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from East Lansing YOUR GUIDE TO YOUR NEW HOME BY MSU’S INDEPENDENT STUDENT VOICE

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Vol. 110 | No. 1

FRIDAY, JULY 26, 2019

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CONTACT THE STATE NEWS (517) 295-1680 NEWSROOM/CORRECTIONS (517) 295-5149 feedback@statenews.com

Here’s an overview of what’s going on this school year at MSU.

GENERAL MANAGER Christopher Richert

10 Michigan things observed by a nonMichigander

Go green & recycle this newspaper please! :)

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2019–2020 MSU Academic Calendar

From Faygo to Detroit Style pizza, here are 10 things that make the Mitten State unique.

The Best of MSU Directory Check out what Spartans voted the best in town.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kaitlyn Kelley

MANAGING EDITOR Alan Hettinger

FOR NEWS RIGHT AT YOUR FINGERTIPS FOLLOW US AT:

The Abbot Road entrance to MSU photographed May 15, 2019. PHOTO BY MATT ZUBIK

PHOTO EDITOR Matt Zubik

The State News

COPY EDITOR Mark Ostermeyer

DESIGN Lauren Gewirtz

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ADVERTISING M-F, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. COLOPHON The State News design features Acta, a newspaper type system created by DSType Foundry. The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University on Thursdays during the academic year. News is constantly updated seven days a week at statenews.com. State News Inc. is a private, nonprofit corporation. Its current 990 tax form is available for review upon request at 435 E. Grand River Ave. during business hours. One copy of this newspaper is available free of charge to any member of the MSU community. Additional copies $0.75 at the business office only. Copyright © 2019 State News Inc., East Lansing, Michigan

Setbacks can happen.

We can help. MSU Safe Place Health Services Health Promotion Sexual Assault Program Counseling & Psychiatric Services (CAPS)

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Letter from the Editor: Welcome to campus, hello from The State News BY KAITLYN KELLEY KKELLEY@STATENEWS.COM

W

elcome to Michigan State. A lot has changed here within the past few years, and The State News has been there through it all to tell the university community’s stories and to hold people accountable. The first thing you should know about The State News is that it’s completely student-run by dedicated and talented reporters, photographers, editors, copy editors, designers and advertisers who care deeply about MSU students, faculty, staff, alumni and the rest of the community. As you’re navigating your way around campus for the first time and trying to get answers to your questions, come to us. We most likely have an article or two for you. What you’re holding in your hand is a guide to several MSU-related things that you’ll need to

know about: important dates for the upcoming school year, how to use the on-campus CATA buses, when to buy textbooks for class and more. If we were to outline every single thing you’ll need to know as an incoming MSU student, we’d need more than 24 pages for this guide. You’ll have to periodically return to our website and follow all of our social media accounts in order to stay in the know. Trust me. We’ve provided you with some resources and advice in this print issue, but allow us to provide you with more than that. Let us provide you with the truth. My advice to you is to know what has happened here at MSU and how it has impacted the community. In one of the stories you’ll read in this edition, you’ll learn about the university’s administration, which has experienced a lot of changes recently. As a new student, you might not know that things have changed. You might not know that the university will have a new president starting in August, and you might not know the reason why the university is introducing a new president to begin with. But it’s important to know. It’s important to know that it was just over a year ago when survivors, students, faculty and staff were marching along Grand River Avenue in the cold weather, fighting for change and transparency. It’s important to know that there’s still an ongoing investigation by the Michigan

The State News spring 2019 staff. STATE NEWS FILE PHOTO.

Attorney General into MSU’s handling of reports against Larry Nassar’s abuse — an investigation that has been halted by the university administration’s refusal to hand over hundreds of documents. It’s important to know that people — including student and faculty group Reclaim MSU — still attend Board of Trustees meetings to fight for accountability. It’s important to know why there are hundreds of teal flags hanging up in downtown East Lansing, and it’s import-

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ant to know who put them there. These things are important for any MSU student to know. And these things are ongoing. The State News wants to be a resource for you. We want to find answers to your questions, we want to ensure that your voice is heard and we want to inform you about things that are happening at the university. So, welcome to campus, and hello from The State News.

@MSULiveOn


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MSU ACADEMIC CALENDAR FALL SEMESTER

SPRING SEMESTER

Aug. 25 Residence hall move-in begins for new students.

Sept. 23 Tuition refund period ends.

Nov. 12-17 “Les Misérables” is at the Wharton Center.

Aug. 26 Returning students can move into residence halls.

Sept. 27 MSU’s Homecoming Parade will be at 6:00 p.m.

Nov. 28-29 The university will be closed for Thanksgiving.

Aug. 27 Recess/Dismiss Lists due.

