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State NewsI E D The

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MSU CAMPUS

SURVIVAL GUIDE A guide to all things MSU, from on-campus faces to where you should eat day-to-day

> Meet the who’s who of MSU Administration and the undergrad student government, ASMSU PAGES 4-6

> Not sure what to eat? State News reporters choose their favorite on-campus delicacies PAGE 8

> Do you live in East or South Neighborhood? Check out these services PAGES 22-23 ROYAL OAK, MI 48068 PERMIT #792

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Welcome to MSU

Letter from the Editor: MSU is full of life, but don’t ignore the scandals BY RILEY MURDOCK RMURDOCK@STATENEWS.COM

East Lansing is great, but the reason we're all here is for the campus across the street. Welcome to MSU. Whether you've pulled for the Spartans your whole life or you'll be donning the green and white for the first time — I was a late convert — you're now about to begin life at your new home-away-from-home. Opportunities abound here. I came to study journalism and there's been no shortage of situations in which to further my career. You're certain to find a place, person or group for every ambition or fun idea you can think of. The campus itself is also breathtakingly beautiful. When I first toured MSU, I was taken in by

just how gorgeous campus is. Almost immediately, I thought of strolling along the Red Cedar River on a brisk autumn day. This place called to me and I answered. My whole family is full of Wolverines, but I could never be anything but a Spartan. That's not to say MSU is flawless. As a campus and an administration, the university's faults have been open season both in the media and in conversation as students banter in the cafeterias, dorms and classrooms. MSU continues to face sexual assault scandal after sexual assault scandal. After the U.S. Office of Civil Rights found MSU to have mishandled several cases in 2015, MSU now finds itself embroiled in the Larry Nassar and football sexual assault cases. Nassar, a former MSU and USA Gymnastics doctor, has been accused of sexually abusing his patients. He was arrested in December 2016 on charges of possessing "at least 37,000" images of

child pornography. He pleaded guilty to three child pornography-related charges on July 11. Donnie Corley, Joshua King and Demetric Vance have been charged with criminal sexual conduct after an alleged rape in January. Auston Robertson, another former football player, is charged with two counts of criminal sexual conduct in a separate incident. The football program was found to have handled this case properly in an independent investigation, but almost immediately afterwards, an MSU Trustee publicly shared the identity of the player who informed head coach Mark Dantonio about the alleged sexual assault. The player's name was redacted in official reports. Last year, The State News toured the some schools in the Big Ten and found our intramural facilities do not stack up to conference counterparts. While these facilities might not see necessary funding, the MSU administration has continued

to raise tuition. This July, tuition was increased for the eighth straight year. I cannot speak for my whole staff, but I very much enjoy being a student at MSU. That doesn't mean we should always sugarcoat living here, or shrug off "Moo-U's" actions as an institution. Our job, as reporters, is to hold MSU accountable. The State News lets readers decide whether the university is right or wrong. In this issue, you'll meet the MSU Board of Trustees, who decide the university's budget and tuition rates among other important choices. You'll learn about clubs, dorms, the meal system, intramural facilities and more. Some of the more controversial issues might not be touched on, but at this time we're focusing on introducing you to life at MSU and the potential it comes with. On behalf of The State News, welcome to MSU. We hope you'll stay with us for coverage of the campus you'll call home for the next four years or longer.

Healthcare

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Patients must be 18 months or older. Some age restrictions apply for select services.


Contents ONLINE

Ex-doctor Nassar’s pretrials

Moneyball Pro-Am continues

There Will Be Criticism

Ex-MSU doctor Larry Nassar’s court cases continue with pretrials in two separate counties

Featuring pro players along with college basketball athletes, Moneyball Pro-Am heats up

Every week, MSU film student Simon Tessmer reviews films hitting theaters as part of his column

VOL . 107 | NO. 61 CONTACT THE STATE NEWS (517) 295-1680

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Riley Murdock

NEWSROOM/CORRECTIONS (517) 295-5149 feedback@statenews.com

CONTENT EDITOR Souichi Terada

GENERAL MANAGER Marty Sturgeon ADVERTISING M-F, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

DESIGN EDITOR Alexea Hankin PHOTO EDITOR Jon Famurewa

COLOPHON The State News design features Acta, a newspaper type system created by DSType Foundry.

The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University, Monday and Thursday during the academic year. One copy of this newspaper is available free of charge to any member of the MSU community. Additional copies $0.75 at the business office only. State News Inc. is a private, nonprofit corporation. Its current 990 tax form is available for review upon request at 435 E. Grand River Ave. during business hours. Copyright © 2017 State News Inc., East Lansing, Michigan

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Welcome to MSU

Meet the MSU Board of Trustees, decision-makers of the university BY MADISON O’CONNOR MOCONNOR@STATENEWS.COM

The trustees of MSU help make decisions about the university, its initiatives and its funds. The publicly-elected board come from different backgrounds and have a say in the university’s budget, renovations, construction projects, tuition rates and more. Learn more about MSU’s Board of Trustees below.

Joel I. Ferguson, Vice Chairperson of the Board Ferguson was initially elected in 1986 and has been re-elected three times since. Ferguson is the vice chair of the Blue Cross Foundation, co-founder of the F & S Development Company and co-founder of two Lansing TV stations. Ferguson is a 1965 MSU alumnus earning a degree in elementary education.

Brian Breslin, Chairperson of the Board Elected in 2011, Breslin was the senior vice president of human resources and government relations at Michigan-based Meijer Inc. until his retirement in 2006. Breslin is an MSU alumnus who earned his bachelor’s degree in food systems economics and management in Trustee Brian Breslin gives a statement on June 5 1977. Breslin also played on the men’s basket- at the Hannah Administration Building. PHOTOS BY JON FAMUREWA ball team.

Brian Mosallam, Trustee Mosallam was elected in 2013. Mosallam is a financial adviser at AXA Advisors. An MSU alumnus, Mosallam played on the MSU football team from 1992-96 and earned Academic All-Big Ten honors three times before earning an engineering arts degree. Mosallam is cochair of the Detroit-Wayne County Stadium Authority and is involved with multiple Spartan groups in the Detroit area and southeastThe Hannah Administration Building on June 6. ern Michigan. Melanie Foster, Trustee Foster was initially elected in 2004 and re-elected in 2014. She was also a trustee for Central Michigan University from 1997 to 2004. She is chair of two university committees and serves on the MSU Foundation board. Foster was CEO of two different commercial landscape companies. An MSU alumna, Foster earned a degree in ornamental horticulture from MSU.

