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Michigan State’s Independent Voice

Crime rates during welcome week are significantly higher than the rest of the school year PAGES 6-7

OPINION

C IT Y

CAMPUS

What to avoid when living off campus

How Michigan is combatting vaping

MSU book program plans changes

“What is often disregarded is the total control landlords have over your life for the next year”

Dangers to vaping have circulated with recent warnings. How far will state regulations go?

One Book, One Community hopes to encourage students to read the annual selection in new ways

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CITY

TWO HOTELS PLANNED FOR $250 MILLION RED CEDAR DEVELOPMENT PROJECT BY CHASE MICHAELSON CMICHAELSON@STATENEWS.COM

Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer gestures into the audience during the State of the State address on Feb. 12, 2019 at the Capitol in Lansing. PHOTO BY SYLVIA JARRUS

How the state budget affects the East Lansing community BY WELLS FOSTER WFOSTER@STATENEWS.COM

A state’s budget is one of the most impactful pieces of legislation a state government can pass, but the legalese, political language, and fighting among lawmakers can make it one of the most confusing laws for the average citizen to decipher, despite its effect on our everyday lives. When Governor Gretchen Whitmer took office after the November 2018 election, the Michigan government became split. The executive branch houses a Democratic governor, but the legislative branch houses a Republican-majority state Congress. “I think at the end of the day, both sides are trying to advance what they believe is best for the state of Michigan, and Republicans believe that we need to keep government in check and keep government spending in check,” Michigan Republican Party Communications Director Tony Zammit said. During her campaign, Whitmer focused heavily on fixing Michigan’s roads and water. The budget in its current form, written by Whitmer and State Budget Director Chris Kolb, aims to repair roads, fund schools, bring back industry jobs and more. Strategic Communications Specialist for the State Budget Office Jenni Riehle said via email that the current budget provides $2.5 billion in dedicated annual revenue for roads and bridges, increases in per-pupil funding and distributes almost $200 million through social programs. The governor’s office has additional information on the proposed budget online.

A POTENTIAL SHUTDOWN?

“The biggest hurdle we face today is enacting a budget before the end of the fiscal year,” Riehle said. 2

“If a budget is not passed by Oct. 1, there is the potential for the government to shut down, which all parties are eager to avoid.” The budget could have a serious impact if it does not pass. A resulting government shutdown would mean state-funded institutions would be shut down until a budget is passed, and schools would not receive state aid.

“I think at the end of the day, both sides are trying to advance what they believe is the best for the state of Michigan.” Tony Zammit

Michigan Republican Party Communications Director A shutdown has not happened in Michigan since 2009. Riehle said that negotiations with the state Legislature are ongoing. “State employees who live in East Lansing ... they would suffer,” East Lansing Mayor Pro Tem Erik Altmann said. Altmann said that, while East Lansing residents would feel the effects of a shutdown, city-funded operations would continue. “In terms of the day-to-day trash removal, recycling and city hall — that’s all stuff that would keep on running. Day-to-day city activities would probably continue, at least for a while, largely unchanged,” Altmann said. If a government shutdown were to occur, Michigan State University would lose a portion of its funding, although “not a ton,” according to Altmann. However, he expects operations to be affected regardless. “The effects of these sorts of

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shutdowns are a little hard to predict, but they are almost always more far-reaching than anybody can anticipate,” Altmann said.

INFRASTRUCTURE

“Governor Whitmer proposed a pretty significant expansion for our infrastructure,” East Lansing City Council Member Aaron Stephens said. The budget is facing fierce opposition from the Republican-led legislature primarily due to tax increases, the most controversial being a 45-cent-per-gallon tax hike on gasoline. “So far, Republicans have not yielded any kind of other proposal that would put the investment in our roads that the governor has wanted,” Stephens said. “A shift here or there in our budget isn’t going to do much for it. It’s got to be a real investment.” Stephens stressed the importance of roads and infrastructure on the average Michigander. “The governor’s budget would mean more money for roads that maybe even cities don’t have jurisdiction over. You’re looking at roads like Saginaw, and highways and areas where you’ve had a lot of potholes,” Stephens said. “You think ‘oh well, it’s my city. It’s my city,’ when in fact, it’s your state that’s not putting the money and investment in the roads.” Republican and Democratic lawmakers both agree that fixing the roads is a primary concern, but Republicans disagree with the gas tax proposed by Whitmer. “We fundamentally disagree with the governor’s position to raise taxes on what would end up being the highest gas tax in the nation with a 45 cent increase,” Zammit said.

