Friday 07/29/22 - Summer Mail Home

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Michigan State’s Independent Voice

MAIL HOME EDITION SUMMER 2022

YOUR GUIDE TO ALL THINGS MSU

CAMPUS

CITY

Transitional housing and no isolation space: The ins and outs of fall 2022 move-in

Nightlife Guide: The unique personalities of East Lansing’s bars

The State News is here to help you answer questions you may have about on-campus housing with a breakdown of all the changes you can expect to see.

Here is what you need to know about each bar in order to get a taste of what makes the city’s nightlife so special.

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SPORTS

The ultimate Spartan Stadium rule book for freshmen football fans By Eli McKown emckown@statenews.com Alright freshmen, listen up. Assuming you’re like most people who are heading into their first year at Michigan State, you probably have purchased your season tickets for football or you are planning on buying a couple of tickets throughout the season off some friends or Facebook. The Michigan State football game day experience is one that almost all freshmen partake in one way or another. But you might be asking yourselves, what am

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I supposed to do? What are the chants? How soon do I arrive? What if I want to leave early? I’m here to help you. Not out of the kindness of my heart, but selfishly as I want you all to be on your best behavior, plus I want us upperclassmen to not immediately be able to pick you out as you awkwardly stand there with your phone in your hand as the alma mater starts to play.

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msufcu.org | 517-333-2424 | Visit a branch Offer of $100 valid 5/1/22 to 10/31/22 for those who qualify under the MSU student SEG. MSUFCU account must be activated by 10/31/22 and 10 debit card purchases must post within 30 days of card activation to qualify. The $100 will be deposited into member’s checking account within 6 weeks of the 10th purchase. Not valid for existing members with an MSUFCU checking account. May not be combined with any other deposit offers. If new member is referred to the Credit Union, member referral offer will not apply.

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Vol. 113 | No. 1

FRIDAY, JULY 29, 2022

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR:

JOIN OUR TEAM!

The State News will be here every step of the way

By SaMya Overall soverall@statenews.com When I walked into The State News’ office in September 2019, I was just a freshman. I’d been at MSU for an entire two days. I was greeted by then-Editorin-Chief Madison O’Connor and then-Managing Editor Mila Murray. I was hired as a staff reporter, jumping between city, campus and multimedia desks before landing on my feet as a campus general assignments reporter. And then I blinked. And now I’m writing to you as the Editor-in-Chief for the 2022-23 academic year. I left MSU in 2020 as a freshman due to COVID-19. I was a pessimist with mental health issues and my future post-college seemed like a black hole that I was constantly running from. Now, I’m going into my final year; I have a plan for my life once I cross that stage. I have hope that things will get better because if I can survive a global pandemic, what can’t I do, right? And yes, despite that, I am

MEET THE SUMMER STAFF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF SaMya Overall

still thinking, “What the hell was my college experience?” These four years haven’t been easy on anyone, and The State News is no different. We’re all still picking ourselves up after the pandemic, emotionally and, for some, financially. And as sick as some of us may be of talking about COV ID -19, t he t r ut h is, for many of my peers and myself, it’s the headline of our college experience. The State News has been the one consistent thing in my life throughout these four years; I want to give that same sense of consistency and familiarity to you. I couldn’t be more excited to lead a newsroom that has shaped me into the student, journalist and person that I am today. I’ve been in this role for three months and the metaphorical rollercoaster that is editor-in-chief already has me waiting in line for another ride. But with that excitement comes apprehension. I want The State News to do well for you all. The State News is your newspaper. That has always been the goal—to provide students and the larger MSU community with important news for students, by students. We w i l l cont i nue our unbiased, thorough, relevant coverage of all things MSU and East Lansing—administration, st udent organizations, upcoming elections, pop culture events, football, basketball, swim and dive, Roe v. Wade ...

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and anything else that comes up along the way. We’ve made it this far together. We were here when the country closed its doors and we were resigned to our homes. We were here when COVID-19 cases hit the thousands, then the hundred-thousands, then a million. We mourned when COVID-19 variants postponed our return to college life. We celebrated when vaccines were created. We were confused as COVID-19 policies were changed again and again and again. We cried for Brendan Santo and Phat Nguyen. We cheered for MSU football and men’s and women’s basketball. We sighed in relief when finals week ended, shutting the door on a year that was almost as weird as the one before it. We watched as Roe v. Wade was overturned. We witnessed the protests. We saw the joy and the fear. We had to adjust. You had to adjust. We all continue to adjust together. So no matter what this next year holds, I can promise you one thing: The State News will be here. Thank you for allowing me to lead your newspaper. I hope we make you proud. Some of you have walked these four years together and some of you are just joining our journey this year. Either way, we’ll continue to walk them together. I can promise you that.

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OPI N I O N

ELI’S DECLASSIFIED FRESHMAN SURVIVAL GUIDE By Eli McKown emckown@statenews.com

As I enter my senior year of college, there are many things that I look back on and regret like late nights, taking bad classes and much more. For incoming MSU freshmen, I have put together five crucial things that will save you from future pain and help you survive college. Results may vary.