Get to Class On Time…

Trustee Melanie Foster speaks during the Board of Trustees meeting on June 6 at the Hannah Administration Building.

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Dan Kelly, Trustee Kelly was elected in 2016, as his term began on Jan. 1, 2017. Kelly was also a board chair and trustee for Oakland Community College and was a trustee on the Independence Township Board of Trustees. Kelly is a practicing attorney and member of the Board of Directors of the Troy, Michigan-based law firm Giarmarco, Mullins, and Horton, PC, where he serves as chair of the firm’s municipal department. Kelly has over 25 years of litigation experience. Mitch Lyons, Trustee Lyons was elected in 2011. An MSU alumnus, Lyons attended the university on a football scholarship and played from 1988 to 1992. He graduated with a degree in general business administration and went on to play for Atlanta and Pittsburgh in the NFL. In 2000, Lyons began his career in financial services and now owns Lyons Kitzrow Capital Group. Dianne Byrum, Trustee Byrum was initially elected in 2008 and was re-elected in 2016. Byrum was elected to the Michigan House of Representatives in 1991, to the Michigan Senate in 1995 and then returned to the House in 2002. Byrum also served on the Ingham County Board of Commissioners from 1983 to 1990. In 2006, Byrum founded a public relations firm, Byrum & Fisk Advocacy Communications.

G N I R I H

W ’REE WEE’R

Trustee Dan Kelly makes a statement during the Board of Trustees meeting June 6 at the Hannah Administration Building.

If you’re looking for a

HANDS-ON real world

Trustee Mitch Lyons reads an apology on Feb. 17 at the Hannah Administration Building. PHOTOS BY JON FAMUREWA

George Perles, Trustee Perles was elected in 2007 and re-elected in 2014. He became MSU’s head football coach in 1982. His coaching career was highlighted by four Super Bowl victories, two Big Ten titles and a Rose Bowl victory. He earned both his bachelor’s degree and master’s degree from MSU in 1960 and 1961, respectively.

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Welcome to MSU

Meet ASMSU, undergrad student government, and all of its services BY MADISON O’CONNOR MOCONNOR@STATENEWS.COM

The Associated Students of Michigan State University, or ASMSU, is MSU's undergraduate student government. ASMSU's mission is to enhance the student experience through education, empowerment and advocacy. Read on to learn more about ASMSU and its services. ASMSU's services ASMSU recently developed a Safe Ride initiative to help students get home safely. Students can also use the bike share program for alternative transportation. Underg raduates ca n rent iClickers and calculators or pick up a free blue book for class. ASMSU's readership program allows students to pick up a free copy of national and regional newspapers daily and includes digital subscriptions. ASMSU also provides students with free legal services for university-related cases and works with Student Rights Advocates, who can answer questions about MSU's judicial system and can help a student prepare for his or her case. Short-term loans are available from ASMSU, as are reduced prices for preparation courses for MCAT, LSAT, GRE, GMAT, DAT, OAT and PCAT tests. Registered Student Organizations can receive funding for their clubs or groups through ASMSU's Student Allocations Board. ASMSU also offers free printing from its office, paid part-time employment and copies of MSU's yearbook, the Red Cedar Log. ASMSU's leadership ASMSU has a number of different divisions — the staff, class councils, general assembly, student allocations board, academic affairs and governmental affairs are all pieces that make up the organization. Leadership of ASMSU, however, falls to the Office of the Pres-

ident, made up of the organization's student body president and a number of vice presidents.

HOW TO CONTACT ASMSU 517-355-8266 info@asmsu.msu.edu 556 E. Circle Drive, Room 307. East Lansing, Michigan 48823. Located in the Student Services Building

International relations and economics senior Lorenzo Santavicca was re-elected last spring, marking his second year as MSU's undergraduate student body president. Santavicca serves as the voice of the undergraduate students and represents this group to MSU administration. ASMSU's initiatives ASMSU also works on a variety of initiatives. This past academic year, ASMSU engaged in the "It's On Us" national campaign to promote education and awareness of campus sexual assault. ASMSU also started a "Mental Health Awareness Week" on campus to decrease the stigma around mental health and to educate and advocate for students. Through the Mental Health Awareness Week, a Peerto-Peer Support Program in conjunction with the MSU Counseling Center was created. A voter registration competition was held last fall to encourage students to register to vote in the November election. ASMSU consistently works on implementing different initiatives through its general assembly and committees. The 54th session began at the end of the spring semester.

STAY SOCI A L WI T H

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Welcome to MSU

Students have the chance to affect income tax vote, but must turn out BY STEPHEN OLSCHANSKI SOLSCHANSKI@STATENEWS.COM

MSU students have the potential to significantly influence whether their income will be taxed by East Lansing come November, but changing the outcome would require massive, unlikely levels of turnout, recent voting data shows. Students will have to send a fairly minuscule portion of their income to the city in the upcoming year if the ballot measure passes. In the four city elections from between 2009 and 2015, 234 votes were recorded at the five campus precincts. More than half of those votes were recorded in 2011, when 122 people voted. In 2009, 9,416 voters were registered to vote on campus in East Lansing elections. By 2015, that number had dwindled down to 2,557. However, the 2016 presidential election saw 6,762 students registered to vote in East Lansing, giving students the potential to make an impact. Registered student voter numbers for the 2017 city elections will not be known until near the deadline to register in November.

