Issuu on Google+

State News The

Spartans knocked out of Big Dance MSU loses 90-70 to Kansas in the NCAA Tournament, season ends

Head coach Tom Izzo reacts during the second half of the game against University of Kansas in the second round of the men’s NCAA Tournament on March 19 at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Okla. The Spartans were defeated by the Jayhawks, 90-70. PHOTO: SUNDEEP DHANJAL

NEWS

S P OT L I G H T

F E AT U R E S

MSU STUDENT TAKES CARE OF SHEEP

‘‘Just the family here. It really is just a big family, everybody loves each other, everybody is working for each other.’’

POSITIVITY KEY FOR ILL MSU STUDENT

Birthing sheep among responsibilities for the animal science sophomore

Matt Van Dyk, Redshirt-senior forward

Despite brain tumor, MSU student pushes forward in studies

PAGE 2

PAGES 6-8

PAGE 4

M ON DAY, M A R C H 2 0, 2 017

@THESNEWS

STAT ENEWS .COM


News

Rachel Fradette Campus editor campus@statenews.com

MSU students take care of lambs and pregnant sheep at sheep farm BY MILA MURRAY MMURRAY@STATENEWS.COM

An alarm clock goes off for the third time during the night. Animal science sophomore Emmy Schuurmans gets herself up, takes her drive to the barn and does a routine check on her pregnant sheep and the newborn lambs at the MSU Sheep Teaching and Research Center. It’s midnight. Schuurmans began working at the MSU Sheep Teaching and Research Center in the fall, but starting this semester she is living on the farm on her own to ensure the newborns are delivered safely with proper care. Schuurmans grew up on a dairy farm, where she would get up at 2 a.m. to milk the cows every Sunday, so working with animals, specifically production farming, has always been her passion. “Sometimes it is a little lonely, but I grew up in the middle of nowhere and so it kind of feels like home,” Schuurmans said. “That was the one thing that I missed my freshman year ... not being around animals all the time anymore.” Her duties during lambing season, which begins in the middle of January, includes drying off the lambs after they are born, ensuring the sheep and their newborns are put in an individual pen to properly bond, weighing the lamb and writing down details such as the date of birth and the mother’s number. “A lot of people want to do cats and dogs because everyone loves kittens and puppies,” Schuurmans said. “Not a lot of people who go into vet schools think food animals need to be taken care of too, so that’s what I want to do.” One of the most important duties for Schuurmans is to assist if the sheep are experiencing a difficult birth, which can be caused by the mother having too narrow of a pelvis or the lamb being positioned backward. “Humans get one on one interaction, the doctor is always watching them and everything so you don’t really hear of it as much because they’re watching the baby all the time,” Schuurmans said. “They’re taking ultrasounds all the time, making sure the baby is in the right position, and we can’t do that with every sheep here.” When a sheep is in labor it lays with its head

Animal science sophomore Emmy Schuurmans poses for a portrait with a lamb on March 2 at the Sheep Teaching and Research Center in Okemos. Schuurmans is the only student who lives at the farm house and during lambing season she checks the ewes at 9 p.m., midnight and 6 a.m. to check for newborn lambs and assist in the birthing process. PHOTO: NIC ANTAYA

down, and usually if they’ve been in that position for too long there is something wrong. Schuurmans sometimes must help with the birth by herself in the middle of the night. “One time there was two babies coming out at the same time and so if you don’t catch it in time, then the babies eventually don’t make it,” Schuurmans said. “But what really makes up for it is when you do get one that’s alive.” The first time Schuurmans helped a sheep give birth at the MSU Sheep Teaching and Research Center with farm manager Joe Leszcz, she had to wear a glove that went up to her shoulder. It took 30 minutes, and she had to feel for the lamb’s legs and pull out the newborn from the tight space.

