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IN THIS ISSUE:

Sexual Assault Resources Page 8

ASMSU votes support for Engler, Trustees Page 8

Feature:

Flooding at the Beal Botanical Garden

In wake of Parkland shooting, MSU, former Parkland students express shock

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Need a road trip idea? Page 9 All you need is a car and an urge to travel! Check out this guide for travel spots in Michigan and the Midwest.

What’s happening over break? Page 12 Keep following the Spartans and news throughout the week with this calendar.

T HU R S DAY, MA R C H 1, 2 018

@THESNEWS

STAT E NE WS .COM


News

Madison O’Connor Campus editor campus@statenews.com

The health of the W.J. Beal Botanical Garden after MSU’s worst flood since 1975 BY KAITLYN KELLEY KKELLEY@STATENEWS.COM

The W.J. Beal Botanical Garden, located in the floodway of the Red Cedar River, has been underwater in the worst flooding MSU has experienced since 1975. Frank Telewski, curator of the W.J. Beal Botanical Garden, said he hasn’t seen a flood this severe during his time at MSU. Telewski said the garden experiences moderate flooding roughly every two to three years, but this flood, which peaked at more than 10 feet at the Red Cedar River, is a rarity. He said his “fingers are crossed” for the health of the plants. Telewski said the plants in the botanical garden are still dormant from the winter, so they should survive the flood. Since there’s no active growth taking place, the seeds and bulbs are slowly metabolizing and don’t need as much oxygen. “As long as the water drains out, recedes, in relatively short order, then the garden should be OK,” he said. “If the flood waters were to persist for a month, you know, or several weeks, or a week or more, then I’d be worried that the dormant plants would suffer from low oxygen levels.” Although Telewski started working at MSU in 1993, he has still heard the stories of the 1975 flood.

up the branches, litter and other debris the flood leaves behind in the garden. McPeek said the garden staff will most likely begin cleaning up and reorganizing the garden in March after the flood. She is responsible for replacing the plants that don’t survive. “We are actually a part of an international seed exchange,” McPeek said. “We all create a seed catalog and ever y year “The power of nature — the power of water — is really remarkable and it’s something to during the winter time, we exchange it with everyone be respected and awed.” so if there’s seeds or plants Frank Telewski we need, we’ll make seed W.J. Beal Botanical Garden curator requests to other gardens.” Telewski said the university isn’t able to build a flood barrier to prevent the Katie McPeek, a botanical technologist and garden from flooding frequently in the spring the top propagator for the Beal Botanical Gar- because the Department of Natural Resourcden, said ensuring all of the garden’s plants es, or DNR, and the Department of Environare accounted for will be one of Beal’s biggest mental Quality, or DEQ, will not allow them to block the floodway. challenges after the flood. In addition to the regulations set by the DNR “It’s kind of hard to keep track of that because we have such a large collection — and DEQ, Telewski said the cost benefit likewe have 90 beds, 2,000 plants,” McPeek ly wouldn’t justify it. “We’ll find out with this flood if we have any said. “This will be an interesting test on Beal because it’s, what, five days underwater. And, damage. If we do have damage, working with you know, we have plants from all over the Katie, we can get a cost estimate of what it costs to replace it,” Telewski said. “I’m sure world.” Telewski said another task will be cleaning that the cost of replacing the plants that might He said the garden staff had to venture out into the water to catch the remains of the garden, including the plant labels that were on wooden stakes. “They went out there in a row boat with a net catching the labels, trying get as many labels as they could so they didn’t float away,” he said.

Two MSU students float down the Red Cedar River in their row boat under Bogue Street on Feb. 21. PHOTO: C.J. WEISS 2

THE STATE N E WS

The W. J. Beal Botanical Garden pictured on Feb. 21. The garden, located near the Red Cedar River, was impacted by the worst flood on MSU’s campus since 1975. PHOTO: ANNIE BARKER

THURSDAY, MARCH 1 , 2 01 8

die in the garden is going to be much less than the cost of installing that flood barrier.” Telewski said one improvement that has been made since the 1975 flood is keeping better, more efficient plant records. “We’re going to keep good records for the next generation of curatorial staff for the garden, and I think that’s the legacy that we can pass on and that, you know, they can learn from our experience,” he said. Carolyn Miller, a plant recorder at the Botanical Garden, said she has seen ducks swimming in the water that has taken over the garden’s space and the water was still near the steps of the staircases at both sides of the garden. Telewski said he hopes students and other members of the MSU community have looked at the flood because it could be a once-in-alifetime event. “The power of nature — the power of water — is really remarkable and it’s something to be respected and awed,” Telewski said. “So, right out our windows it’s happening and, you know, fortunately no one has been hurt.” McPeek said she believes the garden will survive and persist through the flood. “I think when you see an entire garden flooded, it’s alarming, but I really hope that come spring the theme will be plants are resilient,” she said. “You’re going to see all these plants in bloom and the garden looking healthy, and it’s going to look like, ‘What flood?’”

A bike locked up in the racks outside Pentecost Plaza on Feb. 21. PHOTO: MATT SCHMUCKER


Contents

McKenna Ross Managing editor feedback@statenews.com

ONLINE AT STATENEWS.COM

Women’s basketball in Big Ten Tournament

Alumnus to run for Board of Trustees spot

MSU students create YouTube show

The No. 10 Spartans take on the No. 7 Indiana Hoosiers Thursday night in Indianpolis.

Justin Johnson proposes a trustee committee for coordination of sexual violence prevention.

Communication Arts and Sciences students create “The Sidewalk,” a channel for college students.

“I don’t think we’ve given (Interim President John Engler) enough opportunity to prove himself. He’s here to help.” Adam Majestic James Madison College representative See page 8

BY T H E N U M B E R S

1975 The last time MSU experienced flooding as severe as in February See page 2

James Madison junior Katherine “Cookie” Rifiotis writes “Spartans will look out for each other” on a poster during the Teach-in/Learn-in: Building a Just MSU on Feb. 27 at MSU Union. PHOTO: ANNIE BARKER

The State News will not print on Thursday, March 8. It will resume printing March 15.

In the mean time, check online at statenews.com for updates!

VOL . 108 | NO. 22 CONTACT THE STATE NEWS (517) 295-1680

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Rachel Fradette

NEWSROOM/CORRECTIONS (517) 295-5149 feedback@statenews.com

MANAGING EDITOR McKenna Ross

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CAMPUS EDITOR Madison O’Connor CITY EDITOR Souichi Terada SPORTS EDITOR Jonathan LeBlanc FEATURES EDITOR Sasha Zidar PHOTO EDITOR Nic Antaya COPY CHIEF Casey Holland DESIGN Daena Faustino Lauren Gewirtz

Munn Ice Arena Public Skating Admission: • $6.00 General Public • $5.00 MSU students, staff or faculty w/ID, and anyone under 18 • $2.00 skate rental • All skaters must pay in Pro Shop prior to taking the ice.

