Sauk Rapids Herald - March 14 edition

Page 1

Boys basketball page 24

OBITUARIES Mary Beth Cochran Richard A. Underdahl PG. 5

2 Second Ave. S., Suite 135, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379

Saturday, March 14, 2020

Three constituents separate the ballot BY NATASHA BARBER STAFF WRITER

SAUK RAPIDS – The role of clerk will move to an appointed position in Watab Township following Tuesday’s elections, but the electorate was nearly split in its decision. Only three constituents separated the yes and no votes; 124 residents voted to approve making the clerk’s position appointed while 121 voted for it to remain an elected role. The township board will now have the opportunity to appoint a candidate to the clerk’s position following Minnesota Association of Township guidelines. According to MAT documents, if the clerk’s position is made appointive in an election year, the election for that position is nullified. The town board is advised to ensure an appointee is qualified to serve in the position, but the board

Watab page 3

Eager for transition, community involvement Bergstrom prepares for Sauk Rapids-Rice superintendent role BY ANNA HINKEMEYER | STAFF WRITER

SAUK RAPIDS – When Bradley Bergstrom saw a vacant superintendent position in the Sauk Rapids-Rice School District, he knew almost instantly he wanted to apply. “Everything here is done with and for kids, and I want to be in a place like that,” Bergstrom said. “I have known about Sauk Rapids-Rice for a long time, and it has a reputation of being a great place to work, raise your family and go to school.” For the past three and a half years, Bergstrom has served as the superintendent of the Independent School District No. 564 in Thief River Falls. On July 1, Bergstrom will replace Aaron Sinclair as the superintendent of Independent School District No. 47. Sinclair will be stepping into the role of assistant superintendent in the Little Falls School District. Moving to the district allows Bergstrom to be closer to his family. He and his wife, Lisa, have been married for almost 30 years and have two adult daughters. Breonna and her husband live in Minnetonka and Hannah lives in Northfield. Bergstrom also has a 15-year-old yellow lab named Bailey. “Family is the most important thing to me,” PHOTO SUBMITTED Bergstrom said. “It will be nice to be closer to them.” Bergstrom enjoys fishing and golfing with his Bradley Bergstrom stands with some of his neighborhood school children Sept. 3,

Bergstrom page 3

2019, in Thief River Falls. Bergstrom prides himself on being visible and active in the community and plans to do the same when assuming superintendent roles for Sauk Rapids-Rice School District July 1.

Students explore self during portraiture study

Area districts agree on COVID-19 protocols Three schools suspend visitors, activities

SAUK RAPIDS – In response to the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Stearns County, superintendents from Sauk Rapids-Rice, St. Cloud Area and SartellSt. Stephen school districts have agreed upon shared protocols. COVID-19 is the PHOTO BY NATASHA BARBER name for a disease caused Senior Ellie Fedor paints an oil painting during class Feb. 25 at Sauk Rapids-Rice High School in Sauk Rapids. The by the severe acute respidistrict’s highest level of two-dimensional art students completed self portraits and other works during second ratory syndrome coronatrimester. virus 2. The disease was Self-portrait page 2 first identified in Wuhan, • Mortgage Foreclosure (5) - pg. 17, 18 and 20 China in December 2019 • City of Sauk Rapids Reg. Meeting Minutes, Feb. 24, 2020 - pg. 19 with the first confirmed • Sauk Rapids-Rice ISD Special Board Meetings (4)- pg. 17, 19, 20 and 22 diagnosis in the United • Sauk Rapids-Rice ISD Reg. Board Minutes, Feb. 10, 2020 - pg. 19 States coming Jan. 21 in • City of Sauk Rapids Public Notice - pg. 20 • Benton Cooperative Telephone Co. 2020 Annual Meeting Notice - pg. 19 COVID-19 page 4 • Benton County Ditch Authority Public Notice - pg. 22 • Watab Township Advertisement for Bids - pg. 17

PUBLIC NOTICES

Clerk appointment passes by slim vote

Vol. 165, No. 49

Same Local Coverage Since 1854.


Page 2 | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | SAUK RAPIDS HERALD

NEWS

Instruction stretches beyond basic skills BY NATASHA BARBER STAFF WRITER

When the portraiture unit arrived, instructor Shelley Chambers said students were not phased; they had completed realistic art of others prior. But, when the group realized the assignment was self-portraiture, students pumped the brakes. “What made it a little bit easier is they got to choose an artist who is known for doing portraiture and then imitate the artist’s style and bring their own style into it,” Chambers said. Aidan Regan, a junior, chose to emulate Jono Dry, a self-taught South African artist who uses graphite to create

large-scale works. Chambers ordered special paper for Regan to execute SAUK RAPIDS – his portrait. The roughly Art is more than meets 48-by-60-inch piece is the eye. the largest Chambers has That theory rang true allowed a student to comwhen Sauk Rapids-Rice plete. High School’s highest “I had to relearn how level of two-dimensional to draw (to this scale),” visual art students comRegan said. pleted self-portraitures In addition to his arthis past trimester. The tistic style, Regan was class of primarily junior drawn to Dry’s work and senior students used because the artist sufsubject fundamentals fers from attention defisuch as color alongside cit disorder. Regan, who principles such as prowas involved in contact portion while exploring a sports through his freshdeeper outcome: Several man year, has struggled students learned a little with the ability to focus about themselves while after suffering several completing the project. concussions. Regan said the project is especially important to him as he tries to train his brain sans medication. With light and dark shades across his portrait’s face and a keyhole fused in the pupil of the drawing’s eye, Regan has incorporated symbolism. “The meaning behind the picture is kind of like a tip of an iceberg – you PHOTO BY NATASHA BARBER Three portraits are displayed at the Sauk Rapids-Rice can see the light side but High School Feb. 25 in Sauk Rapids. The work is that of you don’t always see the Eve Mock, a senior, who explored how self-perception dark,” he said. ... “The

PHOTO BY NATASHA BARBER

A portrait of Ellie Fedor (right) and one by artist John Byrne are show side by side. Two-dimensional art students used inspiration from existing artists when creating self portraits during Sauk Rapids-Rice High School’s second trimester.

keyhole represents focus. I can’t just unlock my brain and use the capacity like others. It’s a keyhole to unlock it in order for me to concentrate.” Eve Mock, a senior, mimicked the art of Bryan Lewis Saunders who has created at least one can change on a daily basis. self portrait a day since 1995. “He was trying to figure out what it felt like to have self-perception change every day,” Mock said. Mock started with a goal of 10 portraits over the unit but completed three after realizing the importance she places on the quality of her work. “I learned how a mood can affect the way I draw too,” Mock said. Ellie Fedor had a similar experience. Fedor, a senior who modeled her portrait after the work of John Byrne, said she could see herself in a similar portrait which PHOTO BY NATASHA BARBER was odd to her as she is Aidan Regan uses graphite on his self portrait Feb. 25 in Sauk Rapids. The Sauk Rapids- normally unreserved. Rice High School junior’s composition was inspired by the work of Jono Dry, a self“It was just a differtaught South African artist.

ent side of me coming out in this project,” Fedor said. “I don’t know if it was the headspace I was in where I was feeling unsure about moving forward. I’m at a spot in my life where I’m faced with a lot of decisions and part of me just wants to hide a little bit. Parts of me are really out there still, but parts of me are going to hold back.” Chambers said allowing the students to choose an artist to emulate when creating a self-portrait is just one of many ways teachers have altered instruction over the years.

ALL LINES OF INSURANCE www.tricoins.net ti i t Tri-County Insurance 800 Industrial Dr S Suite 206 Sauk Rapids, MN • (320) 251-2552

Tri-County Insurance Foley Frandsen Auto Bank Lobby Foley, MN • (320) 968-6496 R11-eowtfn-TV

Creative Catering . . . Not Just for Weddings! Tuesday, March 17th Catering to Central Minnesota

by The Old Creamery Cafe

“The subjects haven’t changed; how you approach it as a teacher has changed,” Chambers said. ... “I think the idea is student’s have more input about what the subject is. Even though the principles are the same, the students choose more about what goes into the art.” Fedor’s portrait, a landscape painted by Mock and other works from Sauk Rapids-Rice High School students are featured at a juried art show at the Paramount Center of the Arts through April 3.