“I get to see young people like Emmy develop as they work here and gain in their skills and their knowledge,” Leszcz said. “That’s the really rewarding thing about being out here.” Leszcz takes the male lambs that weigh more than 60 pounds to an auction where they are often sold to buyers from Detroit, whereas the female lambs are typically added back to the flock. “A lot of people think that it’s for wool production, but we actually lose money when we shear them,” Schuurmans said. “Wool doesn’t really make a lot of money for sheep farmers. We just have to do it for the health of the animal really.” At the farm, Schuurmans and other student workers also watch for the sheep’s health, treat-

ing them with antibiotics if they contract mastitis, an infection in the mammary glands and checking for other injuries in both the lambs and sheep. “Sometimes the utter will swell up and be kind of reddish and looks inflamed,” Schuurmans said. “Also you have to test them, if you milk her out it kind of looks like cottage cheese almost.” Other duties at the MSU Sheep Teaching and Research Center include feeding, bedding and working at the barn, which is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. “Farms sometimes have a bad rap, that farmers don’t care about their animals,” Schuurmans said. “But people put in a lot of effort to make sure the animals are healthy and happy.”

TUESDAY • GREAT AMERICAN CHEESEBURGER SPECIAL WEDNESDAY • $2.50 POWER HOUR & FREE LIVE TRIVIA THURSDAY • ALL DAY $4 HAPPY HOUR

1351 E. GRAND RIVER EAST LANSING, MI 517-492-5052 2

THE STATE N EWS

MONDAY, MARCH 2 0, 2 01 7

A flock of lambs lay together on March 2 at the Sheep Teaching and Research Center in Okemos. Every year there are three lambings, which occur in January, May and October. PHOTO: NIC ANTAYA


Contents

Cameron Macko Managing editor cmacko@statenews.com

Development projects move forward

Sympl. app created to help students

Jake Boss Jr. hits 300 career wins

A clearer picture of the future downtown East Lansing could emerge by mid-April

Five students and recent graduates designed an app to help students outside of the classroom

MSU baseball’s win over the University of Richmond put him over the top

20 BY T H E N U M B E R S

The number of points MSU lost to Kansas by See pages 6-8

“Whenever I get sick, instead of my antibodies attacking the illness they also attack the brain, which makes it inflamed, which can trigger off multiple things like 40 to 50 different symptoms.”

VOL . 107 | NO. 47 CONTACT THE STATE NEWS (517) 295-1680

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jake Allen

NEWSROOM/CORRECTIONS (517) 295-5149 feedback@statenews.com

MANAGING EDITOR Cameron Macko

GENERAL MANAGER Marty Sturgeon ADVERTISING M-F, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ADVERTISING MANAGER Emalie Parsons COLOPHON The State News design features Acta, a newspaper type system created by DSType Foundry.

CITY EDITOR Stephen Olschanski

The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University, Monday and Thursday during the academic year.

PHOTO EDITOR Nic Antaya

One copy of this newspaper is available free of charge to any member of the MSU community. Additional copies $0.75 at the business office only. State News Inc. is a private, nonprofit corporation. Its current 990 tax form is available for review upon request at 435 E. Grand River Ave. during business hours.

DESIGN EDITOR Claire Barkholz

Copyright © 2017 State News Inc., East Lansing, Mich.

CAMPUS EDITOR Rachel Fradette SPORTS EDITOR Souichi Terada FEATURES EDITOR McKenna Ross

COPY CHIEF Casey Holland

Carter Helinski Environmental studies and sustainability sophomore on his health issues PAGE 4

Chelsea resident Hoyt Swager, 7, right, looks for water after crossing the finish line during Run for the House on March 18 at 4100 Okemos Road in Okemos. Run for the House is an annual marathon event that raises funds for the Ronald McDonald House of Mid-Michigan. The organization provides an alternative for families with critically ill children in hospitals: free care, shelter and food, which alleviate some stresses and discomfort that might have come if the family stayed in a hospital for months while their child received treatment. PHOTO: CHLOE GRIGSBY

LEARN ABOUT THE FASCINATING HISTORY OF EAST ASIA THIS SUMMER!