DO WHAT’S BEST FOR YOU AND YOUR SCHEDULE

When you start putting your schedule together, many people will tell you that you shouldn’t take an 8 a.m. class or you should avoid Friday classes. Truthfully, all that matters is that you make a balanced schedule that fits your current

a cheap pair of slides from Meijer that cost me about $10. If you want to be stylish and have some nicer Nike slides or some Gucci slides, go ahead. As long as they keep your feet fungus-free, you’ll be good

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF YOUR DINING PLAN

life. If you’re a late riser, probably don’t schedule that early class and vice versa. For me, I’m big into getting up and getting my classes done early so I can have the rest of my day to relax or work. That’s the minor part of scheduling, however. The hardest part is balancing difficult and easy classes. My biggest struggle in college with mental health was when I loaded a semester full of difficult classes and that caused my social life to dwindle and my work to suffer. However, loading a semester with easy classes also can be a detriment as it lets you relax too much and it can be hard to get back into the normal routine of school when you’re wasting lots of time.

My best suggestion is to schedule a nice balance of easy and difficult classes to keep you on your toes, but not drown you.

SHOWER SHOES ARE A MUST

Truthfully, I really don’t care if you are in the communal bathroom or the suite-style bathroom, you need shower shoes. Yes, it sounds lame but it is an absolute must with what MSU provides for housing. The number of people that have used the shower before you should be enough to make you want to have shoes. To avoid getting something nasty on your feet or catching some k ind of f ung us, I recommend a pair of slides of any kind. Personally, I had

As tempting as it is to wander over to Grand River Avenue and get some food every day, I can’t stress enough how much I miss the dining hall now and wish I still had that access. The ability to walk in at nearly any time of day and get food and not have to cook for yourself was something I did not appreciate nearly enough as a freshman. Not only should you go into the dining hall as much as you want, but make sure to never leave a combo unused. Even if you don’t want any instant food from one of the dining options around, go into Sparty’s and grab yourself a combo to throw in your fridge or closet when you are hungry later and everything is closed. While you should go out and eat with your friends from time to time, save that money for when you no longer have the meal plan.

while at college. I have a daily routine from Sunday through Friday to wake up no later than 9 a.m. and to be in bed by midnight to ensure I still get eight to nine hours of sleep each night. Without that eight to nine hours, I can get to be a bit of a wreck and much less productive. Nights out in East Lansing can change my sleep schedule, obviously, but if you can keep a consistent routine it will help a lot. In addition to sleep, make sure to plan out your days ahead with your class schedule and block out time to eat meals and take time for yourself. In college, it can be so easy to neglect taking care of yourself. In addition to eating to keep you moving, I recommend having an hour every day at a minimum to do something you want to do like watching TV, playing video games or whatever it is to make you happy. There’s always something you can be working on or doing that you have to do, but taking care of yourself is paramount to sustained success.

be the past. I can tell you that there is nothing worse than being around someone at a party and they say, “When I was in high school, I … .” Trust me, nobody cares. You can still have things from high school, but college is your time to evolve as a person. Avoid going home every weekend and try to stay around college so you can adjust and begin to grow. Welcome to MSU and good luck this year.

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SET A DAILY ROUTINE

While your class schedule may dictate some of this, a daily routine is crucial in staying up

LET HIGH SCHOOL GO

This is coming from the guy who’s in a long-term relationship with his high school sweetheart and is still best friends with his friends from high school, but to grow, you need to let those days

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CAMP U S

Transitional housing and no isolation space: The ins and outs of fall 2022 move-in By Wajeeha Kamal and Jenna Malinowski feedback@statenews.com

If a student meets any of those requirements, they are automatically approved to live off-campus, but they must register through the housing exemption application. And, if the criteria does not apply to the student, they may still apply for financial or medical circumstances.

If you’re an incoming freshman, you probably have a lot of questions about the current status of dorm life this fall. The State News is here to help you answer some of those questions with a breakdown of all the changes you can expect to see.

WHAT ABOUT COVID-19?

Due to the new requirement, MSU Live On announced in November 2021 that upperclassmen would be unable to live on campus during the 2022-2023 academic year. “We certainly evaluate the process every year after it happens, and make adjustments for the following year, and I have no doubt that that will happen in this case as well,” Cooper said.

In addition to the transitional housing, RHS will not provide quarantine and isolation housing for on-campus residents in 2022-23 either due to low usage. There is no requirement to notify the university of a positive COVID-19 test, but RHS expects students who test positive to isolate themselves and limit non-essential contact with others, not attend in-person classes or activities,and contact medical personnel if symptoms worsen or do not improve. Students should be prepared, Cooper said, and bring masks and tests.

CAN I BE EXEMPT?

AS A PARENT, HOW BAD IS IT REALLY?

WHAT IS ‘TRANSITIONAL HOUSING’?

Transitional housing is a term used to describe the temporary housing situation up to 20% of new and transfer students will experience this fall. Incoming freshmen may be subjected to living with three people in a dorm traditionally accommodating two people or five people in the case of the Akers dorm, which regularly holds four people, until additional housing opens up. Affected residential halls include Akers, Hubbard, Armstrong, Bryan and Wilson halls. The incoming freshman class would be the largest to enroll at MSU, causing on-campus housing to be at capacity. Most students have been informed of their housing assignments and know whether they have been assigned to traditional or transitional housing, Residential Education and Housing Services, or RHS, Chief Communications Officer Kat Cooper said. However, this may change before students move in depending on how

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MSU President Samuel L. Stanley Jr. recounts a story about being upstaged by Sparty at fall move in on Aug. 28, 2021. Photo by Chloe Trofatter

many students decide not to attend the university between now and the fall semester. Many students have also reported being placed with a random roommate or being placed in a dorm outside of their Living Learning Community, or LLC. Cooper said students are not able to switch assignments at this time with the exception of students living in suite-style dorms being able to swap suitemates. Each student in a transitional housing assignment will pay a reduced room rate during that transitional period and students will be moved throughout the fall semester as space becomes available. T h is is happen i ng because MSU reinstated the second-year housing requirement.