We also do corporate events, funerals, receptions or any other event that requires catering. We will work with your wedding planner • We will not break the bank •

Celebrate St. Patrick's Day

Now serving domestic and imported

Beer and Wine

Call 320-393-4100

to visit about your catering needs!

www.creativecateringricemn.com

405 Main St. East Rice, MN

R10-2B-BL

320-393-4100



NEWS

Page 4 | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | SAUK RAPIDS HERALD

Borcherts highlighted at council meeting

COVID-19 from front

Washington. As of March 12, 1,215 confirmed and presumptive cases had been reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Symptoms include fever, cough and shortness of breath and can reveal themselves two to 14 days following exposure. The districts will follow CDC guidance and partner with local health officials, the Minnesota State High School League, the Minnesota Department of Health and Minnesota Department of Education as they move forward. The following protocols will be in place in all three districts until further notice: - Only district personnel are permitted inside district schools. Visitors and volunteers will not be admitted to schools at this time. - Beginning and end of day routines allowing families into the school to drop off or pick up students will remain the same. Other family visits during the school day will be limited to scheduled school business. - All school-sponsored public and family events and activities will be canceled until further notice. Middle and high school practices for activities and athletics are considered an extension of the school day and will continue as scheduled. - Community education classes will be canceled, and fees will be refunded when applicable. - Use of district facilities by external organizations and community groups will be limited to practices only. - Students and staff members who have been exposed to a diagnosed case of COVID-19 must notify school administration or human resources, respectively, before returning to facilities. - Students and staff members who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 or have a household member diagnosed with the disease should not report to school and must notify the district. - Parents must notify the district if a student is not in attendance as a precautionary measure related to COVID-19. The district announcement follows a stream of organizations adjusting to the COVID-19 pandemic. Nearly 40 Minnesota state colleges and universities have extended spring breaks, suspended classes and/or began alternatives to face to face instruction. CentraCare Health has limited visitors at all its facilities and many businesses – both corporate and small – have taken precautionary measures to ensure the safety of their staff and the surrounding community.

Couple began area archery business BY NATASHA BARBER STAFF WRITER

SAUK RAPIDS – A Sauk Rapids couple was recognized by Mayor Kurt Hunstiger Monday for their contributions to the city’s former business sector. Arnold and Marlyce Borchert, who now reside at Ridgeview Place Senior Living, were recognized for the couple’s former archery and canoe business at the Sauk Rapids City Council meeting March 9 in Sauk Rapids. Arnie’s Archery and Canoe Shop was located in the basement of their former home on the 1400 block of Broadway Avenue South. The archery portion of the business, through many ownership transfers, eventually became Archery Country in Waite Park, according to Arnie Borchert. This was the second recognition the couple had received over the last month. The couple was

PHOTO BY NATASHA BARBER

Arnold Borchert and his wife, Marlyce, are Mayor Kurt Hunstiger’s guests March 9 at the Sauk Rapids City Council meeting in Sauk Rapids. The two were recognized for their contributions to the community as the former owners of Arnie’s Archery Shop.

the first to participate in Ridgeview Place’s Memories in the Making program Feb. 12. The quarterly program serves as a way for couples to continue creating memories while they reside at the senior living facility. The couple was treated to a day date at Archery Country, a meal at Best Burger Ever in Waite Park, professional photos from the Camera Shop in St. Cloud and flowers from Stems and Vines in Waite Park. “It was completely surprising that something

like this would happen to us because most of those things happen 50 years ago,” Arnie said. “That day was just fine, and she was in great shape.” Archery has been important to the couple who has been married for 66 years. Arnie gave Marlyce her first bow as an anniversary gift shortly after they were married. “It wasn’t long and she was shooting better than I was,” Arnie said. Marlyce went on to become the 1956 Minnesota State Field Champion and continued to win overall champion in the state competition the next two years. She was honored during the state’s centennial celebration as one of five archers and one of 1,958 state athletes, and she also competed on a mens archery team. Arnie said the couple began their archery business in Sauk Rapids due to the lack of quality equipment in the area. They purchased a business from Glenwood, learned The Sausage Th S Specialists S i li t the trade from the former owner and relocated the www.maneasmeats.com product to their home in (320) 253-8683 PHOTO SUBMITTED 1959. 114 2nd Ave N., Marlyce Borchert shoots a bow Feb. 12 at Archery The Borcherts have Sauk Rapids, MN Country in Waite Park. She is a previous three-time two children, 13 grandstate champion and was afforded the opportunity to children and 10 greatWe are here because of you! Think of us when grilling this Summer! R1-eowtfnB-TV shoot after 17 years through Memories in the Making, a

Manea’s Meats We thank you for your business!

grandchildren. In other council news: - Approved reinvesting $275,000 in downtown impact mitigation funds into a building owned by Warnert. O’Reilly’s has 34 months remaining on its lease of the building at the corner of Benton Drive North and Second Street but the building owner believes the company may be willing to sublease. The money, which was originally paid to the city as a penalty for contract language which has since been met, would be used for upgrades to the building and build out. - Awarded the Ninth Street South lift station improvement project to Pember Companies Inc., who bid the project at $207,950. Pember Companies was the lowest of seven bidders. The total estimated project cost with engineering and fees is $240,000. - Approved placing 6 inches of crushed granite over the existing parking lot surface at Bob Cross Park. The $62,000 cost will be funded by sales tax. - A large gathering permit was approved for the Sauk Rapids Chamber of Commerce, a division of St. Cloud Area Chamber of Commerce, to host a block party from 4-9 p.m. July 30 on Second Avenue North between Second Street North and Third Street North. - The open book meeting facilitated by the Benton County Land Services Department will be 9:30 a.m. April 7. This meeting is an alternative to the local board of appeal and equalization and takes place for land owners to question valuation and classification of their properties.

program hosted by Ridgeview Place Senior Living.

2 Second Ave. S., Suite 135 Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 (320) 251-1971 Sauk Rapids Herald (USPS 21690) is published weekly, 52 times a year, by Star Publications, 2 2nd Ave S, Suite 135, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379-1651. Second-class Postage paid at Sauk Rapids, MN 56379. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Sauk Rapids Herald, 2 2nd Ave S, Suite 135, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379-1651.

Hours: Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Official newspaper of the city of Sauk Rapids and Independent School District No. 47

Advertising: Our ad takers have no authority to bind this newspaper, and only publication of an advertisement shall constitute final acceptance of the advertiser’s order. Subscription Rates: Free in Sauk Rapids and Rice P.O. boxes, city routes and rural routes. Benton, Stearns or Sherburne Counties - $50 per year Other counties and outside Minnesota - $55 per year, $5 per month for snowbirds

Letters: Letters to the editor and other opinion articles are welcomed. Letters must be signed with first and last name and include address and phone number. Letters should be short and to the point (400 words or less). We reserve the right to edit lengthy letters. Corrections/Clarifications: The Herald strives for accuracy. If you would like to report a factual error, please call (320) 251-1971.