All times are subject to change. Please call 353-4698 to confirm times.

We Stand with the Survivors February Thursday, 02/22: 12:15pm-1:45 p.m. Friday, 02/23: 12:15pm-1:45 p.m. Sunday, 02/25: 4:30pm-6:00 p.m. Monday, 02/26: 12:15pm-1:45 p.m. Tuesday, 02/27: 12:15pm-1:45 p.m. Wednesday, 02/28: 12:15pm-1:45 p.m.

The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University on Thursdays during the academic year. News is constantly updated seven days a week at statenews.com. One copy of this newspaper is available free of charge to any member of the MSU community. Additional copies $0.75 at the business office only. State News Inc. is a private, nonprofit corporation. Its current 990 tax form is available for review upon request at 435 E. Grand River Ave. during business hours. Copyright © 2018 State News Inc., East Lansing, Michigan

March Friday, 03/02: 12:15pm-1:45pm & 7:00pm-8:30pm Saturday, 03/03: 1:30pm-3:00pm 6:00pm-7:30pm Sunday, 03/04: 4:30pm-6:00pm Monday, 03/05: 1:30pm-3:00pm 6:00pm-7:30pm Tuesday, 03/06: 1:30pm-3:00pm Thursday, 03/08: 1:30pm-3:00pm Friday, 03/09: 7:00pm-8:30pm Sunday, 03/11: 6:30pm-8:00pm Monday, 03/12: 12:15pm-1:45pm Tuesday, 03/13: 12:15pm-1:45pm Wednesday, 03/14: 12:15pm-1:45pm Thursday, 03/15: 12:15pm-1:45pm Monday, 03/19: 12:15pm-1:45pm Tuesday, 03/20: 12:15pm-1:45pm Wednesday, 03/21: 12:15pm-1:45pm Friday, 03/23: 7:00pm-9:00pm Saturday, 03/24: 8:00pm-9:30pm Monday, 03/26: 12:15pm-1:45pm Tuesday, 03/27: 12:15pm-1:45pm Wednesday, 03/28: 12:15pm-1:45pm Thursday, 03/29: 12:15pm-1:45pm Friday, 03/30: 12:15pm-1:45pm 7:00pm-9:00pm Saturday, 03/31: 6:00pm-7:30pm

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To the MSU Student Body BEHOLD, HOW GOOD AND HOW PLEASANT IT IS FOR SIBLINGS TO DWELL TOGETHER IN UNITY (Psalm 133:1)

To the Students of Michigan State University: We, the clergy and faith leaders of the Greater Lansing area, know that this has been a difficult time for the MSU community, and the upcoming visit of Richard Spencer is adding to the feeling of turmoil. As faith leaders in the wider Lansing community, we want to let you know that we have your back. All of us stand together with you-- the student body--hoping and dreaming that MSU will become more and more a community of love and healing, a place where all are welcome and none are despised, a place of truthfulness and compassion, and a place of tolerance and diversity. Any of us are here to provide listening ears for you. We also join with you and the wider community in asserting our shared values of diversity and acceptance for all. All of our religious traditions uphold the primary value of love. In the end, it is only love that will matter. And so we want you to know that we are here for you today, and will continue to be here for you going forward, proclaiming this single shared value: Love, not Hate.  We, the undersigned clergy and faith leaders, do hereby stand with you during this difficult time. We pledge to support you and keep you in our prayers. We pray for your physical safety and your emotional well-being as you navigate through the days ahead.

Rev. Elizabeth Aho The Peoples’ Church, East Lansing

Rev. Drew Filkins The Peoples’ Church, East Lansing

Rev. John Pohl Asbury United Methodist Church

Yael Aronoff Jewish Studies Program-MSU

Rev. Tom Fox Wesley Campus Ministries, East Lansing

Rev. Andrew Pomerville The Peoples’ Church, East Lansing

Rev. Haley Vay Beaman One Community Lutheran/Episcopal Campus Ministry, East Lansing

Rev. Paul Hahm Lansing Grace UMC

Pastor Peter Robinson Pilgrim Congregational Church-UCC, Lansing

Pastor Bob Higle Plymouth Congregational Church, Lansing

Rev. Ellen Schoepf Faith Lutheran Church, Okemos

Father Mark Inglot St. Thomas/St. John’s Parish, East Lansing

Rev. Nikki Seger St. Michael’s Episcopal Church, Lansing

Rev. Stanley Jenkins First Presbyterian Church of Lansing

Rev. Linnea Stifler Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Hastings

Rev. Dr. Julie Kilmer First Church of the Brethren, Lansing

Rev. Kristin Stroble Eastminster Presbyterian Church, East Lansing

Terry Link Peace Education Center

Rev. Jenn Tafel Q-Cross, MSU

Imam Solail Chaudry Islamic Center of East Lansing

Rev. John Marsh Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Greater Lansing

Father Fred Thelen Cristo Rey Church, Lansing

Pastor Dawn Christenson First Congregational Church, UCC, Charlotte

Rev. Kim Metzer Hope United Methodist Church, Hastings

Rev. Dr. Bruce Cromwell Central Free Methodist Church, Lansing

Rev. Liz Miller Edgewood United UCC, East Lansing

Rev. William W. Chu Wesley Campus Ministries, East Lansing

Rev. Richard Moe Retired Lutheran (ELCA) pastor

Llewellyn Drong The Bah’ai Community of Lansing

Neil Myer UKirk at MSU Presbyterian Campus Ministry

Rev. Bryce Feighner Green Street United Methodist Church, Hastings

Rev. Tony Patrick Mt. Hope Presbyterian Church, Lansing

Rabbi Amy B. Bigman Congregation Shaarey Zedek, East Lansing Rev. William Bills University United Methodist Church, East Lansing Rev. Gary Bunge University Lutheran Church, East Lansing Rev. Dr. Kit Carlson All Saints Episcopal Church, East Lansing Rev. Dr. Rob Carlson Okemos Presbyterian Church

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THURSDAY, MARCH 1 , 2 01 8

Rev. Mark Thompson Lansing Central United Methodist Church Rev. Alice Fleming Townley The Presbyterian Church of Okemos Rabbi Becca Walker MSU Hillel Pastor Julie Winklepleck St. Paul Lutheran Church, East Lansing Rabbi Michael Zimmermann Congregation Kehilat Israel, Lansing