Oct. 16 The middle of the fall semester.

Aug. 28 A late enrollment fee of $100 will be charged after this date.

Oct. 31 Halloween.

Aug. 28 (Wed.) Fall semester classes begin. Sept. 2 (Mon.) The university will be closed for Labor Day. Sept. 10-15 “Come From Away” is at the Wharton Center.

Nov. 8 Deadline to enroll for spring 2020 classes is at 8 p.m. A fee of $50 will be charged after this date. Nov. 9 Tuition billing statements for the spring 2020 semester will be available on STUINFO.

Jan. 6 (Mon.) Spring semester classes begin. A late enrollment fee of $100 will be charged after this date. Jan. 20 The university is open. Classes are cancelled for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

Dec. 4-15 “Aladdin” is at the Wharton Center.

Mar. 21 Summer Enrollment begins. Apr. 1-19 “Wicked” is at the Wharton Center. Apr.24 Spring classes end. Apr. 27–May 1 Spring semester final exams.

2019

Feb. 26 Middle of the spring semester.

Dec. 6 Fall classes end. Dec. 9-13 Fall semester final exams.

Feb. 26 – Mar. 1 “My Fair Lady” is at the Wharton Center.

Dec. 13-14 Commencements for the fall semester.

Mar. 2-6 Spring Break.

Dec. 17 Fall semester grades are due by 4 p.m.

Mar. 17 St. Patrick’s Day.

May 1-3: Commencements.

2020

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Department of Student Life MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

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Mental health resources on campus BY HALEY SINCLAIR AND JUNYAO LI HSINCLAIR@STATENEWS.COM JLI@STATENEWS.COM

Adapting to college life can be challenging. As you move into on-campus housing, you might wonder about the different resources on campus for mental health. PROJECT LETS AT MSU AND OTHER ON-CAMPUS MENTAL HEALTH GROUPS Project LETS is a national organization with the goal of challenging the stigma associated with mental illness. Anna Tomlanovich, a Project LETS at MSU member, said loneliness was something she struggled with as an incoming student. “I’m from a very small town and I went to a very small school and I came (to MSU) by myself, so I didn’t have very many people around to have a community,” Tomlanovich said. “I didn’t have people to go do stuff with. I felt very isolated sometimes.” During your first semester at MSU, it is encouraged to start building a community of friends as soon as possible. Having people to talk to — like your roommate — can help you manage lonely feelings you might be having upon arriving to college. Forming bonds early on can be an important step to help make you feel

MSU student Arlene Bradford holds her cat, Willow, while posing for a photo on July 10. Playing with animals can be a great way to relieve stress. PHOTO BY MATT ZUBIK

more comfortable talking to someone in the future if you were to ever experience any mental health issues. Loneliness and homesickness don’t affect everyone in the same way. A mental health advocacy program is also offered, where students can help those battling mental illness within their community. After an 8-week training program, they are paired with individuals who are experiencing the same area of mental health they studied.

COUNSELING AND PSYCHIATRIC SERVICES MSU Counseling & Psychiatric Services, or CAPS, is an on-campus place to help students with mental health concerns. CAPS is located on the third floor of the Olin Health Center. Students are allowed up to three free psychiatry sessions within their time at MSU. After that, the fourth session is billed by insurance or out of pocket. “The best way for students to get

connected is to simply just walk-in,” Mark Patishnock, director of CAPS, said. “That’s one of our goals: to make it as easy as possible.” Every MSU student also has access to free and confidential services through an app called My SSP: My Student Support Program. The app provides counseling services that are available wherever you go through talk, text or video in over 100 languages. The app benefits those who don’t feel comfortable talking in person with a counselor. CAPS offers same-day, drop-in screening with no appointment needed. During these drop-in sessions, they will ask questions to better understand your specific needs. CAPS will recommend services through CAPS or other services within the community for longer-term or specialized care. Group counseling is another great alternative to meeting with a counselor one-on-one. CAPS at MSU offers about 30 different support groups, covering a wide range of topics. Some of the group sessions are focused on body image, grief, gender identity, heartbreak, stress management, anxiety, bipolar support and more. CAPS has a phone line for emergency situations. You can call 517-3558270 and press “1” to get in contact with a counselor for free.

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“College is challenging. There are a lot of pressures that are put on (students) from many different directions,” Patishnock said. “I’d encourage students to know that there is no concern too large or too small to get this process started.” Neighborhood Engagement Centers and the MSU Union have additional CAPS services. EMOTIONAL SUPPORT ANIMALS Patishnock said service animals, therapy animals and emotional support animals are all part of the mental health arena. MSU provides accommodations to students living in the residential halls with a “documented disability.” The university recognizes service animals as “any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual or other mental disability.” The university recognizes assistance animals as “a category of animals that may work, provide assistance or perform physical tasks for an individual with a disability and/or provide necessary emotional support to an individual with a mental or psychiatric disability, but which are not considered Service Animals under the ADAAA.”

