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STATE OF FASHION 2018

SEARCHING FOR THE NEW LUXURY


THREEASFOUR IRIS VAN HERPEN TENANT OF CULTURE RAFAEL KOUTO THE SARTISTS VIN + OMI YING GAO YUIMA NAKAZATO VIVIENNE WESTWOOD STELLA MCCARTNEY ANNEKE HYMMEN / KUMI HIROI LARA TORRES BRUNO PIETERS H&M CONSCIOUS COLLECTION VIKTOR & ROLF FOR ZALANDO OSKLEN 11.11/ELEVEN ELEVEN

BUTTON MASALA FASHION4FREEDOM PETIT H BY HERMES G-STAR RAW MUD JEANS SELF-ASSEMBLY MAVEN WOMEN APPARATUS 22 HELEN STOREY CONSCIOUS CONTEMPORARY CRAFT: CONNECTING COMMUNITIES FASHION REVOLUTION ELISA VAN JOOLEN MUSEUM ARNHEM & ARTEZ PRODUCT DESIGN ARTEZ FUTURE MAKERS & WUR FUTURE FOOTWEAR FOUNDATION

KRISTINA WALSH WASTE2WEAR TEIJIN PAULINE VAN DONGEN H&M GLOBAL CHANGE AWARD ALGAEFABRICS ORANGE FIBER MYCOTEX BY NEFFA MAKE WASTE-COTTON NEW LISELORE FROWIJN AND PIÑATEX BY ANANAS ANAM LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION ECOALF CANEPA ECCO LEATHER


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Foreword Searching for the New Luxury Manifest Index: Introduction Index: Icons Unlock the Change Suggested Reading

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MASTERS OF CHANGE

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State of Fashion: Open Call Connecting People

New Imaginations Introduction Text ThreeASFOUR Iris van Herpen Ying Gao Yuima Nakazato Rafael Kouto The Sartists Tenant of Culture Anneke Hymmen & Kumi Hiroi Stella McCartney & Viviane Sassen Lara Torres Apparatus 22 Vivienne Westwood VIN + OMI

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The Product and the Maker in the Spotlight Introduction Text Bruno Pieters Stella McCartney H&M Conscious Collection Viktor&Rolf for Zalando 11.11/eleven eleven Osklen Button Masala for Crafts Fashion4Freedom Petit h by Hermes G-Star RAW

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New Business Models Introduction Text Maven Women MUD jeans Self-Assembly

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Fashion Design for a Better World Introduction Text Helen Storey Conscious Contemporary Craft: Connection Communities Fashion Revolution Elisa van Joolen

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Interdisciplinary Approaches Introduction Text Ecoalf Kristina Walsh GCA - Orange Fiber GCA - Make-waste cotton new GCA - AlgaeFabrics GCA - Fungi Fashion Canepa Liselore Frowijn & Piñatex by Ananas Anam Pauline van Dongen Future Footwear Foundation ECCO Leather Teijin VIN + OMI Waste2Wear London College of Fashion (UAL) & H&M Barefoot Hero Future Makers Museum Arnhem

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RECAP STATE OF FASHION 2018

Aftermovie Exhibition Design Construction State of Fashion Teaser Campaign Towards Circular Fashion Fashion Colloquium Opening Adele Varcoe Apparatus 22 Whataboutery Education Reflags Credits Colophon #5 ANNEX

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Exhibitors State of Fashion 2018 Project Credits Partners & Sponsors

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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FOREWORD

In 2017, the board of the Sonsbeek & State of Fashion Foundation, together with curator José Teunissen and a small, ambitious team of professionals, embarked on a new adventure: State of Fashion. The first edition of the event was designed as an exploration of solutions for a more sustainable future of the fashion industry, which is currently the second biggest polluter after the oil industry. Teunissen’s call was heard: more than 27,500 visitors from the Netherlands and abroad joined her search for the new luxury, by visiting the exhibition or taking part in one of more than 50 events. Together with our team, Teunissen achieved an important goal: she showed a broad audience of professionals, media and interested parties that a sustainable future could be closer than we think.

generation of designers: visionary makers who are guided by experiment, who are inspired by the possibilities of materials and new technologies, and who are focused on collaboration with sometimes unconventional parties from within and outside their networks. The findings of Jose Teunissen’s search already provide food for thought for a next edition. And the positive results of State of Fashion 2018 also give cause to anticipate a follow-up edition. For those who cannot wait: part of the exhibition travels to Berlin in August 2018, and the interim results of the research ‘The Future of Living Materials’ by ArtEZ University of the Arts and Wageningen University & Research already be shown in Wageningen and at Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven in September and October.

The first edition of the new quadrennial event State of Fashion has been an artistic and financial Eiso Alberda van Ekenstein success. We ended with a slightly positive balance. Chairman, Sonsbeek & State of Fashion Foundation As an organisation, we are proud of that, together with its highly artistic quality. State of Fashion is the successor to the Arnhem Fashion Biennial, previously a joint initiative of ArtEZ and the municipality of Arnhem, which put Arnhem on the map as a fashion city between 2005 and 2013. The Arnhem Fashion Biennials were of a high artistic quality, and received national and international acclaim for their content. But the last two editions also faced a number of problems, resulting in the discontinuity of the biennial. We are therefore pleased that State of Fashion, with its strong artistic programme, its solid organisation and support from key partners ArtEZ University of the Arts and Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem, has managed to regain the confidence of Arnhem. On a national and international level, State of Fashion 2018 | searching for the new luxury created a unique new platform with which Arnhem once again establishes itself as a fashion city. Supported by the Municipality of Arnhem, the Province of Gelderland, and the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, as well as various funds and sponsors, and in collaboration with ArtEZ University of the Arts and Wageningen University & Research, State of Fashion offered its visitors a glimpse into the future. A future that is ushered in by a new FOREWORD

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In the last few years it has often been said that the current fashion system is outdated, still operating at a 20th-century model that celebrates individualism and the ‘star designer’. On one hand, designers and big brands experience enormous pressure to produce new collections at an ever growing pace, leaving less room for reflection, contemplation and innovation. On the other hand, there is the continuous race to produce at even lower costs and implement more rapid life cycles, presenting disastrous consequences for society and the environment. There is definitely the need for fashion to become relevant and resilient again, and to take itself seriously, not only by producing clothes in a circular and socially responsible way, but also by using its power to envision a better world. Fashion as a discipline should build on its strengths and use its groundbreaking seductive power to redefine what beauty and luxury entail in the 21st century. The answers are not there yet, but State of Fashion 2018 | searching for new luxury explores what may define these new values of luxury. The classical dream of fashion the world of Hollywood glamour, the elegance of the Parisienne and the fashion magazine - is outdated and will be replaced by a new visual language that underlines and expresses the values of an upcoming generation. These completely fresh lifestyles and values will transform the representation and visual language of the fashion system as we know it, which currently recycles the same retro trends over and over again. 12

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State of Fashion 2018 | searching for the new luxury investigates a new sense of conscious consumerism by embracing state-of-the-art technologies, innovative production methods and ingenious business models, and by exploring the exciting area in which science and fashion design meet. But above all, the exhibition showcases a range of seductive products and concepts that evoke a better and resilient world, a world in which we aspire to live in and to feel connected to. Professor JosĂŠ Teunissen Dean School of Design and Technology London College of Fashion (UAL), Senior Research Fellow ArtEZ University of the Arts, and Curator State of Fashion 2018

Interview by Kestrel Jenkins with JosĂŠ Teunissen about State of Fashion for the podcast Conscious Chatter. INTRODUCTION

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#IMAGINATION #AGENCY #ESSENTIAL #TECH #CARE #REUSE #FAIRNESS #NO WASTE IS THE NEW LUXURY


Knowledge is power. To make change, having access to information is key. Throughout the exhibition the visitor was able to find facts and figures. Each project showed a ‘…Did you know’, as well as different icons, each with their own meaning. The index on the following pages shows which projects tick which specific boxes, and where improvements for a healthier industry are being made. It does, however, also show the blanks and makes visible where there is still progress to be made.

Water usage

CO2

Co2 emission

Craft

Energy

Local

Awareness

Toxic

Social Empowerment

Transparency


THEMES

DESIGNERS

NEW IMAGINATIONS

THREEASFOUR IRIS VAN HERPEN YING GAO YUIMA NAKAZATO RAFAEL KOUTO THE SARTISTS TENANT OF CULTURE ANNEKE HYMMEN & KUMI HIROI STELLA MCCARTNEY & VIVIANE SASSEN LARA TORRES APPARATUS 22 VIVIENNE WESTWOOD VIN + OMI

THE PRODUCT AND THE MAKER IN THE SPOTLIGHT

BRUNO PIETERS STELLA MCCARTNEY H&M CONSCIOUS COLLECTION VIKTOR&ROLF FOR ZALANDO 11.11 / ELEVEN ELEVEN OSKLEN BUTTON MASALA FOR CRAFTS FASHION4FREEDOM PETIT H BY HERMES G-STAR RAW

NEW BUSINESS MODELS

MAVEN WOMEN MUD JEANS SELF-ASSEMBLY

FASHION DESIGN FOR A BETTER WORLD

HELEN STOREY CONSCIOUS CONTEMPORARY CRAFT: CONNECTION COMMUNITIES FASHION REVOLUTION ELISA VAN JOOLEN

INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACHES

ECOALF KRISTINA WALSH H&M GLOBAL CHANGE AWARDS – ORANGE FIBER H&M GLOBAL CHANGE AWARDS – MAKE-WASTE COTTON NEW H&M GLOBAL CHANGE AWARDS – ALGAEFABRICS H&M GLOBAL CHANGE AWARDS – FUNGI FASHION CANEPA LISELORE FROWIJN & PIÑATEX BY ANANAS ANAM PAULINE VAN DONGEN FUTURE FOOTWEAR FOUNDATION ECCO LEATHER TEIJIN WASTE2WEAR LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION (UAL) & H&M BAREFOOT HERO VIN & OMI

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CO2

INDEX

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STATE OF FASHION UNLOCK THE CHANGE ‘There is no beauty in the finest cloth if it makes hunger and unhappiness…’ Gandhi

must be globally stabilised at 450 parts per million to have a chance of avoiding global warming above 2°C (Neslen, 2016). Should the fashion industry continue its current path, then by 2050 it will absorb Fashion is a very influential instrument that enamore than 26% of the carbon budget associated bles individuals to channel their vision in various with a 2°C pathway (Ellen MacArthur Foundation, contexts. Textile and clothing embody the contex2017). In addition, a number of social problems tual vision by which fashion connects people and require urgent action and radical changes at system brings new imaginations to life. Once upon a time, level. Worth $1.3 trillion, the clothing industry emtextile was the most precious material, and fashion ploys 300+ million individuals across supply chains. was capturing art and cultural heritage in customHowever, a lack of transparency and end-to-end ised yet creative forms. But both the definition of supply chain visibility hinders consumers from fashion and its conceptualisation have substantially understanding the real social cost attached to changed. The elimination of the Multi-fibre Agreefashion products. ment in 2005 has resulted in the introduction of new production and distribution strategies. These Change is not only required, it is urgent. The resulted in globally dispersed and fragmented sup- fashion industry desperately needs new definitions ply chains enabling a reduction of production costs to account for transparency, circularity, accountand delivery times. As a consequence, fashion, once ability and inclusivity. And, it is imperative for us a cultural reference point for craftsmanship, has as consumers to stop and take responsibility for been redefined through associated business our unstoppable need for consumption. We need characteristics, such as demand unpredictability, to join forces to acknowledge that our very own uncertainty, shortened life cycles, changing choices have a material impact on the planet, consumer patterns and, inevitably, a lack of love. and we need to learn from our mistakes. State of Fashion captures the profundity of sustainability in Subsequently, fashion has become one of the most fashion by demanding transparency and by giving challenging industries, with the accelerated growth a voice to new ideas that chime for the necessary in the production and consumption of garments. change in the fashion game. This body of work Clothing production has more than doubled since invites everyone to the act of empathy, and helps 2000. While the average consumer buys 60% more the fashion industry accelerate its transition to items of clothing (Greenpeace, 2016), 40% of the circularity, sustainability and inclusivity by starting clothing purchased is not actually worn (Fashion with something everyone is capable of: changing Revolution, 2017). Obviously, fashion has a sigtheir own behaviour. nificant environmental and social footprint. The fashion industry is responsible for 92 million tonnes Dr. Hakan Karaosman of solid waste per year globally, accounting for 4% Politecnico di Milano of the 2,12 billion tonnes of global waste dumped every year (Global Fashion Agenda and Boston Consulting Group, 2017). Furthermore, fashion is a thirsty business: it requires massive amounts of water, with 93 billion cubic metres of water used in textiles production annually (Ellen MacArthur Foundation, 2017). It is not a surprise that 20% of global freshwater pollution comes from textile treatment and dyeing processes (WRAP, 2017). As for emissions, in 2015 the global fashion industry was responsible for about 5.4% of the 32.1 billion tonnes of global carbon emissions (Fashion Revolution, 2017a). On the whole, CO2 concentrations 18

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SUGGESTED READING BY DR. HAKAN KARAOSMAN Aiama, D., Carbone, G., Cator, D. and Changing Markets Foundation. Challender, D. (2016), Biodiversity (2018), Dirty fashion: Spotlight Risks and Opportunities in the on a polluting viscose giant. Apparel Sector, Gland. Cline, E. (2014), “Where does Bain, J., Beton, A., Schultze, A. and discarded clothing go?”, Mudgal, S. (2009), Reducing the The Atlantic. environmental impact of clothes cleaning, BIO Intelligence Service in Ditty, S. (2015), It’s time for a collaboration with Giraffe fashion revolution, Dec 2015, The and Intertek, London. United Kingdom.

Karaosman, H., Morales-Alonso, G. and Brun, A. (2016), “From a Systematic Literature Review to a Classification Framework: Sustainability Integration in Fashion Operations”, Sustainability, Vol. 9 No. 1, p. 30.

Balch, O. and Idle, T. (2016), How brands can improve apparel value chains, Management Briefing: Sustainable Apparel, London.

Ellen MacArthur Foundation. (2017), A new textiles economy: Redesigning fashion’s future.

Neslen, A. (2016), “Carbon dioxide levels in atmosphere forecast to shatter milestone”, The Guardian.

Fashion Revolution. (2017a), Loved clothes last. Global Fashion Agenda and Boston Consulting Group. (2017), Pulse of the fashion industry.

Organic Cotton. (2015), “Environmental risks”, The risks of cotton farming.

Carbon Trust. (2011a), International Carbon Flows: Cotton, London. Carbon Trust. (2011b), International Carbon Flows: Clothing, London. CDP. (2015a), Accelerating action: CDP Global Water Report 2015, London. CDP. (2015b), CDP Global 500 Climate Change Report 2015, London. Clean Clothes Campaign. (2015a), “Global brands leave Cambodian workers fainting over fashion”.

Global Fashion Agenda and Boston Consulting Group. (2017), Pulse of the fashion industry. Greenpeace. (2012), Toxic threads: The big fashion stitch-up, How big brands are making consumers unwitting accomplices in the toxic water cycle, Amsterdam.

Moulds, J. (2015), “Child labour in the fashion supply chain”, The Guardian.

Quantis and Climate Works Foundation. (2018), Measuring fashion: Insights from the environmental impact of the global apparel and footwear industries study, Quantis and Climate Works Foundation. WRAP. (2012), Valuing our clothes: The true cost of how we design, use and dipose of clothing in the UK, Valuing our clothes.