HST 210 MODERN EAST ASIA

CHINA • JAPAN • NORTH & SOUTH KOREA

DISCOVER EAST ASIA IN THIS ONLINE SUMMER CLASS! POP CULTURE ICONS, ECONOMIC PARTNERS, MILITARY TIES AND MORE.

MONDAY, MARC H 2 0, 2 01 7

TH E STATE N E WS

3


Features

McKenna Ross Features editor features@statenews.com

Student remains positive, focused on studies despite brain tumor BY JAIMIE BOZACK JBOZACK@STATENEWS.COM

Two years ago, environmental studies and sustainability sophomore Carter Helinski received news that changed his life. When looking at him, one would never guess the struggles Helinski has faced. On the outside, Helinski is an average student. He is involved with multiple clubs on campus, he spends time in his dorm and he is pursuing his dream of environmental protection. On the inside, there is a much larger story. Helinski has a hypoglossal schwannoma brain tumor, which is growing at a steady rate. During his junior and senior year of high school, Helinski experienced pounding headaches that affected his everyday routine. He visited the doctor and received a magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, and the scan showed a cavernoma, or a small cluster of blood vessels, but the tumor went undetected.

During a checkup after another MRI a year later, Helinski received the news that he had a tumor. He said the location of the tumor and his age are both rare. “Especially being so young, it’s even more rare,” he said. “Typically, they find them in people who are 40, 50 and 60. ... I kind of felt like I was going to throw up. I didn’t really know what to think. It was kind of surreal. I kind of felt like I was in a dream for awhile. What else now?” In addition to the tumor, Helinski deals with Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections, or PANDAS, which he was diagnosed with when he was 4 years old. “Whenever I get sick, instead of my antibodies attacking the illness they also attack the brain, which makes it inflamed, which can trigger off multiple things like 40 to 50 different symptoms,” Helinski said.

MSU DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY

SUMMER 2017

ONLINE CLASSES

For more information, please call at 517-355-6640 or visit sociology.msu.edu

FIRST SESSION

MAY 15 - JUNE 29

SOC 100: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY Fulfill a SOC major/minor requirement with out most popular course!

SOC 131: SOCIAL PROBLEMS Fulfill a SOC minor requirement & learn to diagnose & solve social problems!

SOC 216: SEX & GENDER Fulfill a SOC major/minor requirement & learn about human sexuality & gender identity!

SOC 315: FAMILY & SOCIETY Learn about humanity’s most fundamental institution!

SOC 316: YOUTH & SOCIETY Learn about changing patterns within childhood adolescence!

SOC 412: ANIMALS, PEOPLE, AND NATURE Learn about how humans interact with wild, domesticates, & companion animals!

4

THE STATE N E WS

MONDAY, MARCH 2 0, 2 01 7

Environmental studies and sustainability sophomore Carter Helinski poses for a portrait on March 15 in his dorm room. He has known for two years that he has a brain tumor which needs to be removed. “It could be worse ... could be cancer, could not have known about it,” Helinski said. PHOTO: CHLOE GRIGSBY

Helinski’s flare ups can include symptoms of anxiety and depression. He said this can make being in school difficult, but he keeps persevering. “Pretty much every day you wake up and you figure out what kind of day it’s going to be and you go from there,” Helinski said. “It is pretty much an up in the air thing, hour by hour, day by day and minute by minute. I just kind of take things day by day. I try not to look at years.”

minutes, you could go 80 years from now ... so it’s pointless to go around with a negative attitude,” he said. “I definitely discovered that I am a lot stronger than I ever thought I was in terms of handling things on my own.” Professor in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Rick Foster had Helinski in his class last semester and said he did not see Helinksi’s health issues hinder his schoolwork.