Deadlines: The deadline for most news in the Herald is noon on Wednesday. Exceptions are obituaries which have a deadline of 10 a.m. Thursday. The deadline for advertisements in the Herald is 5 p.m. on Wednesday. Mark Klaphake Joyce Frericks Missy Traeger Natasha Barber Maria Bichler Anna Hinkemeyer Evan Michealson Jakob Kounkel Pat Turner Amanda Thooft Maddy Peterson

mark.k@dairystar.com .................General Manager joyce@saukherald.com ............. Business Manager missy@saukherald.com.................... Sales Manager natasha@saukherald.com .................................Editor ........................................................................ Copy Editor anna@saukherald.com .................................Reporter evan.m@star-pub.com .................................Reporter jakob.k@star-pub.com...................................Reporter pat@saukherald.com .....Co-production Manager amanda@saukherald.com ...................Lead Design maddy@star-pub.com .................Graphic Designer

Kayla Hunstiger Jennifer Coyne Andrea Borgerding Tim Vos Warren Stone Daisy Perez Robin Brunette Emily Hoium Gretchen Jennissen Lorie Swedenburg Logan Thomas

kayla@saukherald.com .. Specials Sections Editor jenn@saukherald.com ..................................Reporter andrea.b@dairystar.com ..............................Reporter tim@saukherald.com .................................Marketing warren@star-pub.com ...............................Marketing daisy.p@star-pub.com ...............................Marketing robin@saukherald.com .......................... Inside Sales emily@saukherald.com .......................Bookkeeping gretchen@saukherald.com................Bookkeeping lorie@saukherald.com ..............................Circulation logan@saukherald.com .........................Sign Design


NEWS

SAUK RAPIDS HERALD | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | Page 5

Township approves slight increase to 2021 levy

Nearly 70% of township taxes allotted to road, bridge fund BY NATASHA BARBER STAFF WRITER

SAUK RAPIDS – Watab Township roads will continue to get a boost after residents approved the 2021 levy at the annual meeting March 10. About 40 residents attended the meeting at the town hall in Sauk Rapids and represented the township’s population of approximately 3,100 people. Jeff Wollak was approved as moderator of the meeting. The electorate approved a $765,000 levy, which reflected a $10,000 increase, or 1.3%, over 2020. Supervisor Julie Johnson explained to the resident body that although only one line item is detailed on resident property tax statements, the township levy is divided into five funds: general, road and bridge, fire district I, fire district II and road debt service. The road and bridge fund will see the only increase in next year’s levy. It will be increased by $30,000 for a total of $525,000. Lloyd Erdmann, resident and former supervisor, moved to approve the increase. “For the last 12 years, we have been at-

tempting to raise the road and bridge fund because we have a lot of needed road work to get done, and I’m in total agreement with the board’s request,” Erdmann said. Johnson said West Lake Road reconstruction, which is slated to be completed in about two years, is estimated to be $750,000. Therefore, any funds left over will likely be placed in the township’s money market account. “We’re trying to be diligent with our tax dollars and put them in savings, so we don’t have to go into debt when we build that road – that we have enough cash built up to pay for it up front,” Johnson said. Fire district I (which covers the northern third of the township) and fire district II (which covers the southern two-thirds of the township) were decreased by $10,000 and $7,500, respectively. The township has gained ground with peo-

ple paying incident invoices for services. For the combined districts, roughly 46% of bills for calls for service were paid in 2019 as opposed to 22% in 2018. The debt service fund decreased $2,500, and the general fund will remain at $80,000. Johnson also reviewed the 2020 budget with the audience. She said the supervisors, clerk and treasurer reviewed the books at a Jan. 21 special meeting and found the books to be in order with corrections regarding a retirement plan benefit being paid to an ineligible employee and a road debt fund figure originally entered incorrectly. Both issues have been addressed. Johnson said budget highlights to be noted included a drop in supervisors’ salaries over the last two years. She covered line items that include government meetings, and mileage and supplies. “In 2017, combined it was about $44,000; in 2019, that dropped to $31,000,” Johnson said. “So, we dropped $13,000

The electorate approved a $765,000 levy, which reflected a $10,000 increase, or 1.3%, over 2020.

OBITUARY Mary Beth Cochran

Memorial services will be 11 a.m. Wednesday, March 18 at Trinity Lutheran Church in Sauk Rapids for Mary Beth Cochran, age 68, who passed away March 6, 2020, in Reno, Nevada. The Rev. David Hinz will officiate. Visitation will be from 4-8 p.m. Tuesday at Williams Dingmann Family Funeral Home in Sauk Rapids and one hour prior to the services Wednesday at the church. Mary Beth was born Oct. 18, 1951, in St. Cloud to Albert and Donna (Tomporowski) Rasmusson. Mary Beth lived all of her life in Sauk Rapids and graduated from Sauk Rapids High School in 1970. She met Ron Cochran while

Mary Beth Cochran

they were both working at Herberger’s and attending St. Cloud State University, and they were married shortly after in 1972. From 1985-2007, she worked at SCSU in the physical education department and in the human performance lab where she taught classes and was an aerobics instructor. She also worked for the city of St. Cloud at Whitney Senior Center as an aerobics

instructor for over 30 years, and worked as the banquet coordinator at Wapicada Golf Course for over 25 years where she was blessed with many, many friends. Mary Beth was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church where she was a member of the choir and played the hand bells. Her faith was very important to her and she loved her church community. She was very active all her life and was musically talented. Mary Beth devoted her life to keeping people healthy and was focused on people’s health and wellness. She was outgoing, gregarious, social, selfless, and was always willing to help others. Mary Beth loved being with her friends and family, especially her annual trips to visit her son in Lake Tahoe, Nevada and her weekend

in costs there just in the general fund. There are other funds that have also dropped.” In the road and bridge fund, supervisors’ pay dropped by over $4,000 in the past two years. However, in the past – some work such as pot holes and tree trimming – had been completed by town board members rather than being hired out. Johnson said amounts reflected only supervisors’ pay and did not include the amounts paid to outside contractors in 2019 to complete such work. In other annual meeting news: - Approved the recommendation of three donations: $2,500 will be given to Benton Economic Partnership, $1,000 will be given to the Benton County Agricultural Society and $3,000 will be given to the Rice Recreation Department. - BNSF rejected the township’s plans for the quiet crossing at 105th Street Northwest, so the township will reconstruct the roadway but will need to delay the implementation of a crossing until further design of a crossing can be coordinated with the railway. - The next annual meeting will be at 8:15 p.m. March 9, 2021. Elections will also take place that day and polls will be open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

“MBMB Getaways” every summer with her three lifelong friends, Barb Claseman, Mary Justin and Barb Larson. Survivors include her husband, Ron of Sauk Rapids; son, Ryan Cochran (Melissa) of Lake Tahoe, Nevada.; and several nieces and nephews. Mary Beth was preceded in death by her parents; sister, Janelle Hackett; and brother, Scott Rasmusson. Mary Beth’s family would like to extend a heartfelt and special thank you to the entire staff at Wapicada Golf Course, especially Brad Deyak and Jason Rieder, for the years of friendship that were given to Mary Beth. Obituary, guest book and video tribute available online: www. williamsdingmann.com R-11-1B

OBITUARY

Richard A. Underdahl

Funeral services will be 11 a.m. Monday, March 16 at Redeemer Lutheran Church in St. Cloud for Richard A. Underdahl, 86, of Sauk Rapids, who passed away March 11, 2020, at the St. Cloud VA Medical Center surrounded by his loving family. Pastor Bruce Timm will officiate and burial will be with full military honors at the Minnesota State Veterans Cemetery in Little Falls. Friends and relatives may visit from 4-7 p.m. Sunday, March 15 at Williams Dingmann Family Funeral Home in Sauk Rapids and also one hour prior to services at the church in St. Cloud Monday morning. Richard Arlen Underdahl was born April 7, 1933, in Fertile to Orville and Ione (Droppo) Underdahl. At the age of 17, in 1950 he went to work for Northern Pacific Railway in St. Paul. He served in the United States Army during the Korean War and in Japan from 1952-55 as a combat engineer. Dick was honorably discharged as a staff sergeant E6. He returned to work for the railroad after the war. In 1956, he attended Dunwoody Institute in Minneapolis for auto mechanics. Later in 1961, he bought a gas station in Thief River Falls and named it “Dick’s Corner Texaco”. In 1964, he went to work for the state of Minnesota (MnDOT) and started as a bridge worker and retired in 1992 as bridge maintenance superintendent. 1964 was also the year he married his sweetheart, Janet Bell in Baker. They moved around Minnesota with Dick’s job and settled in Detroit Lakes in 1967 and eventually to the Sauk Rapids area in 1974 after a job transfer. After his retirement he drove school bus for Larson’s (Laidlaw) Bus Company for 15 years. He was a member of Redeemer Lutheran church, where