Greenpeace. (2014), A little story about a fashionable lie, Amsterdam. WRAP. (2017), Valuing Our Clothes: the cost of UK fashion. Clean Clothes Campaign. (2015b), Greenpeace. (2016), “Global Wage Forum confirms living Timeout for fast fashion. WWF. (2014), “Cotton”, Sustainable wage as core human right”. Agriculture. Greenpeace. (2018), Destination Clean Clothes Campaign. (2015c), Zero: Seven years of detoxing the “Italian factory conditions clothing industry. deteriorate”. ILO. (2013), Making progress Clean Clothes Campaign. (2016), against child labour - Global “European garment workers face estimates and trends 2000-2012, forced overtime and poverty Geneva. wages”. ILO. (2016), “Textiles, clothing, leather and footwear sector”, Textiles; clothing; leather; footwear. UNLOCK THE CHANGE

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STATE OF FASHION OPEN CALL To widen the scope of State of Fashion 2018, the Sonsbeek & State of Fashion Foundation organised an open call for projects in collaboration with the Prince Claus Fund. Designers and concept developers from all over the world were invited to share ideas that offer new perspectives on the fashion system and on the way we deal with the things that surround us. The call resulted in 97 applications from 22 countries. Thanks in part to the network of scouts from the Prince Claus Fund, but also through international contacts of the curator and the organisation, as well as social media, we were able to reach participants in Asia, Africa and South America. The selection for the open call was made with the help of an international expert panel, consisting of: Joumana El Zein Khoury Director Prince Claus Fund

As a result the Sonsbeek & State of Fashion Foundation invited seven initiatives to showcase their work during the exhibition State of Fashion 2018 | searching for the new luxury: Rafael Kouto (Switzerland/Togo), ALL THE NOTHING THAT WILL REMAIN Anneke Hymmen and Kumi Hiroi (the Netherlands), Remodeling 11.11/eleven eleven (India), the Khadi Way Elisa van Joolen (the Netherlands), PORTAL Anuj Sharma (India), Button Masala for Crafts

Corinna Gardner Senior Curator of Design & Digital, V&A Museum

Kristina Walsh (United Kingdom), Footwear Beyond the Foot: Extensions of Being

Dr. Hakan Karaosman Politecnico di Milano

Matti Liimatainen (Finland), Self-Assembly label

Han Nefkens Founder Han Nefkens Foundation Johan Maris Director Control Union

The selected participants were also invited to share their experiences and knowledge in the Masters of Change masterclass, organised in collaboration with the Han Nefkens Foundation and the Dutch Embassy in Paris’ Atelier Néerlandais. During the opening weekend of State of Fashion’s first edition, the Fashion Colloquium (31 May and 1 June 2018) - organised by ArtEZ University of the Arts, in collaboration with State of Fashion - offered the invited designers a platform for their ideas and enabled them to engage into conversation with experts and peers. Watch WHATABOUTERY | 11:11/Eleven Eleven here Watch WHATABOUTERY | Matti Liimatainen here

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OPEN CALL

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CONNECTING PEOPLE

Connecting people through art is the Han Nefkens Foundation’s motto. Even though our current main focus is on helping international video artists to produce and exhibit their work worldwide, we still want to support emerging fashion designers. This is thanks to the enthusiasm and knowledge with which José Teunissen, this year’s curator of State of Fashion, since 2006 has guided me through the world of innovative fashion. We previously supported international fashion designers through our Fashion Award, enabling the winner to produce a new work that would subsequently be shown at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam. We also organised two widely acclaimed exhibitions that were shown at this museum, as well as internationally: ‘The Art of Fashion’ in 2009 and ‘The Future of Fashion is Now’ in 2014. It was while preparing the latter exhibition that we realised how different today’s young fashion designers operate in comparison to previous generations. This is evident in their interest in sustainability and in social issues, such as healthcare, gender equality and the plight of workers in the apparel industry, particularly in the Global South. Many of these designers also show a keen interest in applying forgotten traditional artisanship or cutting-edge technologies into their designs. But the way they work is also radically different from the introverted and excluding world of traditional fashion houses. What struck me most, was the generosity of these emerging fashion designers, the willingness to share their experiences, their sources and their difficulties.

different perspective, or a way of archiving and communicating the conclusions of the very masterclass they are involved in. The masterclasses we organised - in Shanghai, Shenzhen, Paris and now Arnhem - invigorated the designers, by them just being together, and by talking and listening to each other. This adds another dimension to the class. This was certainly the case at the masterclass Masters of Change masterclass during State of Fashion 2018 in Arnhem, where the participants are still in contact with each other. One Japanese designer who resides in the Netherlands will travel to New Delhi later this year to visit a designer that she met during the masterclass. I myself still exchange ideas and perspectives with several of the designers that were part of the group. Besides these new contacts, perhaps my greatest personal satisfaction and joy in Arnhem came from seeing how well everybody got along. If only the ‘real’ world would be like that! There is nothing as uplifting as sharing intense moments with others, moments in which you feel close to people you may have never met before. There is nothing as reassuring as knowing that you are not alone. We will continue with these encounters since we are absolutely convinced that something worthwhile will arise again, even though on the outset we have no idea what that may be. Because going ahead vigorously and full of zeal without knowing what the exact outcome will be, is part of the great adventure called life. Han Nefkens Founder Han Nefkens Foundation

There are many virtual networks through which emerging designers are in ongoing contact with each other, often without ever having physically met. José and I decided that we could help them by organising events where they could meet in person and get to know each other in this way. Even though a lot of information can be exchanged through the internet, nothing beats the magic of physical presence. If you put bright and ambitious young people together in a room, something will come out of it, be it an idea about how to connect designers working on the same theme, an innovative way of investigating sustainability in fashion from a 24

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Watch Han Nefkens on the Han Nefkens Foundation during Whataboutery 1: #AGENCY here

CONNECTING PEOPLE

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NE I MAG A TIO


W GI N O NS


NEW IMAGINATIONS

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One of the distinctive forces of fashion is that it can create new worlds and manages to tempt us to immerse ourselves within them. A new generation of designers and labels is increasingly using this force to bring about sustainable change. Designers do this by combining fashion with technology, as well as by connecting nature with research. They redefine the role of the fashion designer, and show a groundbreaking new conception and imagination of fashion. Moving away from tradition and led by material experiments, they are closely followed by other designers as well as the industry.

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THREEASFOUR

Tree of Life by Alex Czetwertynski (2016) United States threeASFOUR, founded in 2005 by Gabriel Asfour Did you know... (1966) Angela Donhauser (1972) and Adi Gil (1974), ...by 2040, it is expected that more than 40% of our combines advanced technology with traditional clothes will be directly connected to Internet? craftsmanship to create clothing for new worlds. Their short film ‘Tree of Life’ unveils the intimate Watch ‘Tree of Life’ here connections between the organic and the mathematical, as well as the transcendent and the quantum. As we explore these intricate macro and micro landscapes, notions of size, space, and locality become relative. For this highly detailed film, threeASFOUR joined forces with digital artist Alex Czetwertynski. Groundbreaking 3D fractal animation takes us on a journey through imaginary anatomical regions of the human body. The initial effect is disorienting yet ultimately reassuring, as we begin to grasp our own place in the cosmic progression.

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IRIS VAN HERPEN

Spring 2018 Haute Couture collection ‘Ludi Naturae’ The Netherlands Iris van Herpen (1984) is known for her innovative work, often inspired by nature, in which she applies the latest technological developments to traditional couture techniques, resulting in interesting and sculptural collections. For her collection ‘Ludi Naturae’, Iris van Herpen examined natural and man-made landscapes from a bird’s-eye view, inspired by the aerial photography by Thierry Bornier and Andy Yeung. This dress is made from the innovative material ‘foliage’, developed in collaboration with the Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) in which leaf-like patterns are 3D printed with a thinness of up to 0.8 mm. Then tulle is laid into the 3D printer to print directly onto the fabric, creating exceptional softness.

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Did you know... ...since the printer is too small to make the dress in one go, separate patches of 30 x 30 cm were printed? While printing the patches, the printing process was regularly stopped in order to insert the tulle textile into the printer and enable the materials to become interwoven. Atelier Iris van Herpen then combined the separate patches to create a single piece. In total, printing with this method took more than 260 hours, adding 60 hours of manual finishing by Atelier Iris van Herpen on top. Watch ‘Ludi Naturae | Process film’ here See the ‘Ludi Naturae’ collection develop from inside the atelier to the final runway show.

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YING GAO

Possible Tomorrows (2017) Canada Ying Gao (1977) focuses on the relationship between wearer and garment, but also on the relationship with one’s environment. She attempts to create an interaction between these different positions. The results are interactive dresses that respond to the touch of others. However, the material is only activated in the presence of strangers whose fingerprints are not recognised by the material. On one hand, the work consequently touches upon technology and interdisciplinarity. On the other hand, it addresses notions of privacy and individualism.

Did you know... ...the design of this dress was developed from a series of algorithms associated with the realm of pattern recognition? Watch ‘Possible Tomorrows’ here

Ying Gao: “The aesthetic of these garments evokes hypotrochoids, shapes borrowed from the vintage game Spirograph. Their flattened curves are drawn by a single point linked to a mobile circle that rolls without sliding, on and inside of an initial circle.”

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YUIMA NAKAZATO

Autumn/Winter 2017-18 collection ‘Freedom’ Japan Japanese designer Yuima Nakazato (1985) explores the possibilities for the future of haute couture by combining old crafts with new technological innovations. For his ‘Freedom’ collection he created a system by using digital fabrication that allows various materials used for clothing – like cotton, wool, and nylon – to be combined freely, without the use of needles and threads. The 3D Unit Constructed Textile can be adjusted to the size and shape of a garment to precisely fit the wearer’s figure, unlike the standard method of making clothes from a sewing pattern. Each unit has a serial number – as if it was the DNA of the wearer. For the silhouettes of the collection Nakazato was inspired by the 1950s, a decade characterised by contrasting yet dominant trends. On one hand, there was the elegant ‘Golden Age of Couture’, and on the other hand, there were jeans, a mass-produced item that has been elevated from workwear to an essential item in everyone’s wardrobe. Age of Couture’ and on the other hand the jeans, the mass-produced item that has been elevated from workwear to an essential item in everyone’s wardrobe. 54

Did you know... ...3D Unit Constructed Textile is a unique idea and technology that Nakazato and his team have been developing over the last few years, that explores the possibility of more sustainable fashion? Through this process they developed a manufacturing system that allows making partial updates to garments, significantly extending the lifespan of the item to semi-permanent. During the research, it became clear that the principle philosophy of the technique shares similarities with Boro, a Japanese traditional custom of mending ragged textiles. Watch the ‘Freedom’ process film here The film explains how textiles created with 3D units can adjust the size and shape of a garment to precisely fit the wearer’s figure.

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RAFAEL KOUTO

ALL THE NOTHING THAT WILL REMAIN (2017) Switzerland / Togo ‘ALL THE NOTHING THAT WILL REMAIN’ focuses on sustainable design systems, by mixing upcycling with couture techniques and crafts in the creative process on three main layers: prints, embroidery, and weaving. For the collection, Rafael Kouto (1990) was inspired by a quote from the artist Romuald Hazoumè: “I send back the West that which belongs to them, that is to say, the refuse of a consumer society that invades us every day.” The result is a strong statement about new values and meanings of a more sustainable production system in fashion. Kouto collaborated with the recycling centre Texaid in Switzerland and collected textiles, garments and other materials to transform them into unique and luxury items. Kouto’s aim is to conduct research about upcycling waste garments and other materials in the creative process and in large-scale production.

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Did you know... ...in today’s very linear fashion system, only 20% of textiles is recycled each year, while only less than 1% of the materials used to produce clothing is actually recycled into new clothing? ‘ALL THE NOTHING THAT WILL REMAIN’ was selected from the State of Fashion 2018 Open Call.

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#IMAGINATION #TECH #NOWASTE

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THE SARTISTS

Our Tribe (2015) South Africa Andile Buka (1990), Kabelo Kungwane (1990), Wanda Lephoto (1993) and Xzavier Zulu (1992) are the creative forces behind The Sartists, a Johannesburg-based multidisciplinary collective. Formed to challenge colonial and parochial ideas about blackness in modern society, they take a considered, autodidactic and documentary approach to style and identity. “Our Tribe is an idea that addresses the sustainability of our traditions, culture and people. It wants to cultivate a conversation about the cultural fusion between African spirituality and the adoption of Western ways in African communities. In a changing world dominated by technology and Western traditions, the sustainability of our cultures is threatened even further, and certain traditions and cultures are often misunderstood and mislabelled as ‘dark magic’ or ‘dark practices’.” Our Tribe aims to balance this cultural mismatch and to use conversation as an instrument to bring society and the environment closer together. 58

Did you know... ...for this series the collective looked to explore an authentic South African phenomenon, namely the cultural hybridity between fading cultural practices of the Zulu tribe and the increasing adoption of Western pop culture? In this case they focused on the International Stüssy Tribe (IST), an American skate brand that was later adopted by hip-hop culture.

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TENANT OF CULTURE

Storage (2016), Science and Worms (2016) and Violet (2017) The Netherlands / United Kingdom ArtEZ-alumna Hendrickje Schimmel (1990) works as an artist under the name Tenant of Culture, emphasising that she works as a cultural post-producer rather than as an autonomous creator. In her work she looks at the relationship between preservation, morality and trend. She asks us: how do we decide what should be preserved and protected? She archives found or damaged pieces of clothing; through her work she aims to extend the longevity of products we care for and do not want to discard because they are damaged. Schimmel is currently artist in residence at Sarabande, The Lee Alexander McQueen foundation in London.

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Did you know... ...the number of times a piece of clothing is worn before it is discarded has declined by 36% over the past 15 years, due to the fast fashion mentality?

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ANNEKE HYMMEN & KUMI HIROI

Remodeling (2017) The Netherlands / Japan It is often said that fashion is a matter of taste. Or is it the other way around: is taste a matter of fashion? To what extent are our preferences and ideas of beauty really our own? Anneke Hymmen (1977) and Kumi Hiroi (1979) started examining the fashion industry through the images it produces. They invited others to join their investigation: while browsing through a stack of magazines, people were asked to describe their thoughts about a fashion advertisement that attracted their attention. The collected words, mostly keywords and abrupt phrases, became their working material. Without seeing the original images, they began reconstructing their own, this time visual, interpretations of the descriptions at hand. ‘Remodeling’ engages the audience to experience how fashion is communicated, and encourages the viewer to evaluate the messages that lay within. By radically interrogating how consumers feel about advertisements where trends, sex appeal and glamour are promoted, ‘Remodeling’ shows a number of portraits that expose the real beauty 62

of people and creates a positive connection to reality without using professional models, makeup or filters. Did you know... ...in 2003, GQ magazine reduced the size of the actress Kate Winslet’s legs by about a third? Similarly, in 2009, Ralph Lauren’s campaign images were retouched to make the model’s head look bigger than her waist. ‘Remodeling’ was selected from the State of Fashion 2018 Open Call.

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VIVIANE SASSEN FOR STELLA MCCARTNEY

Stella’s World of Sustainability (2017) The Netherlands / United Kingdom The short film by acclaimed Dutch photographer Viviane Sassen (1972) forms the cornerstone of a new visual identity and concept imagined for Stella McCartney’s work in sustainability. The film conveys the symbiotic nature of humans, nature and animals; it explores the idea that to fully protect and care for ourselves we must also nurture the world we live in, as we are one and the same. The words of Maria Barnas’ poem ‘To Nurture, To Nature’ – specially conceived for the project – are recited over the film. Sassen’s work spans art and fashion, demonstrating ideas about abstraction and objects in relation to their often incongruous surroundings. Through Sassen’s abstract visual language, Stella McCartney finds a new and exciting way to engage in the conversation surrounding sustainability, entering into a new mood.

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Did you know... ...Stella McCartney (1971) is a leader in sustainable and cruelty-free production through her luxury fashion brand? A lifelong vegetarian, McCartney uses no leather or fur in any of her collections, choosing innovative alternative materials instead. The brand utilises cutting-edge technologies to find new ways of achieving better circularity, protecting ancient forests and creating positive change for the environment. Watch ‘Stella’s world of Sustainability’ by Viviane Sassen here

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LARA TORRES

Unmaking (2016) United Kingdom Lara Torres’ (1977) film ‘Unmaking’ explores the Did you know... limits of today’s fashion practices by proposing a ...compared to 15 years ago, the average person stream of consciousness in which her thought buys 60% more items of clothing and keeps them processes are transcribed through the medium of about half as long? video. ‘Unmaking’ deconstructs our preconceptions about the relationship between the body, clothing, Watch ‘Unmaking’ here production, and consumption. One can, for instance, explore how a jacket was constructed by unmaking its seams. By not producing garments, Torres aims to to replace the product with the idea or image that is essential in the definition of fashion. Providing new ways to deepen and expand the areas of intervention and action available to fashion practitioners, Torres questions the fashion system by interrogating the definition of fashion through the juxtaposition of images, text, and sound in this poetic essayfilm, which is part of her current PhD research entitled ‘Towards a practice of unmaking: a strategy for critical fashion practices’ at London College of Fashion (UAL).

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APPARATUS 22

Patterns of Aura (15° Synaesthesia) (2011 - ongoing) Romania During State of Fashion | searching for the new luxury the new collection of Apparatus 22 was shown hourly, at the start of each hour. ‘Patterns of Aura’ is many things for many people: – the sweet icing of wild imagination – a rather drifting collection – a hole to look in the dark heart of the fashion circus – an aura of an aura of an aura of an aura – a bitter pill too – a seed for a necessary revolution

Did you know... ...that this century the fashion cycle has sped up from two collections per year (Spring/Summer and Autumn/Winter) to up to 12 per season, resulting in overproduction and an enormous workload for the design teams?