“You could go in an hour, you could go in five minutes, you could go in 80 years from now ... so it’s pointless to go around with a negative attitude.” Carter Helinski, Environmental studies and sustainability sophomore Helinski said there are two treatment options that include brain surgery or pinpointed radiation. He is planning to treat his tumor with one of the two options this summer. People often react with sympathy or disbelief when he tells them about his health. “Having so many things happening at the same time people think, ‘I don’t know how you get out of bed in the morning’ or, ‘I don’t know how you keep up with what you’re doing,’” Helinski said. “People say, ‘I could never do that if I was in your situation.’ Yeah, you could. If you’re in the situation you don’t really have a choice. ... When people say that it feels good, but I don’t want to feel like some hero or I don’t want to feel like some Superman because I am not. “I am just going about everything like I typically would.” Helinski said he won’t let his health affect his passion to save the environment and protect animals. “You could go in an hour, you could go in five

“He was always the first one in class and the last one to leave, and that wasn’t because of any kind of learning issue,” Foster said. “I admire him very much. ... We would engage in a lot of conversations because he was always there before class ever started sitting in front of me, and there was never a conversation of complaint, it was always an upbeat conversation.” Helinski’s mother, Rachel Helinski, said she was in shock when she learned of the tumor. Carter’s father, Mark Helinski, had a brain tumor removed nine months earlier. She said his father helped inspire Carter during the past two years. “The hardest thing is that you never want to see your kids suffer or have to go through something this life altering and he has already had a lot of challenges thrown at him in his life,” Rachel Helinski said. “He’s had to work twice as hard as everybody else at a lot of things and so I think it was always his goal to get to MSU and have that fighting spirit of, ‘You think I can’t do this? Watch me.’”


The MSU men’s basketball team comes together before the game against University of Miami (Fla.) in the first round of the men’s NCAA Tournament on March 17 at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Okla. The Spartans defeated the Hurricanes, 78-58. PHOTO: SUNDEEP DHANJAL

MSU men’s basketball : 20-15 overall, 10-8 Big Ten

FINAL SCORE

BY THE NUMBERS MSU SEASON STATS REBOUNDS PER GAME 36.4 FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE

47%

3-POINT PERCENTAGE

37.3%

FREE THROW PERCENTAGE

67%

POINTS PER GAME

71.9

90

70

KANSAS

MSU

ASSISTS PER GAME 16.9

WINSTON SEASON STATS

WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT MSU MEN’S BASKETBALL On the second day of the NCAA Tournament, Tom Izzo is 21-5

MSU has made at least the second round of the NCAA Tournament 10 of the last 11 seasons

MSU men’s basketball has won 20+ games for the sixth straight season and 12 of the last 13 seasons

POINTS PER GAME

6.7

REBOUNDS PER GAME

1.8

ASSISTS PER GAME

5.2

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE

47.5%

3-POINT FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE

38.6%

FREE THROW PERCENTAGE

77.5%

PHOTO: SUNDEEP DHANJAL

MONDAY, MARC H 2 0, 2 01 7

T H E STATE N E WS

5


Crossword

L.A. Times Daily Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Spotlight

After strong start, MSU knocked out by 1-seeded Kansas by 20 points ACROSS

1 Franklin’s faith 6 Civil rights org. 11 Nursery offering 14 More than just saber rattling 15 Not as well 16 Numero __ 17 1980 Clint Eastwood film about a Wild West show 19 Elton’s title 20 Forward 21 “Isn’t that something” 22 “Hold it right there!” 23 1965 Jerry Lewis/Tony Curtis farce involving flight attendants 26 Prey for cheetahs 29 Little League airer 30 Fishing spot 31 GPS suggestion 33 Milk source 37 Pro 38 Low-budget cinema ... and, literally, the four longest puzzle answers 41 Program file ending 42 Two-step, e.g. 44 College URL ending 45 Lyra’s brightest star 46 Et __ 49 Really dull 51 2005 Christian Bale superhero thriller 55 Jackson 5 hairdo

