production team is putting in. I get choked up every time I think about some of the tiny details.

HERE ARE BECKY‘S TOP FIVE MUST-HAVES FOR YOUR THE UPSIDE OF UNREQUITED READING KIT 1. Cadbury Mini-Eggs 2. Your most embarrassing high school journal 3. Pinterest 4. Mason jars 5. Emojis! With two books now in stores, which point in your writing career so far made you feel like you were successful as an author? Honestly, I don‘t know if I‘ll ever feel successful! I think it‘s very hard to measure success in this industry. Very true. That said, it‘s undeniable that SIMON was received exceptionally well when it was released and even after—did you ever feel pressured to surpass your own writing with UPSIDE? I definitely felt a lot of pressure—I still do! I worry my Simon readers won‘t connect with UPSIDE. I worry people won‘t be interested in Molly‘s story because she‘s a fat girl. I think UPSIDE is probably a better book, but I also know it‘s impossible to please every reader. No need to worry Becky, there is an audience out there that‘s been waiting for Molly‘s story all along without knowing it and I have no doubt they will feel seen and known when they find out for themselves how relatable UPSIDE is! I wish I could give all the stars and awards to that

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book. But you‘ve won an award before—how exactly did it feel winning the William C. Morris award for SIMON? It was surreal! I still can‘t quite believe it. I have always viewed my books as rom-coms, and rom-coms don‘t usually win awards (though I wish they did more often). I definitely cried on the phone when the committee called to break the news! Well then I‘ll assume there must have also been tears when you heard SIMON was being turned into a movie. How would you describe the moment you found out about the movie deal? This is actually a really interesting, somewhat complicated question! I‘m finding that the film industry is a little different than publishing. When you get a book deal, that almost always leads to the publication of your book. But movies seem to have a lot more hurdles behind the scenes? I was so excited about my film option, mostly because it was fun to daydream about, but at that time, no part of me expected the film to actually move forward. It‘s actually pret-

You mentioned details so let‘s talk about them—how do you feel about each of the cast members? How involved will you be in the movie process? I‘m completely thrilled with the casting—like, I can‘t even begin to explain how wonderful my team is. The production team has been really wonderful about keeping me involved and in the loop. I definitely don‘t have final decision making power, but I trust this team completely. I‘m so excited to hang out on set. You’ve met the cast recently! How did it go? B: And it was absolutely wonderful (I‘m still sort of stunned by it all). They are all completely down-toearth and friendly. I got to meet Nick Robinson, Alex Shipp, Jorge Lendeborg Jr., Katherine Langford, and Logan Miller, plus so many members of the amazing production team. Every single person I talked to is passionate about this project. We‘re in such good hands. That‘s amazing to hear! Also, I‘m sure the whole experience was memorable but what was your favorite moment when you met/interacted with the cast? I don‘t know if I can pick a favorite! I did step on Nick Robinson‘s foot at one point, and he was very sweet about it. Logan Miller shared some interesting stories about some of the unexpected demographics of his fanbase. I made fun of Jorge Lendeborg‘s low ski-ball score, and then promptly scored twenty points lower than him. Katherine Langford is a big fan of the book, and was ridiculously lovely about it. And Alex


Shipp is literally Abby Suso in the flesh—though she swears she was a Leah in high school! What scene from SIMON are you most excited to see on screen? Believe it or not, I think I‘m most excited to see a scene that isn‘t in the book. The screenwriters have changed a few details and added some things, but it feels so faithful to my story. There is some HILARIOUS Martin stuff in store for us. We are so ready for all the hilarious stuff! The movie adaptation is gonna be so epic with such an amazing cast of actors. But if you could also pick a dream cast for UPSIDE, who would you choose? This one‘s actually really hard for me to answer, because there are SO few fat teen actors and actresses in Hollywood. I actually don‘t know who I‘d choose! I‘d keep Alexandra Shipp for Abby, though, definitely. Ah truth! We still need fat rep in Hollywood. I hope we‘ll see UPSIDE on screen one day too and wish for many exciting news following your new book‘s release! Even though you‘ll probably busy with UPSIDE‘s launch, what books are you most excited for this Spring? So many! A few I‘ve read and adored: THE GENTLEMAN‘S GUIDE TO VICE AND VIRTUE, GIRL OUT OF WATER, SEVEN DAYS OF YOU, WHEN DIMPLE MET RISHI, GOODBYE DAYS, FIREWORKS. All books we‘re very excited for here at Stay Bookish! With book number two almost out in the world, what are you working one next? Can you give us any details/a teaser on your latest project? Yes! I am currently editing my third book, which will be a Simon sequel from Leah‘s POV. It takes place during senior year, so you‘ll get to see the gang at prom, figuring out colleges, and getting emotional about goodbyes. It‘s time to wrap this up with one last question: What is your message to the readers of your new book? Whatever you‘re feeling, and whatever you have and haven‘t experienced—you‘re not alone.

Becky Albertalli was born and raised in Atlanta, GA. She is a licensed clinical psychologist and the author of the bestselling YA novel, Simon Vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda, which won the William C. Morris YA Debut Award in 2016. Her upcoming novel The Upside of Unrequited will be released this April 2017. Website: http://beckyalbertalli.com Twitter: http://twitter.com/beckyalbertalli

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DEBUT YA AUTHORS

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SLAMBOOK: Ira Bloom Wendy Jo Brant Sara Biren Joanne O’Sullivan Laura Silverman Cale Dietrich Sandhya Menon Karen M. McManus

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Ira Bloom

irabloomauthorized.com @bloom_ira Represented by Merrilee Heifetz at Writer’s House Published with Scholastic Favorite writing beverage: Nikka Taketsuru 17 Favorite writing music: Oregon Favorite local bookstore to visit: Copperfield’s in Sebastopol, CA Favorite social media: Facebook Favorite TV shows/movies: You’re the Worst, The Seven Samurai, Guardians of the Gallaxy, Tampopo Favorite YA authors: Paul Rudnick, Suzanne Collins, David Lubar, Kass Morgan, David Levithan, Alexandra Bracken Cool YA Author Info: My current YA read is EXO by Fonda Lee. My superpower is blistering sarcasm that can peel the flesh off my enemies at 40 paces. When I’m not writing, I’m usually wishing I was writing. I usually get my writing ideas from a Higgs Boson in my sock drawer. I’m a plotter & pantser. One writing quirk of mine is I never research deeply because I don’t want reality telling me what I can or can’t do. I write YA because all the most fun books these days are YA, and who doesn’t want a piece of that? The best writing tip I ever received is to “fight like a demon for your writing time.” If I were to write in a different genre, it would be Noir.

Hearts & Other Body Parts

(Humor, Romance, Fantasy, Horror, Sci-fi, Paranormal) Release Date: March 28, 2017

Book Talk: In five words, my book is about Wiccan sisters loving deadly boys. A fun fact about my debut novel is that Kasha the demon cat is partially based on my cat Akira, and is not to be trusted. The character from my book who is most like me is Katy, because she embraces her weirdness. My current YA WIP/next book is about a girl who gets posessed by a demon and has to make the best of it.

“Hello readers! I hope you enjoy reading Hearts & Other Body Parts as much as I enjoyed writing it. These characters are all my brain children (except Kasha of course; I’m not entirely certain he didn’t invent me). Now we’re sending Esme, Katy, Veronica, Norman and Zack out into the world. In the immortal words of Dr. Frankenstein, “It’s alive!” Now the fun starts.” - Ira Bloom

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Wendy Jo Brant wendybrant.net @wendyjobrant

Represented by Wendi Gu at Sanford J. Greenburger Associates Published with KCP Loft Favorite writing music: The Lumineers Pandora station Favorite local bookstore to visit: Anderson’s Favorite social media: Facebook Favorite TV shows/movies: This is Us, The Middle, The Big Bang Theory Favorite YA authors: John Green, Rainbow Rowell, Suzanne Collins Cool YA Author Info: My current YA read is Aftermath by Clara Kensie. My superpower is catching typos and grammatical errors in other people’s social media posts (but I don’t always catch them in my own!) When I’m not writing, I’m usually parenting. I’m a pantser. One writing quirk of mine is I write all the “fun” scenes first. I write YA because teenagers are still developing their view of life and the world. Adults are stubborn and opinionated (I say this as an adult). The best writing tip I ever received is “It’s gonna take awhile. It’s normal to take awhile. You’ve just gotta fight your way through.” (Ira Glass) If I were to write in a different genre, it would be dystopian YA or women’s fiction.

Zenn Diagram

(Contemporary, Paranormal) Release Date: April 4, 2017 Book Talk: In five words, my book is about psychic math nerd finding love. A fun fact about my debut novel is it takes place in a fictional town based on Port Washington, Wisconsin, where my brothers both live. The character from my book who is most like me is Eva, because she’s kind of an introvert who craves intimacy. Also, she wants to do the right thing, but doesn’t always. My current YA WIP/next book is about a tech savvy blogger and an tech phobic farm boy get stranded together during an ice storm, and romance and healing ensue.

“THANK YOU for reading Zenn Diagram. I have been writing novel-length fiction for 25 years, and those of you who have read, reviewed, or shared my book have helped make my life-long dream come true. Thanks so much for your support- I hope to write many more books for you to enjoy! “ - Wendy Jo Brant

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Sara Biren

sarabiren.com @sbiren Represented by Steven Chudney Published with Amulet Books Favorite writing beverage: Coffee Favorite writing music: Playlists - mostly rock/alternative Favorite local bookstore to visit: Buffalo Books & Coffee, Buffalo MN Favorite social media: Instagram Favorite TV shows/movies: M*A*S*H, Seinfeld, Freaks & Geeks/Gone With the Wind, That Thing You Do!, Pride & Prejudice (2005), This is Spinal Tap Favorite YA authors: Stephanie Perkins, Kasie West, Rainbow Rowell, Jennifer Echols, Robin Constantine, Sarah Dessen, Kerstin Gier Cool YA Author Info: My current YA read is You Don’t Know Me But I Know You by Rebecca Barrow. My superpower is keeping my family’s schedule straight. When I’m not writing, I’m usually reading or freelance editing. I usually get my writing ideas from observing the world, memories, sometimes dreams, music. I’m a pantser. One writing quirk of mine is I don’t write chronologically. I write whatever scene comes to mind. I write YA because I’m quite taken with that time of life - the intensity of emotion, the struggle of becoming, the excitement for and the uncertainty of the future. The best writing tip I ever received is start on the day life changes for your character. If I were to write in a different genre, it would be chick lit.

The Last Thing You Said

(YA Contemporary) Release Date: April 4, 2017

Book Talk: In five words, my book is about first love, loss, grief, forgiveness A fun fact about my debut novel is Ben and Lulu attend the wedding of Ben’s cousin, Aaron, and his bride, Maria... inspired by the wedding of my niece, Maria, and her groom, Aaron. The character from my book who is most like me is Lulu, because I love strawberry-rhubarb pie and maple fudge and ice cream. My current YA WIP/next book is about the only girl on a boys’ high school hockey team and the trouble it causes, especially when she’s thrust into an unexpected spotlight and falls for the team captain.

“Thanks so much for reading! And always remember ~ it’s a good day to have a good day. ” - Sara Biren

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Joanne O’Sullivan

joanneosullivan.com @jkosullivan1

Represented by Clarie Anderson-Wheeler Published with Candlewick Favorite writing music: Sufjan Stevans, Tori Amos, Band of Horses Favorite local bookstore to visit: Malaprops and Spellbound Children’s Bookstore Favorite social media: Instagram Favorite TV shows/movies: I like British detective shows like Sherlock, Broadchurch and Poirot. Favorite recent movies are indie movies including Moonlight and Sing Street Favorite YA authors: Stephanie Perkins, Megan Shepherd, Beth Revis, Jaye Robin Browne Cool YA Author Info: My current YA read is Cheesus was Here by J.C. Davis. My superpower is compassion. When I’m not writing, I’m usually adulting! I usually get my writing ideas from songs or people I observe. One writing quirk of mine is when I’m doing revisions, I title the document ‘experiment’ to let myself feel like I *might* keep some of the old version: that way I don’t feel like the old material is wasted. I write YA because Teens are at such an important time in life- there are so many issues and ideas to explore with a character at this age. The best writing tip I ever received is that action is character (F. Scott Fitzgerald quote) If I were to write in a different genre, it would be Middle Grade.

Between Two Skies

(Contemporary, Historical Realistic) Release Date: April 25, 2017 Book Talk: In five words, my book is about love, belonging, letting go, and starting over. A fun fact about my debut novel is it’s full of music and food- you’ll want to listen to Louis Armstrong and make a bowl of gumbo while you read it! The character from my book who is most like me is Evangeline- she’s loyal, loves the outdoors and doesn’t let go of her dream. My current YA WIP/next book is about a girl from a progressive school in the Pacific Northwest who moves to the deep South and finds out things aren’t always what they seem.