EDUCATION

College students could be impacted by the budget as well. The proposed budget increases funding for universities, limits tuition

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increases, and adults past the traditional college age could see affordable or tuition-free certification programs. “University and community colleges would receive a three percent increase in operation funding. To further help students and families, universities will be required to hold tuition increases to no more than inflation-plus-one percent to be eligible for the funding increase,” Riehle said. That limiting figure is 3.2% in 2019. Riehle said that the proposed budget funds the creation of a Michigan Reconnect Program, which provides opportunities for adults past traditional college age to seek training, certification or associate’s degrees in specialized careers. Eligible participants would receive tuition-free training. “Once you graduate, the conversation is ‘where do I go now?’ We see a lot of people moving out of Michigan, taking their talent elsewhere. I think Governor Whitmer is definitely putting priority with an investment in jobs and talents development to keep people here in the state and maintain some of our job market,” Stephens said. Writing a state’s budget is not a simple task, even when it isn’t facing opposition from within its own government. The Budget Office said that the biggest hurdle when writing the budget was finding a method to increase revenue. “The state’s general fund revenue has not grown in the last 20 years, leaving us with less money to support the state as inflation continues to rise,” Riehle said. “Without a dedicated revenue source for these projects, like the 45 cent gas tax that is being proposed by the governor for roads, it becomes increasingly difficult to fund projects of that size without devastating cuts to other important programs and services.”

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Lansing-based Continental/Ferguson LLC will break ground next month on infrastructure for two hotels in the Red Cedar development project near SkyVue apartments, according to a release from the developers. The construction for the hotels is slated to begin next summer and is expected to be finished by 2022. The cost of the entire Red Cedar development project, which will include the hotels, a student living complex and a senior living complex, is estimated to exceed $250 million. The project was approved in April. Hyatt House and AC by Marriott will share a common check-in area, housekeeping staff, and will function in many ways as one hotel with two brand names under the management of North Carolina-based Concord Hospitality. This dual-branded hotel is expected to afford that luxury to business and university travel. The development is spearheaded by Michigan State University Trustee Joel Ferguson and developer Frank Kass. “We’ve lacked a first-class hotel that people from MSU, people from the insurance industry that are trying to attract employees, investment and things like that … would actually drive to Grand Rapids or Ann Arbor and drive them back to this area,” Chris Stralkowski, Executive Project Manager for Ferguson Development, said. “We did not have a hotel that was up to the expectations of some of the people that were being courted.” A green retaining wall will be constructed to obstruct the view of the parking structure to be built underneath the hotels, which will occupy six stories of an eight-story high structure. The hotels will feature a ground-level pool, ballroom and restaurant, as well as a sixth-floor dining area. “This will be a tremendous asset and investment for Lansing and the region as we’re finally developing an underused, yet important, area and a critical link connecting East Lansing and MSU to Lansing and the Capitol catalyzing the Michigan Avenue corridor,” Ferguson said in a statement. The development project will be funded in part by tax increment financing, which will reimburse the investors of the project $50 million over 30 years by using the increased property tax value from the development. Part of the project will include a pedestrian walkway connecting East Lansing to Lansing through the Lansing River Trail, which Lansing City Council member Jody Washington said was a major asset to the project back when it was initially proposed in March. “Right now, there seems to be this invisible barrier between the two cities,” she said at the time. Stralkowski said Lansing has been historically underserved in terms of high-end hotels, pointing to the Radisson near the Capitol, as an example. “When you’re trying to attract someone to either invest or to relocate or to put down roots … what are you gonna do, stick them in the Radisson?” Stralkowski said.

“...We’re finally developing an underused, yet important, area and a critical link connecting East Lansing and MSU to Lansing and the Capitol...” Chris Stralkowski

Executive Project Manager of Ferguson Development


Vol. 110 | No. 3

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2019

Kevin Townsend of DeWitt and Beth Tompson of Haslett watch the 13th annual Crosstown Showdown on Sept. 3, 2019 at Cooley Law School Stadium in Lansing. Check out the gallery online at statenews.com. PHOTO BY SYLVIA JARRUS

IN TODAY’S PAPER

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How the state budget will affect East Lansing The hotly-contested state budget will have community implications

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Photo gallery: And we’re back Scenes from the first week of the fall semester, from move-in to the first football game

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Column: The duality of Brian Lewerke

42 Arrests made by East Lansing and MSU Police during Fall Welcome

Will an injury-free Lewerke return to form as Spartan QB?

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Madison O’Connor

CONTACT THE STATE NEWS (517) 295-1680

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COPY CHIEF Alan Hettinger

GENERAL MANAGER Christopher Richert

CAMPUS EDITOR Kaitlyn Kelley

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SPORTS EDITOR Paolo Giannandrea PHOTO EDITOR Sylvia Jarrus MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Haley Sinclair DESIGN Genna Barner Courtney McKown This week’s cover was designed by Courtney McKown

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GETTING READY TO

LAUNCH YOUR CAREER?