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A GUIDE TO THE ONCAMPUS CATA BUS ROUTES A CATA bus is pictured on June 8, 2017 at the CATA Transportation Center. PHOTO BY KAIYUE ZHANG

BY GENNA BARNER EMAIL@STATENEWS.COM

Michigan State’s campus spreads over 5,200 acres, so public transit is often a helpful tool for getting around. The Capital Area Transportation Authority (CATA) provides free rides for on-campus routes. Off-campus buses cost 60 cents with a student ID, or students can purchase a semester bus pass. Weekday routes run from 7 a.m. to 2:30 a.m., unless otherwise noted. For accurate schedules of the routes, download the free Transit app. Below are the highlights of each route:

ROUTE 30: (Weekdays) This bus, along with Route 31, is a must for those living in East Neighborhood. Route 30 will take you from East Neighborhood to the International Center, around Spartan Stadium and to South Neighborhood. It then goes back around Spartan Stadium on its way back to East Neighborhood. ROUTE 31: (Weekdays) This route can take you to just about anywhere on campus. It runs from East Neighborhood, past the MSU Auditorium, down Grand River Avenue to Brody Neighborhood. Route 31 will bring you back to East Neighborhood passing by the Breslin Center, the Library, and the MSU Dairy Store in Anthony Hall.

ROUTE 32: (Weekdays) This bus will take you as far as Commuter Lot 89, past Lots 91, 92 and 100 on its way back to the CATA bus station, turning around at the MSU Auditorium. This route ends at 7 p.m. ROUTE 33: (Weekdays) Beginning in South Neighborhood, Route 33 passes by the MSU Dairy Store in Anthony Hall, to the MSU Auditorium, passing by Olin Health Center and the MSU Union on the way to North Neighborhood. On the way back to South Neighborhood, Route 33 will bring you by the Library and International Center. This route ends at 10:30 p.m.

ROUTE 38: (Weekdays) This bus runs from Spartan Village to the CATA bus station, and back around. This route concludes at 10:45 p.m. ROUTE 39: (Weekdays) This route will take you from University Village, around Spartan Stadium, to the CATA bus station and back to University Village. The weekend routes run from 9 a.m. to 2:30 a.m. ROUTE 34: (Weekends) Route 34 takes riders from University Village, past the library, to the CATA bus station, up to Grand River Avenue on the way to Brody Neighborhood, and back to University Village.

ROUTE 35: (Weekends) Riders can take Route 35 from Spartan Village to South Neighborhood, up and around Spartan Stadium, to the CATA bus station, and back around. ROUTE 36: (Weekends) This is a shorter route that takes riders from East Neighborhood to the CATA bus station and back.

As of publication, CATA has not announced changes to the routes for the coming school year. Stay with The State News for more updates.

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How to attend sports games at MSU BY MATT ZUBIK MZUBIK@STATENEWS.COM

College sports are an essential part of life at any Big Ten school, and that’s especially true at Michigan State. MSU is considered by many to have one of the best combinations of football and basketball programs in the entire NCAA. FOOTBALL The Spartan football team is one of the most storied teams in the Big Ten and consistently competes for the conference championship from season to season. MSU reached the College Football Playoff in 2016, and they’re one of two Big Ten teams to reach that stage in the season, the other being Ohio State University. Home football games bring everything that normally happens in East Lansing to a halt. Attending games is a great way to spend Saturdays in the fall. Student tickets for the 2019 season are sold as $183 general admission passes. That $183 also includes the official 2019 football student section shirt. Seating at each game is first-come, first serve, and students will camp out outside of the stadium long before the gates open for important games. MEN’S BASKETBALL The Spartan basketball team has made it to two Final Fours in the past five years, and they’re currently the consensus preseason No. 1 team in the nation. Senior point guard Cassius Winston, senior shooting guard Josh Langford and forward Xavier Tillman are expected to be key players on this year’s team.

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THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT THE UPCOMING SPARTAN FOOTBALL SEASON: • The Spartans finished last season 7-6. Coach Mark Dantonio expects to compete for a Big Ten championship this season. • Players who are expected to have important roles within the team this year are defensive end Kenny Willekes, linebacker Joe Bachie and quarterback Brian Lewerke. • MSU will play rivals Ohio State University and the University of Michigan on the road this season. The most anticipated home football game for this season will be against Penn State University on October 26. • Tailgating on campus is restricted and often reserved for alumni season ticket holders. Several on-campus public tailgates open to students exist, but many students and student organizations hold their own tailgates off campus.