“Thank you for reading Between Two Skies! I hope it takes you somewhere you’ve never been before!” - Joanne O’Sullivan

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Laura Silverman

laurasilvermanlovesbooks.tumblr.com @LJSilverman1 Represented by Jim McCarthy Published with Sourcebooks Fire Favorite writing beverage: Iced Tea Favorite writing music: Classical or white noise (like library sounds) for writing & Folk, Jam Bands, Classic Rock, Indie, etc haha for editing Favorite local bookstore to visit: When I lived in NYC it was Books of Wonder! (hard to visit stores now often because of my chronic pain, so usually the one just closest to my house) Favorite social media: Changes! I use Twitter the most! Used to be Instagram. Also love(d) Tumblr but I was never really active. Favorite TV shows/movies: GREY’S ANATOMY FOR LIFE. I watch a lot of television but Grey’s never lets me down. Also The Office. Movies, also so many, I can always re-watch Beasts of the Southern Wild and The Social Network Favorite YA authors: IMPOSSIBLE QUESTION! ALL OF THEM! Okay, a few, Becky Albertalli, Aisha Saeed, John Corey Whaley, A.S. King, Nicola Yoon, David Levithan, Angie Thomas, Adam Silvera *insert a million more Cool YA Author Info: My current YA read is American Street. My superpower is writing sprints. Editing takes me forever but I can get a lot of words on the page quickly when I’m in the zone, especially when I’m mostly writing dialogue and will fill out the scene later.When I’m not writing,

I’m usually doing a lot of things, especially going to concerts, but because of chronic pain, I’m usually resting and watching TV. Also breaks to hug my dogs. Also, reading. I get my writing ideas everywhere! Life, reading, TV, dreams, my characters may or may not tell me things. One writing quirk of mine is I LOVE writing and reading about food, so hopefully you like reading about food. My characters eat a lot haha! I write YA because It’s always been my favorite genre to read and write. I think you feel really strongly when you’re a teenager, and things in your life are often changing quickly. And I love writing about family dynamics - parents, siblings, in my debut: cousins. I think it’s sometimes harder to write those dynamics if you’re writing adult characters. Though, because of my disability, I live at home again, so maybe I’ll write about that dynamic one day.

Girl Out of Water

(YA Contemporary) Release Date: May 2nd, 2017 Book Talk: In five words, my book is about surfing, skating, family, romance, food. A fun fact about my debut novel is *whispers* I’ve never surfed before. The character from my book who is most like me is Tess because I’m upfront with my friends and I’d much rather read a book on the beach than get in the ocean. My current YA WIP/next book is about an exploration of Jewish identity in America and academic pressure (and yes there’s a swoony romance too).

“Thank you so much for reading about me and my debut novel! I seriously don’t have the words to express how much I appreciate your love and enthusiasm!” - Laura Silverman 30

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Cale Dietrich caledietrich.com @caledietrich

Represented by Leon Husock Published with Feiwel and Friends Favorite writing beverage: Coffee Favorite writing music: I have playlists for each manuscript - it’s usually a mix of pop, pop punk and alternative. Favorite local bookstore to visit: Dymocks Favorite social media:Twitter Favorite TV shows/movies: Veronica Mars, Community, The Office Favorite YA authors: Becky Albertalli, Adam Silvera, Leigh Bardugo, J.K. Rowling, Carlie Sorosiak, Sonia Belasco, Tricia Levenseller and Angie Thomas Cool YA Author Info: My current YA read is Caraval. My superpower is making swirls of whipped cream that look really pretty. When I’m not writing, I’m usually parenting. When I’m not writing, I’m usually reading or gaming. I usually get writing ideas from my life, but in an abstract way - it’s more about feelings than things that literally happened to me. Although characters usually appear in my head fully formed, I have no idea how that works. One writing quirk of mine is I usually draft in a different font, then switch to Times New Roman during editing (like when I’m happy with a section, I switch it to Times New Roman).

The Love Interest

(YA Spy Thriller) Release Date: May 16, 2017 Book Talk: In five words, my book is about two spies falling in love A fun fact about my debut novel is that the plot has stayed essentially the same from the very first draft - there are only a few bonus scenes I added later. All of my revisions were about voice. The character from my book who is most like me is Caden and Juliet. I think if you mashed up the traits of those two you’d get pretty close to what I’m like. My current YA WIP/next book is about confronting privilege and questioning your identity and beliefs. I’m really excited about it.

“Thanks for reading this, and I hope you check out The Love Interest when it comes out on the 16th of May!” - Cale Dietrich

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Sandhya Menon sandhyamenon.com @smenonbooks

Represented by Thao Le Published with Simon & Schuster Favorite writing beverage: Tea! Favorite local bookstore to visit: Covered Treasures or Tattered Cover, both in Colorado Favorite social media: Twitter- it’s the publishing water cooler! Favorite TV shows/movies: Bollywood movies (natch), Bates Motel, The Killing, The Fourth Kind, Mindy Project, Friends... and so many more! Favorite YA authors: Jenny Han, Stephanie Perkins, Stephanie Garber, Adam Silvera, Becky Albertalli, and so many more! Cool YA Author Info: My current YA read is Caraval by Steph Garber, and I’m sooooo into it already, just a few pages in! My superpower is seeing words in my head as I speak! It’s why I’m good at spelling. When I’m not writing, I’m usually reading, playing board games with my family, or romping around Colorado. I usually get my writing ideas from the idea generator in my brain that NEVER. goes. to. sleep. One writing quirk of mine is I need complete silence to write, to the point where I even take ear plugs to the library! I write YA because I want teens to be able to read stories about people like them. The best writing tip I ever received is that E.L. Doctorow quote: “It’s like driving a car at night. You never see further than your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way. Writing is an exploration.”

Even though I’m a plotter, I like taking the book scene by scene this way. If I were to write in a different genre, it would be probably speculative fiction of some kind or light adult romance.

When Dimple Met Rishi (YA Contemporary) Release Date: May 30, 2017

Book Talk: In five words, my book is about arranged marriage, Indian-American teens, luuuurrrrve! A fun fact about my debut novel is there are real Indian actors from the eighties named Dimple and Rishi! The character from my book who is most like me is Dimple because we both like to thwart people’s expectations about Indian women’s roles in society. My current YA WIP/next book is about a teen who writes letters to her fave female filmmakers as she attempts to deal with family, friendship, and romance drama!

“For everyone who’s ever opened a book hoping to see their face reflected back at them.” - Sandhya Menon

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Karen M. McManus

karenmcmanus.com @writerkmc

Represented by Rosemary Stimola Published withDelacorte Press Favorite writing beverage: Water or red wine, depending on how well things are going. Favorite writing music: Depends on the book/characters. Lately Alessia Cara & Anna Nalick. Favorite local bookstore to visit: Porter Square Books in Cambridge, MA Favorite social media: Twitter Favorite TV shows/movies: The Breakfast Club and Pretty Little Liars - which also happens to be the blurb for my book . Favorite YA authors: Kara Thomas, Courtney Summers, Becky Alberalli, Nova Ren Suma Cool YA Author Info: My current YA read is A Study in Charlotte (Finally!) My superpower is extreme punctuality When I’m not writing, I’m usually working, reading, or hanging out with my 10yo. I usually get my writing ideas from driving and listening to the radio. A song or news story often sparks a train of thought. One writing quirk of mine is I feel bereft when my chapters aren’t of equal length.mI write YA because the teen years are intense, pivotal, and full of possibility. The best writing tip I ever received is your characters should be doing something in the last chapter that they’d never do in the first.

One of Us Is Lying

(Thriller) Release Date: May 30, 2017 Book Talk: In five words, my book is about The Breakfast Club, with murder. A fun fact about my debut novel is the four main characters would sort very well into the four Hogwarts Houses. The character from my book who is most like me is Addy, because it takes her a while to figure out who she is. My current YA WIP/next book is about secrets & lies in a small town with a tragic past that might be about to repeat itself.

“All writers are readers first. We know what it’s like to truly connect with a story, and having that impact on others is the best part of becoming a published author. I’m deeply thankful to everyone who has read ONE OF US IS LYING over the past several months! There are so many wonderful books out there, it means the world that you chose to spend time with mine.” - Karen M. McManus

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UNDER THE RADAR BOOKS This list was compiled by a number of our staff members, focusing on books released from the past year to the date of this publication. Without further ado, here’s the Stay Bookish Zine’s Under the Radar picks!

Mirror in the Sky

BY ADITI KHORANA When an alternate universe appears in the sky with a message intercepted from NASA, Tara starts to question her own life and its place in the world. This wonderfully written debut novel blurs the line between sci-fi and contemporary asww Tara thinks about the choices she’s made, or will make.

A Darkly Beating Heart

BY LINDSAY SMITH

In this thrilling revenge fantasy, Reiko flits between 19th century and modern day Japan. Written well, A Darkly Beating Heart will grip you until the very end.

A Taste of Honey

BY KAI ASHANTE WI LSON A stand-alone companion to The Sorceror of the Wildeeps, this beautifully written short novella is an immersive fantasy you won’t forget. The point of view switches in time which actually adds to the story instead of taking away from it. A Taste of Honey is definitely a unique story you definitely don’t want to miss out on!

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Watching Traffic

BY JANE OZKOWSKI With Watching Traffic, Jane Ozkowski has mastered the art of finding a way straight to the reader’s soul with her words. A beautiful story of change, transition and new beginnings that makes you feel like you’re not alone.

How to Make Out

BY BRIANNA SHRUM

To make money for a trip to New York, Renley starts a blog giving advice, where users pay to unlock answers. As the blog gains popularity, she has to decide what is more important to her and make some difficult choices. A contemporary novel you don’t want to miss!

Aftermath

BY CLARA KENSIE

Charlotte fought her way to freedom after being locked up in an attic by her captor for four years. Now she’s back in her home surrounded by the people she knows and loves. Except it isn’t like that anymore – her mother is an alcoholic, her twin sister wound up in rehab and her dad is a glutton for fame. In this heartbreaking novel, Charlotte explores the aftermath of her own tragedy and the damage it has brought upon her own family.

It’s All Absolutely Fine

BY RUBY ELLIOT Darkly comic, honest and unapologetic illustrated account of the daily struggles with mental health. Ruby Elliot, aka Rubyetc, is the talent behind the hit tumblr account, ‘Rubyetc’, which has over 210k followers and growing. Taking readers on a journey through the ups and downs of life, the book will encompass everything from anxiety, bipolar disorder and body image to depression and identity, shining a light on very real problems – all framed with Ruby’s trademark humour and originality.

WRITTEN BY SHELLY & SOPHIE B. PHOTOS BY KEANNA S TAY B O O K I S H Z I N E

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cover lovin’

We all love books. We read and read, but what is that initial drive that makes you want to pick up a new book? Is it the fact that you’ve read the author’s work before and you’re interested in their next book? Is it that the synopsis sounds intriguing and you just need more? Or is it the fact that you see the book everywhere and you want to see what all the hype is about? All of these are reasons why I pick up a book, but there is a reason that tends to motivate me more than the others, and that is the stunning cover. Design is something that I love, so if a cover catches my eye in any way, I will want to pick it up faster than you can say “bibliophiles rule.” Anyway, I’ll be showcasing five book covers that have caught my eye and that will soon get my money because I need these beautiful designs on my shelves. BY ERICA MILLER

under rose-tainted skies At seventeen, Norah has accepted that the four walls of her house delineate her life. She knows that fearing everything from inland tsunamis to odd numbers is irrational, but her mind insists the world outside is too big, too dangerous. So she stays safe inside, watching others’ lives through her windows and social media feed. But when Luke arrives on her doorstep, he doesn’t see a girl defined by medical terms and mental health. Instead, he sees a girl who is funny, smart, and brave. And Norah likes what he sees.Their friendship turns deeper, but Norah knows Luke deserves a normal girl. One who can walk beneath the open sky. One who is unafraid of How absolutely stunning is this cover? The watercolor pinks and reds draw me in. Not only that, but the bird cage with the writing as the chain is a perfect, subtle addition to the cover. The blue foil for the main title is the cherry on top.

peter darling Ten years ago, Peter Pan left Neverland to grow up, leaving behind his adolescent dreams of boyhood and resigning himself to life as Wendy Darling. Growing up, however, has only made him realize how inescapable his identity as a man is. But when he returns to Neverland, everything has changed: the Lost Boys have become men, and the war games they once played are now real and deadly. Even more shocking is the attraction Peter never knew GAH. This cover. The cloud-like aspect of this cover makes me want to fly to Neverland. I want to dive into the cover and submerge into the world, which speaks volumes. I haven’t even read an inch of this book and I’m already ready to jump head first into the world of Neverland. 36