BUSINESS ANALYTICS & MARKETING RESEARCH

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THURSDAY, SEPTE MB E R 5, 2 01 9

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CAMPUS

And we’re back PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATT SCHMUCKER, SYLVIA JARRUS AND CONNOR DESILETS FEEDBACK@STATENEWS.COM

The largest incoming freshman class in history moved onto MSU’s campus at the beginning of this semester. Returning and new Spartans alike joined in on the first week festivities, including the annual Sparticipation event, tailgating and the first football game of the season

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SPOTLIGHT

ARRESTS, DISORDERLY CONDUCT AMONG WELCOME WEEK CRIME A LOOK AT CRIME RATES FROM THIS YEAR’S FALL WELCOME BY ANNA LIZ NICHOLS ANICHOLS@STATENEWS.COM

Fall welcome week can be a time for new beginnings at Michigan State. Incoming freshmen and outgoing seniors alike try out their alcohol tolerance like trying on back to school clothes, and sometimes are met with the flashing red and blue lights of local law enforcement. Over the course of fall welcome week, the MSU and East Lansing Police Departments reported a total of 42 arrests. This number is lower than in previous years, Deputy Chief Steve Gonzalez said. “There were certainly some arrests and some parties and problems that we had to deal with that come with every fall welcome period, but there was nothing that was out of control,” Gonzalez said. “There was nothing that was excessive in our view. It went as expected. Overall, it was a pretty mild fall welcome.” Amid the week’s events, ELPD hopped on the popular internet trend “there ain’t no laws when you’re drinking claws,” to remind students that, that is not a valid legal argument.

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THE STATE NEWS

Citations for open alcohol swelled to six incidents during the week — a slight uptick — all resulting in arrest. At the same time, White Claws and other hard seltzers have become a popular choice of drink among college-aged people. According to Nielsen data, hard seltzers saw a 193% increase in sales in the past year. Gonzalez said it’s more likely the nice weather during the week that contributed to individuals carrying around open alcohol containers, but the 5% alcohol by volume beverage may not have helped. “I don’t know if people associate those with alcohol drinks or standard beer, open beer or something like that,” Gonzalez said. “While the White Claws and things like that are kind of new on the market this year, way back when I started here, wine coolers like Bartles & Jaymes were the rage and you carried those around as well.” In order to subdue some of the first week of school debauchery, MSU shortened the amount of time between Fall Convocation and the start of classes in 2009. MSU’s administration rebranded

THURSDAY, SEPT E MB E R 5, 2 01 9

“Welcome Week” into “Fall Welcome” and instead of a five-day gap, there is now a three-day gap. Nine out of the 10 disorderly conduct charges during the week were paired with arrests, as Gonzalez said it is rare for someone to be issued a disorderly conduct citation and then be sent on their way. There are over 30 acts in East Lansing ordinances that can result in the disorderly conduct charge, including loitering, indecent exposure, fighting in public and window peeping. There were seven reports of assault and battery, none resulting in arrest. One arrest for disturbing the peace took place at Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity on Grand River Avenue due to a misdemeanor noise violation on Aug. 28. A first-degree sexual assault was reported at another frat house, FarmHouse, on Aug. 30. Gonzalez said ELPD detectives are investigating the incident. As for on campus, things were relatively calm and MSUPD kept busy with answering questions for those new to the university, MSUPD Captain Doug Monette said. On MSU’s campus, there were 12 lar-

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cenies and two burglaries, according to MSUPD records. An incident of damage to property at Jenison Field House reported on Aug. 27 is under an open and ongoing investigation. Friday is a busy time for MSUPD and the various local agencies that come to East Lansing to offer their services. Monette said the game day on Friday was calm overall. “It went really well. It was busy. Any time you have a Friday work day with a Friday football game, it’s a busy time,” Monette said. “There’s a lot of excitement in the air, but yet there’s a little bit of the unknown just because there’s a lot of people on campus who aren’t from here, so there are a lot of questions that we respond to.” Two MSU students were charged last week with threatening terrorism toward MSU President Samuel L. Stanley Jr. Jennifer Spicer, 20, and Rami Souguir, 19 are accused of making a post on Reddit threatening President Samuel Stanley. Jr, Chris Wickman — attorney for Souguir — said. He said the post was intended as a joke, but has resulted in charges of terrorism.