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Students may seek an exemption from all housing requirements if they meet one of the following criteria: They’ll be living with a parent or legal guardian, they’ll be 20 years of age by the first day of class of fall semester, they’re married, they’re a military veteran with one or more years of active service, or they will be taking six or fewer credits during the semester in question.

Kate Randall’s son Cooper was placed with his selected roommate in Mayo hall and has had a good experience with housing. However, she was preparing him for the possibility of receiving a transitional assignment or not being placed with his selected roommate. “We just tried to be really openminded,” Randall said. “I think it’s all just part of the college

experience, but we’re very happy so far with everything.” Isabella Djordjevski’s son Robert was admitted for the spring semester but is yet to receive a housing assignment for the fall. After reaching out to admissions, Djordevski said they found out no spring admits had been moved up and that they should contact housing. “We cannot believe a prestigious university such as Michigan State University would be so unorganized and uncaring,” Djordjevski said. One parent, who asked to remain anonymous, said her son coordinated efforts to live with four others in the Residential Business College which is housed in McDonel, but was placed in a transitional assignment with two other students he doesn’t know in a double in Brody neighborhood. “Placing him in essentially temporary housing will create chaos,” she said. “Once you arrive on campus, you want to be settled where you will live so that you can start your college journey.” Overall, Cooper advises students to bring flexibility for their fall 2022 move-in. “Whether you’re transitionally housed or not, there’s going to be something different than what you were expecting,” she said. “Bring your open mind because something is going to surprise you and you never know exactly what it’s going to be.”


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What to know about Michigan State’s on-campus neighborhoods By Nick Lundberg nlundberg@statenews.com One of the biggest transitions for incoming Michigan State freshmen is learning how to navigate the campus. Knowing your way around early into your college career can be very helpful in getting ahead start in many areas of your university experience. As a rising sophomore, I am here to give you a deep dive into the specifics of the five different neighborhoods on campus to help those who may not be familiar with the lay of the land.

GENERAL AMENITIES

There are many different helpful characteristics each neighborhood has to offer, but there are some that every neighborhood has. At MSU, there is no cost to do laundry. “Students just have to provide the detergent and there are laundry rooms in each hall, typically in the basement,” Residence Education and Housing Services communiations team manager Bethany Balks said. There are also cardio rooms and at least one community kitchen in each neighborhood. Each neighborhood has at least one all-you-can-eat dining hall

along with a Sparty’s for grab-and-go food. Holmes and Holden also offer mobile ordering options as well where students can order meals through Eat at State. While there are many general amenities each neighborhood shares, there are also a lot of differences that make each unique.

EAST NEIGHBORHOOD

East Neighborhood is located on the northeast side of the campus near the intersection of Hagadorn and Shaw Roads. It contains the Akers, Holmes and Hubbard dormitories. In East Neighborhood, you will find a lot of freshmen as well as a few sophomores in Holmes. There are two dining halls: one in Akers and the other in Holmes Hall. Nearby, you can find the IM East, the Wharton Center for Performing Arts and the Business College Complex.

RIVER TRAIL NEIGHBORHOOD

This neighborhood is located along the south bank of the Red Cedar River on Shaw Lane. This neighborhood includes McDonel Hall, Shaw Hall, Owen Graduate Hall and Van Hoosen Apartments.

This neighborhood only has one dining hall in Shaw Hall. It is right next door to East Neighborhood, so you are also very close to IM East, the Wharton Center and the Business College Complex as well as the MSU College of Law and the College of Veterinary Medicine. River Trail, like East Neighborhood, has designated Honors College floors.

NORTH NEIGHBORHOOD

The halls in this neighborhood are the oldest on campus and they feature traditional collegiate-style architecture. The neighborhood stretches just north of the Red Cedar River and alongside Michigan and Grand River Avenues. North Neighborhood holds 10 separate halls; Abbot, Campbell, Gilchrist, Landon, Mason, Mayo, Phillips, Snyder, Williams and Yakeley. This neighborhood features two dining halls (Landon and Snyder-Phillips), as well as a food court in the MSU Union. Along with the MSU Union, North Neighborhood is also located near Adams Field, the Broad Art Museum and the bustle of Grand River. Grand River Avenue is one of the main attractions at Michigan State, as it features a lot of restaurants and places to shop.

State News File Photo

SOUTH NEIGHBORHOOD

This neighborhood is located southwest of Spartan Stadium between West Shaw Lane and Trowbridge Road. Along with being close to Spartan Stadium, it is also close to the Breslin Center, Munn Ice Arena, IM West and outdoor tennis facilities. It features Case Hall, Wonders Hall, Wilson Hall and Holden Hall. There is one all-you-can-eat dining hall in Case and a grab-and-go dining hall in Holden. If you are a science major, recent graduate Nick Saba, who stayed in the dorms all four years of his MSU career, said he can not recommend Wilson Hall enough. “It really is good because it is full of a lot of other freshmen and it is really meant to bring you in and get you started on campus,” Saba said. South will feature a lot of freshmen as well this year, as all four of its dorms house first-year students. It also has

optional co-ed floors for students.