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Junior linebacker Dante Razzano (37) makes adjustments at the line of scrimmage. The green team beat the white team, 42-26, in the MSU Spring football game at Spartan Stadium on April 13. PHOTO BY MATT ZUBIK

For those wanting to follow Michigan State basketball, becoming a member of the Izzone, the team’s student section, is a must. An Izzone membership costs $55 up front and includes an official 2019 Izzone T-shirt. Individual game tickets cost an additional $10 each for members. Unfortunately, you probably won’t have the chance to buy lower-bowl Izzone tickets for many of the big games for the upcoming season. However, the Izzone operates on a pointbased, multi-tiered ticketing system that awards students points for attending home MSU basketball games. The number of points you have determines

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which tier you will be in for the next ticket sale, and during ticket sales, higher tiers have the opportunity to buy lower bowl seats first. This system gives access to the best seats in the stadium to the fans who show up to the most games. MORE INFORMATION ON ATTENDING GAMES AT MICHIGAN STATE Admission to every MSU Athletics sports event held on campus besides football, men’s basketball and men’s hockey games are free to attend. For additional information on MSU Athletics and answers to frequently asked questions about attending sports events at Michigan State University, visit the Spartan Athletics website.


MAIL HOME search following ex-MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon’s resignation in light of the university’s handling of Larry Nassar’s sexual abuse. Stanley said he plans on living close to campus, wants to be engaged with the community and is eager to meet with survivors of Nassar’s abuse. “Know this: I’m committed to being a great listener. I’m committed to learning from you,” Stanley said. “I have a lot to live up to, but I will do my best to be the president that Michigan State needs.” CHAIR OF THE BOARD, TRUSTEE DIANNE BYRUM Byrum served as co-chair of the presidential search committee — the committee responsible for leading the presidential search. She has been on the board since 2008. Although the presidential search was closed to the university community, Byrum said the committee made an effort to include the community through input sessions. The closed presidential search was critiqued by groups like Reclaim MSU and community members.

Get to know Michigan State’s Administration MSU president Samuel L. Stanley Jr. speaks during a press conference at the Hannah Administration Building on May 28. PHOTO BY MATT ZUBIK

TRUSTEE MELANIE FOSTER Foster served alongside Byrum as co-chair of the presidential search committee. Foster was elected in 2004 and was re-elected in 2014.

the university.

BY KAITLYN KELLEY KKELLEY@STATENEWS.COM

Michigan State has recently experienced several changes to its administration and leadership. Here is a list of the people you should know at

PRESIDENT SAMUEL STANLEY JR. Stanley — Stony Brook University president for almost 10 years — was unanimously approved by the Board of Trustees as Michigan State’s next president. Stanley will officially begin his term as president August 1, 2019. The presidential announcement came about a year after the board outlined a presidential

TRUSTEE BRIAN MOSALLAM Mosallam — elected in 2012 — has been one of the most outspoken board members about the university’s handling of reports against Nassar. In the summer of 2018, Mosallam called for John Engler’s termination as interim president of the university. Engler — appointed as interim president following Lou Anna K. Simon’s resignation — was highly criticized for com-

ments he made about survivors. Only Mosallam and Byrum supported Engler’s termination at the time. In January 2019, the board unanimously approved Engler’s resignation and appointed former dean Satish Udpa as the new interim president. Mosallam said Engler’s resignation was a “new day” for MSU. TRUSTEES KELLY TEBAY, BRIANNA SCOTT AND NANCY SCHLICHTING Tebay and Scott were elected in 2019. Scott is a former prosecutor who worked on criminal sex cases, and Tebay graduated from MSU in 2008 and is a survivor of sexual assault. Both Scott and Tebay have said they want to be a part of a cultural change at MSU. In December, former Governor Rick Snyder appointed Schlichting, former CEO of the Henry Ford Health System, to the board. TRUSTEES JOEL FERGUSON AND DAN KELLY Ferguson was elected in 1986, making him the longest-serving member of the current board. Ferguson has been met with criticism in recent years for his comments about there being more at the university than “this Nassar thing.” In January 2019, he stepped down from the presidential search committee when he discovered Scott was interested in being a member. Trustee Dan Kelly is the vice chair of the board. He was elected in 2016. ASMSU PRESIDENT MARIO KAKOS The Associated Students of Michigan State University, or ASMSU, unanimously elected Kakos as president of the 2019-20 session. ASMSU is MSU’s undergraduate student government, which provides various resources to students.