SPOTLIGHT

42 ARRESTS 8 CASES OF ASSAULT & BATTERY Students make their way to the bars on Sept. 1, 2019 in East Lansing. PHOTO BY SYLVIA JARRUS

The alleged terrorist threat on Monday was on the minds of law enforcement officers during the past week, Gonzalez said. There are a lot of unseen actions local law enforcement takes to keep the East Lansing community safe, Gonzalez said, along with actions like setting up barricades on the roads during outdoor events, a relatively new practice. “Especially over the last year or two, with the active violence incidents that we have seen flourish across the country, it is something we discuss here internally quite a bit.”

Nichols Law Firm put out a video that Wickman said until new information comes to light, is his firm’s statement on the case. “I had to watch two families grieving in an East Lansing courtroom this week, the

parents of our client Rami, the other parents, as their children were arraigned on two 20-year felony charges, a gross overcharging decision in my humble opinion,” Michael J. Nichols said. “Such a great kid, so excited to come to the university, this

is disappointing.” There’s a no-contact order for the students from President Stanley and his family, according to court records. MSUPD has since said that after investigation, there is no current concern for campus safety.

11 CASES OF DISORDERLY CONDUCT 3 DUI CASES

(DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE)

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SPORTS

COLUMN

THE DUALITY OF A MAN NAMED BRIAN LEWERKE Current redshirt senior quarterback Brian Lewerke (14) walks off the field after the game against Northwestern at Spartan Stadium on Oct. 6, 2018. STATE NEWS FILE PHOTO

BY MATT SCHMUCKER MSCHMUCKER@STATENEWS.COM

Brian Lewerke’s 2017 season was one of the best an MSU quarterback has ever had. As one of the most interception-averse quarterbacks in program history with an excellent run game to boot, he was one of seven players named a Heisman dark horse at the beginning of the 2018 season by the Associated Press. The season he would go on to have in 2018 was … not of Heisman caliber. Or even of starting caliber, really. What happened last year? And which version of Brian Lewerke will we see on the field this year? To really understand how bad his 2018 year was, let’s compare it to his 2017 season – the one that made him a Heisman dark horse. Let’s start with looking at Lewerke’s yards per attempt in the two seasons. Yards per attempt — for those unfamiliar with the stat — does a good job measuring how effective a quarterback is by looking at how much yardage his team gains every time he throws the ball, not every time he completes a pass. This takes incompletions into account, an important thing to look at when evaluating a quarterback. After all, it’s harder to score when you aren’t completing passes to move the ball toward the end zone, or when the passes you are completing don’t go very far. Last season Lewerke’s yards per attempt dropped from 6.7 to 6, which is pretty substantial. Looking at where the drop came from, most of it comes down to a drop in completion percentage – from 59% to 54.3%. There are other places to look for reasons though, like an increase in checkdown passes. Instead of throwing the ball downfield to his wide receivers, Lewerke spent a lot of time throwing to his running backs. In 2017, running backs caught 37 passes all season. Last year, running back Connor Heyward caught 32 passes on his own, mak-

ing him MSU’s third leading receiver in terms of receptions. Running backs L.J. Scott and La’Darius Jefferson added 10 and seven receptions, respectively, for a total on the season of 49 receptions for MSU’s running backs. Now granted, some of those receptions were on passes coming from Lewerke’s backup, Rocky Lombardi. Why was Lombardi throwing passes, you ask? INJURY Right. Brian Lewerke played the second half of this season with an undisclosed shoulder injury that was reportedly causing him pain as he threw. Why was he playing through an injury like this? Your guess is as good as mine. But what is certain is that it hampered his ability to throw the ball downfield, throw the ball accurately and throw the ball generally. Lewerke injured his shoulder in the game against Penn State Oct. 13, which meant he couldn’t practice Monday through Thursday the following week leading up to the Michigan game. Lewerke went 5-25 for 66 yards with no picks and no touchdowns. But MSU did score one touchdown on the day on a Wolverines fumble that gave the Spartans first and goal from the seven-yard line. MSU then proceeded to score on … *checks notes* … a passing touchdown by wide receiver Darrell Stewart Jr., caught by Brian Lewerke. Five of 25 isn’t what we had come to expect from Lewerke and, after this game, head coach Mark Dantonio didn’t even know what was happening. “I don't know whether he was off, dinged up or what,” Dantonio said. Well, it’s tough to be a quarterback without a working shoulder, but at least he had a good supporting cast around him all season, right? No.