Registered voters over the years have depleted because of a number of reasons, City Clerk Marie Wicks said, chief among them being the state placing voters on inactive status. “In general terms, it would be the transience of students moving in and out, the importance of the election year,” Wicks said. “Certainly, even-year elections we have a lot more interest in voting than, of course, we do during city council years which are odd years.” The waning interest in non-presidential, non-midterm elections has long been the case for the city, student and permanent resident-wise, city manager George Lahanas said. “Our history has been that it’s sort of hard to get people that excited about local elections,” Lahanas said. “But hopefully, I mean we’re holding it at a time when students are here, MSU is in session and hopefully students do get out and vote and give their two cents.” Total voter turnout in city elections reached 21.07 percent in 2015, though the 2013 and 2011 elections totaled 10.64 percent and 12.83 percent, respectively. Comparatively, total turnout for the 2016

students to vote and bills itself as an information center for elections, has begun conversation about furTotal votes at five campus ther voter registration drives. precincts from 2009 to 2015 “Let’s say we register 1,500 students and you went out to vote with Students registered to vote in E.L. a city council election with a turnfor the 2016 presidential election out not generally super-high anyPercentage of total voter turnout in ways, students can absolutely have E.L. during the 2015 city elections an impact,” Wicks said. “I think it’s Percentage of total voter turnout in E.L. very important not just because of the income tax question, but studuring the 2016 presidential election dents need to remember the city council has more impact on their presidential election was 64.09 percent. A contentious issue such as the income tax could day to day life with respect to ordinances.” Besides the ballot question regarding the income drive poll numbers up. But past numbers suggest a close vote decided between less than 7,000 voters. tax, students who move off campus are under the Therefore, if the issue drives them to the polls, jurisdiction of East Lansing ordinances completely different than ones governing MSU. students could determine the vote. The elected City Council ultimately makes deciCurrently, East Lansing is registering incoming freshmen at AOP to better than expected success, sions on issues potentially impacting students Wicks said, with “several hundred” incoming stu- with little to no input from students, as turnout suggests. dents registered. Wicks has said MSUVote, which helps register READ MORE AT STATENEWS.COM

BY TH E N U M B E RS

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Welcome to MSU

Got a meal plan? Don’t miss these State News campus dining favorites STAFF REPORTS

From Sparty’s to the closest nearby cafeteria, MSU’s campus is full of options for the wayward diet. Whether you have a sweet tooth, a carnivorous appetite or only have eyes for veggies, each cafeteria has you covered with many different delicacies. Each cafeteria at MSU has their own restaurant-style serving stations, some unique to that caf, some shared between a few. Many have caf-specific meals or services. Some of the more recognizable signature featur: Snyder-Phillips Hall’s late night pub menu Case Hall’s Great Lakes Plate Wilson Hall’s Pasta Bar Akers Hall’s The Pit.

RILEY MURDOCK

SOUICHI TERADA

ALEXEA HANKIN

EDITOR IN CHIEF

CONTENT EDITOR

DESIGN EDITOR

FAVORITE CAFETERIA

FAVORITE CAFETERIA

CASE

SNYPHI

MEAL: FISH FROM GREAT LAKES PLATE

MEAL: LATE NIGHT CHEESESTEAKS

FAVORITE CAFETERIA

HUBBARD MEAL: SPARTY’S CHICKEN TENDERS

It can be overwhelming to decide what one really desires to eat, so some of us here at The State News sat down and discussed our favorite dishes from our on-campus eateries.

STEPHEN OLSCHANSKI

CASEY HARRISON

EAST LANSING REPORTER

COPS AND COURTS REPORTER

FAVORITE CAFETERIA

LANDON MEAL: PRESIDENTIAL CHICKEN

CREATING VIBRANT JEWISH LIFE FOR OVER 3,500 STUDENTS AT MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

FAVORITE CAFETERIA

SNYPHI MEAL: SUSHI AND GRILLED CHEESE

MADDIE O’CONNOR

JON FAMUREWA

WATCHDOG REPORTER

PHOTO EDITOR

FAVORITE CAFETERIA

SNYPHI MEAL: COOKIES

FAVORITE CAFETERIA

SNYPHI MEAL: MASHED POTATO BOWLS

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

WATER QUALITY REPORT Michigan State University’s 2016 Water Quality Report is now available online for review. The report is a

msuhillel.org | (517) 332-1916

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THE STATE N EWS

DOWNLOAD THE MSU HILLEL APP!

THURSDAY, JULY 27, 2 01 7

general overview of the water quality provided in 2016.

See report at ipf.msu.edu/waterquality


Welcome to MSU

What a ‘Combo-X-Change’ is, and the finer details of your meal plan by riley murdock rmurdock@statenews.com

In the absence of home-cooked meals, MSU’s cafeterias are life-savers for busy, hungry freshmen. Located all across campus, you’re never too far from a cafeteria; compact South Neighborhood alone has three cafs squeezed into it. Each of MSU’s cafs has something to offer, and a meal plan is all you need to access them. Meal Plans MSU offers three tiers of on-campus meal plans to their students: DineOn Silver, Gold and Platinum. All of these meal plans provide unlimited access to all of MSU’s cafeterias, so every tier essentially accomplishes the same purpose. Each plan costs around $3,000 a semester, with slight changes depending on how many amenities you want. The lowest tier, Silver, costs $2,857 per semester and performs the basic functions of a meal plan. Silver includes cafeteria access and one Combo-X-Change a day — more on those later.

msu_panhel

Gold plans cost $3,007 per semester. They include the basic functions a Silver plan provides, but also give $150 in “Spartan Cash” and four guest meal passes per semester. Platinum plans cost $3,157 and double these extra perks up to $300 of “Spartan Cash” and eight guest meal passes per semester. “Spartan Cash” is redeemable at Sparty’s locations on campus and certain off-campus retailers. Guest passes can be used to have a meal A student places their tray on the return belt to be cleaned and cleared by dinning hall employees on Sept. 21, 2016 at with someone who does not have a Holden Hall. STATE NEWS FILE PHOTO meal plan, such as family or out-oftown friends. Combo-X-Change The prices of each meal plan incorporate the Several Sparty’s locations are spread throughamount of Spartan Cash you would receive. Ultimately, the only difference between the plans out campus. These MSU-themed convenience are the amount of guest passes you expect to use stores mostly serve snacks, drinks and microwaveable meals, which can be acquired for free per semester. once per weekday with a meal plan. Off-campus meal plans are also available for MSU’s “Combo-X-Change” allows you to select those who are not living in the dorms, though up to three items per day, categorized into “A” for these are not unlimited.