Richard A. Underdahl

he served as a Sunday school teacher, trustee, deacon, vice president and the president of the congregation. His faith, family and country were extremely important to him. He was also a member of the St. Cloud VFW Post No. 428, he served on the board of directors at Good Shepherd from 20012016 and served for the Middle Management Association for the State of Minnesota for 17 years. Dick volunteered his time with Meals and Wheels and made toys for Toys for Tots, or any other child who would enjoy them. He loved woodworking, fishing, hunting, cutting wood, repairing old Ford tractors and camping. Dick was very hardworking. He owned 40 acres of land and ran a saw mill from 1978-99 ... just for fun! He loved spending time with his family and everyone who knew him, loved him. Survivors include his loving wife, Janet of Sauk Rapids; daughters, Dawn (Steve) Rudy of Sauk Rapids and Darla (Joe) Schmidt of St. Cloud; sister, Dorothy Lee of Fertile; nine grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; brothers, Walter and Gordon Sylstad; sister, Marilyn Sylstad and an infant sister. Memorials are preferred to Prince of Peace Lutheran School in St. Cloud. Obituary and guest book available online at https://www. williamsdingmann.com R-12-1B

“Our Country is in Mourning, A Soldier Died Today.”

In Memory Harry M. Monnier 3/27/51 - 3/13/19

Because someone we love is in heaven, we have a little bit of heaven in our home. Gone but never forgotten! Sue, Harry & Meagan, Jean, Mitch & Garret

R-10-2P

Harry M. Monnier


Page 6 | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | SAUK RAPIDS HERALD

Read the seed envelope Seed envelopes contain a lot of information that is important for gardeners to know when they start seeds whether indoors or out. First look for the botanical or Latin name for the plant. ComBY LINDA G. mon names for many of our TENNESON plants differ from one part of Green and the country to another, and Growing in checking the botanical name Benton County makes sure we are not rudely surprised when the plant that grows and blooms is not the one we were expecting. Seed envelopes also tell us if the plant grows best in sun or shade or if it will tolerate a few hours of each during the day. What will the height and width of the plant be when it reaches full growth, and when the plant is expected to bloom? How deep should seeds be planted, and how far apart should they be placed? Some seed companies also list how many seeds are in the envelope and the expected germination rate. Important for starting the seeds indoors is the time seeds should be started so that the baby plants will not grow too tall before being transplanted outdoors, often referred to as being leggy. This is usually quoted as the number of weeks before the average last frost for the growing zone for your area. Additional details such as keeping the seeds in darkness or light until germination occurs may also be included. A few seeds germinate best in darkness. The temperature of the soil is also a factor. Seeds will not germinate unless they are planted in soil that is warm enough. While indoors, the temperature can be increased by using a heating mat manufactured for that purpose. A soil thermometer may be inserted in outdoor soil to check that it is warm enough for germination to occur. Some seed envelopes also state whether the plant is recommended for growing in a container. The top or bottom of the seed envelope should also have a date stamp which says when the seeds were harvested. Although many seeds will remain viable for several years if stored properly, seeds that were harvested during the previous growing season will have the highest germination rates. Plants started indoors need to be acclimated to outdoor conditions before being planted in their permanent locations. Take the plants outdoors and place them in the shade for an hour or so for several days. Gradually increase the amount of time and amount of sun the plants are exposed to until they are outdoors all day. Plants started indoors also benefit from a fan moving air around them. This will keep them from going into shock when they are exposed to outdoor breezes. Finally, when planting outdoors, it may be necessary to protect the plants from deer, rabbits or other varmints. Homemade or commercial sprays may be used to make the plant taste or smell bad. Chicken wire or hardware cloth fences will keep rabbits away from plants if the bottom edge of the fence is secured to the ground so a rabbit is not tempted to try and crawl under it. Some fences may have the bottom 6 inches inserted into the ground to deter rabbits from tunneling under a fence. Linda G. Tenneson is a University of Minnesota Extension Master Gardener and Tree Care Advisor.

EDITORIAL

Grace, grieving

While I have been to countless Chrising stage since. tian concerts since first being exposed to When he came out and spoke about his the music four and a half years ago, the gratitude, you could see his emotion and concert I attended this past weekend sticks the evidence of grief. I was in awe of how out for me for many reasons. he could get on stage and sing his upliftI messaged a friend about a month ago ing, praiseworthy songs despite his experiasking if she wanted to go to the TobyMac ence. I am not sure many people would be concert, and she immediately said, “Yes.” able to exemplify that kind of strength and The day finally came, March 7, and our ex- BY ANNA HINKEMEYER courage to share how good God is despite a citement was through the roof. I have often painstakingly difficult loss. said a Christian concert is more than enterAfter a few upbeat songs, TobyMac tainment but rather a worship experience. calmed the atmosphere as he walked down the catwalk The concert itself had high expectations in my to the platform at the end of the stage, just him and the mind as there were seven artists on the tour, TobyMac microphone. He talked about the day he will get to see and six others – Tauren Wells, Jordan Feliz, We Are his son again on the same day he gets called home to Messengers, Ryan Stevenson, Aaron Cole and Cochren spend eternity with the Lord, and how God guarantees & Company. Knowing many songs by many of these that. artists, I was ecstatic. We arrived and found our seats Wow. which provided an incredible view of the stage. As I listened to him talk, I admired his grace and The concert started 10 minutes earlier than expect- outlook on the situation. If I am ever in a situation like ed. As each artist performed, the experience of singing that, I hope to have the same attitude amongst the grievalong to the music and listening to the messages of God ing. I hope to proclaim the goodness of God like he has. satisfied my craving for a Christian concert 10-fold, es- He then followed with a performance of his song “21 pecially because the concert ran 45 minutes longer than Years,” which he wrote shortly after his son’s death. anticipated. Kudos and prayers to you once more, TobyMac. TobyMac’s set is still resonating with me. He came This concert is one that will be hard to top on my out and thanked the crowd for all of the letters, cards list for quite some time. The example set by TobyMac and prayers as he has gone through one of the darkest is something to be rivaled, and then the songs and inperiods of his life. Four months ago, he lost his eldest credible lineup of artists he brought on the road with son to accidental overdose and has been in a deep griev- him was icing on the cake.