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMB E R 5, 2 01 9

Even early in the season, before he hurt his own shoulder, Lewerke was playing with the broken remains of an offense. In just their third game of the season, the Spartans were already down two talented receivers in Cam Chambers and Darrell Stewart Jr. By the time they played Penn State — their fifth game — Chambers had returned, but in addition to missing Stewart Jr., wideout Cody White had broken his hand and talented freshman Jalen Nailor had an unknown injury. On top of all this, star receiver Felton Davis III suffered a mid-game hip injury, but would still return to catch a game-winning touchdown with 19 seconds left. So as the receiving corps was falling apart, so was the offensive line. By the Penn State game, both of the Spartans’ starting guards had suffered injuries that kept them out for about a month. Then, Lewerke’s shoulder got hurt. Now we’re back to the Spartans’ rivalry game against Michigan, and there isn’t a lot to work with. The already-injured-but-still-playing Felton Davis III then tears his Achilles, leaving the MSU offense completely barren. This left a receiving core featuring three slot receivers — Stewart, Chambers and Sowards — and … *checks notes harder* … a cornerback. Yes, MSU had to resort to — in multiple games — using Justin Layne as a two-way cornerback-receiver. We have to move past this U-M game. It hurts to look at it too hard. After the game against the Wolverines, Lewerke would just start in games against Maryland and Ohio State. Finally, at this point, Lewerke was done for the regular season, with Lombardi taking plenty of snaps to get through the season. The Spartans then rolled into the Redbox Bowl, with a reportedly slightly healthier Lewerke ready to go. The Spartans then held Oregon’s 25th ranked offense to seven points and still lost. Lewerke threw for 172 yards and an interception against Oregon with no touchdowns. Speaking of interceptions, let’s look at Lewerke’s numbers in both years. He threw 11 in 2018 after throwing seven in 2017, but what is really concerning is that he did it in fewer attempts. If we look at his interception rate in both seasons, you can see that it balloons to double what it was the year prior — 3.2% from 1.6%. So, not only was Lewerke less effective at moving the ball for his own team, he was putting the ball into the hands of the other team twice as often. Remember that yards per attempt stat from earlier? Let’s look at Lewerke’s yards per attempt in every game he played after his injury against Penn State. As bad as that looks, it gives me hope for how Lewerke will look this year. Let’s look at Lewerke’s pre-injury yards per attempt from last year. Now, I understand that these defenses are not the same caliber as the ones that gave Lewerke problems later in the year, but the sharp dropoff at the Michigan game makes me think that this is an injury problem, not a Lewerke problem.

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Want more proof YARDS PER of this? We can ATTEMPT look at Lewerke’s early 2017 numbers in his starts against Bowling PRE-INJURY Green State and IN 2017-2018 Western Michigan. Utah State 8.7 If you ask me, Arizona State 8.1 the jump from Indiana 8.5 h igh seven to Central high eight is even Michigan 7.4 development. In Northwestern 6.5 my book, Lewerke didn’t regress as a POST-INJURY passer last year, IN 2018 he was developing Michigan 2.6 until his team fell Maryland 4.4 apart with injuries Ohio State 4.6 around him, and Oregon 4.3 then he fell apart. There is one last thing I left out. Lewerke forgot he had legs last year. I think. That has to be the only explanation for it, because Lewerke only rushed for more than 50 yards in a game once last year, against Oregon for 63. This is a quarterback who rushed for 559 yards the year before only accruing 184 the next year. That is steep. The only explanation I have for this is that Lewerke was playing with a handicapped offensive line all season, which made it harder to run and made him more vulnerable to sacks, which count against his rushing yards. But I don’t think that should account for 375 missing yards, right? Football is complicated. WATCH VIDEO AT STATENEWS.COM

559 YDS

7 50 YARD GAMES 2017

184 YDS 1 50 YARD GAME 2018

TOTAL RUSHING YARDS


OPINION

Column: Landlords are full of empty promises, here’s what to avoid

RELIGIOUS DIRECTORY Stay up to date at: www.statenews.com/religious

All Saints Episcopal Church 800 Abbot Rd. (517) 351-7160 Sun. Worship: 8am, 10am, & 5pm Sunday School: 10am www.allsaints-el.org

BY EMILY LUDWA ELUDWA@STATENEWS.COM

T

he satisfaction of having your own place cannot be conquered. It's a marvelous step toward “real” adulthood. A moment of euphoria nearly overwhelms you as you stand in the parking lot, smiling and waving as the person who dropped you off or helped you move into your new place drives away. Whether this place is a house with your best friends, cooperative housing with 20-plus strangers or a studio apartment, the freedom that comes with decorating your own space, buying your own groceries and making your own decisions is unmatched. It’s a similar — but at the same time vastly different — feeling from freshman year. From the excitement of being on your own for the first time to feeling responsible for commuting to campus and paying bills. While all of this seems wonderful in theory, there are some concerns people living off campus for the first time should have. For example, what is often disregarded is the total control landlords have over your life for the next year. People don’t tell you about landlords’ money-hungry souls and empty promises. The $800 security deposit pried from your hands months before your move-in date will not be returned. The extra hidden fees for possessing things human beings need to thrive will continue to swell. Oh, and if you want to house a pet, expect to pay at least another $200 up front, plus a