Apparatus 22, the collective formed by Erika Olea, Maria Farcas and Dragos Olea, attempts to underline the slippery, alienating yet seductive nature of fashion while taking inspiration from the very elusive phenomenon of ‘aura’. They aim to use language and voice in order to ignite the imagination of the audience. As each visitor will have its own understanding of the narrated text, each will visualise a personal version of the collection on the catwalk. 68

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VIVIENNE WESTWOOD

Autumn/Winter 2011-12 ‘Handmade with Love’ In collaboration with Ethical Fashion Initiative and the United Nations United Kingdom The Vivienne Westwood Ethical Fashion Initiative Bags are ‘handmade with love’ in Nairobi, Kenya. They are produced in collaboration with the Ethical Fashion Initiative (EFI) of the International Trade Centre – a joint body of the United Nations (UN) and the World Trade Organisation (WTO) – which currently supports the work of thousands of micro-producers from marginalised African communities. The EFI empowers informal manufacturers and craftspeople to enter the international value chain, providing an income for some of the poorest people in the world. This promotes the growth of sustainable business instead of aid dependency, and creates stability among these impoverished communities. This is not charity, this is work. Styles have been created using recycled canvas, reused roadside banners, unused leather off-cuts, and recycled brass, produced in the Kibera slum (Nairobi’s biggest), where discarded metal like padlocks and car pieces are collected and then melted down. The collections include a range of 70

bag styles for men and women, including unisex rucksacks, totes, patchwork drawstring bags and Maasai hand-beaded clutches and key rings, inspired by the African fabrics and surroundings they are produced in. Thanks to the great success of the collections so far, the Ethical Fashion Initiative has sustained its success and is providing more and more employment for impoverished communities. NOT CHARITY. JUST WORK. For the Autumn/Winter 2011-12 ‘Handmade with Love’ collection created through the Ethical Fashion Initiative (EFI) programme, Vivienne Westwood and the team were joined on their first venture to Africa by the world-renowned photographer Juergen Teller. He captured the project, and the people, to help support and promote the EFI campaign, and to create seasonal images for the brand’s advertising campaign. Watch Vivienne Westwood x ITC Ethical Fashion Initiative here 3. THE EXHIBITION


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VIN + OMI

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Autumn/Winter 2017-18 ‘WE ARE NOT SHEEP’ United Kingdom Eco fashion designers VIN + OMI have been focusing on eco-processes and textile development since 2004. The base for their own eco textiles lies in socio-eco circular projects, which form a marriage between their textiles and political messages. Strong believers in individuality, the designers tackle the fashion world and environmental issues in their own way. For their latest collection, ‘WE ARE NOT SHEEP’, they used a variety of their unique textiles: 1. rPET The rPET textile starts its life as salvaged plastic from river and ocean clean-up schemes. The collected plastic is then processed into plastic chips, which are then used as the base of three new types of rPET textile.

Did you know... ...VIN + OMI have produced 12 unique fabrics? The origin of each fabric has a social programme built around it. For example, VIN + OMI search for rivers or oceans in need of a clean-up from plastic waste and initiate a project to collect the plastic, which is then turned into rPET fabric. A percentage of the produced textile is then turned into fashion clothing or accessories, and the proceeds are donated back to the clean-up project or community. WE ARE NOT JUST A FASHION LABEL... WE ARE AN IDEOLOGY Watch Vin of VIN + OMI explain their work during Whataboutery 1: #AGENCY here

2. Sustainable Latex The latex is made from a rubber plantation sponsored by VIN + OMI, which guarantees support for the village. The latex is produced without additives and new types of hybrids are produced from the liquid latex. 3. No-Kill Fleece Organic UK llama fleece was obtained from pet animals, which are not killed for their meat. They live a full life and their fleece is collected annually, eco- processed and dyed naturally. 4. Plant Leathers For the collection they used ‘leather’ made from chestnuts, one of the new plant-based textiles produced by VIN + OMI.

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The internet has made it possible to make all the layers within the production chain visible, and allows us as consumers to make better-informed and more conscious choices when consuming fashion. But the relationship between transparency and sustainability is more complex than just that. Access to more information can shape new, horizontal relationships between us and the producers of our garments. When it becomes clear that skill and craftsmanship go into the creation of a garment, the professionals that are involved in making our clothes gain not only our recognition, but also a much better financial reward: intermediaries like shops, producers and marketeers disappear. The product is the materialisation of the relationship between us and the producer: knowing the maker can create pride, trust or a caring bond for a garment. This approach reveals a shift in focus from the ‘star designer’ to the value of the garment itself, or the professionals behind it.

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BRUNO PIETERS

Honest by Collection VI (2017) Belgium Created by designer Bruno Pieters (1975) in 2010, ‘Honest By’ was the very first label to adopt a 100% transparency policy; Pieters’ brand became the first fashion company to share the entire cost-breakdown of its products. According to Bruno Pieters, fashion is a celebration of beauty, and the story behind that celebration can be equally beautiful. Honest By tells the story about where a garment is made and by whom. Pieters makes the entire production chain transparent. To illustrate, this particular jacket reveals a number of details, from the jacquard fabric made in the Netherlands to its assembly time: 161 minutes.

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Did you know... ...that during the 1960s, almost all of the fabric and fashion manufacturing factories were moved to low-wage countries? Since then, it has become increasingly unclear how garments are exactly produced. We need to increase the transparency and traceability of our supply chains to solve problems concerning working conditions, animal welfare and product responsibility. Read all the information about the material, manufacturing and price calculation here

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STELLA MCCARTNEY Autumn 2018 United Kingdom Stella McCartney is a vegetarian luxury fashion brand that does not use leather, exotic skins, fur or feathers in any of its collections. The bags and shoes from McCartney’s Autumn 2018 women’s ready-to-wear collection might look and feel like leather, however, the products are made from the brand’s cruelty-free alter-nappa material. The material has a recycled polyester backing to reduce the amount of petroleum used in the product, and has a coating with over 50% vegetable oil, which is a renewable, natural resource. The wrap-style dress by Stella McCartney (1971), featuring resin pearl embellishment, is made from a blend of materials that includes sustainable viscose. Viscose, also known as rayon, starts its life as a tree. In line with its ethos to pioneer sustainability in the fashion industry, the brand is committed to ensuring that its sources of viscose are protected and enriched. In 2014, they established a partnership with Canopy, an NGO developing solutions to protect the world’s ancient and endangered forests. The brand’s primary viscose supply chain is fully traceable, transparent and entirely European. Pulp from trees is sourced from an FSC-certified forest in Sweden, which is neither ancient nor endangered. The pulp is then turned into a viscose filament in Germany and then made into fabric in Italy. This ensures an unprecedented level of traceability and makes certain the brand does not directly or indirectly contribute to the destruction of forests.

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Did you know... ...protecting forests is vital for our future as they provide the planet with clean water and air, food, medicine and resources? Not to mention they are a habitat for the majority of the world’s birds and animals. Healthy forests play a critical role in slowing down climate change because they soak up carbon dioxide; their destruction is one of the key drivers of climate change, accounting for nearly 20% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Apart from protecting forests, Stella McCartney only uses recycled polyester instead of, for instance, Brazilian calf leather, for their shoes as bags, which results in 24 times less of an environmental impact, as calculated through the groundbreaking Environmental Profit and Loss Report (EP&L). The brand does acknowledge that synthetic alternatives are not without environmental concerns themselves. The EP&L has shown that the majority of the impact associated with man-made fibres is due to processing oil into yarn. The brand is working to reduce the impact of the alternative materials by using recycled and bio-based materials. The brand is even in the process of developing a lab-grown leather.

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H&M CONSCIOUS COLLECTION

Conscious Exclusive Collection (2013-Present) Sweden H&M is one of the biggest fashion retailers in the world. Given the environmental and social footprint generated by fast fashion, the company faces the responsibility and the challenge to develop sustainable production processes. With its Conscious Collection, H&M focuses on fashion items made from sustainable materials, enabling a broader consumer base to become acquainted with sustainable fashion. With this initiative, H&M takes a step towards a more sustainable future for the brand, creating products out of recycled materials and significantly reducing water, carbon, and waste footprints. Through this project, the company not only contributes to reducing environmental and social impact, but also creates awareness across shoppers by showing that recycled materials can actually be fashionable. In 2017, H&M collected 17.771 tonnes of textiles through the garment collecting initiative for reuse and recycling.

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Did you know... ...H&M aims to use 100% recycled or other sustainably sourced materials by 2030? For the Serpentine Dress from the H&M Conscious Exclusive Collection (2017), H&M used ‘Bionic Yarn’ made from recovered plastic from waterways and shorelines (think plastic bottles, takeout containers and grocery bags). With the increasing consumption of single-use packaging, the quantities of plastics ending up in the ocean have risen astronomically over the past thirty years. Without the significant development of a highvolume recovery and recycling infrastructure, particularly in coastal communities, there will be more plastic than fish in the ocean by 2048. Watch Conscious Exclusive 2017 – The Journey of a Dress here

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VIKTOR&ROLF FOR ZALANDO

Spring/Summer 2018 ‘RE:CYCLE’ The Netherlands / Germany Viktor&Rolf (1969, 1969) launched their debut conscious collection for e-tailer Zalando in February 2018. By applying their couture philosophy to a fast fashion chain, the duo delivered a collection encompassing recycled garments for a wider audience. For the collection, the designers used overstock material that was kept at Zalando’s warehouse and would otherwise have been discarded. Another positive effect of this approach: every piece is a unique garment. Viktor&Rolf previously explored creative recycling methods in their past haute couture collections, in which they used fabrics from their own fabric archive that stretches back 20 years.

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Did you know... ...35% of the fabrics used for making fashion items turns into waste within the supply chain? For example, about 20% of the fabric is swept off the floor of the cutting room.

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11.11/ELEVEN ELEVEN

The Khadi Way (2017) India 11.11/eleven eleven is the label established by the entrepreneurs Mia Morikawa (1983), and Shani Himanshu (1980). Their Khadi Way project represents a journey of kala cotton and khadi denim, from seed to stitch. Each product, within The Khadi Way collection is handmade from start to finish. 11.11/eleven eleven garments have a product code which traces back the human imprint on the product and helps to connect the maker and wearer. The project contributes to environmental sustainability by using organic materials and recycled waste materials. Kala is one of the few genetically pure cotton species left in India, and one of the only species of pure old world cotton that is still cultivated on a large scale, without requiring external input from farmers. It also contributes to social sustainability by cherishing values such as traceability, transparency and craftsmanship.

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Did you know... ...77% of all natural fibre production consists of cotton, which has a massive impact on the environment? Cotton consumes 16% of all the insecticides and 6,8% of all herbicides used globally. In addition, one kg of cotton production requires 20,000 litres of water. 11.11/eleven eleven was selected from the State of Fashion 2018 Open Call. Watch ‘The Khadi Way’ A film by Sam Fleischer that documents the hand-made process behind the denim line.

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OSKLEN

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A21 [Practice #1] (2017 - present) Brazil In 1989 Oskar Metsavaht (1961) set up his luxury brand Osklen in Brazil. For Metsavaht, sustainability has always been an important aspect in his practice. He adheres to the ‘new luxury’ concept, advocating conscious fashion and sustainable luxury. For the development of its accessories, the brand uses the skin of the Pirarucu, one of the largest freshwater fish in the world that lives in the Amazon. The hides are usually thrown away, but Metsavaht started working with farmers to safely grow the fish, while protecting the Amazon and supporting the local population. The results indicate that Osklen’s sustainable model contributes to improving the quality of life for tens of thousands of workers, as well as to the preservation of Amazon forests. Thanks to this project, mitigation measures have been implemented in those parts of the supply chain that show the highest carbon footprint.

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Did you know... …that the Pirarucu skin used by Osklen comes from the state of Rondônia in the Amazon? By sustainably farming the Pirarucu under strictly regulated government control, this avoids endangering the protected species. This in turn helps to stabilise the food supply and the local economy. The size of the farms ranges from 2,5 to 5 acres. When compared to cattle farming, this generates lower CO2 emissions and reduces the deforestation of the Amazon. The farmers achieve 40% higher productivity than raising cattle on the same plot of land. There is no form of child or slave labour involved throughout the entire process. No genetic modification takes place, and no hormones are used. Watch the process and story of the Pirarucu here

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BUTTON MASALA FOR CRAFTS

Button Masala for Crafts (2008 – present) India Button Masala for Crafts, initiated by Indian designer Anuj Sharma (1974) in 2008 is an effective and sustainable way to create garments by only using buttons and rubber bands. The technique does not require investment in machinery and/or technical tools, and can be learned and practiced anywhere, as it does not involve cutting or pattern-making. As such, 20.000 individuals across the world have learnt the technique. Its flexibility enables one to restructure or completely change a garment by removing the rubber bands as well as buttons, and use the same piece of fabric repeatedly. Anuj Sharma teaches the technique to craftsmen that work with Khameer, an NGO in Kutch in Western India. These particular craftsmen are educated to become independent and define new markets by using traditional textiles. Not only does the project educate the local craftsmen, it also involves the wearer in the making and mending process, creating a more democratic environment for the design. 110

Did you know... ...Europeans generate about 150 kg CO2 per year through their fashion consumption? If only 5% more clothing is reused at the end of its first life cycle, the global waste footprint can be reduced by 0.7%. Button Masala for Crafts was selected from the State of Fashion 2018 Open Call.

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FASHION4FREEDOM

Data Min’d collection (2015 – present) Vietnam Fashion4Freedom - initiated by designers for designers - addresses design, environmental impact and community development as integral tenets of its operations. Their production model strives to preserve artisanal heritage, improve livelihoods of disadvantaged producers, and ensure an ethical sustainable supply chain. Fifty million tons of electronic waste is produced each year. Fashion4Freedom acquires precious metal mined from old technology including discarded phones, computers and tablets, to create the Data Min’d collection. The Koi fish is chosen as a visualisation of the struggle to swim through a massive invasion of human ‘stuff’ scattered in the environment. Koi was rendered by a 3D artist in Fashion4Freedom’s Designers & Artisans Collective. Much like Koi, Fashion4Freedom struggles to maintain old methods, while encouraging young artists and designers to blend the new with the old, rather than to simply discard old techniques. Koi unites old and new methods in jewellery making. 112

Did you know... ...Fashion4Freedom is the first socially responsible, ethical and transparent supply-chain in Vietnam? The platform works directly with Vietnamese artisans and co-operatives, with a vision to establish an alternative production model that preserves Vietnamese heritage through an ethical and sustainable supply chain. Supported by the Prince Claus Fund.

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PETIT H BY HERMES

Bracelet by Petit h (2017) France In 2014, Pascale Mussard (1957), great-great -great-granddaughter of saddle maker Thierry Hermès, launched the first Petit h collection. For Petit h, the craftsmen use discarded materials generated at the Hermès workshops, including unused leather, broken porcelain or discarded silk. Any kind of leftover material is used and transformed into beautiful new pieces, ranging from toys to jewellery. Every item is unique, creative and produced in a sustainable manner. This bracelet, for example, was made from remnants of 100% silk fabric and lambskin leather. Petit h merges sustainability with creativity. The brand stands for sustainable luxury by providing an alternative model of using waste materials to create beautiful products, and generating value by putting forward environmental stewardship and craftsmanship.

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Did you know... ...every second, the equivalent of one garbage truck of textiles is landfilled or burned? An estimated value of € 400 billion is lost every year due to clothing that is barely worn and rarely recycled. If nothing changes, by 2050 the fashion industry will use up a quarter of the world’s carbon budget.

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G-STAR RAW The G-Star Elwood RFTPi - the brand’s most sustainable jeans (2018 – present) The Netherlands G-Star RAW has denim innovation at its core, not only through how the products look, but also through the wider impact they have. The brand future-proofs its denim by investing in sustainable innovation and incorporating it in everything it does. G-Star RAW focuses on a circular approach to how denim is made and used by customers, with the aim to create tomorrow’s classics: quality denim with respect for the people and the planet, in a transparent manner. In February 2018, G-Star RAW launched its most sustainable jeans ever – the brand’s latest major shift in reducing its environmental impact. This installation conveys the brand’s sustainable actions and invites you to experience the moment when sustainability and nature become one.