STAY INFORMED

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10 MICHIGAN THINGS OBSERVED 1

MICHIGAN LEFTS

They’re just U-turns. But anyone who’s driving should be aware that they are mandatory. They’re especially prominent on Michigan Avenue, where that is the only mechanism for turning left.

STORY BY EVAN JONES EJONES@STATENEWS.COM

Michiganders are proudly midwestern but have their own cultural quirks that set them apart from the rest of the region. Living in Michigan while not being from Michigan isn’t a complete culture shock, but there are plenty of quirks to observe and make note of.

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BETTER MADE CHIPS

Originally founded in 1930 by Detroiters Peter Cipriano and Cross Moceri, Better Made chips are in 23,048 stores with 124 flavors and products, including chips, popcorn and pork rinds. These chips are deeply cherished snacks all over the state. Demand even exists from Michiganders who leave the state and go elsewhere. The company now has a presence in 14 other states outside of Michigan.

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SAYING YOU’RE FROM DETROIT WHEN YOU’RE AN HOUR AWAY FROM DETROIT.

Many Michiganders are guilty of this, but it isn’t their fault. The Federal Office of Management and Budget defines metro Detroit as the six counties of Lapeer, Livingston, Macomb, Oakland, St. Clair and Wayne, encompassing 3,889 square miles. The 2010 census documented a population of about 4.3 million people, nearly half of

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the state’s total population. Lapeer, Michigan, about an hour and a half in driving distance from Detroit, is still considered as the Metro Detroit area.

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FAYGO

In 1907, Russian immigrants Ben and Perry Feigenson started blending soda flavors to create what is known today as Faygo. Mixing this Detroit classic up with Fanta will get you laughed out of any room in the state of Michigan. There are over 50 flavors of Faygo, and the company has a rich history. Joe Grimm, a Michigan State journalism professor, published a book detailing the company’s background and the people involved. Another thing to keep in mind is that people in Michigan call it pop, not soda.

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VERNORS

Michiganders truly cherish their soft drinks. Detroit pharmacist James Vernor left for the Civil War and returned to create the country’s oldest surviving ginger ale brand in 1866. The company was in his family’s name for a century before it was sold in 1966. Dr. Pepper Snapple Group now owns this hot Michigan commodity. The drink also has a purpose beyond the drink itself. Vernors is popular for baking and stomach relief, though

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medical benefits have not been scientifically verified. The company said it sold 7 million cases of Vernors in 2015, with many of those sales in Michigan. Yet, some Michiganders take their love for the drink one step further, with a collector’s club seeking to own the thousands of available Vernors merchandise.

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LITTLE CAESARS, DOMINOS AND DETROIT STYLE PIZZA

With over 5,000 locations, Little Caesars is the third-largest pizza company in the United States. But for Michiganders, it is a proud state staple. The first location opened in Garden City, Michigan in 1959. In 1998, the company filled what was then the largest pizza order with 13,386 pizzas. Papa John’s broke that record in 2006 with 13,500. The company said in 2015 that it wants everyone to eat Detroit style pizza, which has a rectangular, deep-dish crust, crispy edges and a chewy texture. Domino’s, recently crowned the largest pizza company in terms of global sales, also had its start in the state. The company was founded in Ypsilanti in 1960 and is now headquartered in Ann Arbor.


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BY A NON-MICHIGANDER 7

THE HAND THING

Olympic swimming pools. Founder Wally Bronner was a teenager when he first opened up the niche marketplace in 1945. Up until his death in 2008, he persistently promoted a blend of the religious meaning of the holiday with commercialization. The store carries over 50,000 items with 8,000 ornament styles, of which 1,500 can be personalized, according to the store’s media relations representative. The store has a map for customers to navigate the experience that is Bronner’s.

The first time someone from Michigan uses their palm to locate their hometown, it can be perplexing and perceived as an individual quirk. The next 10 times this happens, it becomes clear they all do it. Here is a rough estimate of the Michigan hand map, with a Michigan map outline to assist newcomers.

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THE CONCEPT OF ‘UP NORTH’

Grand Rapids, Lansing and Detroit are the main urban hubs of the state, which are all in the southern portion. Among Michiganders, what constitutes “traveling up north” is far from a consensus. Here are the most common answers of what “up north” means, using the Michigander-approved map once more. The baseline definition is north of Grand Rapids and Flint, but many Michiganders have a higher threshold for up north. Next is north of Saginaw: the Zilwaukee Bridge, opened in 1987 about 40 miles north of Flint, is considered a gateway between northern and southern Michigan. North of Cadillac or “the thumb”: West Branch is a popular marker because it’s a rest stop on highway I-75, and any camping site around will be free of both traffic and light pollution. The Upper Peninsula: this is what

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Michigan hand map. PHOTO BY MATT ZUBIK

hardcore, uncompromising Michigan travelers consider to be up north, and geographically speaking they could be right, but people who live near the southern edge still believe a lower boundary is necessary.