beverages, “B” for entrees and “C” for snacks, from any Sparty’s store. Certain meal items count as both B and C. Using Combo-X-Change in conjunction with the cafeterias, you can quickly stockpile extra food for study sessions and lazy nights. Just make sure to “Combo” before midnight. If you forget, Sparty’s might close before you get there and you’ll miss out on extra food. Late Night Most of the cafeterias close by a certain point at night, but a few reopen at 8 p.m. until midnight for “Late Night.” The MSU Union Cafeteria’s premium meals are usually only available for purchase or Combo, but become free with a meal plan during Late Night. However, be careful, as not all cafs have this period. Some close at 8 p.m. and stay that way. At the Snyder-Phillips caf, late night usually consists of a pub menu. There, you can get made-to-order Philly Cheesesteaks, among other delicacies.

find your

soul sisters Panhellenic Recruitment

-fall 2017September 10th &11th, September 16th-19th

Sign up at https://msu.mycampusdirector2.com/landing/ please visit msupanhellenic.com

#GoGreenGoGreek17 T H U RS DAY, J U LY 27, 2 01 7

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TO OUR NEW

SPARTAN FAMILY, As mentioned in our June issue, your freshman will be reaching out to you asking for help making a decision on 2018-2019 lodging as early as October. Michigan State University and the surrounding community have an endless list of options for your child to choose from, depending on what they want, and you want for them. I've polled the advertising staff, comprised of juniors and seniors who have lived both on and off campus, and have compiled their list of pros and cons in a variety of categories. Of course, your son or daughter may have different priorities than you, so read carefully, and feel free to reach out if you have any questions that we can help with! See you all very soon!

The State News @thesnews

Michelle Morris Director of Sales and Marketing

statenews

www.statenews.com

On-campus Pro

Off-campus Con

Combo exchange - free daily meal bundle included at a Sparty’s convenience store Food

Location / distance

Meal plan included at the majority of locations

Pro Meal plan available

Stuck with meals at cafs

Con Eating out is expensive

Can cook! ~15 Weeks @ ~$60 Eating out once a week adds about $500 a year = $900, $1,800 for normal year Eat what you want, when you want

Have to cook and clean up

Right on campus

Need transportation for everything but class

Public transport is available

Longer commute

Pool, gym, tanning

No free wi-fi

Gym included on-site (most)

Small

Amenities

Wi-fi and cable are included

Cannot live in dorms during break

Roommates

Have someone to hang out with before you meet others

May not like your roommate

Can select who and how many roommates you want

Stuck in a lease with a bad roommate

Limited access after hours

Cops called for disturbances

Some have guards

Limited security equals increased risk of break-in

Requires dorm key to enter building

Limits guests

Opportunity to bond with others

Communal bathrooms

Private showering

Might not make friends as quickly

Required sign in at night

More options & overnight guests

Limited parking, noise restrictions

Security

Private space Night life

Price

10

Requires one-year lease and a subleaser if you move out

Meal plan: about $6,000 for the year

House: $5,200 (8 months)

Single room no meal plan: $5,760 for the year

Apartment: $4,400 (8 months)

Double room w/ meal plan (lodging minus meal plan): $4,000 for the year

Food: $2,200 groceries ($75/week), and $1,500 in eating out ($50/week)

Total for one person, double room with basic meal plan, 30 weeks = $10,000

Total for one person, in a house, eating out once a week = $8,900 same, in an apartment = $8,100

THE STATE NEWS

THURSDAY, JULY 27, 2 01 7


HURRY, LIMITED NUMBER OF ROOMS AVAILABLE! Apply online or stop by our temporary leasing office.

LiveSkyVue.com Temporary Leasing Office: 319 E. Grand River Ave. | East Lansing, MI 48823

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Welcome to MSU

MSU offers 3 residential colleges BY MARCO SAVARIN MSAVARIN@STATENEWS.COM

For some high school students looking for a place to further their education, MSU might seem to be too big. But by choosing one of the three residential colleges at MSU they can have that small school feel with the resources of an elite university. The three residential colleges at MSU are James Madison College, the Residential College in the Arts and Humanities and Lyman Briggs College. Between the three, they cover a variety of subjects for students interested in each field. James Madison College James Madison College is for the student interested in political, social and economic issues. James Madison offers four majors: International Relations, Political Theory and Constitutional Democracy, Social Relations and Policy and lastly, Comparative Cultures and Politics. Some of the professors in the college have worked in the public sector in state and national agencies like the CIA, State Department and

Congress, as well as in international organizations such as the United Nations. Another perk of being a James Madison student is being able to listen to and speak with public officials from the U.S. and around the world. Speakers from the State Department, CIA and even the Serbian Finance Minister have come to speak with students. The college is located within Case Hall in MSU's South Neighborhood. It is a short walk from Spartan Stadium, as well as the Main Library. Residential College in the Arts and Humanities The Residential College in the Arts and Humanities provides students with an education in the liberal, visual and performing arts. It is the youngest of the three residential colleges at MSU. With an enrollment of approximately 300 students, the RCAH can provide that small college feel. Although all students will attain the same degree upon graduation, the interdisciplinary degree allows students to take more electives, learn languages and create their own path. Students have the opportunity to speak with visiting writers, artists and scholars.

Located in Snyder-Phillips Hall in MSU's North Campus it is close to Grand River Avenue and the MSU Union. Lyman Briggs College Lyman Briggs is focused on the natural sciences, mathematics and research. For students thinking about studying STEM courses or going into the pre-med track, Lyman Briggs has a lot to offer. The funds, facilities and expertise at MSU can provide Lyman Briggs students with hands on experiences within laboratories conducting research. With a strong focus on chemistry, biology and mathematics, Lyman Briggs students are prepared to carry out research alongside faculty. At a large university such as MSU there are a number of available opportunities for students considering it. With 39 possible majors and four minors, Lyman Briggs has something for everyone. It is the premier science college at MSU, allowing only 625 freshmen to enter every fall. It is located in Holmes Hall in East Neighborhood. Students often have classes in their dorms, but the dorm is near the MSU law library, International Center and the Business College Complex.

MSU Residential Colleges Q & A Q: What is a residential college? A: A living-learning community where students with common interests live together. It combines a big-school feel with the small, liberal-arts school vibe. Q: Does it cost more to be a part of a residential college? A: No, tuition rates and housing are all the same for undergraduate students. Q: Can I participate in the Honors program? A: Yes, you’ll be allowed to be a part of the Honors College with any degree in the three residential colleges.

LEASE TODAY FOR 2018!

You do want to live right next to campus right? Here’s your chance, but there’s only a few spots left, so act fast and get yours now and let everybody else fight for closer parking.