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the bone witch When Tea accidentally resurrects her brother from the dead, she learns she is different from the other witches in her family. Her gift for necromancy means that she’s a bone witch, a title that makes her feared and ostracized by her community. But Tea finds solace and guidance with an older, wiser bone witch, who takes Tea and her brother to another land for training. In her new home, Tea puts all her energy into becoming an asha — one who can wield elemental magic. But dark forces are approaching quickly, and in the face of danger, Tea will have to overcome her obstacles… and make a powerful choice. The combination of purple and gold together makes this cover pop, which is hard to do with such deep colors, but it works. The intricate details of the swirls add a perfect touch. Not only do I love the simplicity, but the subtle addition of the woman in the background is perfectly hidden, barely catching the eye.

meg and linus Can friendship, Star Trek, drama club, and a whole lot of coffee get two nerdy best friends through the beginning of their senior year of high school? Meg and Linus are best friends bound by a shared love of school, a coffee obsession, and being queer. It’s not always easy to be the nerdy lesbian or gay kid in a suburban town. But they have each other. And a few Star Trek boxed sets. They’re pretty happy. But then Sophia, Meg’s longtime girlfriend, breaks up with Meg. Linus starts tutoring the totally dreamy new kid, Danny—and Meg thinks setting them up is the perfect project to distract herself from her own heartbreak. But Linus isn’t so sure Danny even likes guys, and maybe Sophia isn’t quite as out of the picture as Meg thought she was... Simple, but lovely. The watercolor pinks and blues draw my eye in, especially when set against the black background. The hand-drawn font wins me over, too!

when dimple met rishi Dimple Shah has it all figured out. With graduation behind her, she’s more than ready for a break from her family, from Mamma’s inexplicable obsession with her finding the “Ideal Indian Husband.” Ugh. Dimple knows they must respect her principles on some level, though. If they truly believed she needed a husband right now, they wouldn’t have paid for her to attend a summer program for aspiring web developers… right? Rishi Patel is a hopeless romantic. So when his parents tell him that his future wife will be attending the same summer program as him — wherein he’ll have to woo her—he’s totally on board. Because as silly as it sounds to most people in his life, Rishi wants to be arranged, believes in the power of tradition, stability, and being a part of something much bigger than himself. The Shahs and Patels didn’t mean to start turning the wheels on this “suggested arrangement” so early in their children’s lives, but when they noticed them both gravitate toward the same summer program, they figured, why not? Dimple and Rishi may think they have each other figured out. But when opposites clash, love works hard to prove itself in the most unexpected ways. An Indian woman on the cover? Heck yeah. She’s smiling and her smile makes me smile. It is so simple, but the simplicity allows the South Asian representation to shine, and that’s the way it should be. This cover is perfect. S TAY B O O K I S H Z I N E

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if you like this popular book, try this underrated book WRIT TEN BY SHELLY PHOTO BY KE ANNA Feel like you’ve read all the popular YA books already? Here are some new suggestions based off some popular favourites!

popular

underrated if you like lyrical writing

if you like sweet romance and witty dialogue

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popular

underrated if you like adventurous science fiction

if you like works by #ownvoices authors

if you like honest, realistic LGBT portrayal

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IT ALL B EG I N S HERE: T H E H I STO RY A N D T R A N S FO R M AT I O N O F YA L I T WRITTEN BY S TAC Y N G U Y E N & J E S S I C A T R U D E AU P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y NIHAAD

Everything comes from somewhere. A chick hatches out of an egg, all wet and fragile; a tree rises out of a tiny seed, slowly, patiently; and YA came from the rise of youth culture. In the early United States, there wasn’t a concept of what it meant to be a teenager in general. Up until the early nineteenth century, the U.S. was a primarily agricultural country, and for many children, studies came second to helping out on the family farm. And when the Industrial Revolution began, more people moved to crowded cities where many children over the age of fourteen had to work in factories rather than attending school (Thompson). This changed in 1918, when Mississippi became the last state to pass compulsory education legislation (Katz), and twenty years later, the Fair Labor Laws Act passed, banning children under sixteen from working (Fried). As a result, more kids started to attend school and create a culture that was strictly for young adults. As journalist Derek Thompson once wrote, “teens didn’t create ‘high school.’ High schools created ‘teenagers’ … and the possibility of a distinct teenage subculture became possible.” Youth culture also grew from the mass production of cars in the 1920s (History.com Staff) (Thompson). Instead of having to go to a date’s house for dinner and make awkward small talk with the parents, cars helped bring a new kind of freedom that allowed teen dating culture to grow into what it is now. Classic dinner and movie dates, parties, dramatic school dances, and more all became possible when cars became cheaper and more accessible to young adults. The emerging youth culture helped inspire stories that were now being written for a new teenage audience. In fact, in 1942, Seventeenth Summer by Maureen Daly became one of the first books “written and published explicitly for teenagers” (Strickland). However, it wasn’t until the 1960s that the Young Adult Library Services Association decided on the label “young adult” for books written for people twelve to eighteen years old (Strickland). The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton, a coming-of-age novel about a teenager and how he deals with cliques and violence, was published on April 24, 1967, becoming one of the books to popularize this category. S.E. Hinton wrote the story because “There was no realistic fiction being written about teen-agers when [she] was in high school—everything was ‘Mary-Jane Goes to The Prom.’” Of course, that didn’t mean that there weren’t any books about teenagers like Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain. These titles were certainly prototypes of young adult literature, but they were yet to be read by many high schoolers let alone marketed for that age group. The Golden Age of YA happened around the 1970s and 1980s, after YA offered “mature contemporary realism directed at adolescents” (Strickland) in the 60s. This paved a way for other serious topics in YA lit, and in the 70s authors, like Judy Blume, began to write about all kinds of teen issues, such as puberty, friendship, and bullying. However, in the 80s, genre fiction became more popular, breaking away from the narrowly focused single issues, with Christopher Pike and R.L. Stine leading the way (Strickland). Teens began to desire more imaginative stories as opposed to the real-life issues of the 60s and 70s (Withers and Ross). Unfortunately, the 90s were a dry period for YA lit due to a drop in the number of teens in the US, which caused the number of YA readers to drop about twenty

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percent (Withers and Ross). This was “the greatest recorded loss of readership in the country’s history,” so a number of reading incentives started to pop up (Withers and Ross). It wasn’t until the turn of the century, when books like J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series were published, that a new golden age of YA (with which most current YA readers are more familiar with) emerged. Throughout the second Golden Age, teens have been devouring YA lit and all its genres. The most popular genres that have exploded are fantasy, paranormal, and dystopian. While books like The Hunger Games and Twilight clearly carved a path for more books of their respective genres, Jennifer Lynn Barnes suggests that these genres have become so popular among teens because „just like adolescence is between childhood and adulthood, paranormal, or other, is between human and supernatural” (Stickland). Other genres, like science fiction, historical, and steampunk, have also grown in popularity with YA audiences. At this point, YA has become such an expansive and growing category that almost any genre has a chance of being the next big trend. Additionally, it’s been increasingly difficult to narrow down what exactly can be considered YA lit, as a new age group genre, New Adult, is emerging. New Adult takes on the upper end of what would previously have been considered YA, with stories about and for youth who are older than eighteen, particularly college students. While New Adult has its own style with more mature themes of sexuality and joining the career force as adults, it is not too different from the ideas that persisted at the start of YA in the 50s and 60s, which is essentially growing into adulthood. Although new genres are exploding in popularity, the coming-of-age stories that tackle real-life issues still persist in the contemporary genre. Teens are not only reading about broad teenage issues, but they’re gaining perspectives into more diverse topics that do not always affect the majority of adolescents, such as sexuality, mental illness, and racism. Some of the most memorable YA fiction consists of books that discuss difficult topics because there is a lack of discussion in real life (particularly at home or in school) about issues such as rape, abuse, and death. In conclusion, the United States’ youth culture helped inspire the creation of young adult literature, but it wasn’t until the 1960s when the term became more official. With literature that encompassed the broad experiences and issues of being a teenager, YA lit boomed into a Golden Age in the 70s. Surrounding the dwindling decade of the 90s, genre fiction took the stage in the 80s and during the second Golden Age of the 2000s. Currently, YA has earned its place in libraries, bookstores, schools and millions of readers worldwide, inspiring a new generation of stories.

RISE OF YOUTH CULTURE

1918 All states now officially require mandatory education 1920s Cars start being mass produced 1938 Fair Labor Laws Act passes 1942 Seventeenth Summer is published 1960s Young Adult Library Services Association coins the term Young Adult; The Outsiders is published

FIRST GOLDEN AGE

1970s Contemporary realism is popular 1980s Genre fiction becomes popular 1982-2002 Fewer people are reading YA 1998 Harry Potter and the Sorcerer‘s Stone is published

SECOND GOLDEN AGE

2000s Several book awards started to honor YA (Epic Reads) 2005 Twilight is published 2008 The Hunger Games is published

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like earth, like air, like water, like fire YA Fantasy & Sci-Fi Books Representing the Four Elements WRITTEN BY MEIA B. Imagine a game where you have the ability to choose teams that will protect your own camp based on the four elements—air, water, earth, and fire. The challenge? You need to think of two Young Adult books that remind you of each elements and it will be your power source for the impending war on camps. One touch on a “fire” book for example will render you the ability to control fire! Touch “water” and it will wash out some damage within your enemy’s camp. Anything is possible if you have the right books within you and you choose wisely. Fun, isn’t it? But wait, it is your first time playing, and the clock is ticking. Lucky for you, I’m here to guide you in classifying different YA novels, so worry no more! As an avid fantasy and a little bit of sci-fi YA reader, picking books in both genre can guarantee representation of each elements for most stories equipped one of the four elements as a major factor in vivid world building and plotting. We can easily identify the elements used because it is vital to the character’s ability or to the story setting itself so it’s all in you to identify on where you will get the elements, be it on the main character’s ability, on the story setting itself, on overall main element used, everywhere within the book! With that in mind, we can say that YA fantasy and sci-fi are the perfect genres for this game. Here are some books you should include in your team for each element.

A IR

AKA the books that will make you soar

MAGONIA by Maria Dahvana Headley A girl with a mysterious lung disease that leaves her always out of breath finds her cure above the sky in a world where she can breathe for the first time—a world called Magonia. This sparkling series beginning will surely leave an imaginative impression on all of its readers. Release date: April 28, 2015 EMPRESS OF A THOUSAND SKIES by Rhoda Belleza Described as a “saga of vengeance, warfare, and the true meaning of legacy,” this debut novel will take you to the depths of the galaxy and beyond. Different motives from different people collide in one epic space adventure, leaving readers with nothing to do but to follow the storyline. Release date: February 7, 2017

F IR E

AKA the books that will ignite a spark of emotions inside of you

A SHADOW BRIGHT AND BURNING by Jessica Cluess With a sequel hitting shelves this September, this novel swept off the book community when it released last fall, spotlighting a protagonist who can spontaneously burst into flames. A human torch, she shines with girl power on fire (figuratively and literally). Blazing and burning, this novel makes readers feel the flame from beginning to end and leaves them desperate for the next installment. And can we talk about the name of the series, “Kingdom on Fire”? The heat is on point! Release date: September 20, 2016 42

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FROSTBLOOD by Elly Blake Don’t be fooled by the title; this novel, with the tagline “The reign of ice must end,” is a flaming debut novel about a seventeen-year-old Fireblood girl who concealed her powers of heat and flame from the cruel reign of Frostblood for far too long. Everything changes when her mother is killed, sparking a burning desire for revenge. The main objective? To kill the Frostblood king. The next novel in the series will be released on September 12, 2017 so the wait will not be too long.

EA R T H

AKA the books that will make you fall into an endless abyss with no

SHADOW AND BONE by Leigh Bardugo This one’s an oldie but definitely a goodie! The legendary first book of the Grisha trilogy lays out an epic introduction to the Grishaverse that we love. Let’s reminisce on the journey towards Ravka and beyond—the mystery of the Shadow Fold and the endless suffering it brings, the undeniable power of an orphaned girl who can break free of the long-cursed Fold, and the danger lurking around the corner. Followed by the second book, Siege and Storm, and the last book in the trilogy, Ruin and Rising, this book crosses the unknown with the quest of a lifetime that can save everyone and everything. THE VALIANT by Lesley Livingston We all hear about the mighty and brave Romans and the famous male gladiators, but we never hear about badass female gladiators… until now. The Valiant follows a captive Celtic princess as she becomes a great female gladiator, the first in history. With cameos from Julius Caesar and Cleopatra themselves, we can expect a mighty battle call of a book armed with cries of action and romance.