News

Souichi Terada City editor city@statenews.com

New Asian fastcasual restaurant opens downtown

RELIGIOUS DIRECTORY Stay up to date at: www.statenews.com/religious

BY XAVIER MATTISON XMATTISON@STATENEWS.COM

Not only do MSU dining halls have to keep pace with rapidly changing menus, so do restaurants. Storefronts along Grand River Avenue have assumed many identities trying to stay ahead of the curve. There is no telling who will stand the test of time and who will be refitted for the next culinary trend. This past year, GoombaS Pizza, Velvet A Candy Store, Cosi and Sweet Lorraine’s Fabulous Mac n’ Cheez have all fallen victim to closure. Hibachi Bowl has recently taken Sweet Lorraine’s Fabulous Mac n’ Cheez’s place. Hibachi Bowl, which opened at 547 E. Grand River Ave. in January 2018, offers a similar fast-casual dining style similar to popular restaurants like Chipotle, Blaze Pizza and Noodles & Co. Hibachi Bowl offers a sit-down style of dining with food delivered to patrons. Its menu includes items such as noodles, white and brown rice, chicken, shrimp, beef, tofu and a variety of vegetables that can be served either cold or grilled. While on the outside, this style of dining might seem like an opportunistic market, there is evidence the reign of fast-casual might be halting as traditional fast food companies adapt, according to a report by Bloomberg. This, however, has not deterred Hibachi Bowl from opening up shop. Hibachi Bowl Manager Jerry Lin said he wanted to open shop in East Lansing to provide customers with “a different style” of food. MSU business junior Jonah Newman said he believes the restaurant will do well because of its appeal to multiple types of people. He described it as an “Asian version of Chipotle.” MSU communication sophomore Natalie Cooper expressed similar views when she dined at the restaurant with her sorority sisters. When asked if the fast-casual format contributes to the restaurant’s potential, she said she thinks it does. “I think it will be because of the atmosphere,” Cooper said.

All Saints Episcopal Church 800 Abbot Rd. (517) 351-7160 Sun. Worship: 8am, 10am, & 5am Sunday School: 10am www.allsaints-el.org

The open sign shines red for Hibachi Bowl on Feb. 16. Hibachi Bowl opened in January 2018. PHOTOS: C.J. WEISS

Manager Jerry Lin cooks the chicken on grill prior to the lunch rush on Feb. 16 at Hibachi Bowl.

Chabad House of MSU 540 Elizabeth St. (517) 214-0525 Prayer Services: Friday night services followed by traditional Shabbat dinner @ Chabad. www.chabadmsu.com Eastminster Presbyterian Church 1315 Abbot Rd. (517) 337-0893 Classes for All Ages: 9:30am Sun. Worship: 10:30am www.eastminster church.org Greater Lansing Church of Christ 310 N. Hagadorn Rd. (Meet @ University Christian Church) (517) 898-3600 Sun: 8:45am Worship, 10am Bible Class Wed: 1pm, Small group bible study www.greaterlansing coc.org

The Islamic Society of Greater Lansing 920 S. Harrison Rd. (517) 351-4309 Friday Services: 12:15-12:45 & 1:45-2:15 For prayer times visit www.lansingislam.com/ Martin Luther Chapel 444 Abbot Rd. (517) 332-0778 Sun: 9:30am & 7pm Wed: 9pm Mini-bus pick-up on campus (Fall/Spring) www.martinluther chapel.org The People’s Church, multidenominational 200 W Grand River Ave. (517) 332-6074 Sunday Service: 10:30am with free lunch for students following worship. ThePeoples Church.com Riverview ChurchMSU Venue MSU Union Ballroom, 2nd Floor 49 Abbot Rd. (517) 694-3400 Sun. Worship: 6:30pm www.rivchurch.com

University United Methodist Church & MSU Wesley 1120 S. Harrison Rd. (517) 351-7030 Sun: 10:30am Thurs: 8:00pm September–April www.universitychurch home.org WELS Lutheran Campus Ministry 704 Abbot Rd. (517) 580-3744 Sat: 6:30pm msu.edu/~welsluth

Don’t be left out of the Religious Directory! Call (517)295-1680 to speak with an Account Executive today

Criminal justice freshman Nicholas Cooper (left) and nursing freshman Morgan Wojcik enjoy their bowls of food on Feb. 16 at Hibachi Bowl. Hibachi Bowl is located at 547 E. Grand River Ave. STATENEWS .COM

University Baptist Church 4608 Hagadorn Rd. (517) 351-4144 uinbapt@gmail.com www.baptistel.org Main Service: Sun, 10am

Hillel Jewish Student Center 360 Charles St. (517) 332-1916 Services: Friday night 6pm, dinner @ 7, September–April www.msuhillel.org

Religious Organizations:

THUR SDAY, MARCH 1. 2018

St. John Catholic Church and Student Center 327 M.A.C Ave. (517) 337-9778 Sun: 8am, 10am, Noon, 5pm, 7pm M,W,F: 12:15pm T & Th: 9:15pm www.stjohnmsu.org

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News

Souichi Terada City editor city@statenews.com

New Asian fastcasual restaurant opens downtown

RELIGIOUS DIRECTORY Stay up to date at: www.statenews.com/religious

BY XAVIER MATTISON XMATTISON@STATENEWS.COM

Not only do MSU dining halls have to keep pace with rapidly changing menus, so do restaurants. Storefronts along Grand River Avenue have assumed many identities trying to stay ahead of the curve. There is no telling who will stand the test of time and who will be refitted for the next culinary trend. This past year, GoombaS Pizza, Velvet A Candy Store, Cosi and Sweet Lorraine’s Fabulous Mac n’ Cheez have all fallen victim to closure. Hibachi Bowl has recently taken Sweet Lorraine’s Fabulous Mac n’ Cheez’s place. Hibachi Bowl, which opened at 547 E. Grand River Ave. in January 2018, offers a similar fast-casual dining style similar to popular restaurants like Chipotle, Blaze Pizza and Noodles & Co. Hibachi Bowl offers a sit-down style of dining with food delivered to patrons. Its menu includes items such as noodles, white and brown rice, chicken, shrimp, beef, tofu and a variety of vegetables that can be served either cold or grilled. While on the outside, this style of dining might seem like an opportunistic market, there is evidence the reign of fast-casual might be halting as traditional fast food companies adapt, according to a report by Bloomberg. This, however, has not deterred Hibachi Bowl from opening up shop. Hibachi Bowl Manager Jerry Lin said he wanted to open shop in East Lansing to provide customers with “a different style” of food. MSU business junior Jonah Newman said he believes the restaurant will do well because of its appeal to multiple types of people. He described it as an “Asian version of Chipotle.” MSU communication sophomore Natalie Cooper expressed similar views when she dined at the restaurant with her sorority sisters. When asked if the fast-casual format contributes to the restaurant’s potential, she said she thinks it does. “I think it will be because of the atmosphere,” Cooper said.