series of monthly payments. Landlords will find any and every way to continue to pull money out of your wallet. It’s expected that if you’re renting in a college town, a greedy company will take advantage of your naivety in order to fuel the poorly structured economical machine, but to intentionally extract every last cent a broke college student — who may be working more than one job on top of taking at least 12 credit hours and participating in extracurriculars — has is despicable. The probability of moving into a house that isn’t well kept, doesn’t have any amenities and has dozens of terms and conditions and still paying hundreds upon hundreds of dollars monthly is high. This isn’t a problem that only plagues East Lansing, but all college towns. On top of stealing money from 20-year-olds, these landlords are often dishonest and leave projects unfinished. When moving into a new place, there may need to be some (or many) improvements, but I promise you when your landlord says they will be around to fix your dryer or repaint your kitchen or repair the cabinet door that will not stay closed no matter how hard you slam it shut, they won’t be visiting you for a while. Unless you’re late on your rent payment, of course. If you’re planning on living

Ascension Lutheran Church 2780 Haslett Road East Lansing (517) 337-9703 Sunday worship: 10:00am Sunday Bible study: 8:45am Thursday Bible study: 2:00pm www.ascensioneastlansing.org

off campus, thoroughly read the contract handed to you. If you don’t understand the fine print the first time, read it again. Ask questions or have a friend or family member you trust discuss it with you. Sometimes, conditions can be worded in a way that purposely makes them difficult to understand. Another thing to keep in mind is taking pictures or videos of your house or apartment the moment you move in. When you end your rental, you’ll have proof that you’ve left your place in the same condition it was in when you arrived. What can be done to fix this dilemma? As college students, there isn’t much we can do. It isn’t as simple as banding together and protesting against living off campus. The university does not have enough housing for every student. Landlords would find other tenants to reserve your space. We have to look at the bigger picture. Cities, especially cities with universities minutes away, need to regulate housing conditions.

“If you’re planning on living off campus, thoroughly read the contract handed to you. If you don’t understand the fine print the first time, read it again, ask questions or have a friend or family member you trust discuss it with you.” THUR SDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2019

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Crossway Multinational Church 4828 Hagadorn Rd. (Across from Fee Hall) (517) 917-0498 Sun: 10:00am crosswaymchurch.org Greater Lansing Church of Christ 310 N. Hagadorn Rd. (Meet @ University Christian Church) (517) 898-3600 Sun: 8:45am Worship, 10am Bible Class Wed: 1pm, Small group bible study www.greaterlansing coc.org Hillel Jewish Student Center 360 Charles St. (517) 332-1916 Services: Friday night 6pm, dinner @ 7, September–April www.msuhillel.org

The Islamic Society of Greater Lansing 920 S. Harrison Rd. (517) 351-4309 Friday Services: 12:15-12:45pm & 1:45-2:15pm For prayer times visit www.lansingislam.com/ Martin Luther Chapel Lutheran Student Center 444 Abbot Rd. (517) 332-0778 Sun: 9:30am & 7pm Wed: 7pm Mini-bus pick-up on campus (Fall/Spring) www.martinluther chapel.org The People’s Church Multi-denominational 200 W Grand River Ave. (517)332-6074 Sun. Service: 10:30am with free lunch for students following worship ThePeoplesChurch.com Riverview Church- MSU Venue MSU Union Ballroom, 2nd Floor 49 Abbot Rd. (517) 694-3400 Sun. Worship: 11:30am-ish www.rivchurch.com St. John Catholic Church and Student Center 327 M.A.C Ave. (517) 337-9778 Sun: 8am, 10am, Noon, 5pm, 7pm M,W,F: 12:15pm T & Th: 9:15pm www.stjohnmsu.org

Religious Organizations:

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University Christian Church 310 N. Hagadorn Rd (517) 332-5193 Sun. Bible Study: 10am Sun. Worship: 11:15am www.universitychristianwired.com University Luthern Church (ULC) Lutheran Campus Ministry at MSU 1020 S. Harrison (517) 332-2559 Sun. Worship: 8:30am & 10:45am (Sept–May) Summer Worship: 9:30am www.ulcel.org University United Methodist Church 1120 S. Harrison Rd (517) 351-7030 Main Service: Sun: 11am in the Sanctuary Additional Services: NEW contemporary service Sundays at 9am with band titled ‘REACH’ TGiT (Thank God its Thursday): Thur: 8pm in the Chapel of Apostles universitychurchhome.org office@eluumc.org WELS Lutheran Campus Ministry 704 Abbot Rd. (517) 580-3744 Sat: 6:30pm msu.edu/~welsluth