Suffering continues to nourish the soul

Oswald Chambers wrote, “And no saint trying to encourage. We want to save our should ever dare to interfere with the lesson loved ones from suffering, but do not enof suffering being taught in another saint’s courage them to be a weak Christian. God life.” is making them one with him. He is preYikes. This statement made me want to paring their heart for where he needs them search the scriptures. to advance his kingdom. That might mean In Mathew 4:1-4, Jesus, being filled with a sudden job loss or a broken relationship. the Holy Spirit, returned from Jordan, was led That might mean leaving work and becomby the spirit into the wilderness and tempted ing a stay at home parent. It could mean for 40 days by the devil. In those days, he ate putting your kids in institutional school and BY MERCY nothing, and afterward, when they had endvolunteering. It could result in commuting, NYGAARD ed, he was hungry. The devil said to him, “If Life by FAith an additional job, taking in an aged parent, you are the son of God, command this stone a cancer survivor, unexpected pregnancy, to become bread.” But Jesus answered him, regrouping your family to a God centered saying, “It is written, ‘Man shall not live by bread home life, a foot in 10 ministries, a drunken, sunken alone but by every word of God.’” spouse. Jesus suffered. I mean like, painfully-hungry, “This is too much for you to handle,” the sympaemotionally-exhausted, tempted with sudden relief thizer might say. that would have rendered forever damage. I often forYes, yes indeed it is. But if God is in it one tiny get this. He had loved ones who died and friends who ounce, he will give you strength in your weakness, betrayed. Suffering comes in many shapes and sizes. and he will provide moments of respite. His grace is He suffered the cross so we do not have to, but when sufficient. He gives us more than we can handle so we we suffer, we fill up what is lacking in the afflictions will know and others will see it is not through us but of Christ. When we are suffering, God is making us through Christ alone we make it to the other side. He one with him. When others see us go through our suf- fills in where we are lacking when we are obedient to fering, we are imperfect ambassadors representing his calling. We will have bad days. We all do. To God Jesus who was perfect, whose grace is sufficient and be the glory that we make it through. Not one tiny whose power is made perfect through weakness as we bad day or monumental, lifechanging catastrophe is lean on him and trust in him and say, “Father, if it is beyond his loving care for us. I take comfort in that. I your will, take this cup away from me; nevertheless, lean into the suffering and hold on to every grace monot my will but yours be done.” ment like vitamin C for my soul. If the disciples knew Christians suffer. Being Christian does not make what Jesus was accomplishing in his suffering, there you lie in a bed of roses for the remainder of your time is no way Peter would have ever said, “This shall nevhere. Coworker fights, spousal fights, kids rebelling, er happen to you.” Maybe our better response to those too much on your plate, swimming with your nose who are suffering ought to be, “Uff-duh, I am praying barely above water – who are we to say, too much for you.” Because, here, prayer is the greater work Lord, it is too much? I will tell you. against the devil as God is making us one with him We are his children, who he values more than through our suffering. sparrows that not one falls apart from his will. He filI always gravitate to those who have received ters our suffering and gives us a way out from tempta- themselves through the fires of sorrow. They have tion. He does not force us to the way out but provides wisdom in their eyes and always make time for me it for us to choose. in my moments of trouble. God is glorified by this We are best not to interfere in ones suffering with because he has made those who have suffered noursympathy. I have to remind myself to be careful when ishment for others.

Letters to the editor welcome E-mail to natasha@saukherald.com

Letters to the editor and other opinion articles are welcome. Letters must be signed with a first and last name and include an address and phone number. Letters should be short (under 400 words) and to the point, and be submitted by at 5 p.m.


EDITORIAL

SAUK RAPIDS HERALD | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | Page 7

Resisting arrest, using force is never the answer Since the founding of this country, In this hearing, the judge will hear testithe government has wrestled with how mony concerning the facts present in the to best preserve public safety while also investigation and arguments from both protecting individual constitutional rights. the defense and prosecution regarding the Peace officers are positioned at the point constitutionality of the officer’s actions. where these two important societal interShould the judge agree evidence was ests meet. Peace officers are charged with gathered in an unconstitutional manner, the authority to deprive citizens of liberty that evidence cannot be considered in the when evidence indicates a crime has been criminal case against the defendant. committed. The constitutional rights of Finally, both Minnesota law and BY TROY HECK citizens are extremely important in this federal law allow citizens to bring a lawexercise of authority. The U.S. Constitu- Benton County Sheriff suit against individual officers or law tion guarantees a number of rights to citienforcement agencies for violations of zens including the right to remain silent, the right to constitutional rights. These laws allow citizens who legal counsel and prohibitions against unreasonable prevail in court to recover monetary damages for searches and seizures. Law enforcement in gen- constitutional violations. eral and our office in particular take great pains to No one has a perfect understanding of constitutrain peace officers regarding where the courts have tional law. Sometimes investigative actions an ofdrawn lines around the exercise of law enforcement ficer believed were proper based on case law are authority. judged by a court to have violated constitutional One alarming trend in our society has been the requirements. Sometimes well-intentioned officers willingness of citizens who are being arrested to make mistakes, and on rare occasions, officers with resist, sometimes with force, because they believe bad intentions misuse the authority vested in them. their rights have been violated. Neither our consti- Regardless of the cause, law enforcement agencies tution nor our body of law provides for forceful re- take seriously our responsibility to look into allegasistance as a remedy for constitutional violations. tions of misconduct and take appropriate action to Rather, our government has provided a number of ensure citizens’ constitutional rights are protected. peaceful ways citizens may obtain relief from a conAt the same time, citizens must understand there stitutional violation. In fact, Minnesota law makes is no constitutional right to avoid consequences of it a crime to resist a peace officer performing his or illegal actions. Resorting to force or violence durher duties. Forceful resistance will always make a ing an arrest or search will only make the situation situation worse, is dangerous to everyone involved much worse. A well-trained law enforcement offiand will lead to additional serious criminal charges. cer will know when that officer is required to obtain One possible reason for otherwise peaceful people a search warrant and when they may search without to make a choice to resort to physical resistance is a warrant. A well-trained officer will know when they do not know what other avenues are available an individual must be read their Miranda rights and to them to properly receive relief from what they how to conduct a constitutionally valid interrogasee as a violation of their rights. The following is tion. Peace officers will pursue those who violate a list of three common ways citizens may address the law to the extent allowed by the constitution and what they believe is law enforcement misconduct. established case law to further the cause of justice The first logical step for someone who believes and public safety. misconduct has occurred will likely be making a If you believe you have been or are being subcomplaint with the officer’s employing agency. All jected to law enforcement misconduct, your best Minnesota law enforcement agencies are required to and safest course is to comply with what is being have a policy concerning the acceptance of allega- asked of you at the time and document the incitions of misconduct. This policy, which is available dent. If you wish to object to a search or choose to the public, will detail what the process is in each not to answer questions, you have the right to make agency for accepting and processing misconduct that known and to exercise your rights in a peaceallegations. Anyone who believes they have been ful manner. When appropriate, request the officer’s party to misconduct or witnessed misconduct is en- name, badge number and employing agency. Once couraged to contact a supervisor of the employing the incident has concluded, you should consider agency and describe the situation in question. Upon which remedy you will follow to have your allegareceiving the complaint, an agency must investigate tion of misconduct pursued in a peaceful and lawful the allegations and take any appropriate corrective manner. action. This could include criminal sanctions if the For more crime prevention information and alleged misconduct was a crime or internal disci- safety information, visit https://www.co.benton. pline actions if the alleged misconduct was found to mn.us/211/crime-prevention. You can also like and violate agency policy. follow us on Facebook and Twitter at @BentonMNIndividuals charged with a crime that is based Sheriff for regular updates and crime prevention entirely or partially upon evidence they believe was messages. gathered in an unconstitutional manner have the right to request an omnibus hearing before a judge.

Political Letters to the Editor Policy – Political letters written regarding elections and election platform issues are limited to 250 words and are printed free of charge. (Ex: Go vote letters, immigration, gun control, universal healthcare). – Political letters endorsing or opposing a candidate, ballot measure or political party are subject to charges. Star Publications will charge a flat fee of $25 for 250-word or less letters. Display advertising rates will apply to letters exceeding the word limit. Payment must be received prior to copy deadline. – Paid letters to the editor will be clearly marked and set apart from those which are not. – Readers will be allowed to submit one political letter every 14 days. – All letters to the editor (political or not) require first and last names, addresses and phone numbers. Names and city of residency will be published in the newspaper along with the letter copy. – The final time and date to submit a political letter to the editor for the general election is 5 p.m. Oct. 14.