All Saints Episcopal Church 800 Abbot Rd. (517) 351-7160 Sun. Worship: 8am, 10am, & 5am Sunday School: 10am www.allsaints-el.org

The open sign shines red for Hibachi Bowl on Feb. 16. Hibachi Bowl opened in January 2018. PHOTOS: C.J. WEISS

Manager Jerry Lin cooks the chicken on grill prior to the lunch rush on Feb. 16 at Hibachi Bowl.

Chabad House of MSU 540 Elizabeth St. (517) 214-0525 Prayer Services: Friday night services followed by traditional Shabbat dinner @ Chabad. www.chabadmsu.com Eastminster Presbyterian Church 1315 Abbot Rd. (517) 337-0893 Classes for All Ages: 9:30am Sun. Worship: 10:30am www.eastminster church.org Greater Lansing Church of Christ 310 N. Hagadorn Rd. (Meet @ University Christian Church) (517) 898-3600 Sun: 8:45am Worship, 10am Bible Class Wed: 1pm, Small group bible study www.greaterlansing coc.org

The Islamic Society of Greater Lansing 920 S. Harrison Rd. (517) 351-4309 Friday Services: 12:15-12:45 & 1:45-2:15 For prayer times visit www.lansingislam.com/ Martin Luther Chapel 444 Abbot Rd. (517) 332-0778 Sun: 9:30am & 7pm Wed: 9pm Mini-bus pick-up on campus (Fall/Spring) www.martinluther chapel.org The People’s Church, multidenominational 200 W Grand River Ave. (517) 332-6074 Sunday Service: 10:30am with free lunch for students following worship. ThePeoples Church.com Riverview ChurchMSU Venue MSU Union Ballroom, 2nd Floor 49 Abbot Rd. (517) 694-3400 Sun. Worship: 6:30pm www.rivchurch.com

University United Methodist Church & MSU Wesley 1120 S. Harrison Rd. (517) 351-7030 Sun: 10:30am Thurs: 8:00pm September–April www.universitychurch home.org WELS Lutheran Campus Ministry 704 Abbot Rd. (517) 580-3744 Sat: 6:30pm msu.edu/~welsluth

Don’t be left out of the Religious Directory! Call (517)295-1680 to speak with an Account Executive today

Criminal justice freshman Nicholas Cooper (left) and nursing freshman Morgan Wojcik enjoy their bowls of food on Feb. 16 at Hibachi Bowl. Hibachi Bowl is located at 547 E. Grand River Ave. STATENEWS.COM

University Baptist Church 4608 Hagadorn Rd. (517) 351-4144 uinbapt@gmail.com www.baptistel.org Main Service: Sun, 10am

Hillel Jewish Student Center 360 Charles St. (517) 332-1916 Services: Friday night 6pm, dinner @ 7, September–April www.msuhillel.org

Religious Organizations:

THUR SDAY, MARCH 1. 2018

St. John Catholic Church and Student Center 327 M.A.C Ave. (517) 337-9778 Sun: 8am, 10am, Noon, 5pm, 7pm M,W,F: 12:15pm T & Th: 9:15pm www.stjohnmsu.org

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News

Souichi Terada City editor city@statenews.com

Groups offer support for survivors BY MAXWELL EVANS MEVANS@STATENEWS.COM

Multiple organizations in the Lansing area have seen increased awareness around sexual assault as a result of the scandals that have rocked MSU, and have offered assistance to survivors of violence. One such organization — End Violent Encounters, or EVE, a nonprofit based in Lansing — provides counseling and advocacy services for survivors. EVE’s 24-hour crisis hotline, staffed by trained advocates, provides crisis intervention and support. EVE also provides temporary housing to women and children affected by relationship violence at its emergency shelter. All services provided by the organization are free. Social media has provided the organization with new ways to conduct outreach into the community. Erin Roberts, the executive director of EVE, highlighted the usefulness of the EVE Facebook and Twitter accounts in spreading the word about the resources provided. “Survivors come from all different walks of life, all different perspectives,” Roberts said. “Trying to get our information out in all the places where somebody may be looking for our services is complicated, but ... we try to make sure that we are available in all ways.” More traditional avenues, like word-of-mouth and postings on doctors’ offices, are still vital to the organization’s success, Roberts said.

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“Word-of-mouth is really a great method for us because people that come to us and receive our services are some of our best advocates,” Roberts said. “They feel supported, our services are all survivor-led and confidential and they come at no cost to the survivor.” The Firecracker Foundation, located in Holt, Michigan, focuses on providing services to children and teens who have survived sexual trauma. Some of these services include mental health therapy, therapeutic yoga and caretaker support groups for guardians of young survivors, according to Carolyn Abide, the foundation’s office manager. These services are provided for free to families without medical insurance and those who are unable to afford copays, according to the foundation’s website. Abide said the sensitive nature of sexual violence can often deter survivors — especially younger ones — from reaching out about their struggles. That makes it important for groups like the Firecracker Foundation to do as much outreach as they can to inform the community about the resources they provide. “People are often not willing to disclose for various reasons, and because we work with youth, it can be difficult for them to know that there are resources available to them — especially if they haven’t told any adults in their life what’s going on,” Abide said. The Women’s Center of Greater Lansing, which provides counseling services and support groups

THURSDAY, MARCH 1 , 2 01 8

to survivors, also refuses to accept insurance for their resources, according to executive director Cindie Alwood. This allows survivors to pay what they can afford — and if they can’t afford anything, they pay nothing. These organizations often provide resources not directly related to sexual assault or violence, but rather can help survivors with other aspects of their lives as well. EVE partners with the Thrifty Sparrow Resale Shop and provides vouchers to eligible shelter residents and other clients for free clothing from the shop. The Women’s Center offers a job seekers’ support group, providing things like computer classes and resume assistance to women interested in beginning or changing careers. Yet the facilitators of this group are also trained on how to manage some of the issues that affect the job seekers — such as sexual assault, domestic violence or other types of trauma — so they can find employers who are willing to adapt to survivors’ specific needs. “There are lots of organizations that help people with job seeking, but I think the approach that we take is very different and unique,” Alwood said. Public response to the mishandling of sexual assault at MSU has led to more survivors seeking out the services these organizations provide, Abide said. The crises at MSU have also exposed “how pervasive this problem is in our society,” Abide said. “We all need to be more aware of what we

can do to support survivors.” Roberts said while she was pleased to see the issues at MSU bringing awareness to sexual violence, the responses of some in the community to immediately dismiss survivors’ claims were troubling. “It is so hard for a victim to come forward and share some of the most intimate details about a crime that was committed against them, and then to have people question whether or not they are telling the truth is harmful,” Roberts said. “That’s a deterrent for others to seek justice.” Survivors seeking assistance can contact any of these Lansing area organizations: End Violent Encounters: crisis line (517) 372-5572 office (517) 372-5976 Women’s Center of Greater Lansing: (517) 372-9163 The Firecracker Foundation: (517) 742-7224 Capital Area Response Effort: (517) 272-7436 Michigan Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence: (517) 347-7000 MSU Safe Place: (517) 355-1100