BRODY NEIGHBORHOOD

Last but not least, Brody Neighborhood is located on the west side of campus just north of the Red Cedar River. Brody accommodates six halls: Armstrong, Bailey, Bryan, Butterfield, Emmons and Rather. These halls feature the largest student rooms on campus. The neighborhood is located close to the Spartan athletic facilities and the Breslin Student Events Center. Brody is home to some of the most architecturally interesting buildings, including Brody Hall itself, home to the Brody Square dining hall. All in all, each neighborhood has its pros. It is up to you to take advantage of everything yours has to offer. If you have any further questions, contact the Residence Education and Housing Services office. Happy on-campus living!

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Out-of-state Spartans share how they found a home away from home at MSU By Madison Rose mrose@statenews.com Only 14.4% of undergraduate students at Michigan State University came from states outside of Michigan in the fall of the 2021-22 school year, according to the 2021 fall enrollment report. When over three-quarters of your classmates have the advantage of familiarity, acclimating to an out-of-state school can quickly become overwhelming. Journalism sophomore Campbell Berg, from Leesburg, Virginia, was drawn to MSU’s journalism program, atmosphere and reputation. Before attending, Berg had only been to Michigan once. “I was nervous to make friends because I know MSU is a state school,” Berg said. “So many people from Michigan were going to be there and it was really hard to see everybody coming in with a set friend group because they already knew people.” However, being naturally outgoing, Berg said she found herself excited at the prospect of so many new people to meet and quickly found her place on campus through student organizations.

“I am a really outgoing person, so I was so excited to meet so many new people because the campus is so big,” Berg said. “There are so many opportunities on campus, as well, and I’m a part of multiple organizations: I’m in a sorority, I’m on (the executive) board for MSU’s Dance Marathon, I’m on the writing staff for Her Campus. So, I was just excited to see all the opportunities that the campus had.” When she first arrived on campus, visits from her parents and cousins helped Berg adjust to life as a Spartan, but finding her friends truly helped her settle in. “Once I met my friends, my experience got like 100 times better because I had people to go around with and explore with,” Berg said. “Once I got out there, I felt more comfortable with the campus and with the city of Lansing and East Lansing.” Berg said she recommends that other out-of-state students take advantage of everything MSU has to offer to get the best experience possible. “Don’t be afraid to reach out and try new things,” Berg said. “Go to all the different stuff that MSU holds, such as Sparticipation, and if your college has a welcome week event or a club fair,

“I wanted to go out of state because I figured it’d be nice to experience something new, a different area, different people.” Illustration by Madison Echlin

Joi Edwards

Animal science sophomore go to those. Meet the people who are there and reach out to people because if you reach out, you’ll find the people who are meant for you and it’ll make your experience so much better.” Like Berg, animal science sophomore Joi Edwards, from Los Angeles, chose MSU for its academics. “I chose MSU for a number of reasons, one of the biggest being that they have a really good animal science major, very hands-on, and my goal is to become a veterinarian,” Edwards said. A cross- count r y move f rom met ropolitan Califor nia to

comparatively-rural Michigan would frighten most people, but Edwards welcomed the change of scenery. “I wanted to go out of state because I figured it’d be nice to experience something new, a different area, different people,” Edwards said. “I really didn’t want to stay in California just because I’ve been here my whole life and I thought I could get a new experience in Michigan.” While excited to meet so many new people, Edwards worried about being so far from old connections as she entered the school year. “I don’t really have access to my family and my friends as easily, so that was something that was a bit nerve-

racking and knowing that I couldn’t just go home as easily as others,” Edwards said. Through her friendships, Edwards quickly found herself at home in a city that could not be more different than her hometown — an experience she credits with bringing a bit of home with her. “The best way to get comfortable is just start making a home,” Edwards said. “Meeting people and buying things that make you feel at home or comfortable, talking to your family as much as you can, because you’ll be homesick, but just talking to friends or family from home every once in a while will make you feel 10 times better.”

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NEW SPARTAN PARENTS! Here’s how to keep up with all the MSU news your new Spartan is too busy to tell you about. Subscribe to The State News daily newsletter. To receive daily top stories Monday to Friday go to

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SP ORTS

The return of MSU’s favorite hockey twins: Christian and Cole Krygier

By Sam Sklar ssklar@statenews.com The Krygier twins are back, but it may not have been without a pair of Krygier-Nightingale encounterings in the last decade. As the final seconds ticked down and the last horn sounded at Yost Ice Arena, lots of pressing questions surrounding the future of the MSU hockey program began swirling – if they were not already. It was an 8-0 wipeout by Michigan in the Big Ten Tournament. Another early, yet predictable, season-ending loss in March. One more season had passed and one more Big Ten Tournament without picking up a single win. MSU collapsed in the second half of the season after an encouraging first three months and settled into its typical spot in the cellar of the conference. Ex-Head Coach Danton Cole was at the headlights of the program’s shortcomings. Five years had passed with little signs of progress and one month later, he was relieved of his duties. Danton Cole vowed that major changes were imminent before he was let go, stating he wasn’t “going to leave any stones unturned this offseason.” While that loss was just about wrapped up when the Spartans fell behind 4-0 in the first period, skating off the ice for the final time is always an uneasy feeling. That’s especially true of those planning to move on, such as defensemen Cole and Christian Krygier. For the first time in their lives, the plan was for the twins to split up. “I think especially not knowing if we were going to come back or what we were doing at that point I think it was definitely a thought in my

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Luckily for the Krygier family, their history with Nightingale goes years past his hiring in early May, laying the tracks for Nightingale’s very first roster move as head coach: bringing back Christian Krygier.