Don’t be left out of the Religious Directory! Call (517)295-1680 to speak with an Account Executive today


CITY

After statewide ban on flavored vape, what’s next? BY WELLS FOSTER WFOSTER@STATENEWS.COM

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ichigan issued a public health emergency on Sept. 4 including a directive to vape shops across the state to stop selling flavored products within 30 days. This isn’t the beginning of regulatory ideas within the state government, and it may not be the end. The flavor ban encompasses both online and retail sales, and extends to mint and menthol flavors. The regulation was enacted by Michigan’s executive branch. The Michigan House of Representatives introduced House Bill 4039 in January that has the potential to go further, raising the purchasing age of tobacco and related paraphernalia. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, released recommendations last Friday advising consumers to “consider refraining from using e-cigarette products” and to not buy products off the street, whether they contain THC, CBD, nicotine or any other substance. The report also said to be on the lookout for symptoms of pulmonary illnesses. The CDC’s recommendations were released after the first death linked to vaping. “Raising the age, it would be less likely for

16-year-olds to get started,” Republican Rep. and bill sponsor Tommy Brann said. “Once you start at a young age, it’s almost so impossible to quit.” For Brann, the negative effects of underage smoking are personal. “I did it too. I thought it was the coolest thing to do in high school,” he said. “I remember swimming to a dock, and I was just out of breath ... that’s when I cold-turkey quit. I was just lucky I had enough discipline to quit, but a lot of people don’t.” The bill would affect vaping and electronic tobacco products as well as traditional tobacco products. Brann said the bill would need to more explicitly define vaping products before it can be included in the age restriction. According to Democrat Rep. Robert Wittenberg, a cosponsor of Brann’s bill, Michigan was one of the only states to not have any kind of legislation pertaining to vaping products. “We were one of the only states that had nothing on the books dealing with vaping or e-cigarettes,” Wittenberg said. “I absolutely think that it’s something we were lagging behind in.” High profile Republicans like Chris Christie — the former governor of New Jersey — have supported similar bills to raise the legal age to buy

After taking a hit of their vape, a student exhales a cloud of the flavored nicotine liquid — soon to be banned. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY MATT SCHMUCKER

and sell tobacco products to 21. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell also said raising the smoking age to 21 is a top priority. “There’s two Republicans that believed in doing the right thing,” Brann said. The bill has some bipartisan support as well. Democrat Reps. Wittenberg, Jon Hoadley, Terry Sabo and Kristy Pagan have attached their names to Brann’s bill. “I remember (Brann) talking about it, and I was supportive of what he was trying to get accomplished,” Wittenberg said. While Brann has seen support from his fellow politicians, local tobacco businesses are worried the bill could damage their business. Grant Kennell, manager of Wild Bill’s Tobacco in Lansing, said the age restriction would deplete

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their business by three-fourths. Kennell made his comment before the flavored products ban. He said that underage purchases aren’t an issue because Wild Bill’s Tobacco checks ID for every customer. “I don’t think that it would be necessary for us as a store to raise our age to 21. ... In my opinion, at 18, you can go overseas, you can get shot in the military,” Kennell said. “At 18, you have the life skills to make your own decisions.” In its current form, the bill would not grandfather in current smokers under the age of 21. It is still in committee. “I got elected to protect my citizens and protect the safety and welfare of them,” Brann said. “This is part of it.”


CAMPUS

ONE BOOK, ONE COMMUNITY TO IMPLEMENT PROGRAM CHANGES BY KARLY GRAHAM KGRAHAM@STATENEWS.COM

For the 18th year, One Book, One Community — or OBOC — has worked to bring the communities within and around Michigan State together through literature. Times have changed since OBOC began in 2002, and the organization is looking to evolve in order to encourage students and community members to read the selected book each year. OBOC announces a new book each spring selected by a committee composed of three members representing MSU, and two representing the city of East Lansing. Last year was the first time the community was able to provide input via an online survey. Almost 500 people responded, according to OBOC Project Manager Erin Sonneveldt. The result of the survey was the selection of Matthew Desmond’s book, “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.” The survey was created to “give more interest in the program and allow the community — both campus and the local community — to help guide the decision,” said Janet Lillie, the assistant vice president for community relations at MSU and a long-standing OBOC committee member. Including the public’s input on the annual book selection is just one way OBOC is changing to fit the needs of the community. Incoming freshmen at MSU are required to read — and are automatically billed for — the selected book. The author visits East Lansing in the fall for a public discussion of their book. The selection process begins in October, when the committee begins reading and creating a short list of books that could potentially be chosen. OBOC’s goal is to choose a book relevant to the current climate of the city, region, country or world. To assist in creating a dialogue, the author attends a question and answer session so the community can ask them questions that were submitted before the event. “We try to pick a book that is meaningful to our communities and is readable, and one that maybe has somewhat of a different theme than previous years,” Sonneveldt said. “We try to develop programming that would be interesting for community members and MSU students and faculty to engage in.” Sonneveldt said she hopes choosing books that are relevant and meaningful will inspire MSU students to really read the book. “I think it’s the selection of the book that we hope inspires people to pick it up — whether it’s the material, the content, the message,” she said. “That, we hope, will engage people as readers.” As the tides are changing, more and more stu-