Features

Sasha Zidar Features editor features@statenews.com

MSU students from Parkland reflect after high school shooting BY CLAIRE MOORE

CMOORE@STATENEWS.COM

“The teachers from the elementary schools here, to the middle schools, to the high schools are phenomenal, and it’s been a great group of kids that my kids have grown up with through the years, so no, you’d never expect it in a community like this, nor would you expect it in any community in the United States,” Ron said In the aftermath of the shooting, Ron said he hit a period of anger. “I was very, very angry, and probably that’s the stages of where I’m at this point right now,” Ron said. In the wake of the shooting, multiple student groups around the country and some politicians have criticized the U.S. government’s response to the Parkland tragedy. Some, including students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas itself, have called for stricter gun “When you have anger, you’ve got to figure control legislation that out who you want to point that anger towards. would include a ban I think everybody, especially the students, on AR-15 rifles — the need to do what they feel is right to do.” firearm used by Cruz to carry out the shooting. Ron Lieberman “When you have Father of Marjory Stoneman Douglas student and MSU anger, you’ve got to figjournalism junior Noah Lieberman ure out who you want to point that anger towards,” Ron said. “I think everybody, especially the students, need Noah said he is looking forward to MSU’s to do what they feel is right to do. And I’m asspring break, during which he’ll return home suming that most of them have gone through to his brother, family and community. the periods of what I’ve gone through, only “Now that it’s all just settling in, it’s still more intensely.” pretty tough, but I think it’ll start to hit me Ron said he believes there isn’t enough being when I go home for spring break next week,” done when these situations happen. Noah said. “There’s a lot of blame to go around,” he Noah isn’t the only MSU student who has said. “And I would tell you that since Columties to the Parkland area. Jake Roell, an bine 20 years ago, we’ve had two Democratic advertising senior who once attended Marjory presidents, two Republican presidents. Both Stoneman Douglas High School, first received times, the presidents had chances to have the notice of the shooting from his father. Congress and the Senate, complete control, “My dad texted me about it on Valentine’s Day at like 3 o’clock, and he was like, ‘Hey, did and nobody’s done anything. “The government has not done anything, you hear about the shooting back home?’ And I was like, ‘No, I didn’t,’” Roell said. “I instantly whether it was Republican or Democrat, and that’s … We’re all to blame. We’ve let our kids went to Facebook and looked it up and was down. Everybody.” just kind of speechless.” Noah said he’s seen a strong call for gun As he drove around MSU’s campus that day, safety and control after the shooting. He said Roell reminisced about his time at the high school and the memories he made in Parkland. it’s good to see the students are starting to call for everyone to work together to resolve gun “I just had a massive pit in my stomach violence. because I just remember walking those halls “They’re handling it the best way they possiand all of the memories I have,” Roell said. bly can,” Noah said. “I don’t think this is going “My friends and I would ride our bikes right to be one-thing-fix-all type of thing. I think past where all the SWAT cars were, so it was just surreal to be looking at a tragedy like that this is going to take pressure from everybody, and until everybody wants to work together, in your hometown.” nothing’s going to get done.” Ron Lieberman, Noah’s father and an MSU Roell said the raw experience of what hapalumnus, said his family is doing OK after the pened in Parkland is something no one should tragedy. ever have to experience, especially in a school He said he’d never expected anything like setting. this to happen so near to him. “My best friend’s younger sister was literally “I didn’t know that we would ever expect trapped in a closet and had no idea whether anything like this to happen anywhere in the or not the next person that was going to open country,” Ron said. the closet door was either police coming to Ron watched three of his sons graduate rescue or the shooter,” Roell said. “No student from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, should ever have to witness that or be in that where he also coached ice hockey for seven situation.” years. To him, the community is like a family. For some individuals at MSU, a shooting which left 17 dead and several others wounded in Parkland, Florida just two weeks ago strikes far closer to home than it does for others. Journalism junior Noah Lieberman attended Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the site of the Feb. 14 shooting, before he attended MSU. Noah’s younger brother was there the day the gunman, 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz, went into the school and opened fire on students and staff. His brother was unharmed, but Noah talked about what was running through his mind when he first received word shots had been fired. “I mean, every bad emotion you can possibly feel was in my body,” Noah said. “It was just terrible.”

Above: The Lieberman family poses for a photo. Below: The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School sign adorned with wreaths after the Feb. 14 shooting. PHOTOS COURTESY RON LIEBERMAN

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News

Madison O’Connor Campus editor campus@statenews.com

T

he Associated Students of Michigan State University, or ASMSU, decided not to move forward with a bill that would call for the immediate resignations of the MSU Board of Trustees and Interim President John Engler during its policy committee meeting on Feb. 22. Some fought to pass the bill, some fought to change the wording so it would exclude explicit resignations and many fought to dismiss it completely. Ultimately, the bill, introduced by Lyman Briggs College Representative Benjamin Horne during the general assembly meeting that Trustee Brian Mosallam spoke at, was tabled with no chance of being reintroduced. “We talked about, ‘It’s going to get harder.’ It’s already hard. The issue is that we can’t make the change that we want to because there’s no one up top listening. I understand the difference between calling for no confidence and resignations, which is why I proposed the amendment,” Horne said. “We can’t let perfect be the enemy of good.” Horne said the discussion over the bill created a divide within ASMSU. A few representatives fought to at least send an amended and more subjective version of the bill to the general assembly meeting on March 1 and voted against tabling it. But more representatives voiced concerns. Some representatives were concerned with calling for any resignations, because the university didn’t give Engler a chance to make any changes yet. James Madison College Representative Adam Majestic brought up some of Engler’s recent actions, like his decision to donate his salary back to the university, and said it shows Engler is committed. “I don’t think we’ve given (Engler) enough opportunity to prove himself,” Majestic said. “He’s here to help. If he wasn’t here to help, I don’t know what he would be here for. ... I fear that ASMSU can become too politicized by taking a stance that can be seen as a political stance.” Interfraternity Council Representative Jack Brinkley agreed with Majestic’s stance. He said though he didn’t agree with the board’s decision to appoint Engler as the interim president without consulting students or faculty, he thought calling for Engler’s resignation is the wrong move. “With regards to President Engler, I don’t believe that there have been any sort of specific instances within the first couple weeks of his term that would have to lead to that (calling for his resignation),” Brinkley said. “It’s been pretty firmly established that in order to move forward, we need to move with the Board of Trustees, not against them.