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WELCOME HOME SPARTANS! Living on campus at Michigan State University is an integral part of the Spartan experience. Here’s why living on campus for at least two years is a smart move for Spartans: • Student housing, conveniently located in five unique MSU neighborhoods • Easy access to neighborhood engagement centers and other services • 27 residence halls and two apartment communities to fit your lifestyle • Countless activities, events and opportunities to stay connected to campus life • It’s a once in a lifetime experience

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THE STATE NEWS

THURSDAY, JULY 27, 2 01 7


Welcome to MSU IMPORTANT MSU DATES

FALL 2017 AUGUST 30

CLASSES BEGIN LABOR DAY

SEPTEMBER 4 NOVEMBER 23-24 DECEMBER 8

THANKSGIVING BREAK CLASSES END FINALS WEEK WINTER BREAK

DECEMBER 11-15 END OF FINALS - JANUARY 8

SPRING 2018 CLASSES BEGIN

JANUARY 8

SPRING BREAK

MARCH 5-9

CLASSES END

APRIL 27

FINALS WEEK

APRIL 30-MAY 4

FLY LANSING

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THE STAT E NE WS

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Welcome to MSU

Consider a bike to explore and navigate MSU’s massive campus BY STEPHEN OLSCHANSKI SOLSCHANSKI@STATENEWS.COM

For a campus as large as MSU, biking is arguably one the easiest and least expensive ways to get around. Especially for freshmen — who aren’t allowed cars — biking has the chance to be a lot more efficient than walking or even taking the bus. Here are some tips for ensuring safe and continued riding around campus. Use the bike lanes and racks Sidewalks at MSU are crowded, making it hard to navigate a bike. Crosswalks along Farm Lane are especially busy during the year. The MSU Bikes Service Center cites MSU’s own campus research saying most accidents between a bicyclist and a vehicle occur while a bike is riding on the sidewalk. The bike lanes also contain very little bike traffic. Bike racks are littered across campus and easily accessible near most buildings. Any bike affixed to a meter or post or building can be impounded by MSU police. Also, according to

Get a permit MSU requires all bicyclists to obtain a free permit for their bike. Bikes without permits can be impounded by MSU police and fines will be assessed for their retrieval.

Follow the rules of the road W h e n bi k e l a n e s become unavailable, bikers are allowed to ride in the streets with motor vehicles. They are afforded the same rights but must also follow the rules of the road. This means stopping at stop signs and yielding right of way when necessary.

Take care of your bike Bikes that are found to be in “inoperable condition” can be impounded by MSU police if they’ve been inoperable for more than 48 hours. Often, an inoperable bike will be ticketed. Make sure tires are inflated, handle bars are in working condition and spokes and frames are not bent.

Utilize the Surplus on Farm Lane. Bike traffic is a common issue for students on campus. Store and MSU Bikes STATE NEWS FILE PHOTO Service Center The MSU Bikes Service Center is located on The MSU Surplus Store also provides used campus, a little ways off of Farm Lane and bikes for sale along with a variety of other along the Red Cedar River. University owned used items from MSU’s campus. Impounded and operated, it provides repairs and a vari- bikes that are not retrieved within 30 days ety of rental plans. You can also purchase are given to the MSU Surplus Store and put new bikes as well. up for purchase.

MSU ordinances, any bike parked illegally is subject to a civil infraction. Use a U-Lock To avoid your bike from being an easy target, secure it with a U-Lock and avoid using a cable lock. Cable locks are more susceptible to being cut.

Cyclists and pedestrians head to class Sept. 10, 2015 on the bridge

MICHIGAN STATE

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THE STATE N EWS

THURSDAY, JULY 27, 2 01 7


Welcome to MSU

MSU police share tips to stay safe BY CASEY HARRISON CHARRISON@STATENEWS.COM

Petty thefts and larceny have been the majority of hundreds of crimes reported to MSU Police since the start of the summer. With fall move-in for incoming and returning students on the horizon, officials with MSU police say it’s important to keep simple safety protocols in mind to protect personal belongings. With the objective to make move-in as smooth as possible each year and maintain safety on campus, MSU police Capt. Doug Monette said he considers dorm life an easy transition from living at home. “Students can face the same safety concerns in the residence halls as they do at home,” Monette said. “But the difference is the residence hall environment is a safe place and conducive to the Michigan State University educational experience.” Monette stressed that since MSU police is open 24/7 and open 365 days a year, he wanted students to know MSU police is a resource to be relied upon. “We always have someone at the front desk, the desk cadets and we always have officers on patrol,” Monette said. “Part of our response is to answer any emergency calls that occur as well as be a resource to our community, as far as even non-emergency things.”

Even if students face problems that are a non-emergency, Monette said MSU police is available to help, or at least point students in the right direction. Over the last few years, MSU police has made it increasingly easier to contact officers, which can now be done over text message or email. Automated alerts can be sent to recipients in the event of an emergency through the same mediums. “We are one of the few services that are 24 hours a day and that’s what we’re here for,” Monette said. “If you don’t know who to call, call us because we can get you to the right person or the right resource. In an emergency situation, call 911. We also have green light phones on campus, and if there’s an emergency there, people can go there and use those. You can text us, you can email us or you can even walk in and file a complaint.” If students are unaware of exactly how to file a police report, Monette said students shouldn’t be deterred. Though some students may think talking with police can be intimidating, Monette said just stopping by the station and asking questions can make incoming students feel well-acclimated to the community. “The university is a big place and for some people, this is their first time being on their own,”

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Monette said. “Not just students from the United States, but also students from international countries. There are programs and orientations they go through prior to the school year starting … but one of the best things to do is get to know your community team police officer, or stop in and meet someone here.” Additionally, Monette stressed that learning to navigate campus and becoming famil-

iar with buildings and landmarks as quickly as possible makes newcomers more aware of their surroundings. “We always have officers here and we’re always here to respond,” Monette said. “One of the best things to do is know your surroundings. During the day walk around, get to know places. (If) you don’t know where your classes are, kind of plan out a route to and from.”