56 Item under many a top 57 Requiring quarters, briefly 61 __ Mini: Nintendo console 62 2003 Disney animated feature with talking grizzlies 64 Hip-hop Dr. 65 New York mayor before Koch 66 Top-flight 67 “Of course!” 68 Asp cousin 69 Robert’s “Out of Africa” role

DOWN

1 Puts on gently 2 Basic French verb 3 Victor’s cry 4 Shallows hazard 5 Hip dude 6 Tip of a Bic 7 Set straight 8 Claim 9 Tabloid subjects 10 Snoop 11 Rolls with rice 12 Salad bar sliver 13 Bandanna cousin 18 Like challenging push ups 22 Go on (one’s way) 24 Comparison phrase 25 Composer’s work

26 Tablet with Mini and Pro versions 27 Flaky mineral 28 Hammer end 32 Genesis matriarch 34 Thought-provoking 35 Army vet 36 Predict using, as tea eaves 38 Banjo legend Fleck 39 “Gotcha, man” 40 Special Olympics founder Shriver 43 Hunter’s garb, for short 45 Easily seen 47 Deep-seated 48 Using one’s passport, say 50 Didn’t sleep quietly 51 Indecent 52 Burning 53 Takes a shot at 54 Cake words Alice abided by 58 Düsseldorf denial 59 Like granola bars 60 W. or LBJ 62 Management major’s deg. 63 __ Honor

Get the solutions at statenews.com/puzzles

Freshman forward Miles Bridges (22) and freshman guard Cassius Winston (5) embrace during the second half of the game against University of Kansas in the second round of the men’s NCAA Tournament on March 19 at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Okla. The Spartans were defeated by the Jayhawks, 90-70. PHOTO: SUNDEEP DHANJAL

BY CONNOR CLARK

Level: 1

2

3

4

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www. sudoku.org.uk SOLUTION TO TUESDAY’S PUZZLE

Get the solutions at statenews.com/ puzzles

3/15/17

6

© 2017 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency. All rights reserved. THE STATE N EWS

MONDAY, MARCH 2 0, 2 01 7

CCLARK@STATENEWS.COM

TULSA, Okla. – As the final buzzer sounded, MSU’s season was ended by the hands of No. 1 Kansas. A hard fought game by both sides, MSU failed to string a run to crawl past the Jayhawks. The final score was 90-70. Freshman forward Miles Bridges did what he could, however he was without much help in the latter 10 minutes of the second half because freshman forward Nick Ward was in foul trouble. With more than eight minutes left in the second half, Ward picked up his fourth foul and had to sit. From there Bridges attempted to carry the team, but the load was too heavy. In the final five minutes, the Spartans were exhaust-

“It really is just a big family, everybody loves each other, everybody is working for each other.” Matt Van Dyk, Redshirt senior forward

ed from dealing with the speed of Kansas and couldn’t make up the increasing score differential. At the two minute mark, Kansas’ Josh Jackson drove down the center of the lane, throwing down a dagger dunk, putting the Jayhawks up 15 points. Frank Mason III added a layup and Devonte’ Graham hit a corner 3-pointer to put Kansas on a 7-0 run and ahead by 20 points. The Spartans end the season with a final record of 20-15. The Departed The Spartans will lose three players to graduation in the offseason: Alvin Ellis III, Matt Van Dyk and Eron Harris. Harris will leave a decent-sized hole to fill for MSU. In just two seasons as a Spartan, Harris scored 616 points in 63 games. His college career ended on the floor of Mackey Arena in West Lafayette, Ind. when he drove baseline, colliding with Purdue’s Isaac Haas, and landed awkwardly on his right leg. His knee would severely buckle and the injured Harris was stretchered off the floor. Izzo was able to give Harris one last shinning movement on Senior Night against then-No. 16 Wisconsin. With the final seconds ticking down and the Spartans leading 84-74, Harris took off his warm-ups and slowly shuffled to the scorer’s table to check-in. He was welcomed onto the court by a standing ova-