E-mail to natasha@saukherald.com

February weather, phenology in review Weather: Compared to last year, a wimpy month. Remember our 18 days with below zero temperatures and 29.4 inches of snow last year? Well, this year only eight days with below zero temperatures and only 1.8 inches of snow. Our wimpy average BY JIM HOVDA high and low temperatures From the North were 30.9 and 5.3 degrees Shore of Little Rock Lake compared to 21.9 and 2.8 degrees below zero last year. Our coldest days were 18 degrees below zero Feb. 13 and Feb. 20. A 51 degree below zero wind chill was recorded in western Minnesota Feb. 13. A reprieve for us Feb. 23 with a 49 degree reading. Precipitation? Not much. Measurable only three days, the most Feb. 18 when I measured 1.5 inches of snow that melted down to .12 inches of liquid. It was a no snow blower month unlike last year. We started the month with 11 inches of snow on the ground and ended up with 8.4 inches. Total precipitation since Jan. 1 is 1.52 inches, and total snow for our snow season is 37.9 inches compared to 49.3 inches last year. Local weather records: The coldest temperature was 42 degrees below zero in 1996 while the all-time state record of 60 degrees below zero set on the same date in Tower. The warmest was 58 degrees in 1932. The most precipitation, 2.94 inches, fell in 1922 and 29.4 inches of snow in 2019. Phenology: Our normal winter birds are here; blue jays, juncos and gold finches in large numbers. Our four species of woodpeckers are here and more appearances of the pileated woodpecker visiting the suet feeder. Also, chickadees, purple finches, white- and rosebreasted nuthatches are here along with several mourning doves. Fewer red cardinals. On Feb. 12, with just a little open water by the Highway 10 bridge, there were four swans in the cold water. They also appeared in the open water in Little Rock Creek. Of note, only one day did ice totally cover the water by the Highway 10 bridge and only a few days was Little Rock Creek covered. The open water in the creeks attracted bald eagles looking for fish. Fred Segler reported he observed about 50 cedar wax wings on his crab apple tree Feb. 29. Yes, my little flying squirrel still makes night visits to the hanging sunflower seed feeder. Spring is not far away. Little Rock Lake: Mark Soderhom reported the ice was about 26 inches thick and water clarity was good. Fishing is slow, endorsed by our other angler Fred Segler. At noon Feb. 29, there were 15 fish houses on the lake, most on wheels. They must be off the lake by close of business March 2. As of March 1, new fishing licenses are due to the state. Check your boat license and check wheel bearings. Shore ground heaving has notably grown. Maybe about 3 feet in front of 170 North Freedom Road. Some years it has been as high as 4 or 5 feet. What is ahead: Ice out on Little Rock Lake? Once in a while it happens in March but usually in about mid-April. Twice the ice has lasted into May. Do not put the snow blower away yet.


Page 8 | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | SAUK RAPIDS HERALD

NEWS

Artfully creating a difference

Drake promotes social issues through art, new book BY ANNA HINKEMEYER STAFF WRITER

ing stories as early as first grade. Drake, 42, considers herself innately creST. CLOUD – Sauk ative and over the years Rapids resident Sarah has continued to create in Drake remembers writ- a multitude of ways.

CentraCare limiting visitors at all locations ST. CLOUD – Due to the outbreak of COVID-19, CentraCare announced in a release March 12 that its facilities will be implementing temporary visitor restrictions. Effective immediately, CentraCare is no longer allowing visitors at its hospitals, long-term care facilities, senior housing and sites where individuals are housed in large numbers. Visitors impacted by this policy include patient family and friends, students, volunteers and nonessential contracted vendors. Exceptions will be made for patient family members under special circumstances such as unstable or critically ill patients, parents of minors and end of life patients. CentraCare will take additional steps to help control the spread of COVID-19, as necessary, according to the release. “We understand that interacting with friends and family can be helpful to the healing process and strongly encourage patients to connect with family members through other forms of communication, such as phone calls and video chats on cell phones or other mobile devices,” the release said. People with symptoms of respiratory illness are encouraged to call CentraCare Connect at 320200-3200 to speak with a nurse, 24/7.

Board receives Pleasantview rebuild update

Sitting at Jule’s Bistro in downtown St. Cloud March 6, Drake has come full circle as she is surrounded by her artwork. Her artwork is also on display at the library in Waite Park and the Local Blend in St. Joseph. “Seven years ago, I was laid off from my full-time job which is when I began to pursue art as a full-time career,” Drake said. “While my pocketbook is not always full, my heart certainly is, and I love that.” Drake has also written and illustrated a children’s book, “Nanou’s Promise: A Journey Beyond Hauling Water,” to accompany her artwork. The fictional story is based on true events of a young girl empowered to find water closer to home so she has time to attend school and learn to paint. Drake’s inspiration for the book, along with much of her recent artwork, is inspired by her first trip to Africa in summer 2011. Drake said the women she met and the experiences she had are always on her mind. “It was such a profound, life-changing experience for me,” Drake said. “Since then, I have been using my art for a tool to create social change. There needs to be a story told within my art. I don’t know if I could be an artist if I didn’t have a cause.” A piece of artwork Drake completed after

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Sarah Drake created “Eddah” as a positive display of diversity, and the artwork hangs on the walls of Jule’s Bistro in St. Cloud March 6. Drake has created over 50 pieces of art over the past three years that address issues like human rights, discrimination and diversity.

returning from Africa incorporated many of the animals she saw, but the piece focused more on the people and the work they were doing within their villages and countries. The piece was exhibited in New York

First designs for new elementary school expected soon BY ANNA HINKEMEYER | STAFF WRITER

SAUK RAPIDS – The Sauk Rapids-Rice School Board received its newest update on the Pleasantview Elementary School rebuild process during its March 9 meeting in Sauk Rapids. The design team, which consisted of 20 people from the school and district administration, toured other schools and prioritized needs and wants within the new building. With the team’s final meeting March 12, ICS Consulting and Wold Architects and Engineers will transition to the next phase – meeting with user groups, including special education, office, cafeteria and art staff, and teachers from each grade level to narrow specifics of how each space will look. Consulting and Wold Architects and Engineers will provide monthly updates to the board on progress. In other school board news: – Approved agreements with paraprofessionals, administrative assistants and cashiers, the superintendent, and the director of technology. Bradley Bergstrom will serve as the district’s new superintendent and Cory Zimpel will assume the role as director of technology, both beginning July 1.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Sarah Drake’s artwork “Abdou” hangs in Jule’s Bistro in St. Cloud throughout the months of February and March. Drake traveled to Africa in the summer of 2011, and the trip and her experiences now inspire much of her artwork.

and in Moscow, Russia. While Drake could not attend the Moscow exhibit, her artwork was on display. One of Drake’s biggest principles in creating her artwork is making sure she is creating a space for people’s voices to be heard, specifically working with people of color and other minorities. Over the past three years, Drake has created over 50 pieces of art focused on human rights, discrimination and diversity. Drake faced extensive challenges getting her artwork into the central Minnesota community but said she eventually built key relationships and partnerships. Many of those who inspire her work are asked to create with her and come along on the journey with her in making a difference. “It is a privilege to be able to create with these powerful messages,” Drake said. “There are people saying the exact things I am, but they are not being heard. My art has become a tool to make conversations happen, so others don’t have to go through what I did to get here.”

Sarah Drake

In addition to creating her own art, Drake has also been a teaching artist through the Central Minnesota Arts Board for 10 years. Drake said she enjoys coming into classrooms and having fun with the students while creating pieces they can be proud of. Drake said she learns as much from the kids as they learn from her. Oftentimes, Drake she keeps in touch with the students as they work their way through school and continue to pursue art. “Being an artist in so many capacities is really rewarding,” Drake said. “It fulfills me and gives me the opportunity to create a space for that creativity and exploration.”


NEWS

SAUK RAPIDS HERALD | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | Page 9

Coborn’s celebrates grand re-opening

BREAK CROSSWORD

PHOTO BY ANNA HINKEMEYER

Representatives from Coborn’s and the city of Sauk Rapids – Kurt Hunstiger (from left), Dave Meyer, Ross Olson, Todd Schultz, Mike Paulsrud and Emily Coborn – pose for the ceremonial ribbon cutting March 6 at Coborn’s Marketplace in Sauk Rapids. The Coborn’s location celebrated its grand re-opening with free samples and giveaways and live music.