NOT YOUR TYPICAL HOUSEHOLD

Cole and Christian Krygier pose on the ice at Munn Ice Arena on July 8. Photo by Devin Anderson-Torrez

head that it might have been the last time putting on the jersey and coming back to Michigan State,” Cole Krygier said. The Krygier twins entered the transfer portal and surveyed their options at other schools while also fielding opportunities to play outside of the college realm. Neither found what they were looking for and it was Cole Krygier who made the decision first in early April when Danton Cole offered him a spot to return for the 202223 season. Three days later, Danton Cole was fired. And with it came a tidal wave of uncertainties, first and foremost with who would be the next head coach. Then there was the roster. Who would stay? Who

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would go? The roster was essentially frozen as nobody knew what the future looked like. Cole Krygier was still determined though. Michigan State was where he wanted to be. “I feel like the other programs that had been offered to me already, like the money or just the opportunity and overall time and just the guys they already had, wouldn’t have worked out well for me,” Cole Krygier said. “So I was set on staying at Michigan State.” One month later Adam Nightingale was named Michigan State’s new head coach. It was a late offseason hiring and many of the first and second pickings of the transfer portal had already been grabbed. Still, nobody on the roster was safe.

Christian and Cole Krygier are not the only athletes in the family. In fact, they are just a share of the family athletes. The twins’ father, Todd, played in over 500 NHL games and scored exactly 100 goals with stops in Hartford, Anaheim and Washington where he helped the Capitals reach the Stanley Cup Finals in 1998 – two years before Christian and Cole were born. The twins are the youngest of five siblings, all of which are Division I athletes. Sisters Natalie and Grace both played soccer at Iowa and Wisconsin respectively. The twins’ lone brother, Brock, was a hockey player too, a defenseman at Michigan State from 2012-15 under Tom Anastos. “It was a lot,” Todd Krygier said. “Typically my wife dealt with the soccer and I dealt with hockey. Occasionally we would crossover but we would definitely have to keep a family calendar with all the practices and games and coordinate everything.” Following his playing career, Todd Krygier swapped his hockey knowledge over to the coaching ranks where, since 2019, he has served as the assistant coach with the Grand Rapids Griffins, the Detroit Red Wings AHL affiliate. Todd’s ties with the Red Wings’ organization is one of two bridges connecting the Krygiers with Nightingale. After one season as a video coach with the Buffalo Sabres, Nightingale assumed the same position with the Red Wings for two seasons.


S PORTS He was promoted to assistant coach ahead of the 2019-20 season, the same year Todd Krygier joined the Griffins. It was only one year of crossover with Nightingale leaving in 2020 for the USA Hockey National Team Development Program, but it was enough for Nightingale to win Todd Krygier’s metaphorical stamp of approval. “More important for me than his coaching is really the person he is,” Todd Krygier said. “I really feel like he really cares about his players that play for him … I am real excited for him at Michigan State.”

THE ZOOM CALL AND THEN THE PHONE CALL

Shortly after Nightingale was hired by MSU, he held a Zoom call to introduce himself to the team. Cole was already committed to returning to Michigan State while Christian was still in the transfer portal. Within an hour after the Zoom call, Nightingale’s phone rang. It was Christian. He wanted to come back. That’s when Nightingale turned to what he remembered about the Krygiers. He didn’t welcome Christian back on the team simply because the team was in desperate need of defensemen. Nightingale remembered his enjoyment of crossing paths with Todd. The combination of person and player helped tide him over. On May 18, Cole and Christian officially announced together that they’d be returning to Michigan State for a fifth season. “I was excited,” Nightingale said. “I think the world of the family and I am excited to get the chance to coach them.”

UNLOCKING THE KRYGIERS

During the 2018 NHL Draft, there were hopes a team would take a chance on

Christian and/or Cole. As the picks kept coming in and their names were not being called, frustration boiled over and they shut off the T.V. They wanted to grab a bite to eat. Christian hopped into the shower and then Cole received a phone call. Christian had been drafted, a seventh-round pick, 196th overall by the New York Islanders. Moments later, another call came in. Cole was drafted too, just five picks after his brother by the Florida Panthers. “It was cool, obviously,” Cole said. “It was special for my parents and my grandparents to hear.” The Islanders and Panthers saw potential in the Krygier twins that night. They are big, physical defensemen who skate well and can defend. Problem is, they’ve yet to put their complete game together. Just ask Todd. “I think they have to improve with playing with the puck and have the puck on their stick more,” Todd Krygier said. “Being more aggressive offensively and not just play defense all the time. You gotta defend well, but you also gotta get up and play.” However, both Cole and Christian accumulated career highs in points last year as Michigan State’s offense rebounded from a putrid 2020-21 season. Neither have topped more than 11 points in a season while with the Spartans. But with Nightingale’s up-tempo style of play he hopes to implement, the Krygier twins could reach limits never-beforereached in their time in East Lansing. “It’s always a good time and definitely don’t take it for granted to be able to play with each other,” Christian Krygier said. “I’m just happy about that and looking forward to it because this probably will be one of the last times that we do get to play together.”

STADIUM: FROM PAGE 1 PRE-GAME

Pre-game is perhaps one of the most important parts of the Michigan State football experience. Timing, activities and rate of your consumption of food and beverage are key. You may be going to a tailgate with your family or friends before. The key thing here is keeping an eye on the clock and watching what you eat and drink. I’m going to tell a little story about myself here. Prior to Michigan State-Penn State in 2019, I ate way too many hamburgers at the Case Dining Hall with friends. I spent the entire time outside the gate to get in, running back and forth to the port-a-potty. I then spent the first half inside the Spartan Stadium bathrooms holding one of what is seemingly four toilets in Spartan Stadium. Moral of the stor y, keep anything you’re eating … or drinking in mind before you go. You don’t want to miss those moments in Spartan Stadium in the bathroom.