When creating the most sustainable jeans, G-Star RAW and its partners followed four fundamental steps: 1. The cleanest indigo dyeing process in the world. Formulated together with DyStar and Artistic Milliners, it uses 70% less chemicals, no salts and produces no salt by-product, saving water and leaving clean and recyclable water effluent. 2. The most sustainable washing techniques, responsibly made. Together with Saitex, G-Star RAW made and washed the garments with utmost care for the environment. Through good chemistry and renewable energies, 98% of the water will be recycled and reused and the other 2% will evaporate naturally. 3. Only 100% organic cotton. Without synthetic fertilizers and toxic pesticides. 4. All components not conducive to easy recycling removed. G-Star removed all rivets and zippers and used eco-finished metal buttons instead. In addition, all labelling and carton packaging is responsibly sourced. Did you know... ...this was the first denim ever to be Cradle to Cradle Certified™ at the Gold Level by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, the most rigorous certification in the world? G-Star RAW and its partners created open access to the technology and thereby created transparency, making the process accessible to other brands through the Fashion Positive Materials Library.

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Biannual collections, big investments and a compulsory catwalk show are no longer conditions for a successful fashion business. Digital platforms allow small-scale designers and local producers the chance to make a living. Some designers seize this opportunity to engage in a dialogue with their consumers, to monitor what we really want. Others even allow us to co-create the products with them. These new business models contribute in preventing so-called ‘dead-stock’ or manage to make unsellable surplus profitable. In addition, the growing interest in sustainability and circular thinking leads to completely new business models such as lease concepts, upcycling and a circular approach.

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MAVEN WOMEN

The Amira dress (2017) USA Maven Women, created by Rebecca Ballard (1981), is the first fair trade workwear clothing line for women. Supply Chain Awareness, Global Women’s Empowerment, Connectivity and Education, Restorative Justice, Natural Beauty and Slow Fashion are six fundamental values that are at the core of each choice the brand makes. Maven Women lets customers vote on the sketches that are up for production and aims to create only dresses that receive 100+ votes. Hereby the wishes and demands of its target group are incorporated while attempting to eliminate overproduction. To illustrate, the Amira dress received 111 votes.

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Did you know... ...that in the current fashion system 30% is sold at a normal price, and 35% goes on sale? The last 35% remains unsold. Watch the trailer of ‘Introducing Maven Women’ by RioSlum Studio here

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MUD JEANS

Lease a Jeans - Recycling process (2013 – present) The Netherlands In 2013, MUD Jeans founder Bert van Son introduced the ‘Lease A Jeans’ concept. This is an innovative approach that aims to prevent overconsumption. Consumers ‘rent’ the jeans, and can return them to the brand after a year of use. MUD Jeans remains the owner of the material and reuses it in two ways. Worn models in good quality can be upcycled to a vintage model that is to be named after the former user, or the material can be recycled into a brand new product.

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Did you know... ...30% of the clothes we have in our closets have not been worn for a year? Actually, extending the average life of clothes by just three months of active use per item could result in about 5-10% reduction in carbon, water and waste footprints. Watch Bert van Son in Whataboutery 6: #Fairness here

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SELF-ASSEMBLY

Self-Assembly (2018) Finland Matti Liimatainen (1983) is a Finnish fashion designer who specialises in conceptual and computational design. For his label ‘Self-Assembly’ he creates ready-to-assemble garment construction kits by using a custom CAD/CAM system. All the products are made with a special seam that allows them to be assembled by hand, without any tools or machinery. The products are delivered as loose, packed components, which need to be joined together prior to wearing. Some of the garments can be amended. For instance if certain panels of a new S-A parka are removed, they can be assembled into a rucksack. The most essential aspect about the design process of ‘Self-Assembly’, and the foundation of the design method, is that products are not ready-to-wear but ready-to-assemble. The design process involves not only the finished product but also the experience of the user.

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Did you know... ...that, apart from sneakers, the fashion production system still is primarily an analogue and industrial process? Digital manufacturing is slowly taking over though. Mass customisation will upscale soon from seven variations in a product to seven million variations. ‘Self-Assembly’ was selected from the State of Fashion 2018 Open Call. Watch more video’s about the manufacturing and assembling process here

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The fashion industry represents not only imagination but also power. The industry operates worldwide and reaches an enormous number of consumers every day. This scope and reach provide the industry with the opportunity to make a difference on a large scale, by taking responsible actions and by taking the human scale within the production process into account. The contributing designers show us how fashion can contribute to a better life, not only by producing in a socially responsible manner, but also by applying their influence to create better living environments and empower communities.

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HELEN STOREY Dress For Our Time (2015 - present) United Kingdom Dress For Our Time is a project by Professor Helen Storey (1959), an artist, designer, and researcher at the Centre for Sustainable Fashion at London College of Fashion (UAL). Storey uses the power of fashion to communicate and act upon some of the world’s most complex issues, notably climate change and the mass displacement of people. The dress is created from a decommissioned UNHCR (United Nations High Commission for Refugees) refugee tent that once housed a displaced Syrian family at Za’atari Camp in Jordan. In giving the tent a second life, it endows this public art installation with an unbreakable bond to humanity and represents the importance of nurturing and protecting all people and safeguarding generations to come. Storey’s current work delivers action-led projects responding to living challenges in the camp. Supported by London College of Fashion (UAL)

D4OT – The Next Chapter In 2016, Storey visited Za’atari Refugee Camp, Jordan (where the tent originated) in her capacity as an academic. She is now co-creating a crossdisciplinary educational, cultural and business programme with the refugees, focused on women and young girls in the camp. LOVECOATS In 2016, Storey and the team developed the LOVECOATS project, which came out of a conversation with the Tiger Girls. The self-named Tiger Girls stands for ‘These Inspiring Girls Enjoy Reading’ and began as an initiative by The Open Learning Exchange as a pilot for innovative refugee education. It has been growing ever since. LOVECOATS is a project designed with them and inspired by their hopes and wishes for the future. They told Storey about their love of fashion, their wish to learn new skills, as well as their fear of the cold winters in the camp. All these things were addressed through this collaborative project and each coat they made was as imaginative and individual as each of the Tiger Girls themselves. “I believe it is possible to make something out of nothing.” “Now I know I am important because I got to make my own coat and I walked on the catwalk. I feel confident.” “When I took my coat home and showed it to my mother and sister they didn’t believe I had made it!” “I looked at things in the cupboard and realised I can use them for something else; I don’t have to throw them out.” Watch ‘Dress for our Time’ video here Watch ‘LOVECOATS’ video here Watch ‘D4OT’ - The Next Chapter’ here

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CONSCIOUS CONTEMPORARY CRAFT: CONNECTING COMMUNITIES

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Fondazione Zegna / San Patrignano and Making for Change at London College of Fashion (UAL) (2018) Italy / United Kingdom Conscious Contemporary Craft: Connecting Communities is a collaborative initiative that involves the community of San Patrignano, supported by Fondazione Zegna, and participants in London College of Fashion’s (LCF) Making for Change project.

Earlier in the project, decorative neckpieces were made by the women at HMP Downview as gifts for the women in San Patrignano who, in turn, made purses from hand-woven fabrics for the women at HMP Downview. The women wrote accompanying messages with each gift, as a way to communicate and connect with each other.

Conscious Contemporary Craft: Connecting Communities proposes luxury in the dynamic of San Patrignano, located in Northern Italy, is a the virtuous circle – a series of actions where each community promoting the rehabilitation of young activity increases the beneficial effect of the next, people affected by substance misuse. Supported by promoting self- development and social change. Fondazione Zegna, San Patrignano enables young individuals to transform themselves through educa- Supported by London College of Fashion (UAL) and tion and the acquisition of craftsmanship skills. the Centre for Fashion Curation Making for Change is London College of Fashion’s training and manufacturing unit based at HMP Downview women’s prison. The project aims to increase well-being and reduce reoffending rates amongst participants by equipping them with professional fashion-related skills and qualifications within a supportive environment. This project promotes the effectiveness of two social facilities, namely a therapeutic community and a prison, to support rehabilitation and to introduce young designers to fashion as a means for personal development and social change. Working with menswear designer and LCF graduate Bethany Williams, women in the weaving workshop of San Patrignano used traditional handlooms to create innovative textile samples from industrial waste materials, textile fibres, plastic tapes and electrical wires. These textile samples inspired LCF students to design garments and accessories reflecting contemporary issues, including ‘protect’, ‘migrate’, ‘protest’ and ‘survive’. Six garments incorporating fabrics woven at San Patrignano have been produced at LCF’s workshops. The accessories designed by the students will be interpreted by the women at HMP Downview out of the fabrics woven in San Patrignano.

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FASHION AS AN IDEOLOGY: CLOTHING AND RESPONSIBILITY: The fashion industry represents imagination, but also power and responsibility. An increasing number of brands show that fashion can contribute to a better world, for example, through socially responsible production processes or by contributing to a better living environment and society. Is this the new luxury? State of Fashion’s curator José Teunissen in discussion with Claire Swift, Director of Social Responsibility of the ‘Making for Change’ project at the London College of Fashion (UAL).

José: Can you tell us about ‘Making for Change’ and the collaboration with Zegna? Claire: ‘Making for Change’ is the name of the training and manufacturing unit of London College of Fashion, based at HMP Downview women’s prison. The project aims to increase the well-being of the imprisoned women by equipping them with professional skills and mediating with potential employers after the release of the prisoners. In 2013 we started collaborating with San Patrignano in Italy. Since 1978, San Patrignano has been a home to young people who have temporarily lost their way or who are suffering from addiction. Fondazione Zegna, an initiative by fashion label Zegna, supports the workshop programme at San Patrignano, which aims to promote textile craftsmanship, to support the community and to modernise traditional techniques. José: What has been the impact of this project?

This gave them the tools to develop more self-respect and self-confidence, which reduced the risk of relapse into drug use, for example. But it also had a positive effect on a personal level: the prisoners in London and the women in San Patrignano exchanged gifts and letters with each other to get in touch and communicate with each other. This is also a way to initiate change. Claire: How are you contributing to change with State of Fashion? José: State of Fashion is a platform for projects like yours, and shows in different ways there is so much more to fashion than just the look of the garment. The value of the process, the story and the people who make the clothing or textile also contribute to making a garment special. The exhibition Searching for the new luxury explores these new definitions of luxury as an answer to urgent ecological and social questions: less waste and less pollution, more equality, well-being and inclusiveness. It also represents a revaluation of the pleasure, fun and the craftsmanship connected to the making-process. State of Fashion sheds light on these different sides of the fashion industry to make designers, companies and consumers aware that real change is possible in the future. José: What is your definition of luxury in relation to fashion? Claire: Luxury is an approach, which consists of respect and recognition of the material, an appreciation for the process and an admiration of the skills of the artisans. Luxury shows a personality and connects us to the maker, through the touch and feel of the material. It is a sensual experience that allows us to appreciate the value of the product and the invisible artists who created it.

Claire: We did not expect the impact of this project to be so big. Firstly, this project offered a valuable platform to bring attention to the work being done within these Claire: A ‘new luxury’ requires a different kind of unique initiatives. In addition, it enabled designer in the future. What could a new generation women to develop themselves through of fashion designers look like? knowledge exchange and learning new skills. 150

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José: The most important thing is that we should stop thinking about a ‘star’ designer as a creative genius. Future designers must take a far more holistic approach where they incorporate innovation, cultural changes and an awareness about a better society and a more sustainable future. As a result they become directors of much wider interdisciplinary teams. They will be involved in collaborations with biotechnologists to develop innovative textiles and in the development of new innovative ways of garment making. The designer of the future will be much more involved with processes than only with the final product, and fashion will be more about ideology than about a fashion brand image. José: Do you already see this type of designer in your practice? Who do you think of when you think of the fashion designer of the future? Claire: Bethany Williams is a great example of a designer who wants to bring about change within the industry through a holistic approach, in which she connects social questions with environmental issues. She explores connections in order to find innovative solutions for questions of sustainability. She is associated with various communities with which she collaborates and invests in change. Bethany’s approach to design, business and sustainability defines what fashion might be in the future. Text by Sabine Winters

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FASHION REVOLUTION

Artwork by Heather Knight (2018) United Kingdom Fashion Revolution is a global movement founded by Orsola de Castro (1966) and Carry Somers (1966) that demands greater transparency, and environmental as well as social sustainability in fashion. The goal is to ignite a revolution to radically change the way clothes are sourced, produced and purchased, and to make sure that what is worn has been safely, cleanly and fairly made. Fashion Revolution strives to be action-oriented and solution focused. Rather than making people feel guilty, they help them recognise that they have the power to do something to make a positive change.

Watch #whomademyclothes here Watch #lovedclotheslast here

On 24 April 2013, the Rana Plaza factory complex in Bangladesh collapsed and killed 1,134 people. Fashion Revolution Week’s #whomademyclothes campaign takes place every April to encourage consumers to ask brands ‘who made my clothes?’ and demand a more transparent supply chain.

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ELISA VAN JOOLEN

PORTAL (2016 - present) The Netherlands With PORTAL, researcher and artist Elisa van Joolen (1983) investigates the emotional, social and economic value of clothing worn by visitors to State of Fashion 2018 in a room-filling installation. During the first two days of the exhibition (1-2 June 2018), visitors were asked to take off a garment, make on outline of it and answer a number of questions regarding the production, ownership, value and materiality of their clothes. “In this time of scarcity of raw materials and labour issues in the clothing industry it is untenable that so much material is wasted,” states Van Joolen. “I therefore see the need to develop innovative concepts of reuse and awareness in fashion. The goal of PORTAL is to unravel the layers of value production and meaning in fashion. I do not make new clothes, I map existing clothing, together with the visitor the consumer. I believe that consumer awareness, how consumers connect to and engage with their clothing (or other products) and what values they ascribe to it, should be central in striving towards a fairer, more resilient fashion system.” 158

PORTAL was selected from the State of Fashion 2018 Open Call. PORTAL 002 zine is available now 100 unique zines 15 euro each

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Fig.9A How much did it cost?

Fig.11A How do you take care of it?

I don't know 11% 0 - 75 50% 76 - 150 13% 151+ 12% gift 2% nothing 10% N/A 2%

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I don't take care 38% I don't know 3% don't wash it 6% dry clean 3% washing machine 31% wash by hand 6% polishing 7% N/A 2% other 4%

Fig.12A How often do you wear it?

once 2% daily 22% weekly 47% monthly 23% yearly 5% N/A 1%

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Cross-disciplinary collaboration and research, merging technical science and fashion, are prerequisites for creating a more sustainable future. Material experiments can lead to new opportunities, shapes and functions for fashion, challenging the status quo. New materials made from algae, fruit residue, and other celluloses, may still seem as something futuristic to us, but the contributing designers show how new scientific technologies are already leading to new design applications. They also make us question the skills the designer of the future might need. Do we need to re-think our fashion education system? Will the next ‘star-designer’ be a couturier, a scientist or a smart hybrid?

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ECOALF

ECOALF Jacket made from discarded fishnets (2017) Shoe from the OCEAN WASTE collection (2018) Spain “Ecoalf arose in 2009 from my frustration with the excessive use of the world’s natural resources and the amount of waste produced by industrialised countries,” says Ecoalf founder Javier Goyeneche (1970). Ecoalf is a sustainable fashion and lifestyle brand that uses breakthrough technology to create clothing and accessories made entirely from recycled materials, with the same quality, design and technical properties as the best non-recycled products. Ecoalf shows that natural resources can be used responsibly and fashion does not have to destroy the world. This shoe, for instance, is made from recycled plastic bottles found on the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea. The composition of the outsole is made from algae.

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Did you know... ...there are five enormous trash patches in the oceans? In some areas there is a ratio of six kilogram of plastic for each kilograms of plankton. Ecoalf is committed to cleaning up the ocean, and has recycled 70 million plastic bottles and more than 80 ton of fishing nets thus far. Watch ‘Upcycling the Oceans’ Video here

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KRISTINA WALSH

Footwear Beyond the Foot: Extensions of Being (2017) United Kingdom Footwear Beyond the Foot: Extensions of Being redefines the parameters of footwear. It encompasses designs that attach to a lower limb – regardless of that limb’s characteristics – and explores what kind of effect such designs have on psychological well-being. The collection, which includes products for amputated lower-limbs and the non-amputated foot, aims to create both new images of the human body and more empathetic relationships with it.

Did you know... ...this collection was designed with research and methods utilised in cognitive behavioural therapy? The products were sculpted by hand before the implementation of appropriate industrial and digital manufacturing processes. Footwear Beyond the Foot: Extensions of Being was selected from the State of Fashion 2018 Open Call.

Research into practices of the prosthetics industry, and into experiences some amputees face after amputation, led to a focus on designs that encourage interactions relating to clinical research findings, interview responses, or medical techniques. The project advances our well-being by promoting emotional intelligence and showcases the potential for design to support a person beyond their physicality.