ASMSU TAX

“I think it’s the selection of the book that we hope inspires people to pick it up — whether it’s the material, the content, the message. That, we hope, will engage people as readers.” Erin Sonneveldt One Book One Community Project Manager dents are choosing to spend their free time doing things other than reading, so OBOC is evolving to try to incorporate other facets of media to encourage people to communicate and foster opinions on specific issues. Choosing books that have accompanying movies, for instance, is one thing OBOC thinks will motivate student interest. “This year, we’re promoting movies that are related to homelessness or that are related to housing insecurity,” Sonneveldt said. “We’re thinking about it a little bit more in terms of music, or thinking about other ways that readers — especially young people — are engaging in content. It’s something we are thinking about implementing (in) our future programs.” It is estimated that over half of the population in East Lansing consists of non-permanent residents, so it is important to the organization to try and connect the permanent residents with MSU students. OBOC is showing movies and having panel discussions and mini lectures related to the topic of housing insecurity at the East Lansing Public Library throughout September. “It is a unique program that brings together our community — East Lansing, the greater Lansing area and our MSU community which includes students, faculty, staff and alumni .— to engage on topics that sometimes are very difficult. And it’s an opportunity for us to learn from each other, so I think that that’s what I find so interesting about this program.”

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Students who are registered as a full time student and paid The State News subscription fee for the current semester may receive a refund of that fee if they do not wish to support the student newspaper. Refunds will be paid during the first 10 days of classes at 435 E. Grand River. Proof of payment of the fee and a photo ID must be presented. Office hours are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Incoming freshmen at MSU are required to read — and are automatically billed for — a book selected by the One Book, One Community organization each year. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY SYLVIA JARRUS

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Employment

Employment

Misc. For Sale

CAMPUS COORDINATOR: Make a difference in the Nov. 2019 city council election while learning grassroots advocacy. Internship or volunteer. Contact Lisa@ LisaBabcock.com

RESEARCH INTERN or volunteer needed: Make a difference in East Lansing by researching city issues. Ideal for Poly Sci or JRN majors. Contact Lisa@LisaBabcock.com.

Set of barstools for sale, like new. Woven seats, walnut finish. $60 OBO. Call or text Don at 517803-7109.

Come roll with Auntie Anne’s Pretzels in the Meridian Mall. Join our fun, energetic team. We are currently hiring Shift Managers. Request an application or send a resume to pretzelsaami113@ gmail.com or apply at the store. DISC JOCKEYS NEEDED! Are you that person that loves music and gets people jumpin’ at the parties? Do you love sports and the idea of playing music to ignite thousands of fans? Are you fun, outgoing and entertaining? TUNES BY T, the Official DJs to all things Sparty & MSU (athletics and beyond) is looking for part-time help. Must have transportation, free nights & wknds. $15.00+TIPS to start. Apply at: tunesbyt.com/employment or call (517) 33-TUNES.

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RETAIL SALES Clerk Delphi Glass Creativity Center p/t, includes weekends. Apply @ 3380 E Jolly Rd. 394-4685 or roy@delphiglass. com

Apts. For Rent ONE BEDROOM one bathrom apartment. Available for 1 tenant. Close to campus. Very neat. 368 Oakhill. 517-332-1763.

Subleases SUBLEASE 1 ROOM IN EAST LANSING 4 BR/2 Bath house, move-in ready, MONTHLY RENT:$500. SECURITY DEPOSIT:1.5 Months. Melrose Avenue East Lansing, MI 48823. Short term lease can be negotiable for Fall semester, 19 or one yr lease. 248-943-6714

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VINTAGE BIKES FOR SALE Maroon Schwinn mountain bike: 21 speeds, combination lock included, great shape, recently tuned by Velocipede Peddler. $120 OBO. 1987 Purple Figi trail bike: 10 speed, cycle computer, new seat, great shape. $75 OBO. Call/ text Don at 517-803-7109. Vintage Gucci 11/12 gold plated ladies watch for sale. In original box with 9 bezels included. $175 OBO. Call or text Don at 517803-7109.

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The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University on Thursdays during fall, spring and select days during summer seme...

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