ASMSU DIVIDED OVER INTERIM PRESIDENT ENGLER BY MILA MURRAY

MMURRAY@STATENEWS.COM

Interim President John Engler speaks during the Board of Trustees meeting on Feb. 16 at the Hannah Administration Building. PHOTO: NIC ANTAYA And we have seen progress with that. Even though we’ve only gotten one out of the eight trustees to meet with us, that is progress from where we were at.” Some representatives were concerned with calling for any resignations because there could be consequences. Even if the bill was amended to exclude explicit names, Vice President for Internal Administration Katherine Rifiotis said there has been concern about whether phone calls, meetings and proposals in coordination with the administration would be compromised if ASMSU voted “no confidence.” At ASMSU’s Feb. 15 meeting, Mosallam said if ASMSU were to call for his and the rest of the trustees’ resignations, he would respect the decision. “It would not affect my relationship with any of your leadership or any of your board. This is not the time for us to cut down dialogue,” Mosallam said during the meeting. “You have that right and don’t ever think that

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THURSDAY, MARCH 1 , 2 01 8

you have to hold back on that because it’s going to affect how you interface with the board. So if you feel strongly about taking that position, then you do it, you take it. And everybody will deal with it.” Another consequence considered during the discussion was that if the trustees were to resign, Gov. Rick Snyder would have to appoint new trustees. College of Nursing Representative Megan Walsh said she “doesn’t want the governor handpicking our future.” College of Communication Arts and Science Representative Maysa Sitar agreed. “I feel like this bill is a short-term, jerk reaction rather than a long-term solution,” Sitar said. “I don’t want Snyder appointing our trustees, and this isn’t a political thing, this because he’s Republican or Democrat, this is because I don’t believe a single person should bypass the entire electoral process. Second, I don’t feel like we have enough data on what the students want us to do.” Some representatives were concerned with whether or not calling for resignations would be effective. Last month, ASMSU voted on a bill that specifically excluded the call for the resignation of former President Lou Anna K. Simon and instead called for the administration to “take responsibility” for mishandling ex-MSU and USA Gymanstics doctor Larry Nassar’s actions. “Calling for resignations, or any action we can take to ‘condemn the Board of Trustees’ in any wording isn’t really effective right now, because that’s basically what we did a month ago,” College of Music Representative Isaiah Hawkins, who made the motion to table the bill, said. And some representatives were concerned with calling for any resignations, because on Feb. 7, ASMSU held a discussion about how they were going to work with Engler moving forward. College of Agricultural and Natural Resources Representative Sergei Kelley said he would rather have cooperation, because the bill could hurt ties with the administration and cause discourse. “So this bill, it goes against what we’ve been

saying, what we’ve been trying to promote as a body,” Kelley said. “We’ve been talking about working with the current administration, working with students, letting their voices be heard, advocating for them, taking their voices to the highest levels. We have been more of a body looking to work with the Board of Trustees so something like this, out of the blue, goes against that.” At the meeting where Horne introduced the bill, he said ASMSU would give the board two weeks to make the changes students want. Now, Horne said nothing will change, and said he is disappointed in the decision ASMSU made. “Personally, I’ve had enough of watching this play out,” Residential College in the Arts and Humanities Representative Brittany Wise said. “The people that I’ve talked to in my college and out of my college have had enough of watching this play out. How much longer do we need to let people let this play out? … We need to let students know that we’re listening, and that we hear them and we support them. Because if we don’t say it, nobody else is going to.” Though the bill has no chance of being re-introduced, a bill with similar language can still be rewritten. Along with the discussion over this bill, ASMSU passed a bill that will “advocate for a constitutional amendment to be added to Michigan’s constitution which reserves at least one voting position on Michigan State University’s Board of Trustees for a current Michigan State University student.” With concerns over communication and transparency from the MSU administration, Vice President for Governmental Affairs Tyler VanHuyse, who penned the bill, said this will allow for more student input. “If we have a student voice on the board, it will force them (the trustees) to really move with the times and actually react to what the current needs of the university are, because we change out our entire population roughly every four years,” College of Agricultural and Natural Resources Representative Josh Prusik said. “Somebody that’s been around for 30 years is not in touch with the needs of students.”


Spring Break 2018 TOP PLACES TO GO FOR

BY JAIMIE BOZACK

JBOZACK@STATENEWS.COM

If traveling somewhere far is too expensive for your budget, then there might be some places in Michigan that could spark your interest. Michigan is full of beautiful scenery, craft beers and everything in between. Check out The State News’ top five Michigan spring break destinations below.

Detroit

Detroit is the perfect place for people who want to go to a bigger city that is not too far away. The developing city has something for everyone. Detroit Institute of Arts: The Detroit Institute of Arts is perfect for any art lover. It has an abundance of art and a variety of artists. The Institute is perfect for an afternoon trip on a chilly day. The Institute has a discount for students who bring their I.D. Motown Museum: The Motown Museum showcases Detroit in a different way and allows people to get a whole Motown experience. The Fillmore, Fox Theatre and more: There are tons of concerts happening on an almost daily basis in Detroit. Check out venues around the area to see some musicians performing in the area. Driving distance from East Lansing: Approximately one hour and 30 minutes.

Top four places to travel in the Midwest for spring break: Chicago

Chicago seems like the number one obvious choice for a closer big city to go to. Chicago can be reached by a train ride or in a short road trip. Nightlife: Chicago has a plethora of options from a big city. Comedy, music and art shows happen daily. There are plenty of bars and restaurants to choose from while visiting Chicago. Art museums: Besides its booming nightlife, Chicago also provides opportunities to keep people busy during the day. The city has art museums which an art-lover can easily spend hours in. Between the Art institute of Chicago and Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, the city provides a haven for art. Deep-dish pizza: The pizza in Chicago is unlike any other. The deep-dish pizza is a favorite for visitors. Some prime pizza places include Giordano’s, Pequod’s Pizza and Lou Malnati’s Pizzeria. Ice skating in Millennium Park: Millennium Park in Chicago is a must-see for people who have never been to the city — it has a lot of scenery and tourist destinations. During the winter and spring months, ice skating is one of the many things provided in the park. Driving distance from East Lansing: Approximately three hours and 30 minutes.

Milwaukee

Milwaukee is a short drive or a quick ferry ride away from Michigan. Some people might not realize Milwaukee has a lot of activities to do, even during the spring months. Milwaukee RiverWalk: The RiverWalk is a walkway that lines the river and goes through Milwaukee’s downtown. It is a good chance to see the river while checking out the nightlife of Milwaukee. The cheese: Wisconsin is known for its cheeses and Milwaukee is no different. There are many places where cheese stands and shops are. Take a bite out of the city with a slice of cheese. Driving distance from East Lansing: Approximately 5 hours.