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ORANGE FIBER

Winner H&M Global Change Award 2016 Collection in collaboration with Salvatore Ferragamo (2017) Italy Orange Fiber is an Italian company founded in 2014 by Adriana Santanocito (1977) and Enrica Arena (1985). It manufactures sustainable fabrics out of citrus juice by-products. Together with Politecnico di Milano, Orange Fiber developed an innovative process that allows them to turn more than 700,000 tonnes of by-products into high quality fabrics. This amount of by-products, produced by the citrus processing industry every year in Italy, would otherwise end up as trash, creating not only processing-related financial costs, but also a significant waste footprint. Santanocito and Arena submitted their proposal to the H&M Global Change Award in 2016, and their submission received a grant of €150,000. This recognition enabled them to further develop Orange Fiber. As a result, they launched the very first fashion collection made with the Orange Fiber fabric together with Italian luxury fashion brand Salvatore Ferragamo in 2017.

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Did you know... ...the rise of fast fashion means a huge increase in raw material consumption? As such, 70 million trees are logged every year and turned into the most used fabrics in fashion, such as rayon, viscose and modal. Orange Fiber proves that using a by-product of the food industry can provide solutions. Watch ‘A Global Change Award Winner: Orange Fiber’ here

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MAKE-WASTE COTTON NEW

Winner H&M Global Change Award 2016 Finland With the decreasing demand for paper, the wood industry started investigating new applications for the use of wood pulp. In 2009, Aalto University in Helsinki initiated a major research project into this subject. The challenge was to develop a solvent, free from toxic chemicals, which could dissolve fragile cellulose from the pulp without damaging it. While developing the process, Professor Herbert Sixta and his team of around 20 researchers discovered that there was no need to use wood pulp. Instead, they could use waste materials such as paper and source the cellulose. And since cotton is 100% cellulose, why not recycle it too? The project received a €300,000 H&M Global Change Award in 2016. Since then, the technology used to recycle waste cotton and spin entirely new textile fibres has progressed faster than the team could have anticipated. The research team believes this technology can revolutionise current recycling gaps.

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Did you know... ...research suggests that almost 95% of the clothes thrown out with domestic waste could be re-worn, reused or recycled, depending on the state of the textile? Watch ‘a Global Change Award Winner: Make Waste-Cotton New’ here

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ALGAEFABRICS

Winner H&M Global Change Award 2016 The Netherlands Dutch product designer Tjeerd Veenhoven (1976) has invented a technology that uses algae to make vegan leather. Algae cell walls contain 70% cellulose, while eucalyptus, commonly used to make textiles, contains only 25%. The technology developed by Veenhoven extracts cellulose from the cell walls and immerses it in a liquid that enables the fibres to stick together in straight lines. Another advantage of algae is that it requires no land for cultivation, and obviously does not need to be watered with fresh water.

Did you know... ...algae appear to be one of the most promising long-term and sustainable sources of biomass and oils for fuel, food, animal feed, and other products? With the ability to double their numbers every few hours, algae provide the foundation for aquatic food chains, and generate about 70% of the air we breathe. Watch ‘a Global Change Award Winner: AlgaeFabrics’ here

Since winning the €150,000 H&M Global Change Award, Veenhoven and his team, together with their partners in the Netherlands and Germany, have further developed the technique and created various products.

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FUNGI FASHION BY MYCOTEX / NEFFA

Winner H&M Global Change Award 2018 The Netherlands “There is an entire generation of people who now expect to own a garment for a year, or maybe two, before disposing it and buying something new. With the right type of (cradle-to-cradle) materials we can meet that life cycle,” says Fungi Fashion founder Aniela Hoitink (1974). Hoitink went to the root of this challenge and found an unexpected resource in mycelium – mushroom roots. Combining it with 3D technology, she found a way to produce customised clothing from this natural fibre. Once worn out, the garments can be simply buried in the ground to decompose.

Did you know... ...mycelium has a number of benefits, such as breaking down and recycling carbon, nitrogen and biological matter? Its ability to safely break down certain matter and chemicals could transform dead materials into rich soil and clean up toxic waste spills without the dangerous effects of cleaning agents. Watch ‘a Global Change Award Winner: Fungi Fashion’ here

By winning a €150,000 H&M Global Change Award, Hoitink was able to take the technology to the next level, by speeding up the research process to improve the material, and setting up a small lab at the MycoTEX by NEFFA studio.

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CANEPA

Scarves made with SAVEtheWATER® Kitotex® (2017) Italy Canepa was established as a silk manufacturer in 1966 and has been creating textile styles for over fifty years. Committed to a more environmentally sustainable textile industry, Canepa has created the SAVEtheWATER® Kitotex® project in partnership with CNR-Ismac of Biella. The ambition is to drastically reduce not only toxic substances but also water consumption in the manufacturing processes of weaving yarn. Kitotex® is derived from chitin, a naturally occurring polymer found in the exoskeleton of shrimp, a waste product of the food industry. The SAVEtheWATER® Kitotex® process is also used in the silk production, where significant water, energy and CO2 savings are achieved, in addition to drastic reductions of polluting substances.

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Did you know... ...Canepa was the first textiles business worldwide to endorse the Greenpeace Detox campaign by making a public commitment to a cleaner fashion industry through replacing machinery and eliminating harmful substances used in conventional textile processes? Watch the SAVEtheWATER® Concept here

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LISELORE FROWIJN & PIÑATEX BY ANANAS ANAM

Autumn/Winter 2018 The Netherlands / Portugal The Autumn/Winter 2018 collection of ArtEZ alumna Liselore Frowijn (1991) is inspired by Marie-Laure de Noailles, an important patron of the arts in the 20th century for a number of great artists, such as Dali, Picasso, Cocteau and Man Ray. Her approach to the design practice is strongly related to today’s sharing economy, and is relevant for a new generation of young artists who apply art as a social tool, to connect people in a more sustainable way, and to create a fresh perspective on our future. Since 2017 Frowijn has been working with Piñatex®. The leather-like fabric is made from the leaves of the pineapple plant, a by-product of the fruit industry, which is traditionally discarded or burned. Sixteen pineapple plants or 480 pineapple leaves account for 1 square metre of Piñatex®.

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Did you know... ...the tanning process to convert animal skin into leather is a very complicated one? It involves approximately 250 chemicals, which are harmful to both humans and the environment, to halt the decomposition of the leather. Piñatex® tackles these issues as a sustainably sourced textile, made out of a natural waste product. It requires low water use, generates minimal production waste and contains no harmful chemicals or animal products.

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PAULINE VAN DONGEN Six projects: Solar dress, Solar shirt, Solar Windbreaker, Phototrobe, Issho and Radius The Netherlands Pauline van Dongen (1986) is a Dutch fashion designer specialising in wearable technology. As a creator intrigued by the notion of interactivity in fashion, she researches the human body in relation to its surroundings. She is fascinated by concepts of change, movement, energy and perception, as she believes the future of fashion lies in its premise to be dynamic and changing. To her, technology is not merely a tool, but an important part of the aesthetics of fashion. Solar Dress (2013) The Solar Dress is the first design by Pauline van Dongen in the ongoing research project Wearable Solar, which aims to create garments that can harness the sun’s energy. The project started from the notion of connectivity and the fact that we have come to rely heavily on smartphones and other small devices. Moreover, in the context of designing wearables, the project’s incentive was to create a personal, sustainable energy source that could be worn comfortably on the body. The transformable silhouette is one of the main characteristics of the dress. The side panels contain vertical arrays of solar cells and can be folded towards the body, turning it into an elegant shift dress. A smartphone can be connected using the cable in one of side pockets. In bright sunlight it will be fully charged in roughly two hours. The project was developed in collaboration with Christiaan Holland and Gert Jan Jongerden. Solar Shirt (2015) The Solar Shirt is the second item in the Wearable Solar collection. The shirt combines thin film solar cells with printed, flexible electronics developed in collaboration with Holst Centre. The shirt is designed to become an accessible piece of everyday wear, which can charge a smartphone or any other USB-compatible, portable device. Under bright sunlight, the shirt produces around 1W of electricity – enough to charge a smartphone in a few hours. The electricity can be stored for later use in the shirt’s battery pack, which is invisibly located in the front pocket. 186

“When I wore the shirt for the first time in Austin (Texas, USA), I observed how the shirt made me more aware of my surroundings. I started walking on the sunny sides of the street to generate more energy with the solar cells embedded in the textile. I find it interesting to experience how wearing the shirt could change my perception of my surroundings or, for example, how it would invite me to walk outside more often,” Van Dongen states. Solar Windbreaker (2016) During low tide, the surroundings of the Wadden Sea Islands transform into a vast open landscape of tidal flats that can be explored on foot. Tour guides from the Wadden Sea Society introduce hikers to this beautiful area during different types of expeditions. To improve the experience of these expeditions, the Wadden Sea Society commissioned a wind- and waterproof garment that could equip the tour guides with solar energy. For this assignment, Pauline van Dongen joined forces with sustainable clothing brand Blue LOOP Originals. Together, they designed a garment that could provide the tour guides with solar energy and shelter them from wind and water. Developed with the lowest possible environmental impact, the graphite-coloured fabric of the windbreaker jacket is made of upcycled denim yarns by Blue LOOP Originals, combined with recycled polyester. Designed for high-functionality, the jacket integrates five pockets, is waterproof and has a hood, which can be stored behind a zipper in the collar. Did you know... …the dress integrates 72 thin films and flexible solar cells that are interconnected on the inside by using electrical wire? The solar shirt holds even more, with 120 solar cells integrated in groups of 12. The windbreaker allows the user to wirelessly charge any kind of portable device, from a smartphone (about two hours charging time), a camera and GPS navigation device to a power bank, which is placed directly in the lining of the jacket.

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#NOWASTE #REUSE Phototrope running shirt (2015) Phototrope is an illuminated running shirt designed to enhance a runner’s ability to respond to changing light conditions. The design process started from the notion that light could not only improve safety but also contribute to a new form of aesthetic expression. It allows the wearer to remain visible and feel safe during a nighttime run, and also enables new playful interactions with other runners. Phototrope incorporates LED ribbons that are hidden behind soft and flexible TPU foils. Through their prismatic structure, they refract the LED light in a vibrant and subtly multicoloured way. Through an integrated microcontroller, the shirt can communicate with an app on a smartphone. Via the app, a trainer can control the light behaviour (like light intensity and frequency) in the shirts of the runners in his or her team. The trainer can communicate with the runners from a distance, for example, to set a running pace using the blinking frequency or assign the role of the pacer.

Did you know... ...that through bodily sensations - such as gentle stroking on the upper back - this jacket encourages the wearer to be present in the moment.

Did you know... ...the research revealed that the light impacts not only the runner’s physical performance, but it also supports them on a psychological level by enabling them to get into a flow?

For this backpack, specialty yarns, such as expansion yarns, are combined with strong shrinking techniques. This creates a variety of densities that give the backpack structure and form, texture and padding. The strap that runs across the front of the backpack appears to blend in with the knit of the top lid. But a closer look reveals how the light breaks on a beaded surface.

Developed in collaboration with Philips Research, Marina Toeters / by-wire.net, Fred van Mook, the Lichtlopers, Aartsen Elektronica Issho jacket (2017) The project started with the newfound possibility of weaving conductive yarns into denim fabric to obtain a level of intelligence that could add value to daily life. In our increasingly accelerating world, our minds are often focused on future events. Every now and then Issho reminds the wearer to be in the present moment. Golden conductive yarns incorporated in the weft of the fabric create touch-sensitive zones. The intelligent denim jacket records social interactions - from physical encounters and activity on smartphones - and is also able to give feedback to the wearer using small vibration motors.

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Developed in collaboration with Italdenim and with the kind support of the Creative Industries Fund. Special thanks to Isabel Berentzen. Radius backpack (2017) Radius is a circular knitted travel backpack created in collaboration with Studio Eva X Carola and Santoni Innovation Center (Shanghai, China). Circular knitting allows for an all-in-one approach, meaning that a product can be constructed on the machine without the need for conventional assembly and finishing, while also reducing the amount of waste. Moreover, the material can be engineered stitch by stitch, enabling a unique combination of material qualities such as texture, volume, stiffness and density.

Did you know... ...the material holds secret powers? Each bead is a tiny spherical solar cell that is woven into the fabric, creating a unique energy-harvesting textile. The strap opens with a magnetic closure, revealing a hidden pocket in the top lid to access the charging cable connected to the solar strap. Watch the video’s per project here

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FUTURE FOOTWEAR FOUNDATION

Natural feet are back in fashion (2015 – present) Led by Catherine Willems KASK, School of Arts, Gent Belgium Belgium Landfill sites are choking with the remains of millions of shoes made of non-bio-degradable materials, and (in)tangible cultural heritage is either disappearing or being commoditised by market forces.The Future Footwear Foundation, led by Catherine Willems, develops alternative footwear that is sustainable for the environment and the body.Shoes usually do not reflect the natural shape of your foot. Our five toes do not converge to a point in front as one would expect from the shape of many shoes. They rather spread out fan-like, with the big toe standing out. The interactive presentation will show you your own gait process and link it to how your natural foot would actually look like if you had never worn footwear.

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Did you know... ...3D-printing inspired by indigenous handcrafted footwear can offer an alternative? The two have a lot in common: its use of materials and time, as well as its focus on the individual. After scanning a person’s feet, a ‘made-to-measure’ shoe is printed in specific 3D-printed material. The link with the indigenous counterpart, made of vegetable-tanned buffalo hide, is clear both in aesthetics and in biomechanical properties. The indigenous-inspired 3D prints show how individual needs and sustainable production come closer together through new technology. The project is a collaboration between Future Footwear Foundation KASK, School of Arts Gent, Materialise, RSPrint and Vivobarefoot.

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ECCO LEATHER

Apparition Jacket by Sruli Recht (2017) The Netherlands / Iceland A small team of innovators within Dutch leather manufacturer ECCO Leather studied old Egyptian and Greek tanning techniques for three years. By combining these techniques with modern industrial applications, they developed Apparition, the first soft, transparent and waterproof cow skin leather with lasting pliability. ECCO Leather worked together with Icelandic fashion designer Sruli Recht (1979) to create this collection of almost ghost-like jackets.

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Did you know... ...tanneries use approximately 40 to 45 litres of water per kilogram of raw hide-skin for processing finished leathers? Using ancient natural tanning techniques is therefore of great interest in the pursuit of a cleaner and less water-consuming leather industry.

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TEIJIN

SOLOTEX® garment (2018) Japan Teijin is a technology-driven global group, with a subsidiary in Arnhem, offering advanced chemical and textile solutions in the areas of environmental value, safety, security and disaster mitigation, with a view to demographic change and increasing health consciousness. Its main fields of operation in Europe are high-performance fibres. One of Teijin’s innovations is SOLOTEX®, a polyester fibre that is super soft, provides form and stability, and maintains its shape at all times, even after repeated machine washings. SOLOTEX® is environmentally friendly as biomass-derived and plant-based ingredients are used for 37% of the polymers. The fabric thus reduces consumption of fossil fuels, and helps cut down greenhouse gas emissions.

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Did you know... ...SOLOTEX® feels even softer than luxury cashmere wool? Mongolia is the world’s second biggest producer of cashmere (after China) and produced approximately 7,000 tonnes of the fabric in 2015 alone. Due to the grazing of large herds of goats, 90% of the country is in danger of desertification. Watch SOLOTEX® by Teijin here

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VIN + OMI

Sustainable Eco Latex (2009-present) United Kingdom In 2009, VIN + OMI invested in a latex plantation in Malaysia to ensure that the caretaker village was cared for and financially compensated for its work. The trees are ‘milked’ to extract the rubber and are not destroyed. The natural latex sheeting produced has other natural ingredients added to it, to produce a more elastic, yet breathable, biodegradable latex.

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Did you know… … VIN + OMI have developed unique eco textiles and processes since 2004? The designers ensure that each process is circular and is based on science, social and environmental awareness, and problem solving.

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WASTE2WEAR

Waste2Wear® fabrics China / The Netherlands Waste2Wear was founded by Monique Maissan in Shanghai, China. Since 2006, the brand has been focusing on recycling 100% post-consumer plastic bottles into eco-friendly fabrics. The process involves turning environmentally damaging waste into useable, sustainable yarns. The recycled yarns are then combined with natural fibres to be woven or knitted into eco-friendly fabrics, suitable for garments, home textiles and accessories.

Step 3: The clean flakes are transformed into small pellets of pure recycled plastic that are virtually indistinguishable from ‘virgin’ PET. Step 4: The pellets are extruded into yarn, which can be made into just about any colour. Step 5: The 100% recycled polyester yarn can be used on its own or blended with other eco-friendly yarns to produce Waste2Wear® fabrics.