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BRONNER’S CHRISTMAS WONDERLAND

It is Christmas 361 days of the year in the town of Frankenmuth, Michigan, with a store the size of eight

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APPLES

Michigan is the third-largest state producer of apples in the country, following Washington and New York, and it’s no secret that apples have blended in with Michigan culture. Apples, applesauce, caramel apples and, especially, apple cider are all popular in Michigan. Visiting apple orchards in the fall to go apple-picking is a necessary childhood experience for any Michigander. There are over 11.3 million apple trees covering 35,500 acres on 825 family-run farms, according to the Michigan Apples Committee. The committee lists 16 different varieties of apples grown in the state, and MLive compiled a list of 83 fan-favorite orchards across the state in 2018.

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Safe Ride and other late-night and early-morning transportation options BY HALEY SINCLAIR HSINCLAIR@STATENEWS.COM

Michigan State’s campus is large and, during the evening and morning, it can be difficult to find transportation. Here are some alternatives to walking home alone late at night or in the early morning — whether it be for a late-night study session at the library or for an early-morning job. SAFE RIDE The Associated Students of Michigan State University, or ASMSU, provides Safe Ride, a lateenight transportation service to reduce assault and drunk driving-related accidents on campus. Safe Ride drivers are non-judgmental and prepared for anything you may need while getting home safely. You can request a Safe Ride by downloading the TransLoc Rider App and selecting Michigan State University. Then, use your MSU NetID to create an account. The service is running if there is a blue rider icon in the lower left hand corner of the app. The service is not running if that icon is gray. When using Safe Ride, you’re only able to share the ride with up to two guests. It can refuse to provide service if you are requesting a ride somewhere other than your home, asking for multiple rides in one night, requesting transportation for more than two other guests,

or making the driver wait for more than five minutes upon arrival. Safe Ride has a wheelchair-accessible vehicle that can be requested, which covers addresses within the boundaries of East State Road, Mount Hope Road, Park Lake Road and U.S. 127. STATEWALK MSU’s Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed service fraternity, offers StateWalk, which is a free latenight service provided to students who study into the night at the MSU library. Students from Alpha Phi Omega will walk you to any place on campus Sunday through Thursday from 9:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. MSU NIGHT OWL MSU Night Owl, provided by the Capital Area Transportation Authority, or CATA, is a great option for students who may have a late-night or early-morning job on campus. The Night Owl will transfer students from any two places on campus and will arrive within 20 minutes after you place a call. The student fare is 60 cents per ride, which is the same rate as a normal CATA bus ride. Students can also buy semester passes, 31 day passes or 10-Ride cards. The Night Owl runs weekdays from 2 a.m. to 7 a.m. and on weekends from 2 a.m. to 9 a.m.

ABOVE: CATA bus stop on Grand River Avenue at night. STATE NEWS FILE RIGHT: The table at the MSU library where members of the Alpha Phi Omega offer their “Statewalk” service to students Thursday through Sunday every week. Photographed on June 22. PHOTO BY MATT ZUBIK

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MSU Student Housing Co-op

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OF 2019 T S E B

ONE STOP SHOPPING!

MSU APPAREL • RENT • BUY • SELL BOOKS • SUPPLIES

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When and how to buy textbooks BY GENNA BARNER GBARNER@STATENEWS.COM

When buying textbooks for class, it can be difficult to find the best deal. However, there are ways to get books for a somewhat reasonable price. As a first piece of advice, wait to buy books until after the first day of class, unless a professor says you will need it on the first day. Most professors will not expect you to have materials quite yet. This way, you will learn which books are required and which are recommended. Sometimes, you don’t need to buy all books that are listed on the syllabus. There’s a lot of debate between buying and renting books. I recommend renting books, unless you are sure you can get a better deal when buying. Keep in mind that, when you buy a book, you can sell it back to the bookstore. Whatever way is

going to save you more money in the end is the best option. Before buying from one of the places listed below, I recommend comparing prices so you can get the best deal. Collegeville Textbook Company, located at 321 E. Grand River Ave., has a wide selection of books. Students are unable to rent books from here. However, most of the books have a “Guaranteed Buyback” sticker, meaning that Collegeville will pay “at least 50% of what you paid on select titles,” according to their website. Students can also reserve textbooks in advance. The Spartan Bookstore is located at the center of campus in the International Center. The store offers a price match guarantee so you can get all of your books in one place. Textbooks can be purchased online or in store, and can be bought or rented.