WA T ER

AKA the books that will drown you with feels

DAUGHTER OF THE PIRATE KIN by Tricia Levenseller Set in the course of a spin of action, adventure, romance, and magic, this thrilling debut pirate tale promises an epic journey to retrieve an ancient hidden map, a pirate captain who is willing to go on a suicide mission to accomplish her goals, and a clever and unfairly attractive first mate. Complete with a slow-tempo romance that matches the pace of friendly waves, Daughter of the Pirate King is a great pirate tale with an empowered female protagonist. SONG OF THE CURRENT by Sarah Tolcser A destiny lies within the currents of river in this enchanting, captivating debut novel. Song of the Current features promising worldbuilding and a bold female personality who will master the courage to be the captain of her own ship on an expedition that will leave us wanting more. While waiting for the book to be released, let’s appreciate how glorious the cover is! Release date: June 6, 2017

Now that my teams are all set, I’m excited to hear yours! Let’s go wander through the pages of a book and explore the elements of the world through reading. The clock is ticking! S TAY B O O K I S H Z I N E

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BOOK SPOTLIGHT

Here We Are: Feminism For

Here We Are is a response to lively discussions about the true meaning of feminism on social media and across popular culture and is an invitation to one of the most important, life-changing, and exciting parties around.

Living in a country that is considered one of the worst places for a woman to live, I’m lucky enough to have a supportive family, the right to choose my education, my future job, and my future partner. Now, this might seem normal for you, but I know two girls who left school to get married at the age of 15 and I know that there are thousands of girls like them. I once heard someone say, “Just because it’s not happening to you doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen to someone else.” And it’s true; we won’t notice other people if we don’t read about them. Here’s the truth about feminists: They come in all the shapes, sizes, and colors. Feminism is not a physical uniform. Do I know about the trouble that immigrants face? The answer is no. But I do know about feeling unaccepted. Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World edited by Kelly Jensen discusses such experiences and more, and that’s what I like about it. I didn’t relate to all of the stories, but it changed me. Reading about this diverse group of women changed how I felt about myself. Other times, I caught myself saying, “Yes, I wanted to say this but you put it in words.” Especially during Lily Myers’ piece “I Have Always Eaten the Bread” because it portrayed the way I felt about my body, and this is very important because it shows other teens that they are not alone. Seeing themselves in other successful people, teens will feel like they’re valid no matter what they look like.

Feminism is about recognizing power and fighting to distribute it equally, regardless of race or class or ability or gender. Feminism is not static, and it never has been. In fact, feminism demands change. Malinda Lo 44

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the Real World I thought I was the only one, but no—I’m not alone. In fact, many women are the same as me. This book taught me that we may look different, but we’re also similar: we all want the same rights; we want to be accepted by others; and we want to be accepted by ourselves. This book also taught me why we need feminism—I believe that we’re not fighting against laws; we’re fighting against societies and ignorant people. I go to school every day but should I ignore the thousands of girls who are forced to leave school at an early age? Should I ignore the women who don’t get health care? Absolutely not! But many people ignore these problems, or worse, they don’t learn about them because media doesn’t always show [or even talk about] what is real.

I thought I was practicing self-improvement; it turned to be self-imprisonment. My brain was a tetherball, constantly pulled back to the scrutiny of my body. Lily Meyer

This book introduced me to problems I have never experienced like what it is like be a black woman in America or what it is it like to be an immigrant/refugee, and this is what feminism is about—demanding change for everyone. This book made me strongly believe that we need diversity, especially in media platforms. I want to see the day [where] I can be a journalist or a TV interviewer without hearing, “If you wear your hijab you won’t be chosen.” I don’t want other girls to hear anything like that because they are different. Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World is a life-changing book that deserves to be in your reading list. WRITTEN BY Hala Salah El Din

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Why !e hype? THE HATE U GIVE WRITTEN BY JM Cabral PHOTOGRAPHY BY Hazel Ureta Hype1 [hahyp] Informal. 1. to stimulate, excite, or agitate (usually followed by up) 2. to intensify (advertising, promotion, or publicity) by ingenious or questionable claims, methods, etc. (again, usually followed by up). 3. to create interest in by flamboyant or dramatic methods; promote or publicize showily. Have you ever wondered as to why a specific book is so hyped up? Or why reading a hyped up book gives readers that sense of validation? Honestly, there are tons of reasons for a title to be in the know. It can be about the issue(s) that an author chooses to address in their work. It can also be a much-awaited sequel to an exciting series. But sometimes, and more often than not, it can be about the book’s timeliness. In this issue, we’re breaking down Angie Thomas’ debut novel, The Hate U Give, and why we think it’s worth the hype.

“Reading The Hate U Give is like awakening one’s own sense of activism.” The Hate U Give, or otherwise known as THUG, is a novel inspired by the important, and rather timely, #BlackLivesMatter movement. According to Angie Thomas, she wrote this book back in 2010 after hearing about the Oscar Grant Shooting Case, and at the time, she wondered as to what would happen if a shooting took place in her neighborhood, and how would they react. This fueled Thomas’ frustration and anger, and because of this “she wanted to find a way to find hope,” and “to show the human side of these cases.” 46

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“But somehow, we can, in our own small way, bring light to other people’s lives, and help them find their own voice to fight.” Reading The Hate U Give is like awakening one’s own sense of activism. Reading Starr Carter’s story will not just inspire you to use your voice to raise awareness on certain causes like #BlackLivesMatter, but it will also help readers re-evaluate their life, and make them think about how unimpressive it is to stay quiet just to be passive, and not use your voice. It will open their eyes to reality, how right now, we are living in a world where racism, albeit being fought endlessly, is rampant. But somehow, we can, in our own small way, bring light to other people’s lives, and help them find their own voice to fight. The hype surrounding The Hate U Give is well-deserved because everyone, not just black people, deserve to read an unflinchingly honest story such as Starr’s. They deserve to know and take into consideration before acting that every one of us fight a different fight and that we should strive hard to understand one another, regardless of race, color, or religion. We, as readers, and people in general, must respect one another so as to show that we are above these social issues. That we are capable of living under normal circumstances, without having to be brutal and/or immoral.

ART BY PAM WISHBOW

But on a less emotional note, The Hate U Give isn’t just a book with a premise that could have readers hooked instantly. The writing style is amazing, the pacing is impeccable, and her characters are all adorable and quite easy to root for. Thomas’ writing technique might have been raw and honest, but it’s also entertaining, giving the book it’s justification for being categorized under the Young Adult category. It’s also quite relatable, and I think that a lot could relate to Starr; a lot of people have had hard times trying to choose between doing what’s easy, and doing what’s right, because sometimes, they’re usually two entirely different things. Reading stories like Angie Thomas’ debut novel can most certainly entertain. But nowadays, reading is so much more than just entertainment. The Hate U Give has the power to educate readers, and make them feel that same sense of activism that Starr has experienced, and I am greatly hoping that most of the author’s readers, if not all of them, could pick up a thing or two from Starr Carter.

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naz of

A BLO GGE R W IT H A MIS S ION :

RE AD DIVERSE BOOKS encourages readers to broaden their horizons. BY ERICA MILLER

Naz is a fantastic blogger whom I adore. He gives me inspiration, and I’m hoping that with this interview he’ll give you all inspiration as well, whether it be the inspiration to start blogging or just an extra boost in wanting to read more. I hope not only that he gives you inspiration, but that our talk about his Read Diverse 2017 challenge and his recommendations of some diverse reads allow everyone to start reading and promoting more diverse books. Before you dive in, if you want to know more about his Read Diverse 2017 challenge, check out his blog at readdiversebooks.com! Stay Bookish: Hey Naz! Let’s just dive right into things. I love the feature you have on your blog, Read Diverse 2017. Would you like to let everyone know what it’s about? Naz: Hi, Erica! Sure, I'd love to talk about Read Diverse 2017. I got the idea for it last year, when I was doing a monthly feature called "Read Diverse Books Year-Round." The concept was the same: bloggers reviewed diverse books, linked them up on my blog, and won a free book. For Read Diverse 2017, I wanted to be bigger and better! So I added badges that people can earn the more diverse books they review. It's been a huge success, and I'm glad it's encouraged dozens of bloggers to promote diverse books on their platforms. I completely agree; it has been a huge success, and I thank you for creating this beautiful feature. It has allowed me to learn about new & old diverse books which is amazing. Speaking of diverse books, what are some of your favorite (under the radar) diverse reads?

Unfortunately, a lot of diverse books are "under the radar" when you consider the reading community as a whole. On Twitter, I see some diverse books featured more than others, but I think they're still under-appreciated overall. Some of my favorites are Juliet Takes A Breath by Gabby Rivera, Signal To Noise by Silvia Moreno-Garcia, and recently, The Interrogation of Ashala Wolf by Ambelin Kwaymullina. I encourage everyone to look them up on Goodreads! 48

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You bring up the fact that most diverse books are "under the radar.” Do you have any suggestions or tips for how this community could bring the diverse books to the forefront?

Some books like The Sun Is Also A Star, The Wrath and the Dawn, and Homegoing will be very successful, but they are the exceptions. My hope is that one day people won't have to do lots of research to find diverse books that interest them. As readers and bloggers in the community, we can do small things like reviewing a diverse book over a book that has no diversity. I'm not saying don't read books that aren't diverse, but perhaps we can focus our energy promoting the books that need it most. Usually that's books written by marginalized authors with marginalized protagonists. Yes, there will always be exceptions, but focusing our energy on books with diversity is key. It doesn't take a lot to read about diversity and I think if everyone could just join together we could really change the main focus of this community. I love this community and feel so at home in it, but I know some people describe the community, more so Twitter, as “too dramatic” when it comes to discussions about diversity. Do you have comments on any of that?

Twitter has always been home to drama! Even before there were serious conversations about diversity that some people found "divisive," there was still a lot of drama and conflict happening on Twitter. At least that's what I hear. I haven't been on Twitter that long, but it seems that Twitter is just the kind of platform where people feel most comfortable speaking their mind, which tends to cause issues.


“We can focus our energy promoting the books that need it most.” Naz, Read Diverse Books

Not just in the book community, but everywhere. I love Twitter and it’s a very important part of my life as a book lover. So I will be around for a while! I hope everyone else sticks around too. You pull the thoughts right out of my head. I'm glad you pointed out that drama has been here way before the serious conversations about diversity. I feel like some people just get uncomfortable and deflect their discomfort by crying “drama.” But, just like you, I definitely will be sticking around. This community is amazing and I wouldn't be me without it.

So, we focused on diversity a lot in this little questionnaire, and I want to end with just that. Let's do a little rapid fire. Favorite diverse read, favorite diverse blogger, favorite marginalized author, favorite marginalized MC: go!

My favorite recent diverse release will have to be Homegoing. Such a perfect and important book! Everyone read it please, and then review it. I have too many favorite diverse book bloggers, but one of my favorites is Bina from WOCreads.wordpress.com. She was one of the first bloggers I followed! My favorite marginalized author is Benjamin Alire Saenz and my favorite marginalized protagonist Dante from Ari & Dante. He’s so precious to me and I wish I had a friend like him when I was a teen. Okay, well, I cannot wait to share all this info with everyone in the community. I cannot thank you enough for taking the time to talk with me, Naz. I really appreciate all the recommendations and tips you gave. You are a great voice in this community and I'm so happy to feature you on the zine.

Thank you so much for having me! It was fun, so I'd definitely do it again in the future. We can chat more about social media for book bloggers and bookstagramming! Or anything bookish-related because books are life!

W H ER E TO FOL LOW N A Z: blog: readdiversebooks.com twitter: @_diversebooks

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AIMAL :

the reader

with

A PURPOSE By Erica Miller

W

e all love books, right? Of course. Some of us came to this community so we could share our love of books with others who feel the same way. One reader who I have connected with is Aimal. If you are looking for a reader who is a diehard bibliophile then look no further. Not only does she talk about books, but she talks about important issues going on in this world, which is so needed. Aimal is a fun-loving, Zayn obsessed book enthusiast, and if that doesn’t have you hooked, hopefully this interview will. Stay Bookish: Hey Aimal, I’m pumped to show everyone your wonderful personality. I find you to be inspirational because you remain true to who you are and use your voice for good, whether you see it that way or not, and that shows others that they can use theirs, too. Do you have any advice to those who may be afraid to be who they are?

Aimal: Hey, Erica! Thanks so much for the kind words! I don't know if I'm inspirational, but as a minority living under these conditions, I guess I'll just tell people to keep their chins up. There are so many people out there who support and love you, no matter what. There are countless resources from free helplines, and safe spaces on the Internet that you can turn to. It's a scary time right now for many of us, but you don't have to feel like you're alone. And sometimes just realizing and talking to someone who feels the same way you do can be so, so helpful.

I think that's great. Just being able to reassure some that they are loved and that they do have support is really helpful. I'm glad you brought up some resources, too. Also, safe spaces, they can be found in some hidden areas. One safe space that I have is reading and diving into a new world. What are some books you love that give you your own safe space?

reasons why they're so important. Sometimes if things are hard, I find it difficult to concentrate on new material, so my go-to is always something light and fun. Something I love. Harry Potter, of course, brings me so much joy. And the themes in the series about love and unity and overcoming adversity are so relevant. Others include A Series of Unfortunate Events and the Percy Jackson series! Yeah, going into new material may be a bit hard because you're not sure what you're getting yourself into. Going back to something that you know will bring you joy is great. Harry Potter is one that a lot of people love. Speaking of A Series of Unfortunate Events, I see people talk about the new Netflix series. Watching my fave TV shows is another safe space for me. What are some shows you love?