MSU POLICE TIPS TO STAY SAFE ON CAMPUS What are some simple steps students can take to secure their personal property in dorm rooms and on campus in general? - Document serial numbers of all electronics and other valuables that have them - Enable GPS tracking software on devices and similar applications on other cell phones, tablets, and laptops - Never leave any items unattended (i.e. while at the cafeteria, in the library, in the laundry room, in the classroom) What is the best way for students to protect personal information on their computers, tablets and/or phones? - Use secure web browsing, upgrade to latest version of your browser and utilize the security features available - Do not click on links or open attachments in emails that are received from senders unknown to you

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Volunteer or earn MSU credits tutoring children or adults MSU Student Literacy Corps (517) 420- 1849 • literacy@msu.edu

Capital Area Literary Coalition thereadingpeople.org mail@thereadingpeople.org (517)485-4949

Bible Class Phone: (517) 332-0778

Student-led Bible Class

8:05 pm

T H U RS DAY, J U LY 27, 2 01 7

Bus rides from campus available

T H E STATE N E WS

17


Welcome to MSU

Go Greek, socially or professionally

Chemistry Help Room Health Clinics

Writing Center (WC) ITS Computer Help Desk Yoga, Zumba, Cardio Kickboxing, and other fitness classes Math Learning Center (MLC)

MSU Libraries Help Multi-Racial Unity Living Experience (MRULE) Social Science Help Room

Career Counseling Economics Help Room

- Generally, just called fraternities and often allow both genders to join. - Can be formed for professional reasons. For example, business fraternities for networking purposes are popular. For more information on Greek life, visit greeklife.msu.edu - Base membership is mostly determined by gender, often divided between fraternities and sororities. - Chapters and councils primarily led by student governing bodies.

ST. JOHN CATHOLIC CHURCH & STUDENT CENTER

Join us for: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Freshman Ignite (September 8) Fall Undergraduate Retreat (October 27-29) Music Ministry - Collegiate Ensemble Evening Student Masses Theotokos Women’s Group LINDEN College Men’s Group Catholics in Greek Life Alternative Spring Break Free Sunday Suppers Bible Studies Respect Life Group Catholic Book Clubs MSU UNION Discernment Groups Sunday 8:00am, 10:00am, Noon, 5:00pm & 7:00pm

And more!

St. John MARRIOTT

CHARLES

Neighborhood Academic Advising

Professional

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Resources Include:

The differences between a social and professional frat

M.A

MSU Neighborhood Engagement Centers offer a wide variety of resources to help you with everything from math to staying healthy!

house's philanthropy events. I really love how involved people get with everything as well. People in Greek life really seem to be involved across campus and hold many leadership roles in different clubs at MSU."

PARKING RAMP

Resources in the Neighborhoods

part of Greek Life is being involved with so many successful people across organizations in many different settings," Crimmins said. "It's great to meet new, interesting people at parties, and then see them involved with their

GROVE

Greek life has been a long-standing tradition within the foundation of MSU for over a century. The university has held Greek life on campus since 1872. With several organizations currently in practice, students have the ability to join many chapters and fraternities to enhance their college experience. These chapters aim to promote the qualities of leadership, self worth and lifelong friendship. Membership for all groups can vary based on the type of fraternity or sorority it is. However, the invitation is extended to incoming freshmen. MSU is home to 63 fraternities and sororities. Together, they are run by four different councils: the Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic Council, Multicultural Greek Council and the National Pan-Hellenic Council. Each council, which is governed and led by its own executive board, has its own individual foundation and core. There is a combined total of over 4,000 students at MSU who are active members within those fraternities. Each council is unique in its own way. They differ in focus, operational structure, history

and recruitment procedures. Chapters range in size from three to 300-plus members. They offer members a variety of opportunities to hold leadership positions within the chapter itself as well as the college. Members have the opportunity to participate in volunteer and service activities on campus and in the surrounding community. They can become involved in campus life and achieve success academically, personally and professionally. Sean Crimmins has served as Vice President of Recruitment for the Panhellenic Council in Greek Life since December 2016. He said he has greatly enjoyed his time serving on the council, both as a high ranking officer and fellow frat brother. He said his belief is that all students should consider involvement. He said he thinks it helps build overall character. "Students should definitely get involved with Greek Life because it provides you with some of the best experiences at Michigan State," Crimmins said. "Greek Life is a great way to meet new people from around the country at State, and also (helps) expand your horizons," Crimmins' said his experiences within Greek Life have been some of the most noteworthy memories at MSU. "In my own experience, the most enjoyable

ABBOTT

CSKARNULIS@STATENEWS.COM

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St. John Catholic Church & Student Center Visit neighborhoods.msu.edu for the complete resource schedule in your neighborhood! 18

THE STATE N EWS

THURSDAY, JULY 27, 2 01 7

327 M.A.C. Avenue East Lansing, MI

stjohnmsu.org 517.337.9778


Welcome to MSU

Top 6 MSU landmarks BY CODY GALL

CGALL@STATENEWS.COM

MSU’s main campus stretches about 5,200 acres, with numerous artifacts and landmarks striking the area. Symbols represent items on maps but also to the observant eye. Part of knowing campus is learning the architecture and experiencing the pioneer land-grand institution’s natural features.

SPARTY STATUE At the intersection of Red Cedar Road, Kalamazoo Street and Chestnut Road stands the “Sparty” statue. It’s the center shine of campus whose statuesque resonates for many that love for MSU. The statue became officially dedicated on June 9, 1945. Renovations over the years have been done to preserve what was once the largest free standing ceramic statue.

BEAUMONT TOWER

11 12 1 2 10 9 3 8 4 7 6 5

North of these icons, across the river stands the Beaumont Memorial Tower on the grassy knoll. The appreciation and respect for the agricultural sciences prompted the construction of the tower after the structural failure of College Hall. This monument serves as an official icon of the school, maintains the historic preservation of architecture in the North Neighborhood on campus and chimes on the quarter of every hour.

RED CEDAR RIVER The Red Cedar River flows from East to West and drains into the Grand River in Lansing. Walking along the banks of the nicely paved River Trail allows students and visitors to experience murals, the Sanford Natural Area and the Beal Botanical Gardens.

BEAL BOTANICAL GARDENS

Past the ivy walls and diverse tree species, one can spot stacks belonging to the T.B. Simon Power Plant contrasting with the horizon. The power plant is located on Service Road, which lies perpendicular to Farm Lane. Not the most traditional icon but nonetheless a marvel that sticks over 200 feet in the sky and gives you an idea of where you are — MSU.