Spotlight

Cameron Macko Managing editor cmacko@statenews.com

“All the small things that we went through, all of the adversity, all the fighting and all the grinding it out with teammates.” Alvin Ellis III, Senior Guard tion, and without any teammate assistance, he leaned down at halfcourt to complete the Spartan tradition – a kiss upon the spartan helmet logo. In Harris’ entire college basketball year, including the two season at West Virginia, he scored 1,489 points. He is expected to graduate with a degree in sociology. Ellis shot his final arrow for MSU having played in 132 games. During his time wearing the green and white, Ellis scored 414 points, most of which occurred in his senior season. Ellis scored 205 points in his final season and 209 points in his first three seasons combined. Ellis filled in as a starter when Harris was injured. Ellis is expected to graduated with a degree in sociology. “All the small things that we went through, all of the adversity, all the fighting and all the grinding it out with teammates,” Ellis said after hugging former MSU forward Draymond Green. “From just all the trips that we took overseas and the Bahamas and things like that, just all the little things that we’ve been through together.” The final senior is Van Dyk. The redshirt senior from Imlay City, Mich. earned his spot on the roster by walking onto the team before the 2014 season. His hustle and hard work earned him a scholarship from the team before this season. Van Dyk played at St. Clair County Community College before transferring to MSU for academic purposes. He appeared in 49 games and scored 61 points for MSU and is a two-time recipient of the Tim Bograkos Walk-On Award. He is expected to return home and help run the family lettuce farm after graduation. His degree is in agribusiness management. “Just the family here,” Van Dyk said holding back tears about his favorite MSU memory. “It really is just a big family, everybody loves each other, everybody is working for each other.” Uncertainty of Miles Bridges Bridges will be the next focal point for MSU fans while they await his decision on either to return for his sophomore season, or leave college and pursue a career in the NBA. In just one season at MSU, Bridges left an impressive mark in terms of production. If he decides to leave MSU, Bridges will finish his college career with 402 points and 199 rebounds. In 24 games, he averaged 16.7 points per game and 8.3 rebounds per game. Both of those statistics were team highs this season. Bridges missed seven games earlier in the season because of a foot injury. In what could be his final game in green and white, Bridges scored 22 points with eight rebounds. He left early in the first half with an abdomen

injury and returned minutes later still catering to his right hip. His explosive dunks, extended shooting range and all-around talent helped him win the Big Ten Freshman of the Year. Bridges scored in double-figures 25 times this season. Just one year ago, Bridges entered MSU as a five-star recruit from Flint, Mich. He played his last years of high school basketball at Huntington Prep in West Virginia. Bridges did not say whether he was leaving MSU after their loss against Kansas. When he will make a decision is unknown. “Miles is going to be my best friend, man, and you know he’s my little brother, but I just appreciate everything he does and how hard he works and wants to be great,” Lourawls “Tum Tum” Nairn Jr. said. “But he never backs down from a challenge, and I’m going to keep getting on him for the rest of his life because that’s one thing Coach has been pushing me to be better at is holding my best friend accountable.” An update about his choice to leave or not is expected as early as this week and Izzo said he would encourage Bridges either way, noting the demeanor of Bridges reminded him of Gary Harris who decided to stay another year. Incoming class Currently MSU has t wo highly acclaimed signed recruits, Jaren Jackson and Xavier Tillman. Jackson plays high school basketball at La Lumiere School in La Porte, Ind. In his junior year of high school at Park Tudor High School in Indianapolis, Ind. Jackson averaged 16.1 points per game, 7.8 rebounds and 4.4 blocks. He is listed as 6-foot-11, 225 pounds and is a five-star recruit. He will play in the McDonald’s All-American game, the same game Bridges and guard Joshua Langford appeared in last year. Jackson is listed as the No. 16 best incoming basketball recruit and No. 3 best power forward according to ESPN’s Top 100. Jackson received 18 total scholarship offers from notable universities such as: U-M, Kansas, Indiana, Illinois, Butler, Georgetown, Maryland, Purdue and Notre Dame. Tillman is listed as a power forward as well and is 6-foot-9, 250 pounds. He currently plays for Grand Rapids Christian High School in Grand Rapids, Mich. He is a four-star recruit with 10 scholarship offers, mainly from Big Ten schools. Outside of MSU, other Big Ten schools that wanted Tillman include: Purdue, Indiana, Illinois, U-M, Iowa and Ohio State. Teams outside of the Big Ten included: Virginia Tech, TCU and Kentucky. Unless either player decides to decommit and attend another university, the