The process: Step 1: The plastic bottles are stripped of caps and labels and then thoroughly cleaned to remove any residue or contaminants. Step 2: The bottles are processed into flakes and washed again to ensure there is nothing left but 100% PET.

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Did you know... ...every single piece of plastic which has ever been produced is still here on our planet? Waste2Wear used 23 bottles to produce this dress. Six bottles were used for one meter of the satin fabric and eight bottles for the imitation suede.

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LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION (UAL) AND H&M Designing for Sustainability (2017) United Kingdom Thirty three teams of students from LCF’s BA (Hons) Fashion Design & Technology: Womenswear and BA (Hons) Fashion Jewellery were challenged to design a womenswear collection, using garments and materials provided through H&M’s in-store garment collection scheme. Royal Mail Participants: Suwayda Abdi, Nana Nielsen, Aphinop Chanthree and Enol García. Reflecting upon clothing rationing during the Second World War in Britain, this collection explores circular design in relation to resource scarcity. Utilising recycled materials and discarded Royal Mail bags, each garment has been purposively designed to be worn in various ways and with particular elements that detach and attach to different garments across the collection. Did you know... ...each garment contains a ‘clothing book’ label? This label shows the number of hours it cost to make the piece, and offers a record of each person who has participated in its making or wearing over time, tracking the unique journey of the garment’s life. Cut-Pleat Participants: Roxanne Johns, Amy Gray, Nora Kim and Darrin Zhang. This collection has been created through the development of a new zero waste pattern making and construction technique: cut-pleating. Acting as an alternative to creating traditional seams or darts, this technique provides an innovative design aesthetic by cutting and weaving together any two edges of fabric. Did you know... ...with the ability to cut and weave a range of geometrical shapes or even insert additional fabric to join and shape pattern pieces, this zero waste technique allows us to utilise small and typically unusable scraps of recycled material? Supported by London College of Fashion (UAL) and Centre for Sustainable Fashion. 202

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BAREFOOT HERO: A BIOMECHANICS WORKSHOP ON GAIT, GROUND SURFACES AND FOOTWEAR

Students project (2018) United Kingdom / Belgium During a two-day workshop at Liverpool University, students from Fashion KASK, Gent and MA Footwear London College of Fashion explored the relationship between gait and surface. After learning about the biomechanics of feet and footwear at the Gait Lab in Liverpool, the students translated their knowledge into the design of a floor tile of choice with a corresponding outer sole. They explored here is the relationship between form and function in a conceptual way. From a biomechanical point of view, good proprioception is needed as input for the body to adjust to different positions and surfaces, and to control balance and stability.

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The results include tiles: —That massage the feet. —That show a hot stone foot artefact. —That produce sounds. —That invite the user to leave traces. —That evoke urban play. —As a tool to stretch arches inspired by dancers. —As mats of waste material with a cleaning device. The project is a collaboration between Fashion Department KASK, School of Arts, Gent (Catherine Willems), MA Footwear London College of Fashion (Eelko Moorer), and the University of Liverpool (Kristiaan D’Août, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences).

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FUTURE MAKERS The Future of Living Materials Sandals made from a leather-like material, grown from the reishi mushroom species. Colourful silk textiles with microorganisms growing, producing pigment and dyeing the fabric. Mycelium, growing on a mould, to create structures for non-woven bio-textiles. These are just a couple of examples of the LAB-projects as part of the larger interdisciplinary project ‘The Future of Living Materials’ by the ArtEZ Centre of Expertise Future Makers and Wageningen University & Research (WUR), presented at State of Fashion 2018 | searching for the new luxury.

WUR holds great relevance to the research and development of the innovative work of fashion and product designers, and vice versa: the creative, artistic, human-centered, aesthetic focus of fashion and product designers in line with the Zeitgeist is of great importance to the new materials, lab experiments and technological innovations developed by scientists. This artistic and design-driven approach will help to increase the societal relevance and impact of scientific knowledge and experiments.

The synergy between art, design and science has informed the five subprojects of ‘The Future of Living Materials’. 2 The subproject ‘Living Colours’, for example, focuses on the possibilities to create This project brings together scientific research, a new colour palette and a new visual aesthetics lab-experiments, and research-through-design through biodesign and upcycling colors, contribto explore how to optimize the qualities of these uting to a form of ‘aesthetic sustainability’ 3 . This new kinds of bio-based materials for sustainable subproject investigates two different approaches textile, fashion and design applications. It investo colour. Textile designers Laura Luchtman and tigates how these materials – and their biological Ilfa Siebenhaar focus on colour produced by ecosystems – could potentially serve as alternatives microorganisms, specifically the janthino bacterium for the unsustainable materials and production lividum, to bio-dye textiles. The research conducted processes of the current fashion industry, by scientists from WUR explored the optimal aiming to contribute to a more resilient future. conditions to grow these bacteria as well as how Scientists and master students from WUR, to upscale the pigment produced. In order to such as bioprocess engineers, plant biotechnolodevelop a more circular life for colour, fashion degists and microbiologists, joined forces with signer Aliki van der Kruijs reuses residual ink from product and fashion designers, such as Tjeerd digital printing techniques – a form of upcycling Veenhoven, Aniela Hoitink, and Emma van der ink. In this case, scientists from WUR aimed to Leest, to create ‘innovation inspired by nature’ 1 . explore how to treat waste dyes from the textile industry with microbes to develop new products The project ‘The Future of Living Materials’ starts or to degrade them safely. from the observation that more and more designers are actively experimenting with bio-based ‘The Future of Living Materials’ does not only exmaterials. Yet, these designers often do not have plore the material qualities and technical challenges the scientific knowledge – regarding these materiof bio-based resources and their environmental als, waste streams, life cycles, and their potential impact, but also investigates how these new kinds environmental impact – that is required to develop of materials affect design processes. For example, sustainable designs. In order to transition to a more how to design for the material’s next life after its regenerative society, it is important to reengage usage? And to what extent is this question relevant with the material resources of the earth while deep- when using biodegradable materials that can simply ly exploring ecosystems from nature. This will flow back into nature? Designer Aniela Hoitink’s help to fundamentally understand the interdepend- work, for instance, is based on the idea of designing ency of living systems, living organisms, and living ‘fast fashion’ made from biodegradable materials, matter – also in a broader societal context. which could return to their natural biological An in-depth understanding of biological life cycle when the wearer desires to buy a new ecosystems is essential in relation to the principles fashion object. of a circular fashion system, and moreover a circular society. The knowledge of scientists from 206

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Could this be a potential solution for the current ‘throw-away’ culture caused by fashion’s cultivated desire for the ‘new’, which has had a great impact on consumer behaviour? As part of this design-driven approach, this project takes into account the relationship between these living materials and the ‘living matter’ of the physical body of the user or wearer. The subproject ‘Living Skin’ focuses on skin-like materials, and on the interaction between the matter of bio-based materials and the bodily matter of the user or wearer. Clothing is often seen as a second skin, as a means to visually express one’s identity. The personalization of textiles and clothing is essential, since having a unique identity is highly valued in the field of fashion and in contemporary culture. For instance, as designer Karin Vlug explores, how could materials such as mycelium be shaped around – or even grow on? – the physical form, and how does this affect the silhouette and the fit? And what are the implications of these kinds of new materials for processes of personalization and customization in fashion? And with regard to the physical body of the wearer, to what extent is bio-dyeing textiles – letting bacteria grow and produce colour directly on the fabric – healthy for the physical skin? This research project also is a ‘living process’. New insights and questions continuously arise and inform the further development of the project. While the preliminary results of ‘The Future of Living Materials’ are presented at the exhibition State of Fashion 2018, the involved designers and scientists continue their collaboration and will present the next steps at the exhibition at Wageningen University & Research (September-October 2018) to celebrate their centennial, and at Dutch Design Week (October 2018). ArtEZ University of the Arts and Wageningen University & Research intend to develop this project into a larger multi-year research to further explore the future of living materials for a more resilient future and circular society.

1 Benyus, Janine (2009 [1997]) Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature, New York: HarperCollins. 2 The five subprojects are: ‘Living Waste’, ‘Living Colours’, ‘Living Leather’, ‘Living Skin’ and ‘Living Systems’. 3 Harper, Kristine (2017) Aesthetic Sustainability: Product Design and Sustainable Usage, New York/London: Routledge. Watch ‘The Future of Living Materials: Living Colors’ here Watch additional video’s of the subjects here Find more information about the WUR Circular Fashion Lab here

Text by Daniëlle Bruggeman Fashion Professorship | Centre of Expertise Future Makers ArtEZ University of the Arts

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ArtEZ Fashion Professorship The Fashion Professorship aims to rethink the cracks in the fashion system and the role that fashion plays – and could potentially play – in relation to urgent social, cultural, environmental and political developments in contemporary society. Through research, design and critical thinking, we envision an alternative and more engaged future of fashion in which we do more justice to fashion’s human dimension. ‘The Future of Living Materials’ is in line with one of the main research themes of the professorship: towards a new materialism of fashion. The Fashion Professorship aims to create a renewed sense of engagement with fashion’s materials and materialities, moving towards fashion as a new materialist aesthetics. Within this main theme, the research focuses on fashion as a second skin – its relation to physical bodies and the senses – and highlights the material agency of fashion objects, underlining the importance of ‘living materials’ for a more resilient future.

Future Makers team: Jeroen van den Eijnde, Daniëlle Bruggeman, Lucie Huiskens, Jorn Konijn, Anne Hendriks The Future of Living Materials – designers / material developers: Luc Aarts, Lilian van Daal, Aniela Hoitink, Iris Houthoff, Nienke Hoogvliet, Aliki van der Kruijs, Emma van der Leest, Laura Luchtman, Ilfa Siebenhaar, Karin Vlug Coordination and coaching research Wageningen University & Research: Saskia Leenders-Pellis, Ilse Markesteijn, Kim Poldner, Femma Roschar, Nynke Groendijk-Wilders Scientific support research Wageningen University & Research: Johan Baars, Harry Bitter, Ben van den Broek, Maurice Franssen, Iris Houthoff, Willemien Lommen, Marleen Kamperman, Saskia van Muijsenberg, Albert van der Padt, Theo Vogelzang

(modelectoraat.artez.nl) ArtEZ Centre of Expertise Future Makers Future Makers initiates and realizes research and innovation projects that contribute to resilient, sustainable futures and equitable, inclusive and diverse societies. Future Makers cooperates with research institutes, societal organizations and the industry in the fields of textile, fashion and (interior) design. Future Makers connects creative thinkers and practitioners to scientific and practice-based research, and collaborates with Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences (HvA), Saxion University of Applied Sciences, Technical University Eindhoven, and Wageningen University & Research.

Master students research Wageningen University & Research: Fatma Al-Manji, Mirco Bonato, Jeffrey van den Born, Ben Bultrini, Michael Cahalane, Hylke Custers, Joris Galama, David Jeucken, Nuri Kim, Matthijs Mees, Tess van der Meijs, Sabine Meulhof, Eduard Molinero Garcia, Roel Musch, Alejandro Therese Navarro, Gwen Nowee, Margriet Oldenburg, Nina Oud, Daphne van Pelt, John Sluimer, Ruben Tenorio Berrio, Laura Terzi, Riski Gusri Utami, Boyang Yu, Yuan Yuan, Wandi Zhang Financial support: BankgiroLoterij Fonds www.bankgiroloterijfonds.nl

(futuremakers.artez.nl)

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OUT OF THE SHADOWS Museum Arnhem and ArtEZ Product Design Museum Arnhem and the Product Design Arnhem department of ArtEZ University of the Arts joined forces for State of Fashion 2018 | searching for the new luxury. In the presentation Out of the Shadows they showed the results of a joint research project in which selected students researched new meanings for a selection of jewellery from the collection of Museum Arnhem. For Product Design Arnhem, the design of objects goes beyond the construction of materials into form and function. The designer conveys an attitude to the material, and initiates meaning as well as a new perspective. The jewellery pieces from the collection of MuseumArnhem are important witnesses of a certain zeitgeist and have hidden intentions and memoirs. In Out of the Shadows, the students speculate about value, identity, voice and meaning, starting from the theme searching for the new luxury, and invite the public to explore the deeper fictional layers of the exhibited designs.

Project development: Anne-Karlijn van Kesteren (Museum Arnhem) Judith van den Boom (ArtEZ) Cathelijne Engelkes (ArtEZ) Participating students: Merel Dassen Kas Hermkens Lara Klingenberg Jueun Seo

Out of the Shadows was a cooperation between two main partners of State of Fashion; Museum Arnhem and ArtEZ University of the Arts. Museum Arnhem is renewing and expanding. Now that the building is temporarily closed due to reconstruction, the museum ventured into the city! Through a variety of collaborations, the museum continues to surprise and inspire her audience. For the occasion of State of Fashion 2018, Museum Arnhem manifested itself in amongst others in De Melkfabriek. For over 40 years, Product Design has been educating new generations of designers who explore the dynamic and ever-changing nature of design. The course stems from their passion for the rapidly evolving field of design. The world is always changing, and within this field they are interested in contributing towards new approaches and opening new domains.

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Ruudt Peters Collar (1983) Plaster, metal Collection Museum Arnhem The plaster collars by Ruudt Peters (1950) seem unwearable due to the rigid material and the size. Yet the shape of the body can be seen in them. In the early eighties, the relationship between the body and jewellery became a topic of interest within jewellery design. During the official presentation of the series, the collars were worn by young men, referring to classic marble sculptures of young adonises, according to Peters. This started a discussion about the disappearance of the body when the piece of jewellery is considered an independent art form. Naturally, a piece of jewellery enters into a relationship with the body of its carrier, a relationship that disappears in a museum presentation.

Painted Three necklaces from the Painted Series (2010) Yarn Collection Museum Arnhem The fashion collective Painted, formed by Saskia van Drimmelen and Margreet Sweerts, has been working on the Painted Series since 2007. For this series, they work together with masters in unique manual techniques, such as needle lace and cord embroidery from Bulgaria and bead techniques from the Native American Assiniboine tradition. The starting point for their projects consists of communal working methods and care for materials. In this way, different signatures unite into a single object. As a result, Painted Series brings almost forgotten techniques back to life in a constantly evolving collection of clothing and jewellery. The collections are not dependent on fashion seasons and each piece is part of an ever-growing series.

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Gijs Bakker Torn goldleaf (1986) Gold leaf, PVC Collection Museum Arnhem As one of the pioneers within the discipline of jewellery design, the design practice of Gijs Bakker (1942) has had a strong focus on the concept and the artistic meaning of jewellery since the sixties. For Bakker, the choice of materials is a derivative of the concept and the form. The collapsed and fragile gold leaf in this necklace is laminated and brought to a standstill in a circular shape. The apparent value of gold, which has been reduced to a wafer-thin sheet, enters into a relationship with the mundane plastic. The use of a cheap material is at odds with the classic approach to jewellery, in which precious metals play an important role.

Noon Passama Portrait #11 (2013) Ostrich leather, sheepskin, leather, platinum Collection Museum Arnhem This brooch by Noon Passama (1983) is a representation of a personality or character. The ‘face’ is kept abstract, leaving room for interpretation and imagination. The associations with the shape, attitude and size of the face suggest an individual identity and emotion within each piece. The use of leather and fur also adds a unique and tactile dimension to the work. The natural properties of the material, such as the growth directions, the crests and the unexpected patterns in the fur, are kept visible and determine the final shape, which consist of 25 separate pieces that have been sewn together by hand.

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Arianne van der Gaag Candy necklace (2004) Candy, yarn Collection Museum Arnhem The work of Arianne van der Gaag (1968) centres around the intrinsic value of the object. It is about passion, about inspiration. In an almost meditative way she transforms various materials into wearable forms. In her work she plays with concepts such as growth and decay. This decay is clearly visible in the candy necklace. The necklace has been changed in appearance by the ravages of time. Fungi have affected the sweets. However, this candy necklace still retains its beauty. Still, the necklace raises questions about when an object has lost its value, and how the wearer relates to a perishable ornament.

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For the first edition of State of Fashion, curator JosĂŠ Teunissen started a quest for a sustainable future for the fashion industry. 27,500 visitors from the Netherlands and abroad participated in this search, by visiting the exhibition or taking part in one of over 50 events. Watch the aftermovie here.