SPARTAN STADIUM From the status, the most notable structure on campus is the monolithic Spartan Stadium. Located in the center of campus off of Shaw Road, the stadium is home to all things Spartan Football.

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T H E STATE N E WS

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Welcome to MSU

Inside and out, a view of MSU clubs BY CHRIS SKARNULIS CSKARNULIS@STATENEWS.COM

Involvement is key to any college student's success. With over 700 unique student clubs and organizations available, there is bound to be something for everyone. There is a large selection catering to a variety of interests. To get the most of college outside the classroom, be sure to look into joining these clubs: Amateur Radio Club The Amateur Radio Club allows for industry exposure by hitting the airwaves. Members have the ability to learn the basics of radio journalistic reporting, wireless technologies and electrical engineering in this popular club. Computer science senior Reece Cole has been president of the Amateur Radio Club for the past three years. He said he is happy to lead a club that guides newcomers the industry of broadcast journalism. "Members have the ability to experiment with the realms of broadcasting," Cole said in an email. "They can be involved in the tech-

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THE STATE N EWS

nical/production realm, or the live journalistic broadcasting.� Ultimate Frisbee Team Interested in playing a collective game of ultimate? The Ultimate Frisbee Team at MSU offers a gateway to enjoy exactly that. For those that enjoy competitive disc, teamwork dynamics and being active, this sport has it all and then some. Business junior Ryan Plumstead was elected team captain this past May. With his leadership, he has maintained an active team this summer. "This club is all about having fun in competitive frisbee," Plumstead said. "It is definitely a great game to play as a team. Everyone gets along well with each other. To be able to play with teamwork dynamics makes it the most fun a group could have." For more information, contact Plumstead by phone at 517-884-5563 or email at msuarcultimate@gmail.com. Fisheries and Wildlife Club Those that enjoy the great outdoors and being active will enjoy the Fisheries and Wildlife Club. Although the club is mostly activi-

THURSDAY, JULY 27, 2 01 7

ty-based, it caters to students with interests in the study of sciences in fields surrounding biology. Activ ities mostly focus on the subjects of fishing and wildlife management. Poker Club Students who have an interest in the strategic side of poker could consider becoming a part of the poker club. I n a d d i t i o n t o Environmental studies and sustainability junior Jake Pruitt throws the disc play ing the game, as psychology senior Daniel Brown guards him during an ultimate frisbee dynamics and strat- practice March 23 at Munn Field. PHOTO: JON FAMUREWA egy are discussed by members to improve their play. Note that this interested in cycling, check out the MSU group does not promote gambling. Rather, it Cycling Club. Learn the dynamics of the bike seeks to make members better card players. and motivational tips to maintain the stride. The club also provides an alternative way to exercise and get outside. Cycling Club For the chance to view more clubs, check Maintaining all-around fitness is important to any person's overall well-being. For those out Sparticipation early in the school year.


Welcome to MSU

The pros and cons of MSU’s IM facilties and off-campus gyms BY CODY GALL CGALL@STATENEWS.COM

At and around MSU’s campus, there are a plethora of options for students looking to be active or fit. On campus, there is the IM Cir-

cle, IM East and IM West facilities, all available for students and faculty. The fee to sign up is just a one-time cost of $75. There are a number of reasons, good and bad, to sign up for a gym membership with the IM facilities.

IM FACILITIES PROS

CONS

- Multiple facilities: With more than one location on campus, the one-time fee covers all locations, making it easy to pick and choose wherever’s the closest. - Proximity to students: As the facilities are on campus and near the East and South neighborhoods, they’re perfect for students without a car or a bus pass. - Discounts: MSU club athletes receive discounts. It’s an added incentive to staying on campus for fitness needs.

- High-level occupancy: During peak density levels through the school year, finding your workout equipment unavailable is a let down. - Limited hours: Dependent upon holidays, athletic events and other events, the facility’s schedules are often limited. - Equipment: During peak hours, the equipment and room at IM East can be a downer after paying a costly fee for usage of the gyms.

OFF-CAMPUS GYMS PROS

CONS

- Flexible hours: At some locations, the gyms are open 24/7. It allows a student with a busy day to lift and exercise at odd hours of the night. - Equipment: As the gyms cater to the outside population and not just the Spartan community, off-campus gyms have premier equipment. - Escape campus: Some MSU students love campus dearly, but occasionally they’ll need a break.

- Distance: Freshmen often don’t have access to a car or other forms of transportation, making it harder to get to the gyms on a daily basis. A bus pass can work, but it’s arguably tedious. - Monthly payment: While the IM facilities are just a one-time fee, gyms outside of campus usually have month-to-month payment plans. These gyms have a contract, limiting the time you can terminate your time with the gym.

However, there are off-campus gym options around East Lansing students are able to go to. At some locations, it’s close enough to campus where walking is an option. At others, a bus pass or car is necessary to go to the gym more than once a week.

Some of the options for students in the East Lansing area are Planet Fitness, Powerhouse Gym, Sparrow Michigan Athletic Club and Anytime Fitness among other possible gyms in the area. Of course, there are pros and cons for the usage of these facilities, as well.

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ONE GREAT WEEK OF FUN AND SERVICE! Alternative Spartan Breaks is an organization that provides students with the opportunity to become active, engaged, and involved in their communities. Our mission is to encourage  fellow Spartans to get involved in the active citizen movement through quality service opportunities, education, and exposure to diverse cultures and communities. During the school year students participate in week long and weekend service trips to different locations around the country and the world. On these trips participants volunteer and learn about a diverse arrays of social issues ranging from social justice to disaster relief.  ASB is a great way to get involved in the MSU community and is a really fun and affordable way to spend your break! 

For more information about cost, application deadlines, and trips check out our website :

asb.msu.edu We cannot wait to welcome you to our ASB community!

T H U RS DAY, J U LY 27, 2 01 7

T H E STATE N E WS

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Welcome to MSU

Living on East or South campus: a guide BY SOUICHI TERADA

STERADA@STATENEWS.COM

Lots of freshmen live in the South and East neighborhoods, though they’re not limited to those living areas. Get out and talk to your neighbors, as there will be a variety of newcomers living there with you.

Between the South and East neighborhoods, they are connected by the No. 30 bus of CATA. The route takes students directly from each neighborhood, with stops at IM West and IM East included.