Ah, the A Series of Unfortunate Events adaptation is so, so great. I was so glad that they stuck to the essence of the books. I don't watch a ton of TV—I used to, so most of my favorites are older. Breaking Bad is my all-time favorite—nothing tops it. Also Game of Thrones, Hannibal (I'm still bitter it was cancelled), Doctor Who, Supernatural and The Night Of! I love fantasy and/or thrillers when it comes to TV! I’m glad they did the adaptation well. Seeing books go the screen is so terrifying sometimes. Oldies are just a fantastic as new shows. So since you don’t focus on much TV, what else besides reading do you love to do?

Yeah, adaptations are always tricky. Very rarely have I seen an adaptation done so well that I can recommend it in place of the book to non-readers! Apart from TV and reading, I do enjoy writing a lot. It can be nerve-wracking for more reasons than one, especially because I’m a massive critic of myself. But I love to pen down Definitely—I think for any reader, books offer an ideas, write a scene that’s fresh in my mind, escape from harsh realities, which is one of the etc. While writing, I love to put my music on 50

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shuffle and relax! I'm also incredibly fortunate to be living in a city as brilliant and diverse as New York, so I often go out just to explore. I feel like we are our own biggest critics. We expect a lot out of ourselves so we get down and dirty when it comes to criticizing ourselves. Being able to explore the city and find new areas to love is amazing. I'm totally jealous. Okay, so I'll ask one thing before we go: where is one place in NY that you think everyone should visit?

One place?! No! That's too hard a question! If I had to choose, I guess I'd say that it's well worth it to go downtown to the East Village. There aren't any sites to see or any uber famous tourist spots, but you can do so much. From free comedy clubs to entire streets that are full of cuisine from all over the world to Irish pubs to amazing street art. It's a place most people don't come to when they visit, but it's definitely my favorite place here!

See, that wasn’t too hard. I think showcasing a place that kind of seems like a hidden gem is perfect. Now I know that next time I come to New York I’ll be going to check out the East Village. Thanks so much for talking with me, Aimal, it was a pleasure.

Thanks so much for the talk, Erica. Means so much that you took the time to chat with me!

where to follow aimal:

blog: bookshelvesandpaperbacks.wordtwitter: @aimalfarooq tumblr: westfallingforchaol.tumblr.com goodreads: aimal-bookshelves-paperbacks instagram: @bookshelvesandpaperbacks

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EMPOWERMENT, ESCAPISM, AND ENCOURAGEMENT:

HOW ONE BOOKSTAGRAMMER USES HER PLATFORM FOR POSITIVITY

WRIT TEN BY: ERICA MILLER

Bookstagram is forever growing and I’m glad that I was able to find Camila when I first started bookstagramming. Her aesthetic is so pleasing; it’s bright and minimalistic, which is stunning. She focuses on spreading diversity, and the photos she takes complement the books perfectly. Not only are her photos appealing to the eye, but they represent her in a perfect way. She’s bright, fun, and all around a beautiful soul, and I know you guys will agree! Stay Bookish: Hey Camila! I’m so excited to share with everyone your beautiful bookstagram. Not only is your IG beautiful, but you are, too. You constantly stand up for what you believe in and that’s admirable. Why do you think it’s important to stand up for things you feel strongly about? Camila: Hey Erica, thank you for your kind words. I really appreciate them. To answer your question, I’ve been raised by very strong women who’ve taught me that my voice is important. They’ve always encouraged me to speak up and I guess that has translated into my bookstagram/book Twitter. I feel like if I don’t say anything and wait for others to do it then nothing will change. Even when I know I’ll face criticism and hate for the things I say, I don’t feel discouraged (most of the time). I want my followers to feel the same; that their voice matters too. You’re not only speaking up for yourself, but you’re also speaking on behalf of others who may be a bit scared to speak out and that’s fantastic in it’s own way. Do you have any advice for people who may not have found their voice or who may be afraid to speak up? I recognize that a lot of the people in the community are young and might be afraid of putting themselves in the spotlight. I just want to let them know that there are authors and bloggers who are working for them to have a safer reading environment. That we’ll always encourage them to say what they feel because this community is catered to them. Also, take your time. Some peo-

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ple are more impulsive (guilty) and face things head on but some are more contemplative and can keep their heads cool. Just do what works for you at the moment. I think that’s wonderful advice. Everyone does things at their own pace, which is a-okay. And you said it perfectly: this community is catered to them and we want to see them grow. How do you think you’ve grown since you first started in this community? I’ve been officially a part of the community for almost three years now and I can honestly say I’m not the same person I was when I first joined. I’ve seen how treacherous publishing is, I’ve met both amazing and terrible people, I’ve see how harmful bad rep can be and how hard people are fighting to make the book community a more diverse one. It’s been good but it has also been bad at times. Right now, I feel like I’m running with the right people and I now know how important it is to listen to others. I think acknowledging that change has and will happen is good. Especially to the younger book lovers out there. It shows them that things can get better; it just may take a little bit more time than we thought. Why don’t we move from advice over to recommendations. What are some books you’d recommend to people who are trying to find their voice? Maybe a book you loved that made you feel empowered and like you could take on the world. This is a tough one because I feel like most books do teach us how to face the world and its issues. If I could recommend some I would have to say Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell helped me realize that it was okay to find comfort in the things I love regardless of my age. Shadowshaper by Daniel José Older has Sierra is about a girl who demands the truth from everyone and goes on to kick serious ass. This is going to sound odd but The Young Elites really helped me realize that there are always two sides to a story. Adelina goes through so many trials and things don’t go her way. It taught me about defeat and grief. The same goes for The Darkest Minds trilogy by Alexandra Bracken. That trilogy taught me about finding family among friends and truly speaking up when the entire world is against you.

Thank you for those recommendations, they’re perfect. Also, thank you so much for chatting with me today, Cam, I appreciate it so much. Thank you for approaching me and listening.

WHERE TO FOLLOW CAMILA: Instagram: instagram.com/abookeater Twitter: twitter.com/justabookeater_

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A WHOLE NEW (READER’S) WORLD

Teenage BookTuber brings excitement & passion to her channel WRITTEN BY EMILY RASMUSSEN, PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERICA MILLER

She’s Professor McGonagall, and she’d like to know, “Why is it that, when something happens, it is always you three?” She’s Charlie, and she claims that “In that moment, I swear we were infinite.” No, she’s just Julia, a teenage BookTuber who talks about YA literature on her YouTube channel, A Reader’s World. But her enthusiasm for books brings these characters and more to life. She begins each of her videos with a signature opening sequence: introducing herself as a fictional character and sharing one of their most famous quotes, but her videos only get better from there. From reviews to tags, from well-known novels to hidden-gem titles, her dynamic personality and excitement about YA makes viewers vicariously fall in love with any book she praises. Keep reading to find out more about the teenage BookTuber behind the literary video emporium that is A Reader’s World.

“It matters how you feel about the book.”

JULIA

A Reader’s Wo r l d

Hi Julia! Thanks so much for chatting with me about your BookTube channel, which I cannot wait to share with everyone. One of my favorite things about your videos is how much energy and excitement they contain. You’re so passionate about YA books, and you’re great at showing it. What is it about YA literature that makes you love reading it and that makes you so enthusiastic about promoting it? Julia: Thank you for those wonderful comments. I think it’s the creative stories and characters. They transport me to another land and spark my imagination. There is also so much to talk about and discuss, and many stories teach you a lot. I completely agree! What’s an example of a book you think readers could learn from? J: Percy Jackson and the Olympians is probably one that you could learn from. Through the characters and plot, you learn that everyone can be a hero no matter what age, shape, or race. Speaking of PJO, your enthusiasm for big-name books like Harry Potter and Percy Jackson is especially infectious. How do you balance talking about widely-known novels and promoting books that may be on fewer people’s radars? J: I think it matters how you feel about the book. I’m guilty of answering every question in a tag with the Percy Jackson series because I love it so much and it has influenced me. Other books might not get the same recognition, but I still love them as much as Percy Jackson and recommend them to people. 54

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It’s so fun how you start out each of your videos with a “Hi, I’m [fictional character name] and [quote from that character].” How did you get the idea to do that, and how do you choose which characters to impersonate? When I first started, my parents said that I couldn’t use my real name, and I asked myself, “Well how am I supposed to start my videos?” Then I came up with idea to introduce myself as a fictional character and quote them. I usually decide on who I say right on the spot. Sometimes, it takes me about five minutes to think of a character and search a quote from them on Goodreads. I love how you took something that could have been a constraint and used it as an opportunity for creativity. In addition to parental guidelines, how do you think being a teen influences your BookTube channel? I think it can influence a lot, like the content, the quality, and when your videos are being made. As a high school student, I have to focus on my studies more than my videos sometimes. My whole week of midterms, I couldn’t make videos or read due to my tests. I also have to tackle after school activities, but it can also help having a BookTube channel at a younger age. You can learn more and grow up with this new knowledge. I noticed you made your real-life best friend start a YouTube channel herself. Tell me a bit more about your relationship— have you both always been readers? And what’s it like having a good in-person friend who loves books as much as you do? Anna and I have been best friends forever. We were destined due to our moms being best friends. We started being obsessed with reading around the same time, her with Divergent and me with Percy Jackson. It’s a great to have a best friend who reads. We both find out about books from each other. Anna is the one who always finds the diamonds in the rough, though. I’m jealous of that super power of hers. That’s so cool. Your friendship itself sounds like something out of a YA novel (what with your moms being besties). Speaking of bookish friendships, have you made any close friends through BookTube? I’ve made so many friends through BookTube. That’s probably one of the most amazing things about this community. You can connect through literature and discussing your favorite books. I probably text my BookTube friends even more than my in-person friends. If you couldn’t read or make BookTube videos (I know, horrifying hypothetical), how would you spend your extra free time? I usually write during my free time. I’m attempting to be a writer but I don’t know if I could succeed that dream without reading. I think I would still do YouTube. Instead of talking about books, I think I would do something with movies. Besides books, movies are my other passion. People always ask me if I prefer books or movies, but I can’t choose between my children! I see your struggle. Stories, whether in the form of books or movies, are always great. And now, before we say goodbye, it’s time for a fun question: who’s your #1 OTP from Harry Potter? If my little six-year-old self who had only seen the movies answered this question, it would be Hinny, but for me now, after reading the books, Romione takes the cake. I love their development so much. They hate each other, become friends, and slowly become a couple. If you don’t think they love and care for each other, go reread the scene where Hermione gets tortured in Deathly Hallows. The movie makes Ron barely react, but in the book, Ron is screaming her name and scrambling to get out cell and save her. Thanks so much for chatting with me and for your engaging and energetic videos, Julia! I’m looking forward to watching what you create in the future! If you want to watch Julia’s videos, you can find her on YouTube under the username areadersworld. And you can find her friend Anna on YouTube under the username RedBooks. S TAY B O O K I S H Z I N E

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FairyLoot: A Bookish Treasure Box For Fantasy Fans Written By Pamela Alvarado Photography by Fiderly

Subscription boxes aren’t a new thing in the world, but they have certainly become popular in the book community in the last two years or so. One of the first subscription boxes I heard about was FairyLoot. With its trademark black box and fairy logo, what is not to love? FairyLoot was created by bookworm Anissa and her partner Michael to share their love for fantasy and to build a community of book lovers. I’m so excited for you to know more about this awesome box.