Freshman forward Miles Bridges (22) blocks a shot made by University of Kansas center Landen Lucas (33) during the first half of the game against University of Kansas in the second round of the men’s NCAA Tournament on March 19 at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Okla. The Spartans were defeated by the Jayhawks, 90-70. PHOTO: SUNDEEP DHANJAL

Spartans could have a potential starting line-up including: Cassius Winston, Langford, Bridges, Ward and Jackson. More likely Nairn and potentially Gavin Schilling will start. MSU is currently in the race for a third highly acclaimed recruit, Brian “Tugs” Bowen. He currently plays alongside Jackson for La Lumiere School and is originally from Saginaw, Mich. The same

city that produced players like Green and former guard Jason Richardson. Bowen is listed at 6-foot-7, 190 pounds. He is the No. 12 incoming recruit, according to the ESPN Top 100 and is the No. 3 small forward. The five-star recruit has drawn heavy interest from Arizona and MSU as well as five additional schools. Those other schools include: DePaul, Texas, Creigh-

Classified

Your campus marketplace! statenews.com/classifieds

TO PLACE AN AD …

DEADLINES

BY TELEPHONE (517) 295-1680 IN PERSON 435 E. Grand River Ave. BY E-MAIL advertising@statenews.com ONLINE www.statenews.com/classifieds OFFICE HOURS 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mon.-Fri.

LINER ADS 2 p.m., 1 business day prior to publication (includes cancellations) CLASSIFIED DISPLAY 3 p.m., 3 class days prior to publication

NOTE TO READERS The State News screens ads for misleading or false claims but cannot guarantee any ad or claim. Please use caution when answering ads, especially when sending money.

Employment

Employment

Employment

G Y M N A S T I C S INSTRUCTORS Wanted: Reliable, enthusiastic, kid loving instructors wanted for boys/girls recreational gymnastics. Contact John at 517-322-0360

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS $17.25 base-appt. Flex sched. around classes. Great resume builder 5 1 7 - 3 3 3 - 1 7 0 0 . workforstudentsnow.com

VAN ATTA’S Greenhouse in Haslett is hiring. Multiple positions avail. Apply in person at 9008 Old M-78, Haslett, MI or online @ vanattas.com

• Seeking Camp Counselors and Swim Instructors

• Magnificent facilities - pools, lake, sports, nature & arts • Located on over 16 acres in Milford, MI

• Have a great summer working with 75+ college students

THE BEST SUMMER EVER APPLY TODAY:

www.willowaydaycamp.com/jobs or 248-932-2123

statenews.com

WORK ON Mackinac Island This Summer - Make lifelong friends. The Island House Hotel and Ryba’s Fudge Shops are seeking help in all areas: Front Desk, Bell Staff, Wait Staff, Sales Clerks, Kitchen, Baristas. Dorm Housing, bonus, and discounted meals. (906) 847-7196. www.theislandhouse.com

Apts. For Rent 1 BDRM, 1 bath, affordable luxury, downtown EL. Upgraded avail now. Contact 517-204-7488

MONDAY, MARC H 2 0, 2 01 7

Apts. For Rent LIVE BEHIND Dublin with half off rent for summer! Contemporary 2 & 4 bedrms lic for up to 4, includes parking. Contact cronmgt.com or 351-1177 for more info or tour.