Grand Rapids

Beer is something many Michiganders can get behind, and Grand Rapids is a city where beer is in abundance. The city offers a lively nightlife scene ranging from breweries, sports bars, nightclubs and a variety of food options. Van Andel Arena: Van Andel Arena is a venue that many award-winning musicians have performed at. This could be a great place to see a live show at during spring break. Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park: The gardens let visitors experience nature in a whole new way. For the student who is more about nature than city life, the gardens are a good place to take a quick break from the movement of the city. It includes five indoor themed gardens, an outdoor garden and more. Founders, Vivant and nightlife: Grand Rapids is known for its great beer selections throughout the city. It has everything from HopCat to Founders Brewing Co. and food ranging from Caribbean at Chez Olga to burgers at Stella’s Lounge. Driving distance from East Lansing: Approximately one hour and 10 minutes.

Lansing

If you are without a car and stuck in East Lansing, Lansing itself has a lot of interesting places potentially unknown to many students, all only a bus ride away. Mac’s Bar, The Avenue and The Green Door: These three bars are a quick bus ride away from East Lansing and down the road from each other. They each provide new entertainment every night and drink specials. Mac’s Bar has Monday night comedy, The Avenue has karaoke and The Green Door has a variety of bands who perform live. Michigan State Capitol: The Capitol building is located in downtown Lansing among many growing restaurants and bars. The Capitol offers tours and would be perfect for an afternoon visit. Old Town: Old Town has a prime fishing area on the Fish Ladder, walking trails and various shops and bars. MEAT, Pablo’s, The Unicorn Tavern and Zoobies are just some of the many places to eat and drink. REO Town: REO Town is another growing area located near downtown. It has thrift shops for the shopper, Blue Owl Coffee for the coffee lover and Saddleback BBQ for the foodie. Driving distance from East Lansing: Approximately 10 minutes.

Traverse City

Traverse City is a favorite for some Michiganders. Skiing: For the outdoorsy type, there are a few places to go skiing and snowboarding in Traverse City. Spend a weekend enjoying the crisp spring air while on the trails of places like Hickory Hills or Mount Holiday. Wineries: Take a break from the hustle of everyday life and have a nice glass of wine in the city. Driving distance from East Lansing: Approximately three hours.

Frankenmuth

Some students might not know of Frankenmuth. Frankenmuth is a city known for its Bavarian-style food and architecture. It’s close enough to East Lansing for a quick weekend getaway. Bavarian-style food: The Bavarian Inn Restaurant and Zehnder’s give people in Frankenmuth a whole new type of food experience. Food is one of the main attractions of Frankenmuth. Bay City Downtown: The Bay City area has a bunch of one-of-a-kind shops and places to eat. It also provides a small town feel while still being packed with tourists and shops. Driving distance from East Lansing: Approximately one hour and 10 minutes.

Indianapolis

Indianapolis has a lot of fun opportunities for students looking to travel someplace close for spring break. “Indy” has everything from a booming college town to up and coming neighborhoods to breweries. Broad Ripple Village: Broad Ripple Village is a small village outside of Indianapolis which has a lot of youth. It has tons of vintage stores, coffee shops and nightlife opportunities. Breweries and nightlife: Don’t let people tell you otherwise — the nightlife in Indy is always packed. The city offers many brewery tours, including a brew bus tour. The college town: Indianapolis is home to a couple college towns. Indiana University and Butler University are near each other and provide a place for students to blend in while getting a different type of atmosphere. Driving distance from East Lansing: Approximately four hours.

Cleveland

Some might consider Ohio one of the worst places to visit, but if you look hard enough, there are certain places in Ohio that make it worth going. Cleveland is close in distance and is a nice place to take a weekend trip during spring break. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame: Cleveland is known for its rock n’ roll museum. This is one of the prime places in Ohio and provides people a glimpse into the world of rock n’ roll. Architecture: Cleveland has some amazing architecture, and for students interested in that type of thing, the city might offer some great insight into that. The Arcade building and Terminal Tower are just some of the visually appealing buildings for people to fall in love with. Driving distance from East Lansing: Approximately three hours and 40 minutes.

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Features

Sasha Zidar Features editor features@statenews.com

QUIZ: Where should you really go for spring break? BY ANNA NICHOLS ANICHOLS@STATENEWS.COM

You might already have your ticket booked and bags packed, but are you truly ready to go on vacation? Take this personality quiz to find out if you’re actually ready to go hard on a beach — or if your wallet thinks you should stay home.

ACROSS

1 “House” actor Epps 5 Plant-sucking insect 10 Gala affair 14 Went by bus 15 Wear away 16 __ Day VitaCraves Multivitamins 17 Sunbather’s spread 19 Spelling contests 20 Intended 21 Lend support to 23 Wrestling surface 24 “In case you weren’t listening ... “ 26 Like lambs 28 Pat-on-the-baby’sback intended result 29 Cards to bet on 32 Cut and pasted, say 35 New York Harbor’s __ Island 36 Penpoint 37 Tough problem 39 Evergreen tree 42 Jelly beans, e.g. 43 Waiting for customer support, often 45 Brunch dish 49 Singer Fitzgerald 50 Speak from the soapbox 51 “Help!”-ful pot scrubbers?

54 Texter’s “I’m shocked!” 55 Down in the dumps 58 Glee 59 Movie “Citizen” 61 Coupe-back contraption 65 Yet again 66 “Ditto” 67 Try to persuade 68 “Women and Love” writer Shere 69 What Buffy does 70 Lowly worker

DOWN

1 Poet’s planet 2 Stooge with Larry and Curly 3 Tracy/Hepburn battleof-the-sexes comedy 4 Proof of purchase 5 Insurance giant 6 Bit of expert advice 7 “__ about that!” 8 It’s in your head 9 Cold-cuts seller 10 Songwriter Dylan 11 Iron-poor blood condition 12 Womack of country 13 Withstood wear and tear 18 Consumes

22 Wilde’s “The Picture of __ Gray” 24 German automaker 25 Large, innocent-looking peepers 27 VCR format 28 Batman player Affleck 30 Dutch airline 31 Red Muppet 33 “My Cup Runneth Over” singer 34 Eat in style 38 Cholesterol letters 39 Instructions next to a perforated line ... or a hint to 17-, 29-, 45- and 61-Across 40 Afflictions 41 Nutritionist’s fig. 42 Camp bed 44 Warms, as canned soup 45 Pipe smoked in trendy bars 46 Fashion designer Giorgio 47 Fridge sticker 48 Peppermint Patty, for one 52 Farm facilities 53 Opposite of post56 Hugging limbs 57 Paces-and-pistols encounter