ARRIVING AT SPARTAN STADIUM, GETTING YOUR SEAT

Timing is ever y thing when it comes to arriving at Spartan Stadium. First, know who you are going with to the game. As a

freshman, you might not know the personalities of your group, so be sure to plan ahead and communicate that to your group. Upon entry, you will be given a wristband with a color. That color corresponds to your section. If it is the same as in previous years, the pink section is the closest. An insider tip from a senior: If you want to sit nice and close in the pink section for a lower opponent on the schedule, you will want to arrive somewhere between an hour to an hour and a half before gates open. For big games like, probably closer to three hours before the gates open.

CHANTS

You will sing the fight song plenty and no, nine times isn’t enough. You sing it every time. At the end of the game, win or lose, you stay and put your arms around your fellow Spartans and sing the alma mater. No exceptions. There are two things that are the most important to the student fan experience. First, if someone says, “Go Green” to you, respond with “Go White” and don’t ask any questions. Second, bring your keys. Every third down the Spartans are on defense, I better see those keys jangling right in front of your face. I don’t care if you only have your room key, have

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them out. Before the game might be my favorite tradition. Prior to the game, the announcer will address the stadium with the weather forecast. Rain or shine, at the end you must yell with the crowd, ‘It’s aaaaaaaa beeeeautiful day foooooooooorrrrr football!.’ It does not matter if it is a blizzard or a monsoon, you say that every time. You didn’t go to a Big Ten school to complain about it being cold. The new tradition at Michigan State is that when the team runs onto the field Fast Life Yungstaz’s Swag Surfin’ plays. Last year it drove me crazy to watch the student section with half energy partake in linking arms and shifting from side to side or Swag Surfin’ like they just woke up five minutes ago. So please, do us all a favor in making us look good, put your phone down and Swag Surf. They got rid of AC/DC’s ‘Thunderstruck’ after we complained enough, let’s pay it back. Whatever you do with this information is up to you. All I can ask is that you show some pride, act responsibly and have a good time.

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ROMANTICIZING EL: A GUIDE TO LOW-COST, CREATIVE SUMMER DATES By Miranda Dunlap mdunlap@statenews.com Summer is the time in which our professional and academic lives typically slow down, allowing us to give a little more attention to our personal – and romantic – lives. But if you’re a college student on a budget, keeping your dating life fun and interesting isn’t always a matter of whether or not you have the time – it can also be a matter of if you have the funds. If you are living in the East Lansing area this summer or returning for the fall semester, here is a list of ideas to keep you and your significant other entertained without tapping into your tuition savings account.

ATTEND A FREE CONCERT

If you or your partner love music, or just enjoy an upbeat, lively time, concerts can make for an exciting date night. However, concerts are typically reserved for a more special occasion because tickets can get pricey. This summer, a couples concert outing can cost you nothing. The City of East Lansing will host six completely free

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shows each Friday from July 8 to Aug. 12, as apart of the Summer Concert Series. The concerts will take place in Ann Street Plaza and will start at 7 p.m. “For the summer concert series, we highlight local and M ic h iga n-ba sed g roups,” East Lansing Administrative Services Coordinator Justin Drwencke said. “We usually see approximately 200 people come by just for the concert.”

EXPLORE ART EXHIBITS

Art exhibit visits are a great way to spark conversation between you and your date. Discussing the art allows you to catch a glimpse into their perspective of the world. East Lansing offers many free and low-cost opportunities to see artwork. The Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum on MSU’s campus is a popular attraction for visitors and locals alike. Open Thursday through Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., you can reserve your free tickets online. The East Lansing Public Art Gallery is more of a hidden gem located on the second floor of the Hannah Community Center. Admission to the gallery is always free, and you can access it

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whenever the community center is open. “The first Saturday of every month, there’s an art gallery opening and there’s snacks,” Art Festival and Arts Initiative Coordinator Heather Majano said. “You get to ask the artist some questions and check out their art.” Majano said that the art gallery is small but impactful to the artists. Typically, she said, it’s an artist from the East Lansing area being featured and it’s their first showcase, so you and your date will be supporting new artists while having a fun time.

SHOP AT FARMER’S MARKETS

Farmer’s Market days can be a great way to enjoy a slow morning with your partner. Set the romantic scene by listening to feel-good ‘70s jams on your way to the market, and picking out a fun snack to try out together. The East Lansing Farmer’s Market, or ELFM, will take place every Sunday until Oct. 30. You can shop at ELFM from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Valley Court Park. Every item sold by vendors at ELFM is 100% homegrown meaning that every item is made or grown locally in Michigan.

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There is also live music each week, to enjoy while you wander around the market. “The goal is to create a safe space for all to enjoy,” Farmer’s Market Manager Karla ForrestHewitt said. “It provides access to local fresh food, it gives vendors a way to connect with customers. It gives the community a place to engage.” Farmer’s Markets do not have to be strictly a Sunday activity. Just outside of East Lansing, the Meridian Township Farmer’s Market is open on Wednesdays from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. and on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1995 Central Park Drive in Okemos.