Textbooks COLLEGEVILLE TEXTBOOK Co. is your source for used textbooks! 321 E. Grand River 517-922-0013

Automotive 2010 TOYOTA Tacoma. Single Cab 4x4. W/ 50,000 mi. Asking $15,500. Please call (517) 930-0930 for details!

Go State!

TH E STATE N E WS

7


Spotlight ton, N.C. State and UCLA. Next year projections The long list of injuries combined with the youth issues for MSU this season could have a very different look next season. If Schilling and Ben Carter return healthy, which has been a major problem especially for Carter, then MSU will have an abundance of height. Because of injuries this season, Ward stands tallest for MSU at 6-foot-8. This has hurt the ability for MSU to guard the paint and against teams like Purdue, it has squashed the ability to defend the low post. The height of the Boilermakers with 7-foot-2 Isaac Haas and 6-foot-9 Caleb Swanigan was too much to handle for the Spartans. They lost by double digits in both games this season. However, next season MSU would have a front court of 6-foot-9 Schilling, Carter and Tillman. They will also have 6-foot-8 Ward, 6-foot-11 Jackson and 6-foot-6 Kenny Goins. This will drastically help improve the Spartans’ ability to rebound the basketball, a main staple for Izzo coached teams. This season MSU is ranked 123 in the nation in rebounding. Just two seasons ago, the Spartans

Cameron Macko Managing editor cmacko@statenews.com

led the country in rebounding margin. Their guards will remain the same, with Nairn and Winston in charge of the offense. Langford will continue his role alongside the two guards and Matt McQuaid will most likely gain a bigger role with the departure of Ellis and Harris. The experience for MSU will improve as each freshman will have a full season under their belt. Nairn will be the outspoken leader as a senior and Schilling will help lead the big men. For the most part, this team will remain relatively young. In terms of pure talent, next season’s MSU team will be loaded with playmaking and rebounding ability. If Bridges stays, the talent and ability for MSU increases, but if he decides to leave, they will still be threatening to the Big Ten and the nation. “Man, this whole year has been a blessing for me, man,” Nairn said following the loss. “Like I said at the beginning of the season when these guys first came in, I love being around them off the floor more than being on the floor just because they came in as the class. But they’re really so humble and came in just wanting to win games and worked hard every day.”

Senior guard Eron Harris (14) reacts during the second half of the game against University of Kansas in the second round of the men’s NCAA Tournament on March 19 at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Okla. The Spartans were defeated by the Jayhawks, 90-70. PHOTO: SUNDEEP DHANJAL

MSU DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY

SUMMER 2017

ONLINE CLASSES

ISS 330B SOCIAL SCIENCE PERSPECTIVE ON

JAPENESE HISTORY AND CULTURE JULY 7 - AUGUST 18 SECOND SUMMER SESSION

For more information, please call at 517-355-6640 or visit sociology.msu.edu

SECOND SESSION

JULY 5 - AUGUST 18

SOC 100: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY Fulfill a SOC major/minor requirement with our most popular course!

SOC 215: RACE & ETHNICITY Fulfill a SOC major/minor requirement & learn about major racial & ethnic dynamics!

SOC 216: SEX & GENDER Fulfill a SOC major/minor requirement & learn about human sexuality & gender identity!

SOC 315: FAMILY & SOCIETY Learn about humanity’s most fundamental institution!

SOC 316: YOUTH & SOCIETY Learn about changing patterns within childhood adolescence!

SOC 351: GENDERED VIOLENCE & POWER Learn about gendered violence from an intersectional perspective!

ISS 210: SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL Fulfill an MSU ISS requirement & learn about the important field of social psychology!

EXPLORE JAPANESE SOCIETY PEOPLE• POP CULTURE • FOOD • HISTORY HISTORY.MSU.EDU/ONLINE-COURSE-LIST MONDAY, MARC H 2 0, 2 01 7

TH E STATE N E WS

8


Monday 3/20/17