Student Book Store on Grand River Ave, photographed on July 25. PHOTO BY MATT ZUBIK

The Student Book Store, located at 421 E. Grand River Ave., offers textbooks for Michigan State and Lansing Community College students. Materials can be purchased online or in store, and can be bought or rented. The Student Book Store usually offers coupons for textbooks and apparel, so keep an eye out.

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If you have a few days before your textbook is needed, ordering online can be cheaper than buying books in store. Personally, Amazon Rentals has not always had my textbooks available for rent. However, I have heard of a lot of people ordering their books from Amazon. It is easy and

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fairly quick, especially when you have Amazon Prime. Chegg is another popular website for ordering textbooks. They arrive in a fair amount of time and usually come with a small gift. Thriftbooks is another website that offers all types of books, and has textbooks for a cheap price.

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Making your dorm feel like home BY GENNA BARNER GBARNER@STATENEWS.COM

As campus move-in date approaches, it’s time to make sure you have everything you need for your dorm room. Here are the last minute must-haves that The State News’ staff recommends. First and foremost, make sure you have a microwave and a mini-fridge. Even though you have a meal plan, you won’t want to go to the dining hall late at night if you‘re hungry and in your pajamas. Along those lines, you might want to invest in a Brita filter. It isn’t a necessity, but certain areas of campus, such as South Neighborhood, have rusty water. A Brita filter also saves on the cost of buying water bottles, and saves plastic. Whether your residence hall has a community bathroom or is a suite, you’ll want to purchase a shower tote. It makes transporting your shower products easier. For sanitary reasons, we also recommend you have a pair of shower sandals. Community bathrooms are cleaned regularly, but you never know who was in the shower before you. Don’t be afraid to decorate your room. Use posters, tapestries and string lights to make it your own. Use Command Hooks to hang up the decorations, but be careful using Command Hooks when the weather is warm. With no air conditioning, the dorm rooms get hot, causing the Command Hooks to slide down the walls. For functional decor, look into getting a mirror, rug and lamp. Mirrors can help small rooms feel larger. Rugs also help to make your dorm

room homey, while keeping your feet warm in the winter from the hard tile. When it comes to finding a lamp, we recommend a lamp with soft lighting. The florescent lights in the dorm rooms are too bright to leave on if your roommate is trying to sleep while you study. In most dorm rooms, there is only one plug on each side of the room, so you will need the extra outlets provided by a power strip. Most importantly, bring a fan. We recommend a box fan to put in your window and a mini fan to clip to your bed. Students move in at the end of August when it’s still hot outside. The lack of air conditioning and air movement makes it hard to sleep at night without a fan.

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LEFT: Business student Hailey Melnick packs her belongings on August 26, 2018. PHOTO BY SYLVIA JARRUS BELOW LEFT: Environmental studies and sustainability student Courtney Boersema moves into her dorm on August 26, 2018. PHOTO BY SYLVIA JARRUS BELOW RIGHT: Students and families move into Wilson Hall on August 26, 2018. PHOTO BY SYLVIA JARRUS

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SPARTANS ABROAD PHOTOS BY ANNIE BARKER | GROUP PHOTO BY MATT SCHMUCKER

“After almost 30 days, it has finally setting in that I am in Europe. It has been fun to shoot more for school and for fun instead of for journalistic assignments. I would definitely recommend studying abroad because it will challenge you in ways you won’t expect.” ANNIE BARKER State News Photographer

St. John Catholic Church & Student Center

• Sunday Suppers

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• Campus Bible Studies

• College Men’s Group

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FIND US

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FOOD & DRINK CRUNCHY’S BEST BURGER, KARAOKE, & TRIVIA 254 W. Grand River Ave., E. Lansing 517-351-2506 crunchyseastlansing.com

HARPER’S BEST RESTAURANT, E.L. BAR, HAPPY HOUR, & BREWERY 131 Albert St., E. Lansing 517-333-4040 harpersbrewpub.com

CONRAD’S GRILL BEST LATE NIGHT GRUB 1219 E. Grand River Ave., E. Lansing 517-333-7104 conradsgrill.com

HOPCAT BEST COCKTAILS 300 Grove St., E. Lansing 517-816-4300 hopcat.com/east-lansing

JERSEY GIANT BEST SANDWICH 3019 E. Saginaw St., Lansing 517-351-1616 jgsubs.com

BEST OF THEIR KIND The East Lansing area has some fantastic spots to eat and visit. Here are some of the top vote-getters in the 2019 State News Best of MSU:

EL AZTECO

SANSU

BIGGBY COFFEE

JIMMY JOHN’S

BEST MEXICAN FOOD & MARGARITAS 225 Ann St, E. Lansing 517-351-9111 elazteco.net

BEST SUSHI & DATE NIGHT 4750 S. Hagadorn Rd., E. Lansing 517-333-1933 sansu-sushi.com