GO BOOKSTORE-HOPPING

If you or your partner is a bookworm, you’re in luck, because there are several bookstores in the East Lansing area, waiting to be explored. Grab a latte from your favorite coffee shop and visit them all for a low-cost day of entertainment. The Curious Book Shop, located at 307 E. Grand River Ave., has been a part of the East Lansing community for over 50 years. The shop is a three-story space that is filled with books. The shop offers

fun specials like “blind dates,” where employees wrap a book in paper, concealing it’s cover, and allow you to choose a book based solely on a short synopsis that an employee writes. Just a half-mile down the road lives The Archives Book Shop, Curious Book Shop’s companion store. This store is perfect for those that are more interested in antique or collectible books. The space is home to more than 60,000 books. Sc hu le r B o ok s i s a n independent bookstore located just outside of East Lansing, at 1982 Grand River Ave. It’s a relatively larger store, and likely a better fit for those that want to explore more contemporary reads. The store also hosts various events, which can take your bookstore-hopping date to the next level. New to the area is Hooked, a bookstore that doubles – triples? – as a coffee shop and wine bar. Here, you can explore a selection of books that is a bit different from other stores; they focus on keeping stock of books by MSU professors, Michigan-based writers and up-and-coming “indie-next” authors. And if the date is going well, you can stay for a drink on the patio.

If you’re feeling adventurous, introduce a fun game to your bookstore date: ask your partner to pick out a book that they think you would enjoy, and refrain from peeking at their choice until you get home.

TRY OUT A NEW SPORT OR EXERCISE

There are many opportunities to get active around East Lansing, and many of these options are free. Yoga State has partnered with downtown East Lansing to offer Yoga On Albert, a free outdoor yoga class, three times per week this summer. The classes take place on Sunday, Wednesday and Saturday on the corner of Albert Avenue and Grove Street, in the Albert El Fresco space. Practicing yoga with your partner is a good opportunity to try something new and there are also several effects that could benefit your relationship. Yoga is known to positively impact your mood by producing endorphins and decreasing anxiety. Dating doesn’t always always have to be expensive or stressful. Hopefully, this list helps you get creative and turn up the romance this summer!


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C ITY

NIGHTLIFE GUIDE: THE UNIQUE PERSONALITIES OF EL’S BARS By Miranda Dunlap mdunlap@statenews.com If you ask a handful of East Lansing residents what their favorite bar in the city is, it’s likely that you won’t hear the same answer twice. All of the bars that comprise East Lansing’s drinking scene have a distinct personality. If you’re new to the area or the bar scene, here is what you need to know about each bar in order to get a taste of what makes the city’s nightlife so special.

LANDSHARK BAR & GRILL

Bartenders at Harper’s Restaurant and BrewPub on July 20. Photo by Sheldon Krause

Landshark has been in East Lansing for 37 years, but owner Joe David took over just one year ago. Since then, he has tried to make positive changes without compromising what the bar is known for. The bar is typically known for its Shark Bowl — a 20 oz to 46 oz bowl filled with alcohol. But David also revived Landshark’s kitchen, which was defunct for almost 30 years, a development that he takes pride in. Landshark also has live music on Thursdays, when their house band, The Vodka Redbulls, typically takes the stage. Landshark is open from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Sundays through Wednesdays. They are open until 2 a.m. on Thursdays through Saturdays.

CRUNCHY’S

Bottom photos: Lou and Harry’s Bar and Grill on July 20. Photo by Sheldon Krause

Crunchy’s offers an alternative to the typically loud, crowded bar scene, with a vibe that embraces the casual drinking experience. Recent MSU alumnus Anthony Bowers said that Crunchy’s is his favorite bar because of how low-key it is.

“I like the social aspect that it has,” Bowers said via Facebook message. “You get a lot more conversations with people rather than going to some of my other favorite bars that have a lot of loud music and dancing going on.” Crunchy’s is known by locals for its “Famous Crunchy Burger,” buckets of beer and live entertainment. The bar hosts local comedians on Mondays, trivia nights on Tuesdays and karaoke on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Crunchy’s is open from 11 a.m. to 12 a.m. on Sundays through Wednesdays. On Thursdays through Saturdays, they are open until 1 a.m.

TIN CAN BAR

The Tin Can Bar is a favorite amongst more mature East Lansing residents — those that are non-students or nearing the end of their college years. It’s home to stuffed burgers, pudding shots and over 50 Michigan craft beers. Global and international studies senior Lily Cooper said that Tin Can is her favorite bar because it attracts a crowd that is a bit older than the other bars downtown, so it doesn’t get as crazy as other bars sometimes do. Tin Can is known for its infamous “Beer Tours” and “Shot Tours.” If you’re up for a challenge, you can receive a “tour” punch card from a bartender and work on trying all 50 items on the list. For shots, there are four different categories that you must complete: “Faygo Bombs,” “Heavy Hitters,” “Easy Peasy” and “Stiff Shots.” When you finish all the items on your punch card, you receive a tee shirt and a spot on the bar wall. The Tin Can Bar is open from 5 p.m. to 2 a.m. They are closed on Sundays and Mondays.