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EXHIBITION DESIGN BY SPACE & MATTER Space & Matter was commissioned by the Sonsbeek & State of Fashion Foundation to create an overall exhibition design for State of Fashion 2018. The brief: to maintain the existing qualities of the Melkfabriek in Arnhem, and to reflect the core values of State of Fashion. Space & Matter was founded in 2009 by Sascha Glasl, Tjeerd Haccou and Marthijn Pool. Together, they form a proactive architecture agency of spatial thinkers, makers and initiators. Combining on- and offline architecture, they design and develop community-focused environments and processes. They are the creators of numerous innovative projects, which they closely supervise from start to finish. We interviewed partner Sascha Glasl about his take on the exhibition design for State of Fashion:

with suppliers to return their materials after the end of the show. This was one of the reasons why we managed to reuse 90% of all materials used for the exhibition — and that within a relatively short time span.” The Coberco factory “The Coberco is a unique building with diverse distinguishing qualities and a wide variety of available spaces. In this way, we could connect the five different themes to five distinctive spatial identities. First, we carefully examined each room, in order to discern how we could utilise the space. Each room had its own unique atmosphere, the qualities of which were highlighted by a distinct use of materials. By creating five dramatically different environments, each ‘room’ had its own identity and ambience.

“As far as subject matter goes, State of Fashion is right up our alley; it is an innovative project that focuses on sustainability and principles pertaining to circular-economy thinking. With over 50 participants, the exhibition represented a diverse scope of works, disciplines and media. For us, the challenge was to find a spatial articulation for the unique narrative of this exhibition. The five main guiding themes selected by curator José Teunissen, that were to guide the show, and circularity of material use, were leading in determining how we would shape the exhibition.”

The oval space, which is the first space you see upon entering the show, mostly hinges on the construction above it. The structure is slanted upwards, brightly illuminated by high windows reminiscent of a cathedral. The rawness of the abandoned milk factory provided the perfect environment to offer contrast with the innovative projects we wanted to show here. As such, we allotted this space a very simple, almost classic floor plan that focuses the attention to the elongated oval table in the centre. A number of objects dotted the surface of the table. Visitors had the option to Reuse view this installation as a whole, or to concentrate “In line with State of Fashion’s manifesto, circularon a particular object. The materials used for this ity and re-use were key to the design process and space were light and transparent, accentuating construction of the exhibition. Therefore, it was the existing qualities of the factory. In stark imperative that all materials used would have a contrast to this bright oval space stood the Dark predetermined destination upon conclusion of the Gallery. We wanted to emphasise the naturally exhibition. However, to have circularity as a starting shadow-filled character of the space. Using heavy point for an exhibition was challenging because in curtains, we constructed small pockets that created the construction sector reuse isn’t yet common. an intimate atmosphere. Visitors could either Designing State of Fashion functioned for us as a walk through the space, or choose to quite literally laboratory for applying circularity within exhibition disappear into one of these pockets, and be design and the building industry. The various parconsumed by the ambience of the space and the ties with whom we collaborated shared our views works. It offered an entirely different experience with regards to the importance of a circular econo- from the oval space, or the spacious atrium, which my. We received several material donations that we both relied on brightness and stillness, and were re-purposed for the exhibition — from the Rijksmu- designed to be viewed collectively rather than seum, amongst others. We also made agreements experienced individually.” 224

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Experience “The visitor’s experience stood central to our design. We pondered the possibilities to combine lavish glamour with social and ecological activism. Rather than overwhelming the visitor, we tried to convey the baseline message in an attractive manner. We purposefully chose to plan the exhibition in a spacious fashion; that way, the narrative was given the chance to naturally unfold. In each space, the visitor could opt to either stay and spend time with the work, or to simply continue on to the next room.” High-quality exhibition “We saw it as our duty to not only provide a design, but also to form a valuable addition to the community that exists around State of Fashion. Right off the bat, State of Fashion had strong ambitions to produce a high-quality exhibition. Thanks to their professionalism and the shared objectives of all those involved we managed to establish an exhibition that was both exquisite as well as paramount. Literally everyone shared the same goal — it was tremendously special to have been able to contribute to that.” Interview and text by Sabine Winters

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Collectief Soepel, an Arnhem-based collective of six, was hired for the construction of State of Fashion. All working in different disciplines, from (product) design to engineering, the team of Soepel realised the exhibition design by Space & Matter with enormous attention to detail. Watch the aftermovie made by Collectief Soepel here (Dutch only)

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As part of the State of Fashion’s campaign and exhibition, a group of influential speakers from the world of fashion were invited to support the campaign’s cause. They each contributed with a personal video that addresses the importance of change within the fashion industry.

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On 30 May 2018 Control Union, Textile Exchange and State of Fashion organised ‘Towards Circular Fashion’ in Arnhem, the Netherlands. Over 100 fashion industry professionals joined this event to engage with the sector and to explore solutions for closing the loop on fashion’s linear model. The day revolved around recent developments in the fashion and textile industry, fibre and material innovations, circular fashion and Life Cycle Analysis.

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In the morning, Textile Exchange brought its regional meet-up to the city of Arnhem. In the workshop, discussions centred on product design, end-of-use and Cradle to Cradle. In the afternoon Control Union hosted a symposium that continued the exploration towards a sustainable and circular fashion sector, with keynote lectures by Traci Kinden (Circle Economy), Johan Maris (Control Union), Catarina Midby (H&M),

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Adriana Galijasevic (G-Star RAW), and Professor José Teunissen. The symposium was moderated by Tracy Metz. The closing reception included a special performance by fashion collective Maison the FAUX. Find more information and the ‘Towards Circular Fashion’ report here

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FASHION COLLOQUIUM: SEARCHING FOR THE NEW LUXURY An international audience of experts attended the Fashion Colloquium, a conference organised by the ArtEZ University of the Arts in collaboration with the Sonsbeek & State of Fashion Foundation, held just before the opening of State of Fashion 2018, on the 30 th of May and 1 st of June 2018.

Academic partners: London College of Fashion, Wageningen University & Research, and Radboud University Nijmegen

Danielle Bruggeman, Professor of Fashion, ArtEZ University of the Arts

Watch a video registration of day 1 of the Fashion Colloquium (31 May) here

Supported by C&A Foundation The ‘Fashion Colloquium: Searching for the New Luxury’ is supported by the C&A Foundation. The ‘Fashion Colloquium: Searching for the New C&A Foundation is a corporate foundation here Luxury’ explored new definitions of ‘luxury’ against to transform the fashion industry. We give our the backdrop of urgent environmental and social partners financial support, expertise and networks issues. Fashion is in dire need of more value-based so they can make the fashion industry work critical thinking as well as design-driven research to better forevery person it touches. We do this thoroughly explore, disrupt, redefine and transform because we believe that despite the vast and the system. The two-day conference investigated complex challenges we face, we can work together how to move towards a fashion reality that address- to make fashion a force for good. es ethics, inclusivity and responsible consumerism in a more engaged way. Design, imagination and About the Fashion Colloquia aesthetics are essential to express these values The FASHION COLLOQUIA are an initiative of four and to envision a more ethical engagement with institutions (IFM-Paris, Parsons-New York, LCFthe material objects that surround our bodies. London, Domus-Milan) connected by their residence and involvement in the four big ‘fashion weeks’ Click here to watch the keynote lectures by across the globe, and are housed at the London ColOskar Metsavaht (Osklen), Dr. Otto von Busch lege of Fashion, University of the Arts London. (Associate Professor of Integrated Design at Each colloquium offers a mixture of specific themes, the School of Design Strategies, Parsons School which are relevant to each specific location, of Design, NY) and Orsola de Castro (Co-founder and series themes, which will allow different sets of Fashion Revolution) and more. contributions to be added and explored. In 2018, the Fashion Colloquium was organised by ArtEZ Scientific committee: University of the Arts in Arnhem, the Netherlands, José Teunissen, Dean and Professor School of in collaboration with State of Fashion. Design and Technology London College of Fashion (UAL), Senior Research Fellow ArtEZ University of More information: the Arts, and Curator State of Fashion 2018 fashioncolloquium.artez.nl

Kim Poldner, Professor of Entrepreneurship, Wageningen University & Research Anneke Smelik, Professor of Visual Culture, Radboud University Nijmegen Ian King, Professor, London College of Fashion and University of the Arts, London

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OPENING: ADELE VARCOE Onesie World is a large-scale interdisciplinary collaborative performance by artist and designer Adele Varcoe and ArtEZ music, dance and fashion alumni, staff and students. The project brings people together through the act of making and wearing onesies.

During the opening of State of Fashion on 31 May 2018, one hundred onesies were released, especially made for this performance. People danced to music made by a sewing machine orchestra, and sang along to a Onesie World song that spoke about inclusivity and collaboration being the new luxury. Listen to Adele Varcoe in the radioshow ‘Loosefit’ during the Fashion Colloquium 2018 here

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Bring us together Hot hot weather Here we unite In broad daylight For you and me A black onesie Dress similarly Lets see what will be In their onesie they said to me Inclusivity is luxury All for onesie Onesie for all ABCDEFGHIJK What to say? With this U Lets see what we can do Do we have an A, say A Say B Say C Say D Say E Say F Say G

In their onesie they said to me Inclusivity is luxury All for onesie Onesie for all The new luxury Is about connectivity Creating collaboratively As a society Will he and she follow me? Does me and he need to follow she? To change our perception of luxury Do we need to agree as a community? In their onesie they said to me Inclusivity is luxury All for onesie Onesie for all

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Credits: Lead Artist Adele Varcoe Onesie Design Adele Varcoe, Chantal Kirby, Asu Aksu & Julia Kaleta, ArtEZ Master Fashion Strategy Onesie Makers Marijke Broekhuijsen Elisa Kley Natalie de Koning Ieva Uzkurataite Rachel Klok Wolter Pot Meike van Leyveld Marco Blazevic Anne-Marie Leijser John Paul Nathali Nijman Michael de Geus Marijn Brinksma Rosa Kampinga Nathali Nijman Vanessa Duque Lisa Boyle Jason Boyle Dancers Madeline Bullard Julie Kurris Peter Cripps Clark Elise Ostern Sound Andreas Kuhne Luke Deane Film Mats Logen Photography Sifra Kock Facilitated by ArtEZ University of the Arts, Master Fashion Strategy & State of Fashion 2018 Thank you Eltink Sewing Machines, Asu Aksu, Hanka van der Voet, Danielle Bruggeman, Jose Teunissen, Esther MuĂąoz Grootveld, Maria Gil Mendoza, Marjolein de Graaf, Alexander Godschalk OPENING: ADELE VARCOE

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OPENING: APPARATUS 22

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During the opening of State of Fashion 2018 Apparatus 22 - the collective consisting of Erika Olea, Maria Farcas and Dragos Olea - performed ‘Positive Tension (in the air)’ The work raises questions about fashion, each printed on large pieces of colourful confetti, which were shot through air by a large canon.

For State of Fashion 2018 the collective posed new 10 questions:

1. Are there antidotes to the waste epidemic? 2. What truths can you really see through radical transparency? 3. Would inclusivity be a part of the conversation without social media? The work is part of ‘1000 Questions on Fashion’, a 4. Would you wear the “Made in Poverty” label? long-term conversation piece developed by the 5. White male, white board, white vision - how collective. It aims to address 1000 questions to shift diverse can the perspective be? the focus of conversation about fashion from style, 6. Gender studies, ecology, ethics; what else should trends and ‘IT’ items towards issues that ignite a be pushed in the fashion & business curriculum? debate on the lasting impact of this industry on 7. Is the hunger of the digital worlds orchestrating many levels: creativity, authorship and copyright, the “more and more” principle towards ad engagement in public space, economy, labor, infinitum? politics, ecology, technology etc. 8. What if science fiction could radically reshape the ethics of fashion? 9. Artificial Intelligence: curse or blessing? 10. When will the fashion system cater for the disabled?

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WHATABOUTERY Producing sustainable and honest fashion is a challenge: not only should the use of sustainable materials be considered, but also sustainable solutions for obtaining raw materials, for production, sales, logistics, and so on. Every possible solution raises new questions: ‘but what about…?’. How can we come up with solutions for urgent sustainability issues in the fashion industry? Every Friday evening in our event space during State of Fashion 2018, we organised a presentation, debate or talk called the Whataboutery. Each Whataboutery was based on one of the hashtags of State of Fashion’s manifest.

WHATABOUTERY 1: #AGENCY MASTERS OF CHANGE / 01 06 2018 i.c.w. the Prince Claus Fund and the Han Nefkens Foundation. With Rafael Kouto, Matti Liimatainen, Anneke Hymmen & Kumi Hiroi, Button Massala, 11.11, Kristina Walsh and Elisa van Joolen. Kestrel Jenkins of the podcast Conscious Chatter Podcast moderated the debate. WHATABOUTERY 2: #TECH BETWEEN SENSING AND MAKING SENSE / 08 06 2018 i.c.w. Crafting Wearables. With Pauline van Dongen, Lianne Toussaint (PhD student at the Radboud University) and Anneke Smelik (professor Visual Culture, Radboud University). WHATABOUTERY 3: #ESSENTIAL (NO)THING TO WEAR / 15 06 2018 i.c.w. Ontwerp Platform Arnhem. With fashion designers Elsien Gringhuis, Sjaak Hullekes and Karin Vlug. WHATABOUTERY 4: #REUSE 22 06 2018 i.c.w. Wageningen University & Research and ArtEZ University of the Arts. With textile researcher Aniela Hoitink, designer Tjeerd Veenhoven, and Geert Steeghs (Government Services Manager Recycling and Recovery at SUEZ). Dieuwertje de Wagenaar moderated the debate. 246

WHATABOUTERY 5: #AGENCY 29 06 2018 i.c.w. De Volkskrant. With fashion designers Alexander van Slobbe, Francisco van Benthum and Pascale Gatzen, and trend forecaster Lidewij Edelkoort. Fashion journalist Bregje Lampe moderated the debate. WHATABOUTERY 6: #CARE 06 07 2018 i.c.w. Trouw. With Douwe Jan Joustra (Head of Circular Transformation C&A Foundation), Marieke Eyskoot (sustainable fashion and lifestyle-expert), Roosmarie Ruigrok (coordinator Fashion Revolution NL), and Bert van Son (CEO Mud Jeans). Dieuwertje de Wagenaar moderated the debate. WHATABOUTERY 7: #CARE 13 07 2018 With designer Claudy Jongstra, researcher Catherine Willems and designer / researcher Ruby Hoette. José Teunissen moderated the debate. WHATABOUTERY 8: #IMAGINATION 20 07 2018 i.c.w. Transfashional. With fashion researcher Lara Torres, designer Naomi Filmer and art historian / curator Dobrilla Denegri. José Teunissen moderated the debate. 4. RECAP STATE OF FASHION 2018


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EDUCATION

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With the future in the hands of a next generation, it was key to develop a strong educational programme with the aim to include young people in the search for new definitions of luxury. For State of Fashion 2018, a motivated team of guides offered tours every weekend to help a broad audience delve into the world of sustainable fashion. We also teamed up with partners to make sure new young voices were heard.

EDUCATION

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CLOSE TO YOU

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Close to You revolved around ‘slow fashion’. Through workshops led by fashion designer Liselore Frowijn the educational programme explored alternatives to ‘fast fashion’ and created awareness about sustainable solutions for the current challenges in the fashion industry. The photos by Daantje Bons show the results of workshops in the CODA Museum in Apeldoorn, the Heerenstraat Theatre in Wageningen and the Arnhem Open Air Museum.

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CLOSE TO YOU

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EDUCATION

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CLOSE TO YOU

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EDUCATION

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YOUNG & FAIR

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Together with cultural platform Rozet and Young & Fair, a platform that shares knowledge about fair consumption, State of Fashion organised an educational programme for secondary and vocational education. The programme aimed to educate young people about the complexity of fashion production, the disadvantages of fast fashion and the advantages of sustainable consumption.

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ROC DAY

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On 18 June State of Fashion welcomed 75 students from ROC’s (secondary vocational education) Human Technology and Fashion courses. They followed a guided tour through the exhibition and joined a workshop in which they combined discarded materials and technology to make their own smart wearables. The day aimed to increase the students’ awareness about the waste epidemic, the possibilities of upcycling and the power of making.

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REFLAGS In collaboration with Sonsbeek & State of Fashion Foundation, Made in Arnhem, Platform Innercity Arnhem and Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem design studio Vollaerszwart made a statement in the public space of Arnhem. Specialised in city dressing, Vollaerszwart developed a concept to show the wasteful character of fast fashion and the opportunities that circularity offers. Instead of making new promotional banners for the upcoming event, they gathered discarded flags from cultural institutes and companies from the region. Using the old flags, Vollaerszwart made new fabric that coloured the city during the months of June and July. This gift to the city was meant to share the power of circularity with the city’s citizens, as well as to celebrate four local anniversaries: the first edition of State of Fashion, the fifth edition of Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem, the tenth edition of Arnhem’s Fashion Night and the twentieth anniversary of Collection Arnhem.