BEST COFFEE/CAFÉ 270 W. Grand River Ave., E. Lansing 517-332-1471 biggby.com

BEST AFFORDABLE FOOD 643 E. Grand River Ave., E.Lansing 517-351-1800 jimmyjohns.com

THE COSMOS

CHARLIE KANG’S

GOLDEN HARVEST

ZOOBIE’S OLD TOWN TAVERN & BAR

BEST BREAKFAST SPOT 1625 Turner St., Lansing 517-485-3663 Facebook: Golden Harvest

BEST LANSING BAR 1200 N Larch St., Lansing 517-897-3563 zoobiesoldtowntavern.com

BEST PIZZA 1351 E. Grand River Ave., E. Lansing 517-897-3563 thecosmoslansing.com

BEST CHINESE FOOD 109 E. Grand River Ave., E. Lansing 517-332-4696 charliekangs.com

DO YOU LIKE WORKING WITH PEOPLE, THE ENVIRONMENT, OR TECHNOLOGY? MAJOR IN GEOGRAPHY BS Economic Geography For students interested in the roles of space, place, location, scale, key agents, and forces in the economic sphere.

BA Human Geography Provides academic training in the human dimensions of the environment, particularly how people are affected by the environment, and how they alter and change it.

BS Environmental Geography Provides academic training in the environment and how its many aspects interrelate across the landscape.

BS Geographic Information Science For the students interested in the application of information technology to the spatial dimensions of the Earth’s human and physical systems.

LAND A GREAT JOB DOING SOMETHING YOU LOVE MSU Geography graduates are employed as: Environmental Consultants

Cartographers

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Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Sciences College of Social Science

MAP YOUR FUTURE 22

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ZAYTOON

MSU MAIN LIBRARY

BEST MEDITERRANEAN 940 Elmwood Rd., Lansing 517-203-5728 zaytoongrill.com

BEST STUDY SPOT 366 W Circle Drive, E.Lansing 517-353-8700 / lib.msu.edu

MEAT BBQ BEST UNIQUE EATS 1224 Turner St., Lansing 517-580-4400 / meatbbq.com

ONCAMPUS FAVES MSU DAIRY STORE BEST DESSERT 474 S. Shaw Lane, E. Lansing 517-355-8466 canr.msu.edu/dairystore

MSU BIKES

B10 Bessey Hall, E. Lansing 517-432-3400 msusurplusstore.com/msu-bikes

BRODY

QUALITY DAIRY 1109 E. Grand River Ave., E. Lansing 517-371-8929 qualitydairy.com

BEST MSU CAFETERIA 241 Brody W, E.Lansing 517- 355-7470 eatatstate.msu.edu

DSW

NORTH NEIGHBORHOOD

LULULEMON

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD liveon.msu.edu/neighborhoods

STORES STUDENT BOOK STORE

421 Grand River Ave., E. Lansing 517-351-4210 / sbsmsu.com

MEIJER

2055 W Grand River Ave, Okemos 517-349-6800 / meijer.com

2800 Centre Blvd., Lansing 517-316-7963 / dsw.com

3032 Centre Blvd., E. Lansing 517-316-1198 shop.lululemon.com

PREUSS PETS

SERVICES BARRE CODE

1024 Trowbridge Rd., E. Lansing 517-679-0073 thebarrecode.com

CREATIVE WELLNESS

2045 Asher Ct., E. Lansing 517-351-9240 creativewellness.net

GOLDEN GLOW AIRBRUSH TANNING

1127 N. Cedar St., Lansing 517-339-1762 preusspets.com

210 Abbot Rd., E. Lansing. 517-258-0705 Facebook: Golden Glow Airbrush Tanning

WILD BILL’S TOBACCO

MSU FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

3020 E. Saginaw St., Lansing 517-483-2200 wildbillstobacco.com

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DOUGLAS J AVEDA

331 E Grand River Ave., E. Lansing 517-349-9343 douglasj.edu

HAGAN REALTY 927 E Grand River Ave., E. Lansing 517-351-0765 hrirentals.com

HUB ON CAMPUS 543 E. Grand River Ave., E. Lansing 517-507-5516 huboncampus.com

COMCAST

2911 Preyde Blvd, Lansing 800-266-2278 xfinity.com

523 E. Grand River Ave., E. Lansing 800-678-4968 msufcu.org

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Profile for State News

Friday 07/26/19 - Summer Mail Home  

The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University on Thursdays during fall, spring and select days during summer seme...

Friday 07/26/19 - Summer Mail Home  

The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University on Thursdays during fall, spring and select days during summer seme...

Profile for statenews