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CI T Y THE GRADUATE HOTEL ROCK BAR

The Rock Bar takes on a different angle — literally — as an East Lansing bar. On the tenth floor of the Graduate Hotel, the bar offers rooftop views, comfortable seating arrangements and a patio that encompasses summer camp vibes. The Rock Bar is known for its unique craft cocktail menu. The ‘Adult Caprisun’ is served in a plastic pouch, which offers a fun drinking experience. The ‘M.A.C. Manhattan’ and ‘Sparty Water’ take inspiration from East Lansing and MSU. The Rock Bar is the place to visit if you want to sit down, relax and have a conversation over drinks. “I think the vibe at The Graduate is a lot more chill, everyone sitting down just taking in the views from the rooftop,” Bowers said. “This is a bar you could run into your TA or professor at on a Friday and Saturday night.” The Rock Bar is open from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. on Sundays through Thursdays. They are open from 4 p.m. to 12 a.m. on Fridays and from noon to 12 a.m. on Saturdays.

HARPER’S RESTAURANT & BREWPUB

As a naturopath, owner Trisha Riley tries to make the drinking experience as unique and healthy as possible. Harper’s might be known for its bustling nighttime bar scene, but it’s also a brewpub that produces its own gluten-free, organic beers. When it comes to the overall vibe of Harper’s, Riley sums it up as “eclectic.” Though you must be 21 or older to enter Harper’s after 8 p.m., anyone can enjoy the restaurant and patio during the day. Harper’s also hosts “givebacks”— nights where all of their cover fees go to a charity or community members in need. Riley said they are nearing $500,000 in total donations towards good causes. “We want to have a good leadership in the

community and that’s also why we do the ‘givebacks,’” Riley said. “Many of them are local in focus because we want to give back to the community as much as possible.” Harper’s is open every day from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.

P.T. O’MALLEY’S BAR AND GRILL

Having opened in 1981, P.T. O’Malley’s is a longtime staple of the East Lansing bar community. “I’ve talked to so many people who will come up to me and say they met inside P.T.’s and are married with kids,” owner Pat Riley said. “And those kids are now back at Michigan State going to school.” With a capacity of 200, P.T.’s creates a more cozy atmosphere. The bar is also home to the ‘Shot Wheel,’ a giant wheel that you spin to decide what shot you’ll be given at a discounted price. Riley said that the bar would be introducing a new menu of food this fall, which would give students something to look forward to when they come back to East Lansing. P.T. O’ Malley’s is open from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. They open at noon on Thursdays and are closed on Sundays.

LOU AND HARRY’S BAR AND GRILL

Popularly known by locals as “Lou-Ha’s,” Lou and Harry’s uniquely brings in the most business on a weekday. Thursday nights have been coined “Mug Nights,” where patrons purchase a 32oz mug and pay only $4 or $5 to fill it up with a drink of their choice every subsequent Mug Night. “Thursdays are definitely our busiest night, it’s been consistently busy for a very long time,” manager Shane Carney said. The inexpensive drink options are just one part of Lou and Harry’s recipe for success – the next being their kitchen, which serves food until 1 a.m.,

later than most other bars in the area. Lou and Harry’s is open until 2 a.m., six days per week.

THE RIVIERA CAFE

The Riviera Cafe, known by locals as “The Riv,” has been a staple of the East Lansing bar scene since 1981. The Riv hosts different specials throughout the week – Half-off Wednesdays, Twisted Tuesdays, Industry nights and RAMAs all ensure that you won’t spend a fortune on drinks. Complete with a dance floor, a photo booth, giant Jenga, a dart board and a pool table, The Riv guarantees that guests stay entertained while they drink. The Riv is open from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Mondays through Wednesdays and from noon to 2 a.m. on Thursdays through Saturdays. They are closed on Sundays this summer.

RICK’S AMERICAN CAFE

Landshark on July 19. Photo by Sheldon Krause

Rick’s has been a college student rite of passage since 1980. If you ask any MSU alumni from the last 40 years about their college experience, they will likely tell you about their nights out at Rick’s – and ask you if the floors are still sticky enough to maintain the nickname “Sticky Rick’s.” Rick’s hosts specials throughout the week, which can help explain why on some nights during the school year, the line might wrap around the outside of the building. Thursday nights are “country nights” – in which cowboy hats and boots are accompanied by a sale defined as “$3 everything,” where all single well drinks, shots, bottled beers, long islands and RedBull drinks are only $3. Rick’s is open from 7:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. every day except Sunday.

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Harper’s Restaurant and BrewPub on July 20. Photo by Sheldon Krause

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SPARTAN STAPLES TO VISIT ON CAMPUS By Devin Anderson-Torrez and Rahmya Trewern feedback@statenews.com

As summer nears its end, students will begin heading to East Lansing from across the states and across the globe. For some it’ll be a familiar return; leaves will begin to change as we transition into fall, the sounds from Spartan Stadium will only get louder as camp transitions to season and the campus will buzz once again. For others, everything will be new. These future steps will be their first. No matter if this is your first or last year on campus, these “Spartan Staples” will be here waiting for your arrival.

NO. 1: BEAUMONT TOWER

At the center of ‘old campus’, this can’tmiss landmark established in 1928 contains a carillon with 49 bells, responsible for the chiming sounds you might hear while strolling around campus.

No. 3: Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum No. 2: Sparty Statue

The famous statue and grad-pic favorite turned 77 years old over the summer. It is located directly in front of the Demonstration Field.

Established in 2012, the contemporary art museum is known for its shiny and abstract outside designed by architect Zaha Hadid. Featured in 2016’s Batman vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice, you too can walk the same halls as Bruce Wayne and Lex Luthor at the many art exhibitions held throughout the year.

No. 4: Spartan Stadium

Operating under the new moniker “The Woodshed”, given by third-year head coach Mel Tucker, you can catch the season opener under the lights on Sept. 2, when the Spartans kickoff against Western Michigan.

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