City officials, company executives join in ribbon cutting BY ANNA HINKEMEYER STAFF WRITER

SAUK RAPIDS – Shoppers at the Coborn’s Marketplace in Sauk Rapids March 6 received free samples and participated in giveaways throughout the store. The store hosted a grand reopening ceremony which included a ribbon cutting ceremony and live music. Coborn’s executives, including Dave Meyer, executive vice president, and Emily Coborn, vice president of fresh merchandising, were on-site as part of the festivities. Sauk Rapids Mayor Kurt Hunstiger, city admin-

istrator Ross Olson and community development director Todd Schultz were also present. The event took place following the completion of an extensive remodel of the story which began in fall 2018. Décor was changed throughout the store and the natural foods department’s items were integrated into the center aisles. Updates were made to each of the fresh departments as well. Gate City Bank is now located in the store as well. Coborn’s began as a produce market in Sauk Rapids is 1921. The fifthgeneration company has expanded to include over 120 retail locations un-

Mike Paulsrud prepares to cut the ribbon signaling the grand re-opening of the Sauk Rapids Coborn’s location March 6. Paulsrud has been the store director of the store for six years.

der the names of Cash Wise, Coborn’s, Captain Jack’s Liquor Land, Holiday Stationstores, Hornbacher’s, Little Dukes and Marketplace Foods in Minnesota, North Dakota, South

Dakota, Wisconsin, Illinois and Iowa. The Sauk Rapids location is the 10th store within the company to complete the marketplace themed remodel.

Nelson, Stone become reigning royalty Ridgeview Place holds Ice Capades week BY ANNA HINKEMEYER STAFF WRITER

SAUK RAPIDS – John Nelson and Willowdean Stone are considered royalty in the halls of Ridgeview Place Senior Living, of Sauk Rapids, after being crowned prince and princess of the Ice Capades week. The Ice Capades week included dress-up days, a Mardi Gras party, minnow races, ice castle crafts, a grilled meal and dancing. The royalty was crowned based on votes from tenants, family and visitors throughout the week. This was the first time PHOTO BY ANNA HINKEMEYER Ridgeview hosted Ice Ca- John Nelson (left) and Willowdean Stone (right) sit with Sauk Rapids Community pades week, but the facil- Ambassador Anna Lucas Feb. 28 at Ridgeview Place in Sauk Rapids. Lucas assisted ity plans to make it an an- with crowning Nelson and Stone as the Ice Capades week prince and princess. nual occurrence.

Sponsored By:

ST R

Publications

TIMOTHY J. VOS Territory Manager 561 Railroad Avenue Albany, MN 56307 Office: 320-845-2700 • Cell: 320-492-6987 Fax: 320-845-4805

Call to Advertise!

tim@saukherald.com tim@albanyenterprise.com


Page 10 | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | SAUK RAPIDS HERALD

NEWS

WHAT'S HAPPENING

Community Education Corner Movie Madness Watch the 2019 family-friendly movie, “Aladdin,” on the big screen in the auditorium. This event is free of charge, but participants must register. Register one adult and fill out the form asking how many will be attending. An adult must accompany children. Friday, March 20, 6:30 p.m. Sauk Rapids-Rice Middle School, 901 First St. S., Sauk Rapids Summer Fastpitch Softball For girls ages 9-18. Participants will be placed on teams that compete against communities throughout the summer. Games, practices will be weeknights with the possibility of weekend tournaments.

Is there an event you would like included in What’s Happening? Calendar entries are published one issue in advance of the event date. Submit events by emailing natasha@saukherald.com. All submissions must be received by 5 p.m. Wednesday for the following publication. Subject to editor approval. No pricing information for events will be included.

to register, visit https://www.mnsafetycenter.org or call 1-888-234-1294.

Saturday, March 14, 8:30 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. – “Saints Within Us” Women’s Lenten Retreat. Sponsored by the Diocesan Council of Catholic Women. Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 2875 10th Ave. N.E., Sauk Rapids. All are welcome. Visit https://www.stclouddccw.org for more information.

Thursday, March 19, 5-9 p.m. – 55+ Refresher Driving Course. Gilleland Chevrolet-Geo Inc., 3019 Division St., St. Cloud. For more information or to register, visit https://www.mnsafetycenter.org or call 1-888-234-1294.

Saturday, March 14, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. – Home and Lifestyle Show. Presented by the Central Minnesota Builders Association. River’s Edge Convention Center, 10 Fourth Ave. S., St. Cloud.

To register or for more information on programs and costs, contact Sauk Rapids-Rice Community Education at https://www.isd47.org/ce or 320-258-1577.

Saturday, March 14, 10:30-11:30 a.m. – Bees 101. Join Michael and Elizabeth England from Red Hive Honey as they share their experience. For all ages. Great River Regional Library, 251 Fourth Ave. N., Foley.

Sauk Rapids Police Department activity

Saturday, March 14, 3 p.m. – Heritage Day Parade. Division Street North, Rice. Saturday, March 14, 7:30 p.m. – Broken Fiddle. Paramount Center for the Arts, 913 W. St. Germain St., St. Cloud. For more information, visit https:// www.paramountarts.org or call 320-529-5463.

March 3 1553 hrs: Officers received a complaint from the 900 block of Benton Drive North for counterfeit money used in a Facebook marketplace transaction. March 4 0950 hrs: Officers observed a male dancing in the roadway at the intersection of Second Avenue North and First Street. Officers made contact with the male. Officers advised the roadway was not the appropriate place and the male moved on. March 6 2246 hrs: Officers responded to the 900 block of Benton Drive North for a found bag of marijuana. Officers gathered the bag and brought it in to be destroyed. Incidents: 30 assists, 24 traffic stops, 18 suspicious activity reports, 17 parking violations, 15 medical calls, 14 animals, 11 various calls, 10 child, 6 alarms, 6 property, 6 disturbances, 6 thefts, 5 civil, 4 unwanted, 4 welfare checks, 4 permits, 3 human services reports, 2 accidents, 2 missing persons, 2 domestics, 2 tows, 2 harassments, 2 fraud and 2 attempts to locate.

Sunday, March 15, 8 a.m. to noon – Omelet Breakfast. Sponsored by the Waite Park American Legion Auxiliary. American Legion Post No. 498, 17 Second Ave. N., Waite Park. Sunday, March 15, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. – Home and Lifestyle Show. Presented by the Central Minnesota Builders Association. River’s Edge Convention Center, 10 Fourth Ave. S., St. Cloud. Monday, March 16, 7 p.m. – Rice City Council Meeting. Rice City Hall, 205 E. Main St., Rice. Monday, March 16, 5:30-9:30 p.m. – 55+ Refresher Driving Course. Whitney Senior Center, 1527 Northway Drive, St. Cloud. For more information or to register, visit https://www.mnsafetycenter.org or call 1-888-234-1294. Tuesday, March 17, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. – 55+ Refresher Driving Course. St. Cloud Life Assembly of God Church, 2409 Clearwater Road, St. Cloud. For more information or to register, visit https://www. mnsafetycenter.org or call 1-888-234-1294.

Rice Police Department activity March 6 2124 hrs: Officers observed a vehicle parked on the 12500 block of Fromlet Loop Northwest. Driver said she was stopping for a short time to allow her young children time to sleep out of their car seats. Officers advised the female to move to the Holiday parking lot. Incidents: 9 various calls, 3 assists, 3 thefts, 2 traffic stops and 2 suspicious activity reports.

Tuesday, March 17, 9 a.m. – Benton County Board of Commissioners Meeting. Benton County Administration Building, 531 Dewey St., Foley. Tuesday, March 17, 3:30 p.m. – Metro Bus Public Hearing. Regarding fare increases for Connex ondemand ride service. Increase would take effect April 1. Change would not affect free transfers. Sartell City Hall, 125 Pine Cone Road N., Sartell. Contact Metro Bus at 320-251-1499 by March 15 if special accommodations are needed. Wednesday, March 18, 1-2:30 p.m. – Senior Art Classes featuring Paige LaDue Henry. Presented by Community Action Respecting Elders and Foley Community Education. Dewey Place, 455 Dewey St., Foley. Wednesday, March 18, 2-4 p.m. – Advocates for Independence. Make a difference in your community for people with disabilities. Increase leadership, assertiveness and communication skills. All abilities welcome. Independent Lifestyles, 215 N. Benton Drive, Sauk Rapids. Thursday, March 19, 7:30 a.m. – Foley Area Chamber of Commerce Membership Meeting. New Life Church in Foley, 931 Norman Ave. N., Foley.