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Stay Bookish: What inspired you to create a subscription box? Anissa: I have always loved subscription boxes, whether they’re books, games, or pot noodles (yes, I’m subscribed to a pot noodle box!)—I just think they’re such a great way to treat yourself and give yourself something to look forward to every month. I love Young Adult Fantasy books, and I wanted to combine my love (or obsession) for subscription boxes into one thing, and thus FairyLoot was born! Can you tell us a bit about how you got started for the business side of subscription boxes? What kind of planning and effort did it take to make the box happen? When my partner Michael and I started FairyLoot, we went into this not knowing very much. We spent hours upon hours researching and planning and had many late nights (that involved lots of pizza). FairyLoot sparked such a passion in us, and even though we ran into a lot of dead-ends we just didn’t give up. We‘re a real team and we really wanted to bring something special to the world—and we knew we could if we tried hard enough. What is typically included in your boxes? Our box typically includes one hardback newly released fantasy book along with 5-6 other goodies. Our books usually come with a signed bookplate and other promotional goodies that make it all the more special, and to add to the experience we also include ‚FairyScoop‘ in our box every month that features an interview with our author of the month. How was the experience of first launching your box? It was nerve-wrecking, challenging, exhausting and incredibly exciting. Even today, I still feel just as nervous and excited when people start to receive their boxes. FairyLoot is a real labour of love, and all of the hard work pays off when you see everyone‘s happiness opening the boxes! Which has been your favorite box so far? This is such a tough question because I love them all equally but in different ways and I put my heart into all of them! I think our first ever box (March 2016: Retelling) will always be special just because it was our first. What are your criteria for choosing books for your box, themes and genre aside? I don‘t really have a criteria—I usually just look for books many months before their publication date and read their synopsis and whichever ones stand out to me I put them down as potential selections and read the ARCs when they are available. I try to mix up the themes as often as possible and I am always looking for diverse reads! Which would you say has been your most successful box the last year? I wouldn‘t say that any box was more successful than others—I feel like every month there‘s loads of exci-

tement and as we‘re always growing, that excitement grows too. How would you describe your subscription box’s aesthetic? I would say the box itself is very mysterious and dark, and so is the general aesthetic. Our box is always black and we always have bright purple shredded paper inside that keeps the items safe during transit. As for the actual contents, they are often quite matching in aesthetic depending on the theme but it‘s not something I do on purpose so it always takes me by surprise haha! Who are your favorite designers or what are your favorite shops to work with for bookish goodies? This is such a tough question because there are so many companies that I love to work with but I couldn‘t list them all here because we could go on forever. Here are just some of the many favourite shops and designers: Meraki Candles, Behind The Pages, Read At Midnight, Risa Rodil, In The Wick of Time, Geeky Clean, Lexy Olivia, BookOtter. Honestly, there are so many amazing ones out there that I could just go on and on! Who are your current reps and how do you work with them? Our current reps are such a lovely bunch of people, they are all so talented and enthusiastic - I am so lucky to have them! Be sure to check out these fantastic people: @fictiontea, @readsleepfangirl, @thebookranter, @spinatale, @miss.fiction, @horriblism, @the.book. nirvana, @_livelaughread, @paperbackparamour, @ darkfaerietales_, @thebookferret, @therusticwindow. We host new rep searches every 3 months, so if you‘re interested in repping us you should definitely apply! What are the ups and downs of running a subscription box? Well, I guess it is no different to running any kind of start up business: there‘s a lot of work, and it requires a lot of attention to detail. I need to be really on top of things because everything needs to be planned many months in advance, and we have loads of deadlines. I absolutely love what I do—I think it‘s safe to say I‘m a bit of a workaholic! Your subscription box has been going on for a year now. Any special plans to expand or make big exciting changes? I still can‘t quite believe it has already been a year, it feels like only last month we started packing our very first boxes in our tiny living room! We don‘t currently have any particular special plans (yet!), we just want to continue to spread our love of fantasy books around the world! What can you tell us about your upcoming boxes for this season? All I can say is that I have some very exciting things planned for our upcoming boxes - we‘ve got some fantastic books lined up for 2017 and boxes you definitely don‘t want to miss out on!

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Writing in English: Inclusive or Not? W R I T T E N B Y PA M E L A A L VA R A D O P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y H A Z E L U R E TA

I live in Ecuador and speak Spanish, but almost all the books I read are in English. That is the kind of thing that happens when you live in a place unblessed by the “reading powers that be,” and there are little to zero translated novels. How is this an issue? As a reader, I want YA stories in my own language. However, this is not common in Spanish literature. Hence, I read authors who write in English, and I use the same language to communicate and be part of the book community, where most of the magic happens. It is something we all experience as writers, bloggers, bookstagrammers, booktubers, and readers all trying to get our voices heard. Some say it’s natural to use English because after all, it is a universal language. “English is very much the universal language when it comes to communication between different countries. Most writer forums and resources and even books about writing are in English, so I gravitated towards that.”— Brazilian YA writer Laura Pohl (onlybylaura.com) “I decided to use English to communicate here in the community because it was the general language for everyone in here. And because it was the language I used in the bookstagram community.” — Melanie (ashymareviewsbooks.wordpress.com), a Puerto Rican blogger and bookstagrammer However, at what point do we draw the line? Some book reviewers go to the length of using English even to people who speak the same native tongue, while others do the exact opposite, in which they ignore those who do not use English.

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of people from my country use our language on their blogs, but it’s kind of limiting. The only people who will understand are the people who share our language. The second reason is about comfort. I’m kind of more used to writing in English because I feel like when I write in my native language, it often comes out as either too formal or too slang-y. Plus, it almost always sounds cheesy for some reason. [Also,] when I stumble across a lot of gorgeous blogs that are not in English, I don’t follow them because I won’t understand what they’re talking about.”—Puput (pupuutc.wordpress.com), a book blogger from Indonesia These reasons are valid; for instance, these are my reasons for writing in English as well. From observation and experience, there seemed no chance of making it in the global scale if the work has not been translated or written in English. According to Pohl, “publishing in [English] felt ‘easier’” because there is a larger market for these books worldwide. “The [Brazilian] industry works much like the one in the US, except for literary agents. Although good to have, it’s still not considered a career in Brazil, so there aren’t many people offering it. The Brazilian industry is also much smaller, and they tend to buy books that are considered safe—in this case, books that have already become bestsellers in their countries. There aren’t many opportunities for new writers in Brazil, and it’s a pity that we don’t get to see Brazilian writers being published. Because the industry is so small and not a lot of people buy or read books, it’s harder to invest in new authors, and thus, it’s very rare that a Brazilian writer gets published.” — Pohl

“If I wanted to be able to talk with other bookworms I’d have to write my reviews in English because most of Goodreads members read and talk in English. It reached [to a] crazy point that even when I’m talking with a fellow French speaker—in the comment section, for example—I’ll use English 99% of the time because I find it, I don’t know, rude to speak a language other readers don’t understand.”— Alienor (meetthebookworld.com), a book reviewer from France

However, does this mean stories should only be written in English? For many, they prefer stories translated to their native languages for a more diverse and inclusive community.

“I think I have to [use English] if I want to expand my reach. It’s not mandatory and I’ve seen a lot

“I only have to look at how few French novels are translated into English every year to see that if I wanted to

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“[If I published a novel], I would publish it in English so it reached more people around the globe, but if I had the opportunity I would be the one in charge of translating it to Spanish, my mother tongue.” —Melanie


publish a novel, I’d better write it in English—and maybe, after, translate it into French to reach the French readers. Isn’t it crazy? I honestly believe that there aren’t nearly enough translated novels published in the US and the UK, and that’s a shame, because all these voices are never heard. In a global world as ours is, isn’t it frustrating to see that the voices being pushed are always the same?”—Alienor “When I think of getting published, I always think of the competition so for now my WIP is in my language, Indonesian, because I feel like I have better chance of getting published here.”—Puput It is hard to say which one is the ultimate right way. Members of the book community live all over the world and display so much diversity indeed, yet somehow, communicating in English is what ties people together. But while this is certainly satisfying and useful today, the fact that readers are not consuming books in their own language might very well play a role in killing their own country’s publishing industry. And whose responsibility is it to fix this? The writers’ or the publishers’? Or is it the readers, who should show interest in books translated into English? My best bet: everyone. We all need to pay attention to the different cultures behind every language, and develop a reading culture that does not only put English under the spotlight, but also Indonesian, French, Portuguese, Spanish, and more. This way, the writers and the readers themselves are the ones creating an inclusive community. S TAY B O O K I S H Z I N E

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Being a lover of books written in the English language is not as easy in France as it might be in an English-speaking country. The most obvious reason why is this: the cruel lack of English bookshops. Although most bookshops now have an English-books section, books there are quite expensive, and I always miss the feeling of being able to browse through endless shelves of young adult books like I can whenever there’s a Barnes & Noble or a Waterstones in sight. Thankfully, France does have some hidden bookish treasures that I should feel lucky for. Today I’m taking you with me on a bookish tour of Paris—to explore bookish places where we can smell books endlessly and have tons of feelings. THE BOOKSHOP YOU SHOULDN’T MISS You can find the usual WHSmith along the Jardin des Tuileries, a couple of feet away from The Louvre, but it’s not the stop you should make on your trip to the City of Lights and Love. It’s a bit south, along the Seine river and right across from Notre Dame, that you’ll find the bookshop you ought to be visiting when you are in Paris: Shakespeare & Co. This place has everything a bookworm dreams of, and everything we all wish to have in our rooms: an endless supply of books. Since it’s the most famous bookshop in Paris, you shouldn’t be afraid of crowds taking pictures in front of the sign, but once you 64

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France : A Boo Tour Of Paris By: Marie V.

get in, it’s a completely different story. The shop is quite small for us human beings, because it’s clear who rules here: the books. From floor to ceiling, piles and piles of books. There are no long alleys like you’d find at Barnes and Noble; here’s it’s a labyrinth of books. Sometimes on tables, sometimes in shelves above your head (yes), sometimes in piles. They are everywhere, swallowing you whole as you enter. A bookworm’s dream is here. From fiction to nonfiction, adult to children’s, it’s a little bookish paradise you need to explore for yourself. THE PLACES YOU SHOULDN’T MISS There are so many places to visit in Paris, it’s hard to know where to start—and this is no tourist guide. I’m here to take you on a rather unusual bookish tour of the city, for us fans of young adult literature, especially cute stories. Does the Anna and The French Kiss series ring any bells? Shoes on and camera at hand, let’s go for a tour full of feelings.


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AN ANNA AND THE FRENCH KISS TOUR OF THE FRENCH CAPITAL

It’s hard to find with all of the tourists milling around, but here, right under our feet, is Point Zero, the point from After your little discovery of which all of the roads in France the Shakespeare & Co book- are measured. shop, you’re a short walk away from the rest of this unusual In Anna’s experience of Paris, tour: cross the Seine river, the there are so many places you place where many walks and shouldn’t miss either: her ride cute discussions have hap- up to the Eiffel Tower, the Arc pened between the characters de Triomphe, the walk down in Anna and the French Kiss. the Champs Elysées and her Just like in the books, you’ll need to ride up to the Ferris find street vendors selling Wheel right at the end of it, touristic goodies, but also art La Place de la Concorde, her pieces, t-shirts, and anything exploration of The Louvre and you can imagine. the little glass pyramid situated close to the gigantic museOnce you cross, on your left, um, and her walks along the you’ll find it and finally be able Jardins du Luxembourg. This to drink in all of its beauty: nice resting place from all the The Notre Dame Cathedral, a crowds is a perfect place to gothic monument filled with end your journey, with another history—but for us, we’re real- book in hand, dreaming about ly just thinking about all of the your next bookish destination. fangirling we had while reading the scenes set here. S TAY B O O K I S H Z I N E

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photo by Nihaad

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Shenna M. Lagdameo

FOR TEENS

Most people say that “time” is the real villain when it comes to spending time with your precious books. I hate to break it to you but the problem is not “time”, it’s YOU. Time has always been a constant in this world. Before you were born, time existed. That alone doesn’t mean you’ll let time boss you around, it just means you should learn your way with it. While the hands of time may not be in your control, you have the power to manage every second in our life. I know it sounds cliché but “Time is Gold” so let us not waste even a single minute of your life. Dedicate your time to things that make you feel happy and amazing. And if you’re a book lover, that is reading. I’m here to give some tips on how to fit reading in such a busy schedule. Because I know that this has always been a major problem for book lovers who are also students in high school, I’m more than willing to help in solving it. Let’s start now, shall we?

1. Read in-between classes. I’m sure that we all have our fair share of spare minutes between classes. Whether because your history teacher likes to walk slowly in the corridor or if your English teacher does stop-overs before going to your classroom, let’s make the most out of that spare time. The moment your teacher leaves the room and you’re not quite busy, the best thing to do is read. Always keep your book placed on your desk or in the most accessible part of your bag so you can grab it quickly and kill time. Let’s just hope your teacher won’t walk in when you’re in the middle of an interesting chapter because oh boy, cliffhangers are killers.

2. Read during breaks. Once you hear that bell ringing, you’re a free elf! Usually, these breaks last for an hour or two so it’s the perfect time to read! Whether it’s a snack break or a lunch break, prop up in the corner of the room you’re most comfortable with and devour those amazing words. Mmmm, tasty. What a terrific way of spending breaks, eh?

3. Read while eating. Trust me when I say that book lovers are experts in doing things single handedly. So, eating food with only one hand is a piece of cake. Just

make sure to not stain your book with spaghetti sauce or you’ll suffer forever. Disclaimer: Please only do this when you’re eating snacks in a café or wherever you may be as long as you’re not sitting at the dining table. Let us respect our food & give thanks to our Almighty God first & then go back to reading after you finish eating.

4. Read in a moving vehicle (as long as you’re not the one driving!). I’ve tried this many times and it sure works. In the morning before class or after class, people usually ride different vehicles to get to or out of school. If you’re one of them, give this a try! Just try to flip some pages of your current read and utilize your time. This will make your short journey worthwhile. But if you’re a person who gets motion sickness while riding in moving vehicles, this is not for you. It may end badly if you pursue this tip so feel free to try other suggestions!