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REFLAGS

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PHOTO CREDITS All exhibition photography: Eva Broekema (unless stated otherwise) STATE OF FASHION: OPEN CALL Filmstills of Shani Himanshu and Matti Liimatainen during Whataboutery 1: #AGENCY Video’s by Halfvol (p. 23) CONNECTING PEOPLE Filmstill Han Nefkens from Whataboutery 1: #AGENCY video by Halfvol (p. 25) THREEASFOUR Film still from ‘Tree of Life’ by Alex Czetwertynski (p. 49) YING GAO Film still photography by Dominique Lafond and Alexandre de Bellefeuille (p. 53) RAFAEL KOUTO (P. 57) Photographer: Diago Mariotta Mendez Still life: Simone Cavadini Models: Ade, Mozher, Jairus and Servano Retoucher: Flavio Starita Hair & Makeup: Meltem Sahin @ Angelique Hoorn Management In collaboration with: Texaid, Boer Groep, Swisstulle, MCO Amsterdam, Jakub Tywoniuk, Jolinde Verbaandert, Valeria Fornera - Tramer, Atelier Nicola Sartorio, Sandberg Institute THE SARTISTS (P. 59) Art Direction: The Sartists Styling: The Sartists Photography: Hanro Havenga Models: The Sartists Wardrobe: Personal items and Stüssy Retoucher: OURSEARCHOF TENANT OF CULTURE Photography by Hendrickje Schimmel (P.61) STELLA MCCARTNEY Photography by Viviane Sassen (p. 64) LARA TORRES Film stills from ‘Unmaking’ (p. 67) APPARATUS 22 Installation image by Valerie Spanjers (p. 68) 262

VIVIENNE WESTWOOD Photography (prints) in installation by Juergen Teller (p. 71) VIN+OMI Photography via VIN+OMI (p. 76-79) Vin during Whataboutery 1: #AGENCY video by Halfvol (p. 80-81) BRUNO PIETERS Image via Honest By Lookbook VI (p. 93) STELLA MCCARTNEY Image via stellamccartney.com (p. 95) H&M CONSCIOUS COLLECTION Video via H&M (p. 96) VIKTOR&ROLF FOR ZALANDO Image via Zalando.com (p. 99) OSKLEN Photography by Oskar Metsavath and Johnatan Chicaroni (p. 104-107) FASHION4FREEDOM Necklace image via Wrong by Fashion4Freedom (p. 112) PETIT H BY HERMES Bracelet image via Hermes.com (p. 115) MUD JEANS Via Mudjeans.com (p 131) SELF–ASSEMBLY Photography by ©Self-Assembly (p. 133) HELEN STOREY Video and still by David Betteridge (p. 147) CONSCIOUS CONTEMPORARY CRAFT: CONNECTING COMMUNITIES Bottom installation image: photography by Valerie Spanjers (p. 148) Photoshoot: photography by Agnes Wonke (p. 152-155) FASHION REVOLUTION Film stills from #whomademyclothes and #livedclotheslast via Fashion Revolution (p. 157)


ELISA VAN JOOLEN Photography by Anouk Beckers and Elisa van Joolen (p. 158-159) Graphic design by Beau Bertens (p. 159) Production by @warehouse.amsterdam KRISTINA WALSH Photography by Celia Tang (p. 172) H&M GLOBAL CHANGE AWARD Algae Fabric - via Tjeerd Veenhoven (p. 179) Mycotex by Neffa - via Aniela Hoitink (p. 181) LISELORE FROWIJN AND PIÑATEX BY ANANAS ANAM Photography by Valerie Spanjers (p. 184) Photography by Chriss Searles (p. 185) PAULINE VAN DONGEN Solar dress: Mike Nicolaassen (p. 187) Solar shirt: Liselotte Fleur (p. 187) Radius: Ola Krondahl (p. 190) Phototrobe: JR Hammond (p. 190) Issho: Sharon Jane D (p. 191) ECCO LEATHER Left image via ECCO Leather (p. 194) VIN+OMI Photography via VIN+OMI (p. 198-199) WASTE2WEAR Image via Waste2Wear (p. 200) LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION (UAL) AND H&M Images via Centre for Sustainable Fashion (p. 203) ARTEZ FUTURE MAKERS Portrait Danielle Bruggeman by Rosa van Ederen for OW Magazine (p. 207) Video The Future of Living materials by Thijs Adriaans for ArtEZ Future Makers (p. 207) MUSEUM ARNHEM & ARTEZ PRODUCT DESIGN Top image: photography by Bart Laport (p. 215) Images of Painted, Gijs Bakker and Arianne van der Gaag: photography by Anne-Karlijn van Kesteren (p. 216-218) Image of Noon Passama: photography by Museum Arnhem (p. 217) PHOTO CREDITS

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PHOTO CREDITS RECAP STATE OF FASHION AFTERMOVIE STATE OF FASHION 2018 Video by Halfvol (p. 222-223) SPACE & MATTER Aftermovie Collectief Soepel by Bart Laport (p. 226-227) Photography by Bart Laport (p. 228-231) TEASERCAMPAIGN Video by Glamcult Studio (p.232-233) TOWARDS CIRCULAR FASHION Michael Floor photography (p. 234-237) FASHION COLLOQUIUM Top image: design by Catalogtree (p. 239) Video by OpenWebcast (p. 239) OPENING ADELE VARCOE: Photography by Sifra Kock (p. 240-242) OPENING APPARATUS: Top image: photography by Miret Pelgrom (p. 244) Bottom image: photography by Valerie Spanjers (p. 244) WHATABOUTERY Video by Halfvol (p. 247) EDUCATION Photography by Neelke Jacobs (p. 248-249) CLOSE TO YOU Photography by Daantje Bons (p. 250-252) YOUNG & FAIR Photography by Neelke Jacobs (p. 256-257) ROC DAG Photography by Valerie Spanjers (p. 258-259) REFLAGS Top image: via Funke (p. 261) Bottom image: photography by Eva Broekema (p.261)

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CAMPAIGN: STATE OF FASHION | SEARCHING FOR THE NEW LUXURY (cover, p. 2-3, 278-279) Concept & Art Direction: Glamcult Studio Photography: Barrie Hullegie Styling: Leendert Sonnevelt Hair and make-up: Kathinka Gernant for Chanel @ Unspoken Models: Arad Inbar, Jette @ Let It Go, Jemal @ Max Models


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COLOPHON CONCEPT, TEXT AND EDITORIAL SUPERVISION: José Teunissen Renee van der Hoek Hakan Karaosman FINAL EDITING: José Teunissen Guus van Engelshoven Renee van der Hoek Esther Muñoz Grootveld WITH CONTRIBUTIONS BY: Foreword (p.11): Eiso Alberda van Ekenstein Searching for the New Luxury (p.12-13): José Teunissen Unlock the Change (p.18-19): Dr. Hakan Karaosman

ADDITIONAL EDITING BY: Jos Arts Jeanne Tan TRANSLATIONS: Guus van Engelshoven IMAGE EDITING: Renee van der Hoek Melanie Hulsebosch DESIGN: Glamcult Studio No part of this publications maybe used or reproduced in any form or manner without prior written permissionfrom the publisher. Every reasonable attempt has been made to identify owners of copyright. Errors or omissions will be corrected in subsequent editions. © Sonsbeek & State of Fashion Foundation, 2018

Connecting People (p. 24-25): Han Nefkens Fashion as an Ideology (p. 150-151): Sabine Winters Futuremakers (p. 206-213): Daniëlle Bruggeman Out of the Shadows (p. 214-219): Anne-Karlijn van Kesteren (Museum Arnhem) Judith van den Boom (ArtEZ) Cathelijne Engelkes (ArtEZ) Exhibition design by Space & Matter (p. 224-225): Sabine Winters

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COLOPHON

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#5

ANNEX


EXHIBITORS STATE OF FASHION 2018

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ThreeASFOUR Iris van Herpen Tenant of Culture Rafael Kouto The Sartists VIN + OMI Ying Gao Yuima Nakazato Vivienne Westwood Stella McCartney Anneke Hymmen / Kumi Hiroi Lara Torres Bruno Pieters H&M Conscious Collection Viktor&Rolf Osklen 11.11 /eleven eleven Button Masala Fashion4Freedom Petit h by Hermes G-Star RAW MUD jeans Self-assembly Maven Women Apparatus 22 Helen Storey Conscious Contemporary Craft: Connecting Communities Fashion Revolution Elisa van Joolen Museum Arnhem & ArtEZ Product Design ArtEZ Future Makers Future Footwear Foundation Kristina Walsh Waste2wear Teijin Pauline van Dongen H&M Global Change Award AlgaeFabrics Orange Fiber Mycotex by Neffa Make Waste Cotton New Liselore Frowijn and PiĂąatex by Ananas Anam London College of Fashion Ecoalf Canepa ECCO Leather

EXHIBITORS STATE OF FASHION 2018

threeasfour.com irisvanherpen.com tenantofculture.com rafaelkouto.com the-sartists.com vinandomi.com yinggao.ca yuimanakazato.com viviennewestwood.com stellamccartney.com hymmen-and-hiroi.com laratorres.com honestby.com hm.com viktor-rolf.com osklen.com 11-11.in fashion4freedom.com hermes.com g-star.com mudjeans.eu self-assembly.fi mavenwomen.com helenstoreyfoundation.org fondazionezegna.org fashionrevolution.org elisavanjoolen.com museumarnhem.nl / artez.nl futuremakers.artez.nl futurefootwear.org krish-walsh.com waste2wear.com teijin.com paulinevandongen.nl tjeerdveenhoven.com orangefiber.it neffa.nl ioncell.fi liselorefrowijn.com arts.ac.uk/fashion/ ecoalf.com canepa.it leather.ecco.com

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PROJECT CREDITS CURATOR TEAM: José Teunissen, curator Renee van der Hoek, assistant curator Hakan Karaosman, assistant curator Asu Aksu, coordinator Open Call MANAGEMENT TEAM: Raymond de Haas, head of operations Esther Muñoz Grootveld, head of projects Amber van den Eeden, management assistant COMMUNICATIONS TEAM: Melanie Hulsebosch, communications manager Daniël Bouw, communications manager (until Dec 2017) Madelief Emmens, communications assistant Aimy Eyzenbach, communications assistant Nancy van Oorschot, online communications Pleunie de Wild, communications assistant schoon den boer PR, national PR Sarah Schulten, international PR Editing and translations: Guus van Engelshoven, editor-at-large Aron Friedman, translations PRODUCTION TEAM: Alexander Godschalk, producer Thijs Adriaans, styling and dressing Aimy Eyzenbach, production assistant Marko Meijer, production assistant Marne Siebenhaar, production assistant Thielo Weber, production assistant Natasha Beijer, ticketing coordinator Marjolein de Graaf, producer opening Sophie Schijf, producer Fashion Colloquium Carolijn Wessels, volunteer coordinator Karin Huibers, assistant volunteer coordinator

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EVENT TEAM: Renske de Vriend, project manager events Liselore Frowijn, curator Close to You Neelke Jacobs, tour coordinator Indre Klenauskyte, production assistant Nikita Oldert, producer events Cornelie de Ruiter, event coordinator TOUR GUIDES: Sabine Beck Sandra Booltink Caroline Evers Elze Haukes Niek Michel Kasper van Moll Charley Reijnders Herlof Schürmann Petra Smits Henriëtte Somsen Thijs Tittse OFFICE TEAM: Ellen van Loenen, office manager Durra Ali, office assistant Deniece Verwer, office assistant Lynn Aaldering, office assistant PARTNERSHIP ENGAGEMENT: Marischka Leenaers, consultant partnership engagement Hester Swaving, consultant partnership engagement

5. ANNEX


FUNDRAISING: Blueyard SPATIAL DESIGN: Space & Matter

Last but certainly not least: a very special thanks goes out to Christine de Baan, for building the foundations of the Sonsbeek & State of Fashion Foundation, and for paving the way for a successful first edition of State of Fashion.

GRAPHIC DESIGN: Glamcult Studio VISUAL IDENTITY AND WEBSITE: Fabrique CITYDRESSING: Vollaerszwart EXHIBITION CONSTRUCTION: Collectief Soepel LIGHTING DESIGN AND INSTALLATIONS: Kohl Theatertechniek MEDIA SOLUTIONS AND TECHNICAL INSTALLATIONS: Alwi Elektrotechniek MTS-Audiovisueel PRINTING SOLUTIONS: Platform P FOOD & BEVERAGE PARTNER: Dudok in de Melkfabriek BOARD OF DIRECTORS: Eiso Alberda van Ekenstein, chairman Guus van Kleef, treasurer Renate Litjens, secretary Charles Esche Alex van Hooff Hedwig Saam INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY BOARD: Gerrit Bruggeman Frances Corner Corinna Gardner Bregtje van der Haak Linda Loppa

PROJECT CREDITS

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VOLUNTEERS: Amber van As Angela Klunder Anne van Bon Anneke van de Vijfeijke Annemie van Heugten Annet Kronenberg Bert van der Weg Betty Biemans Carla Louwes Catherine Nassy Chiara Balm Chika Bayardamba Christel Driessen Christien van den Berg Claire King Clarien van Harten Daisy Por Debora Vos-Barentsen Désirée Nothnagel Dominique Struik Dorien van Haren Dorijo Haukes Ed Buiskool Elma Poelsma Gaby Langelaar Gerda Jansen Hannah Carter Hanneke Bakx Hans Marcelis Herlof Schürmann Hermie Treffers Hetty Slagter Ilonka Speksnijder Ineke Holstvoogd Jacqueline Mooi Jannie Eisen jenny Auxier Jos Schouten Josje Blesgraaf Judith Kessener Judith Berendsen Judith Bezemer Judith Brouwer Karin Huibers Klaarke Schuiringa Leontine Hamer Leslie Siron Ludo Mooi Marcella de Joode Marcia Melo Margaret Dalman Marian Reimert 274

Marijke de Bruïne Marja van Drecht Marjo Tenten Marleen Lievens-Addink Mick van Rootseler Mieke Wagener Nicole van Kalker Nienke Wind Nina Lanke Paula Pegman Paulette Fromager Peter Schampers Piet Marcelis Priska Agyemang Rae Woo Koh Renee Kuijper Rieky van Elk Robert Koekkoek Romy Derks Rosalie Boonstra Rudolf Jekel Senka Bajramovic Sonja Dietz Stef de Wit Tatyana Khingeeva Thea Jongbloed Ton van den Hanenberg Tonneke Bos Trudie Duyndam Veronique van der Schans Vincent Zaaijer Wieke Lameris Wilma Furstner Yvonne van Lingen Yvonne Rohde Coby Dagelet Daniëlle Jansens Greet de Haan Isabel Lee Andersen Jolanda Verstegen Olav Kramer Thea te Dorsthorst Wilma Kattenbelt

5. ANNEX


VOLUNTEERS RIJNIJSSEL COLLEGE: Alara Tatar Ani Pivazijan Atifa Nourzaji Ayla Geurtsen Cannel Cay Chloe v.d. Brink Deveney Fransisca Femke Schoonderbeek Ilse Degen Jannemijn Hooghoudt Jodie van den Brandhof Kim Gemmink Lieke Roeven Lisa Hartjes Mabel Augustinus Megan Lawson Nilan Kuiper Nuray Boga Radivoj Vasiljevic Saida Rasouli Sanne Hogendoorn Sara van Groeningen Saida Rasouli Sofie van Hal Suzanne Bennik Tara van Trigt Vida Soheili VOLUNTEERS STICHTING ’T BROEK OMHOOG: Danny Evers Gift Isaiah Bravo Ainembabazi Yosief Gebreyesus Tewelde Youssuf Ibrahim We also thank Winny van Bakel and the other volunteers of Stichting ’t Broek Omhoog for their fantastic help and support in making State of Fashion into a success.

PROJECT CREDITS

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STATE OF FASHION WAS REALIZED WITH THE FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF:

THE PRESENTATION ‘ARTEZ FUTURE MAKERS - LAB’ WAS MADE POSSIBLE BY:

THE PRESENTATION ‘OUT OF THE SHADOWS’ IS AN INITIATIVE BY:

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KEY PARTNERS:

PARTNERS:

CONTENT PARTNERS:

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

IN DE MELKFABRIEK

PARTNERS & SPONSORS

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STATEOFFASHION.ORG

Profile for State of Fashion

State of Fashion 2018 (NL)  

State of Fashion 2018 (NL)