Level: 1

2

3

4

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12/5/17

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How much money do you have? 1. My parents are paying 2. Work life has been good to me! I have $1,000 3. I saved up $500 for a trip and this Friday is payday 4. I have all my Combo-X-Changes from this week. How much are those worth? 5. lol What’s your car sitch? 1. Zoom zoom, I have plane money 2. My car is fine, except for all the little lights I don’t understand 3. Jessica’s car smells funky, but I can deal with it 4. We’re living on a prayer with this Impala 5. Remember those Little Tikes red and yellow cars? How much did you like the cinematographic masterpiece that is Steven Spielberg’s “Jaws”? 1. It’s my religion 2. It was OK 3. I like “Sharknado” better 4. HECK FREAKING NO I DON’T EVEN TAKE BATHS ANYMORE 5. I never saw it and I have frequent nose bleeds What level of heat can you handle? 1. Let the sun hurt me 2. Gotta jack things up like 30 degrees 3. I’m profoundly over Michigan winter, like rude 4. I just want to feel my toes again 5. I think East Lansing weather is beautiful and I haven’t been outside in 10 years What’s your spring break bod sitch? 1. I spend every day at Powerhouse and my fridge is stocked with Muscle Milk 2. I’m doing the paleo diet until I look like The Rock and Ronda Rousey’s love child 3. I try to eat healthy — and by that I mean I only get Cottage Inn after 10 p.m. 4. I have a gym membership at IM Sports-West. Does that count? 5. I never take my parka off 10

T H E STAT E NE WS

Who do you want to go with (AKA who would split the cost and share Spotify Premium)? 1. My mom because she is amazing, funny, kind, loyal, wise, a literal ATM, compassionate, adventurous, pretty woke for a mom and my best friend 2. My best friends, Venmos at the ready, we are playing JT the whole time 3. I don’t really know them. They’re my friend’s friends 4. Chad. He says he has a Venmo account, but I’m still waiting for him to pay me back for Faster Horses 5. Dude, man is an island and I love Pandora How strong is your liver? 1. The Big Ten Party Store cashiers know my credit card number by heart 2. I chose to live in West Circle so I could be close to my true love, Jonna’s 2 Go 3. I came in fourth place in a Beer Olympics... but I passed out after 4. I make a face every time I sip Burnett’s and I have to chase with Ice Lemonade from Sparty’s 5. Thinking about tequila makes me gag

Results: 7 - 12

Dude, go to Europe. You can afford to swim in a fountain and eat a croissant.

13 - 18

Florida, go nuts.

19 - 24

Go west, young man. Maybe not, like, California because you’re kind of broke, but like, the Grand Canyon would be cool.

25 - 29

Make a friend who has a cabin Up North. You could actually have a ton of fun. Nothing bad has ever happened in a cabin in the woods.

30 - 35

T H U RS DAY, M A R C H 1 , 2 01 8

Go home.


IT’S A SPARTAN If it’s sunny, throw on the shades. If you’re trying to block out the haters at the bar, throw on the shades.

BY PETER ATKINS PATKINS@STATENEWS.COM

Spartans, spring break is upon us. We have made it past midterms and survived the great flood. To listen to music on the plane without paying way too much for Delta Wi-Fi, download your music to Spotify or Apple Music.

We at The State News want to make sure you all are prepared for your spring break journeys — whether you’re going to Cancun, Europe or up north — here are some tips to make your spring break as enjoyable as possible.

Don’t forget those headphones too! You wouldn’t want to annoy your new pal in the aisle seat.

If you forget a backpack, you might as well just stay in East Lansing for break. •Socks & undies Don’t be that guy who forgot to pack underwear other than the pair you wore on the plane. •Laptop & Study Material You probably won’t be productive at all, but at least you have the option. •Multiple sweet kicks Bring shoes for multiple occasions. Tennis shoes for the gym, loafers and heels for the clubs, because Spartans do not wear flip flops to the club. Just no.

Alert the bank. Tell your bank you are traveling. You don’t want your credit card to get turned off because Jim from Visa thought your card number was stolen by a guy in Miami.

Your campus marketplace! statenews.com/classifieds TO PLACE AN AD …

Call your mom. Let her know you made your journey safely ­— moms eat that stuff up. Send her your toned down pictures too. A positive attitude. Traveling is hectic and crazy unexpected things will happen. If you keep a positive attitude, you and your friends will have a much better time.

DESIGNED BY DAENA FAUSTINO

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MAJOR TRIP TIPS Passport Copy. For the international travelers, don’t forget to copy your passport just in case. If it’s stolen, you can still prove your American citizenship.

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SPRING BREAK CALENDAR Just because students get the week off, doesn’t mean the university stops. Here’s a handy list of everything MSUrelated scheduled during break.

SATURDAY MARCH 3

SUNDAY MARCH 4

MONDAY MARCH 5

TUESDAY MARCH 6

Men’s Basketball* Big Ten Tournament TBA - Semi-final New York

Baseball vs Arizona DQ Baseball Classic 11 a.m. Minneapolis, Minn.

Softball vs. Cal StateFullerton 9 p.m. Fullerton, CA

Wrestling Big Ten Tournament All day East Lansing

Women’s Gymnastics vs. UIC 3 p.m. Chicago

White Nationalist Richard Spencer, of National Policy Institute, speaks at MSU 4:30 - 6:30 p.m. Auditorium in the Pavilion

Ice hockey vs. Ohio State Big Ten Tournament 7 p.m. - Quarterfinals Columbus

Softball vs. Cal Poly Judy Garman Invitational 4 p.m. Fullerton, CA

WEDNESDAY MARCH 7

THURSDAY MARCH 8

FRIDAY MARCH 9

SATURDAY MARCH 10

SUNDAY MARCH 11

Women’s Tennis vs. USF Noon Tampa, Fla.

Softball vs. Long Beach State Louisville Slugger Invite 2:30 p.m. Long Beach, CA

Men’s Tennis vs. Tulane 1 p.m. New Orleans

Women’s Gymnastics vs. Oregon State 5:30 p.m. Corvallis, Ore.

Baseball vs. Illinois 11 a.m. Greenville, S.C.

Tune in to Spartan sports or current events throughout the week. *Dates contingent on team’s performance

Baseball vs. Clemson 7 p.m. Greenville, S.C.

12

THE STATE N EWS

Swimming and Diving NCAA Diving regionals All day Columbus (March 8-10)

THURSDAY, MARCH 1 , 2 01 8

Women’s Tennis vs. Florida Gulf Coast 1 p.m. Fort Myers, Fla. Track and Field NCAA Indoor Championship All Day College Station, Texas

Celebration of Diversity 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. All Saints Episcopal Church in East Lansing

Track and Field NCAA Indoor Championship All Day College Station, Texas Swimming and Diving NCAA Diving Regionals All day Columbus

Selection Sunday for men’s NCAA Tournament 6 p.m. TV: TBS Daylight Saving Time Starts at 2 a.m. Moves clocks 1 hour forward

Thursday 03/01/18  

The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University on Thursdays during fall, spring and select days during summer seme...

Thursday 03/01/18  

The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University on Thursdays during fall, spring and select days during summer seme...

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