5. Read while walking. Fact: Book lovers basically have a PhD in walking without looking up. If you, yes you, take short walks during your breaks or while you’re getting to your next class, try this tip and have fun. Warning: Please do not read while walking in public places or in places you are not familiar with. Trust me, it’s for your safety.

6. Read in the bathtub. I have no idea how people get so good at this but honestly this is really scary. The thought of a wet book gives me nightmares so if you don’t trust yourself with doing this, don’t. The bright side is you get to multitask and that’s awesome. This is really intended for busy guys and gals who spend more time relaxing in baths, just add a book and have a superb time with your book boyfriends and girlfriends. You can add spice to your bonding time with bookish bathbombs, bath scrubs, soaps of the aromatic scents of your baes!

7. Read before going to bed. Reading is the best way to end the day. Snuggle up in your cozy comforter, put on your matching pajamas and dive into your current read! If you’re up for a night-long read or you just want to lull yourself to sleep, both ways are great!

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have time to read. It just means you have to find time to read. Let’s do our best to lessen our massive TBR list by making time for reading.

Meia B.

FOR YOUNG ADULTS Like all bookworms around the world, I wish I could forget everything and spend all my time reading the books on my endless TBR list. But we can’t have it all; life gets in the way of reading, and reading gets in the way of life. Since the world can get so confusing, it’s equally important to cherish every second of our life and to make time for great stories. Being an avid reader of YA fiction and a college student at the same time, it’s hard to prioritize reading over all the deadlines to meet, all the catching-up and late night study sessions. But do I regret not reading enough? No, because I did well in my last term. Do I wish that I had time to read more? Yes, of course! We all wish we could read more, whether we’re on track to accomplish our reading goals or in a deep reading rut. Here’s some advice on how to make more time to read as a college student. The majority of articles pertaining to the subject of fitting reading time into a busy schedule suggest planning ahead and managing your time wisely. It’s the best advice ever, believe me, but not all can perfect this routine. Even if we make scheduling a habit, there will always a time that we will fail and fall off track. So take it from me, someone who always plans her day ahead and imagines what it should be: it’s important to go with the flow when things don’t go as you plan and imagine. For years now, I’ve been juggling being a college student and being an avid reader. Sometimes I plan on reading a YA novel for an hour and then studying, but then I end up reversing the order. Sometimes I don’t read at all in favor of finishing a project. It’s different every day, and even if my studies may be frustrating to my reading challenges, I ended up enjoying every second of it. The truth, my bookworm friends, on how to fit reading time into a busy schedule when you’re a college student is to plan your next read but go with the flow when things do not go according to your plan. Find time for reading, but when life gets in the way, just shrug and live in the moment. That’s the magic of being a reader: once you are a book68

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worm, you will always be one, and your heart, mind, and soul will always reach for reading no matter how far or near you are to your next read. Remember, we are all unique people. Each of us has individual preferences. You do not need to sacrifice one aspect of your life to improve another; you can hold on dearly to both things you love. Finishing college may be hard, but finishing it is the same as finishing a good book—you just need to realize that devoting more time to one aspect of life doesn’t mean neglecting the other. If you learn to let the moments pass, the drive for reading, studying, or whatever you’ve been putting off will be back again soon. Here’s to all bookworms who will graduate this year! A big congratulatory salute to all of us! Bookworm and proud!

Lauren

FOR ADULTS

Sometimes I wish I had more than twenty-four hours in a day. I often think about all the things I could do with that little bit of extra time. I could go to that yoga class in my hometown I’ve been dying to try. I could go out with friends more instead of seeing them once every few weeks. Or I could bake more often because who doesn’t love more cake? The list of possibilities are endless and will vary from person to person, but there’s one thing all bibliophiles share: we wish we could read more. Yes, bibliophiles read more than the average person, but our hunger is insatiable. Have you seen our TBR list? It’s a dreadful thing to behold, and it keeps growing longer and longer the more time passes. The only thing we can do to keep ourselves sane is to read, but what if you simply don’t have the time? Lack of time happens to be the most common excuse for not reading more. That shouldn’t come as a surprise. We all know time can be hard to come by, especially when you’re navigating your way into the adult world, which is filled with expectations and responsibilities. Job hunting, working, paying the bills, finding time to spend with your family or loved ones… There are so many things to do.


Reading can easily take a backseat if you allow it. Before you know it, you haven’t opened a book in months. Sounds dreadful, doesn’t it? I should know because I’ve allowed myself to get swamped by the adult life the minute I graduated from university. For the first time in my life, I had a real, paying job where people expected me to do things and meet deadlines. And it didn’t get any better when I got home after a long day of work. I would collapse into the sofa and didn’t move another muscle. Hello, microwave dinners and Netflix. I’m not going to lie: it took a long time for things to get better. I didn’t go from getting up at six ‘o’clock in the morning, working full days, and feeling exhausted at the end of it to writing, reading, and blogging again in a matter of days. But it did get better. I finally found a balance between my personal life and my professional life. Since I know there are many, many more people who struggle with the same issues and many more still who have it a lot tougher than I do, I want to share what helped me spend my time in a more productive way. And by productive I mean writing, blogging and, most importantly, reading.

Audiobooks are also useful in other situations. Do you have to fold laundry, do the dishes, or make dinner? Why not listen to an audiobook while you work? Trust me, it makes your chores a lot more enjoyable. Time will fly by and before you know it, you can curl up in the sofa and read another book.

1. Read on your commute.

The last thing you want is another deadline, right? Wrong. I’m here to tell you that setting a reading challenge will do wonders for your productivity. Committing yourself to a monthly or yearly goal such as the Goodreads Challenge will motivate you to keep reading. Let’s face it: nobody likes to lose.

This is my number one tip. Have you ever considered how many hours, days, weeks, months you spend on public transport your whole life? Let me tell you, it’s a lot. Personally, I spend two hours on a train every day. That’s ten hours a week. It would be a shame to let that time get wasted, wouldn’t it? Reading on the train has been a life changer for me. In the mornings, most passengers listen to music, read the newspaper or quietly sleep against the window. I used to fit into the first category, but I found that reading a book suited me better. Surprisingly, it gives me energy and makes me excited for the day to come. It’s a little trickier in the evenings. Most passengers are excited they get to go home and talk about their day to colleagues they share their commute with. For me, this means it’s harder to read since I need my peace and quiet to focus. But no worries. That’s what tip number two is for.

3. Read what you enjoy. This one seems fairly obvious, but too many people read books they don’t enjoy. I’m guilty of this one as well. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve hit a reading slump simply because I wasn’t enjoying the book I was reading. Sound familiar? One piece of advice: get rid of it. If you’re struggling with time, the last thing you need is to read a book that makes you feel like you’re wasting it. Now, I’m not saying you should give up on every book after five pages, but there’s also no point in sticking with a 300 page book if you’re not enjoying it by page 100. Cut your losses and pick another one.

4. Set a challenge & hold yourself accountable.

5. Join a community. Are you bad at motivating yourself? Do you want someone to push you to read more, shares your passion, ask for recommendations? Then joining the book community might just be the thing for you. Whether you decide to join the world of book blogging or bookstagrammars, you’ll find a wonderful community of like-minded people who share your passion and who’ll understand what you’re going through. Give it a go. It might just change your life.

2. Listen to audiobooks. Now, some people consider this to be cheating, but I’m not one of them. Audiobooks are a perfect substitute for traditional reading. As I’ve said in the previous section, it’s a great way to continue reading your book when your surroundings are too loud and distracting. You can just pop in your earphones, close your eyes, and focus on the words and the story. S TAY B O O K I S H Z I N E

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Getting Started BookTube Basics

Written by Keanna Lewis Illustration by Selena Hughes

You’re casually searching on YouTube when one of your recommended videos features a YouTuber reviewing your favorite book. Of course you have to click on that video to see what they thought about it. A couple of hours later, you’re knee-deep in TBRs and awe-worthy bookshelves, finding new books to read. And you want to know more about the world of BookTube. What you read above is my experience, and now two years later my channel KeyReadThat has flourished. It’s something about expressing my love for books that is just an amazing feeling. I don’t consider myself an expert by no means. I feel like I’m just getting into a routine now. But no worries, I got you. Here are a few basics for you that I’ve learned over the last two years:

BookTube Terminology As you’re watching video after video, you may be thinking: “What is a book haul?” Or “What is a TBR?” It can be confusing at times (kind of like learning another language), but once you’ve got it, you’ve got it! A TBR is To Be Read which is a list of books that you want to read. An Unhaul is what it sounds like; the BookTuber is purging books they don’t want or need anymore. Bookstagram is a community of IGers who take amazing and swoon-worthy pictures of the books, bookshelves, and more. I promise it’s not a different language and you’ll learn quickly.

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Equipment & Editing Some people think that you need the best camera or editing software, but that’s totally wrong. If we can see you and hear you, then honey you’re cooking with grease. Kill us with your personality. You can worry about getting more expensive equipment later. There are also free editing systems. For example, if you’re using a Windows computer like I do you can use Windows Movie Maker like I do. And for Apple users, there is FinalCut Pro, which is also free.

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Yes, very few things in this world are free, but editing can be one of them. You can use your phone to record your videos. Just take a chance, because I guarantee you have an army of nice, fun and wonderful people waiting to meet you. So you’ve chosen an editing software. Now the fun part begins. When you’re editing your video, cut out the ums, ohs and pregnant silences. As time goes on you’ll find out your editing style, such as whether you like a lots of bells and whistles in your videos or whether you want your thumbnails simple and minimalistic. It’s totally up to you!

Be Involved In The Community Get involved, y’all! Don’t be scared to comment under your favorite BookTube videos or bookstagram pictures. I was super scared to comment at first, because I felt like they may not comment or just won’t see it. As BookTubers and YouTubers in general, we love getting comments and getting to interact with you guys. Even if it’s one comment, it makes our day. If you’re deep into the community and want to interact with authors and other BookTubers, you can make a Twitter or Instagram or even both. These are just a few things to get you started and set up on BookTube. So just remember: have fun!

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Book Blogging Tips & Tricks to Blog Your Heart Out

Written by Marie V. Photography by Joséphine

Spreading the love, joy and power underlying in young adult books is something we, as readers, always think about. How do I manage to fangirl about books without looking like a complete freak all the time? Fear not, there is a solution here, and it is pretty easy—in fact, it can be said using just two words. Book blogging. The moment when you finally decide that you have things to say, books to fangirl about, and lots of love to give for young adult literature is the moment you start a book blog. The moment you’ll take the leap and never return. But why would you want to? Book blogging is an amazing adventure, but it comes with its share of struggles and obsessions. How can you be the best book blogger you can, and how do you make the most out of this adventure? Book bloggers and aspiring book bloggers alike, keep on reading for answers—and an insight into the mind of a crazy book blogger, AKA me.

Keep Your Blogging Voice Strong It’s hard, at first, to know if you stand out in the massive community of young adult book bloggers. This was, without question, one of the first thing I panicked about. Let me reassure you right away: everyone is unique in their own way, and you’re not writing like anyone else—or fangirling about a book like anyone else either. Not comparing yourself with other great and famous book bloggers is easier said than done, but really, it’s the key to your success. Your own blogging success has nothing to do with numbers; it’s the proud feeling of having something entirely yours.

Find Your Blogging Frenzy Time is something we all struggle with. Juggling blogging and the real-life responsibilities we’d rather avoid is hard. But it’s not impossible; the first thing to remember is that you need to find your own rhythm. Maybe it will take time, but you will eventually figure out whether you’re just like me, crazy about scheduling and planning and knowing where you are going or if you are more of a spontaneous, let’s-see-where-this-day-takes-me kind of person. If you’re into posting every single day, or 72

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when the mood strikes you. Absolutely no one will be mad at you when you’re into a slump. Life happens, and you’re blogging for yourself, because you love it. It’s not an assignment, and there’s no “required reading” to get through.

Reach Out to Publishers Book bloggers are living in some sort of in-between magical world when you think about it. Some of us are lucky enough to be in touch with publishers, indie or not, and lucky enough to get our hands on advance reading copies of the latest books before they release to the rest of the world. This is something we kind of have a love/hate relationship with, for so many reasons. The love. The fangirling earlier. The commitment. The stress. But we are lucky to be able to break so many barriers thanks to book blogging, get an insight of the publishing world, an insight of all the work it takes to bring a book to life—and bring a book hype. So request the ARCs you want, but do it like you’d buy books when your bank account is almost empty—one book at a time. Okay, maybe a couple. Don’t let yourself get too overwhelmed with it. If you don’t know where to start, try out NetGalley and Edelweiss. Then, when you have the courage to do so, find on the publishing companies’ websites the contact emails to ask for review copies. Nothing to lose, and a book to gain should be your ARC motto.