Once it hits midnight, students who live in the dorm will have to swipe in at the main entrances to get inside. At each entrance, there are night receptionists who swipe your ID to gain access. The side doors are disabled, so

you have to go around to get inside your dorm after 12 a.m. hits. Note: you’re only allowed a maximum of three guests after midnight, so make sure you can accommodate your friends after a night out partying.

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THE STATE N EWS

THURSDAY, JULY 27, 2 01 7


Welcome to MSU SOUTH CAMPUS LIVE ON TIPS > The entirety of south neighborhood is close to a majority of the sports complexes, including Spartan Stadium. However, be careful to carry your ID with you during football season. On game days, you’ll need it to enter your dorms until game time. > Since it is so close to the athletic facilities of MSU, a variety of athletes live in South neighborhood. > South neighborhood, in general, is close to the middle of campus. It’s a walkable distance to both the MSU Main Library and Wells Hall, where you might have a few classes. > Among the four dorms in south neighborhood, three of them have a cafeteria for all of your food needs. Make sure to go to Wilson’s cafeteria for late night, because the Case and Holden cafs won’t be open after 8 p.m.

HOLMES

AKERS

HUBBARD

BUILT:

BUILT:

BUILT:

1965

1964

1966

CAF?

CAF?

CAF?

YES, BUT NO LATE NIGHT

YES, WITH LATE NIGHT

CLOSED IN 2016, SOMETIMES OPEN FOR SPECIAL EVENTS

STYLE:

STYLE:

SUITE

SUITE

STYLE: SUITE

EAST CAMPUS LIVE ON TIPS

> MSU’s East Neighborhood is on the edge of campus near Hagadorn Road, and somewhat far away from a lot of main attractions, including Spartan Stadium. Calculate walking time to the stadium as part of your commute to class or sports games. > While there are only two food options in East Neighborhood, Shaw and Snyder-Phillips Halls are just a short walk away from the dorms for your food needs. > For the CATA bus system, the East Neighborhood has a few options. The No. 30 bus can take them to South neighborhood easily. The No. 31 bus takes students directly from East neighborhood to Grand River Avenue.

EDUCATIONABR AD With over 275 programs in more than 60 countries, Michigan State University is proud

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abroad programs in the nation. Unparalleled learning opportunities with diverse program options, dedicated faculty, experienced available to assist and guide you.

START PLANNING TODAY! • Visit the Education Abroad Advising Center in room 108 of the International Center • Search for programs at educationabroad.msu.edu • Attend the Education Abroad Expo at the Breslin Center on September 28, 2017 • Check into financial aid and scholarships • Meet with your academic adviser

#spartansabroad Education Abroad Advising Center | International Center, Room 108 Email: abroad@msu.edu | Web: educationabroad.msu.edu | Phone: (517) 353-8920 T H U RS DAY, J U LY 27, 2 01 7

T H E STATE N E WS

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Welcome to MSU

An overview of MSU and its sports BY SOUICHI TERADA STERADA@STATENEWS.COM

There's a constant on the banks of the Red Cedar once the weather cools and MSU students come roaring back in droves — tailgating season. As the MSU football team gears up to kickoff another season, Spartans in the classroom also ready themselves for home games and "darties." Of course, after Miles Bridges announced his return to MSU, the hype surrounding the men's basketball team has been overflowing campus. Izzone members are counting down the days until the campout and ultimately, the season. But besides the headlining sports of MSU football and men's basketball, there are other successful sports the Spartans feature. Games are mostly free for students just by showing your ID, save for a few of the mainstream ones. Come this fall, here are a few key sports to look out for: MSU volleyball In the midst of historic Jenison Field House, head coach Cathy George has created a powerhouse program, one garnering national attention. Just last season, the Spartans earned the overall No. 9 seed in the NCAA Tournament, going 25-9. The Spartans will be led by a strong senior

24

THE STATE N EWS

class, including the likes of Rachel Minarick, Holly Toliver, Autumn Bailey and Alyssa Garvelink. MSU lost some hard-hitting seniors, but looks to compete again in arguably the best conference in the country. The Spartans grace Jenison for 2017's first home game Sept. 1 as part of the Auto-Owners Insurance Spartan Invitational. There, they take on San Diego State, Marshall and Texas A&M Corpus Christi. MSU ice hockey The MSU hockey program has struggled the past few years. The Spartans won just seven games during the 2016-17 season. However, after former head coach Tom Anastos stepped down, Danton Cole is the new face of the program. He looks to bring a proud program back to relevancy. Luckily, the Spartan icers have history on their side. Three national championship banners hang inside Munn Ice Arena as MSU embarks on a new journey. Now, the Spartans look to bounce back under a new regime. MSU’s season begins with a home-and-home against Bowling Green Oct. 13-14. MSU women's basketball In a sea of frenzied, crazy Izzone members, the

THURSDAY, JULY 27, 2 01 7

Breslin Center court has seen its fair share of incredible basketball. But besides the headlining men's basketball team, the Spartan women's basketball squad has made its fair share of noise. After flirting with the bubble in 2016-17, the Tori Jankoska-led Spartans were a No. 9 seed in the NCAA Tournament. While the Spartans' all-time leading scorer in Jankoska departs after a storied career, MSU will be relying on a number of veterans, including Taya Reimer and Branndais Agee, to carry them to another successful season.

The Spartan volleyball team cheers during the first round of the NCAA Championship against Fairfield University on Dec. 2, 2016 at Jenison Field House. The Spartans defeated the Stags, 3-0. STATE NEWS FILE PHOTO

MSU men's soccer The Spartan soccer team concluded its 2016 season with a heartbreaking loss in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. However, under head coach Damon Rensing, MSU looks to 2017, returning key players to mark another run toward the coveted tournament. On the pitch, the duo of Jimmy Hague and

Ryan Sierakowski shined for the Spartans. Sierakowski was a 2016 first-team All-Big Ten selection, second in the conference with nine goals. Hague, on the other hand, was an All-Big Ten second-team, saving the team as the goalkeeper. The men's soccer team has its own group of supporters, the Red Cedar Rowdies, available for the students wanting to cheer on their fellow Spartans.

Mailhome Edition #2 7/27/17  

The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University, Monday and Thursday during fall, spring and select days during sum...

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