Feel Part of the Community Whether you’re a beginner or have years of blogging under your belt, the biggest obstacle in book blogging is finding your kind of people. Everyone loves books, and they are all your kind of people, sure, but how do you manage to feel part of the community? There’s only one piece of advice to be taken here, and it’s this: don’t be afraid. Speak up. Leave comments on blogs you feel are “too big” compared to yours—chances are the bloggers will become your friends because they are awesome. Leave comments on blog posts you enjoy, fangirl with the bloggers who wrote them, and be genuine and thoughtful. If you’re into social media, try Twitter and find a book blogger chat to participate in. #ukyachat, #BBTC, #teenbloggerschat, and #SundayYA are just few of the chats out there.

Break Barriers You might not notice it firsthand, but book bloggers are breaking barriers. We travel all around the world thanks to the books we read and the people we meet thanks to book blogging. We get to visit new settings and meet bloggers from halfway across the world, people we definitely would not know without our love for books bringing us together.

So Don’t Be Afraid to Break Barriers Reach out to publishers because you have got nothing to lose. Reach out to other book bloggers, through comments on their blogs, through Twitter, through the magical feeling of loving and being able to rant about the same books as someone else, no matter where they are from. And blog your heart out. S TAY B O O K I S H Z I N E

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JAM TO 20 NEW YA RELEASES compiled by Sophie Bergeron

1. The End of Oz (Dorothy Must Die #4) by Danielle Paige Release Date: March 14 Song: Dreamstate by Stonefox “And we make war with old friends [...] We’re caught up in a dream state.”

2. Internet Famous by Danika Stone Release date: June 6 Song: Black and Blue by Miike Snow “Hello my friend, I see you’re back again. Hello mystery, don’t bother to explain.”

3. Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentner Release date: March 7 Song: The Funeral by Band of Horses “At every occasion I’ll be ready for the funeral.”

4. You’re Welcome Universe by Whitney Gardner Release date: March 7 Song: Drive It Like You Stole It by Sing Street

5. The Inexplicable Logic of my Life by Benjamin Alire Sáenz Release date: March 7 Song: Holding On by These Kids Wear Crowns “I’ll be holding on [...] When I’m looking for a reason to leave this town, but I’ll keep holding on.”

6. Traitor to the Throne (Rebel of the Sands #2) by Alwyn Hamilton Release date: March 7 Song: Don’t Pay the Ferryman by Chris De Burgh “It was late at night on the open road, speeding like a man on the run, a lifetime spent preparing for the journey.”

7. Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor Release date: March 28 Song: Dream by Imagine Dragons “We all are living in a dream, but life ain’t what it seems. Oh everything’s a mess.”

“Freedom, I’m taking it back, I’m out of here, not turning back.” S TAY B O O K I S H Z I N E

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8. What Girls Are Made Of by Elana K. Arnold Release date: April 1 Song: Where’s Your Heart Gone by Golden Youth “Where’s your heart gone? What’s your head done? Keep your love close to you.

9. But Then I Came Back by Estelle Laure Release date: April 4 Song: Soul Meets Body by Death Cab for Cutie “But if the silence takes you, then I hope it takes me too.”

10. Gem & Dixie by Sara Zarr Release date: April 4 Song: Fast Car by Tracy Chapman “You got a fast car. Is it fast enough so you can fly away?”

11. Letters to the Lost by Brigid Kemmerer Release date: April 4 Song: Making It Up As We Go by Taylor Mathews “I’ll take the lead if you grab the rope. You’re walking on the edge, two hearts in your chest.”

12. The Upside of Unrequited by Becky Albertalli Release date: April 11 Song: You Always Make Me Smile by Kyle Andrews “I don’t know why I love you. I just know I can’t stop thinking of you, away. It’s ‘cause you make me smile.” 76

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13. Always and Forever, Lara Jean (To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before #3) by Jenny Han Release date: May 2 Song: Vienna by Billy Joel “Slow down, you’re doing fine. You can’t be everything you want to be, before your time.”

14. Violet Grenade by Victoria Scott Release date: May 2 Song: Stand Up by The Cab “So tell me I’m outta my mind. Give me a sign. Take it one step at a time.”

15. The Dark Prophecy (The Trials of Apollo #2) by Rick Riordan Release date: May 2 Song: Come Together by Echosmith “We’ve got hopes on the horizon. We can’t stop from climbing the mountain. We’re sick and tired of keeping silent.”

16. Lord of Shadows (The Dark Artifices #2) by Cassandra Clare Release date: May 23 Song: Little Game by The Colourist “I saw you messin’ around. We were down, the times were rough, but was the light that you found on the other side enough?”


17. A Court of Wings and Ruin (A Court of Thorns and Roses #3) by Sarah J. Mass

19. Our Dark Duet (Monsters of Verity #2) by Victoria Schwab

Release date: May 2 Song: Bad Blood by Bastille

Release date: June 13 Song: I Can’t Go On Without You by Kaleo

“All this bad blood here, won’t you let it dry.”

18. Two Roads from Here by Teddy Steinkellner Release date: June 20 Song: You Can’t Always Get What You Want by The Rolling Stones “You can’t always get what you want, but if you try sometimes well you might find, you get what you need.”

“Oh so what’s the point in breaking my sweet heart? She wanted me to let down my guard.”

20. The Bone Witch (The Bone Witch #1) by Rin Chupeco Release date: March 7 Song: All Your Light by Portugal. The Man “My body won’t work for nobody but me, son. No one said that I aim to please.”

CHECK OUT THE PLAYLIST ON SPOTIFY! @STAY B O O K I S H Z I N E

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ACCOMPANYING PLAYLIST Songs that keep the Stay Bookish Zine staff going!

Quiet // MILCK i d Stars // Alessia Cara Waving Through a Window // Ben Platt, Dear Evan Hansen Broadway Soundtrack Rise Up // Andra Day d Dreaming Alone // Against The Current ft. Taka Bad Dream // Ruelle j Player // Ina Shai Goodbye // 2NE1 Dream // Imagine Dragons Escape (The Piña Colada Song) // Rupert Holmes Where’s Your Heart Gone // Golden Youth Run The World (Girls) // Beyoncé We Are // ONE OK ROCK a I Don’t Wanna Live Forever (Acoustic) // Zayn Lanes // Yuna Take It Or Leave It // Great Good Fine Ok a I Don’t Wanna Dance // COIN

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PHOTO BY JOSÉPHINE

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THE

Meet the Editors

H A Z E L U R E TA , E D I TO R - I N - C H I E F

E M I LY R AS M U S S E N , M A N AG I N G E D I TO R

Hazel Ureta believes in the power of sto- Emily is a college student with a pasries. When she‘s not writing about the sion for puns, prose, and politics. She stories she‘s read on her blog, she writes has an incurable case of wanderlust, her own. Her passion for fiction and reali- but she’s sometimes content to settle stic teen narratives drives her to be an for seeing the world through the paadvocate and champion for YA books. ges of a novel.

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STAC Y N G U Y E N , N E WS E D I TO R When Stacy Nguyen isn‘t stressing out about classes, she‘s usually found napping, blogging, writing, reading, or drinking boba while talking about languages. She‘s been reading fantastical stories and writing about them since she was just an awkward pre-teen.

I N A H P E R A LTA , F E AT U R E S E D I TO R

A N G E L I C A G A L AG , L I F E ST Y L E E D I TO R

KB, O P I N I O N S E D I TO R

Inah Peralta‘s biggest dream is to be an astronaut, but being a professional couch potato, she can be mostly seen with a book under her nose, or catching her favorite movies or TV series.

Angelica is a 19 year old girl with a love for literature, anime and cute dogs. Whe she‘s not reading or binge watching you can see her trying to learn to play the guitar.

In the words of author Orhan Pamuk, KB Meniado read a book one day and her whole life was changed.

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ZINE S TA F F Meet the Creatives

S H A N N E L L E C H UA , DESIGNER

SELENA HUGHES, DESIGNER

Joséphine rarely leaves the house without her camera and a book. Photography is her favourite form of expression. She’s also an avid baker, and always up for a good debate.

Shannelle‘s love affair with books led her to lettering, and it‘s been the perfect avenue for her energy during this reading slump. More often than not, she‘s working with words in some way in the comfort of her room.

Selena tries to say smart things about books and chocolate on her blog. It works. Sometimes. She also is pursuing graphic design in college and copes with the homework (and stress) by watching Youtube all the time.

NIHAAD, P H OTO G R A P H E R

B E L L A C AV I CC H I , DESIGNER

JA M I E D E L EO N , DESIGNER

Nihaad is a twenty something bookish girl from Cape Town, South Africa; trying to carve a place for herself in this wild and unpredictable world. Grab a cuppa and join her as she takes on life, one book at a time.

Bella loves stories of all kinds, whether they are told on screen, on stage, or in the pages of a novel. When she’s not stuck with her nose in a book or a pencil in hand, she is likely looking for spare change to pay off her overdue library fines.

Like any bookworm, Jamie’s love for reading started at a young age when she was first introduced to the library and the wonderful world of books. She now loves to lose herself in between the pages of a book and fangirl over several fictional characters who have her heart.

J OS É P H I N E , C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R FO R P H OTO G R A P H Y

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KE ANNA LEWIS, P H OTO G R A P H E R

T I F FA N Y, P H OTO G R A P H E R

When Keanna isn‘t busy, she‘s nestled into her book corner with a good book that she can escape to from stress. When she‘s not reading, she‘s writing up a new blog post or filming her latest BookTube video on her YouTube channel.

Tiffany is a teenager who is obsessed with books and cakes. When she‘s not reading, she is either blogging, watching movies, sleeping, or taking bookish-related photos. Oh! She also loves cats.

F I D E R LY, CO N T R I B U T I N G P H OTO G R A P H E R Find her as @readsleepfangirl on Instagram, where she shares her bookish photography.

Meet the Writers

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MEIA

SHANTI

Meia B. is a pen name empowering the inner thoughts left captive in her real life self with a name also starts with M. She enjoys reading Young Adult Fantasy with frequent detour on Historical Fiction, Contemporary and Mystery sub-genre. When not reading, you will find her daydreaming things, brainstorming plans for the future, blogging her love for books, and writing her own crafted stories.

„Shanti is a reader, writer, and book blogger. When not fangirling on the internet, she can be found doing schoolwork, running, working on her school newspaper and following her imagination to surprising places.

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HANNAH SOPHIA LIN Sophia is a socially awkward communications major who has a GIF for nearly everything and somehow got sorted into Ravenclaw and Gryffindor. She is the host of Novel Newcomers and can be found on Twitter (@HannahSophiaLin) or her blog, Bookwyrming Thoughts.


JM CABRAL JM is a book blogger from Manila. He has a degree in Hotel and Restaurant Managment mainly because it was too late when he discovered that literature and publishing is his true calling. He usually reads romantic contemporaries, and blogs about them over at Book Freak Revelations. And most importantly, he is also an active advocate of the LGBT community.

ERICA MILLER

SOPHIE

Erica is 22 years young bibliophile who is trying to find herself in this crazy world. If she isn‘t lost in thought or reading a book she could be found watching Netflix, baking, or day-dreaming about Zayn Malik & Bellamy Blake.

Sophie has always appreciated the power authors can have on words and on a reader‘s life, which is why she one day aspires to publish a story of her own. Creative to the bone, Sophie can always be found writing, blogging, colouring or trying to find her next favorite song.

PA M E L A

L AU R E N H A N AWAY

MARIE

Pamela is a college student obsessed with passionfruit cheesecake and dragons. She writes in the hopes of inspiring other young ecuadorian writers to realize their stories matter too, and to share them with the world.

Lauren is always thinking about stories, even when she‘s working. Her love for reading and writing has helped her through some tough times and she hopes to do the same by sharing her passion with others.

Marie is a reader, writer, book and travel blogger currently trying to figure out life, as we all are. When she‘s not obsessing about young adult books, she‘s probably planning her next trip or lost somewhere in stories she makes up inside of her own head.publishing,

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STAY BOOKISH ISSUE #2 6/21/17

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STAY UPDATED @STAYBOOKISHZINE

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A N YO N E C A N B E PA R T W I T H A L L T T H E P OT E N T I A L , LOV E D. L I K E A B CURSOR ON AN E WAS J U ST T H E F I B EG I N N I N G O F T B U T AT L E AST I T L E T ’ S J U ST STA R W H AT H A P P E N S. W H AT H A P P E N E D 86

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EG I N. I T WAS T H E T H E P RO M I S E , THE THINGS I LINKING E M P T Y PAG E , I T I R ST T H I N G. T H E T H E B EG I N N I N G. WAS D O N E . T AND SEE SA R A H D E S S E N , D TO G O O D B Y E . S TAY B O O K I S H Z I N E

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Join our team! We are looking for contributing writers, photographers, designers & artists. Visit our page for details on how to contribute: staybookish.com/magazine

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Stay Bookish Zine - Issue No. 1  

Featuring Becky Albertalli, New YA Releases, Spring 2017 Debut Authors & More!

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