BR11-1B-WS

Thursday, March 19, 10:30-11:30 a.m. – Tiny Tots Play Workshop. For ages 0-3 with adult. Great River Regional Library, 1300 W. St. Germain St., Foley. Thursday, March 19, noon to 4 p.m. – 55+ Refresher Driving Course. Salem Lutheran Church, 90 Riverside Drive S.E., St. Cloud. For more information or

Thursday, March 19, 1:30 p.m. – The Sons. A blue grass, gospel, country and comedy trio. Riverside Inn Event Center, 118 Third St. S., Cold Spring. Call 320-685-4539 for tickets.

Friday, March 20, 10-10:45 p.m. – Preschool Storytime. Registration not required. For ages 3-6. Great River Regional Library, 251 Fourth Ave. N., Foley. Friday, March 20, 5-7:30 p.m. – Lenten Fish Fry. Deep-fried fish, coleslaw, baked potato, baked beans, dinner rolls and beverages. Take out available. Immaculate Conception Church, 145 Second Ave. N.E., Rice. Friday, March 20, 5-8 p.m. – Fish Fry and Meat Raffle. Hosted by the Sauk Rapids American Legion Post No. 254. VFW Post No. 6992, 901 N. Benton Drive, Sauk Rapids. Friday, March 20, 5-9 p.m. and Saturday, March 21, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. – 55+ First Time Driving Course. Miller Auto Center Community Room, 2930 Second St. S., St. Cloud. For more information or to register, visit https://www.mnsafetycenter.org or call 1-888234-1294. Friday, March 20, 7 p.m. – The Sons. A blue grass, gospel, country and comedy trio. Riverside Inn Event Center, 118 Third St. S., Cold Spring. Call 320-6854539 for tickets. Saturday, March 21, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. – Repairing and Restoring Old Windows. Presented by Rethos: Places Reimagined in partnership with the Minnesota Historical Society. Join specialist Paul Schmidt. The Nunnery, 201 Third Ave. S., St. Cloud. For questions, contact Ann Marie Johnson at centralmn@rethos.org or at 320-632-4007. Saturday, March 21, 1-2:30 p.m. – Artaria String Quartet. Sponsored by the St. Cloud Friends of the Library. Great River Regional Library, 1300 W. St. Germain St., St. Cloud. Saturday, March 21, 1-5 p.m. – Brad Harrison Benefit. Sloppy joe meal, raffles, silent auction and Saintrio band. Mr. Jim’s, 840 Highway 23, Foley. Saturday, March 21, 5-7 p.m. – Bean Bag Tournament and Soup Supper. Presented by Old Bats for Random Acts organization. All proceeds used to help neighboring families in need. Ramey Church Hall, 34238 Nature Road, Foley. Contact 320-980-3531 or 507-438-7315 for more information. Saturday, March 21, 7 p.m. – The Sons. A blue grass, gospel, country and comedy trio. Riverside Inn Event Center, 118 Third St. S., Cold Spring. Call 320-6854539 for tickets. Sunday, March 22, 1 p.m. – Ham Bingo. Sponsored by Sacred Heart Festival Committee. Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 2875 10th Ave. N.E., Sauk Rapids.

.

.. D E v o m e V ’ e W

, 2020 1 y r a u r b e F f o As tion s at our new loca Look for u usiness Center B s id p a R k u a S in the e 135 2 2nd Ave S, Suit 56379 Sauk Rapids, MN



Page 12 | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | SAUK RAPIDS HERALD • Business • Auto • Home • Farm • Life • Health • COMPETITIVE RATES • EXCELLENT SERVICE • FLEXIBLE BILLING • STRONG COMPANIES

Offices in: • ALBANY • HOLDINGFORD • LONG PRAIRIE • SAUK CENTRE • PIERZ • ST. CLOUD • MELROSE

Manea’ss

114 2nd Ave N., Sauk Rapids, MN 320-252-6650 • advantageoneins.com

320.253.8683 • info@maneasmeats.com www.maneasmeats.com

A Proud er Support rm to S f o s Athletic

YO U R H O M E T O W N B A N K

pinecountrybank.com pinecountrybank.com

Septic Systems, Driveways, General Excavation, River Rock, Boulders, Screened Black Dirt, Class #5 Gravel and More.

Rice, MN • 320-393-2160

www.saldanaexcavating.com Quality Service

50 year in business Since 196 s 9

Protecting Your Today... Insuring Your Tomorrow

(320) 251-2552 www.tri-countyinsurance.net

We Support Hours: Mon-Fri 6 am ‘til 8 pm Our Sat 7 am ‘til 8 pm | Sun 8 am ‘til 6 pm Storm! w 214 2nd Ave N., Sauk Rapids w. roc 320.281.5713 kcre ekcoffeehouse.com

320-764-1000 320-253-7878 HWY 55 - Watkins

HWY 10 - St. Cloud

WARNING: The Polaris RANGER® can be hazardous to operate and is not intended for on-road use. Driver must be at least 16 years old with a valid driver’s license to operate. Passengers must be at least 12 years old. Drivers and passengers should always wear helmets, eye protection, and seat belts. Always use cab nets or doors (as equipped). Never engage in stunt driving, and avoid excessive speeds and sharp turns. Riding and alcohol/drugs don’t mix. All drivers should take a safety training course. Call 800-342-3764 for additional information. Check local laws before riding on trails. ©2018 Polaris Industries Inc.

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

New Menu Daily Food Specials!

320-252-0451

736 S Benton Drive • Sauk Rapids Mon.-Thurs. 11 am - 2 am • Fri.-Sun. 10 am - 2 am

110 First Street South, Sauk Rapids, MN 320-252-2141 Store Hours: Open 24 Hours, 7 Days a Week

Auto - Home - Renters Business - Life - Health

Ryan Stack Michael Opsahl Paul Nordquist

114 Division Street, Sauk Rapids (320) 259-8178 • (800) 599-9866 mopsahl@twfg.com • www.twfgmn.net

1287 2nd St. N., Ste. 201 P.O. Box 215 Sauk Rapids, MN320.253.5175 800.252.5175 www.svbltd.com

Your purpose is our passion.

Sam Lieser 22 N Benton Dr, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 | 320-248-6872 SamLieser.com • SamLieser@EdinaRealty.com

Steven Baker CPA, Corina Schlichting CPA

Sauk Rapids - Rice

PAUL NEMETH

Good Luck to All Sports Teams!

STEVEN V. BAKER, LTD.

SUPPORTING THE FOLEY FALCONS!

w

eat M WWee support our Storm!

SAUK RAPIDS HERALD | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | Page 13

Owner/Operations Manager/Master Electrician Lic.#AM07083 • Contractors Lic. #EA003490

Cell: (320) 250-1023 • Office: (320) 258-5204

702 9TH AVE. S., SAUK RAPIDS, MN 56379

Go Storm!

800-847-2502 • 320-632-2908

www.brandlmotors.com 14873 113th St., Little Falls, MN 56345

603 N Benton Dr, Sauk Rapids

320-251-4771 www.dandbautobody.biz

SAUK RAPIDS HARDWARE HANK

8 N Benton Drive, Sauk Rapids, MN (320)-251-5383 www.wipplerhardware.com

Choir PHOTOS SUBMITTED

The 2019-20 Sauk Rapids-Rice High School concert choir includes Lucy Ahles (front, from left), Alexis Mesenbrink, Emma Brown, Bailey Bauer, Zoey Oehmen, Logan Culbertson, Alexander Bradley, Caedyn Menden-Sautbine, Hanna Lauderbaugh, Isabella Kohout, Callie Pakkala, Bryne Miller and Ellie Fedor; (second row, from left) Live Odegard, Emma Heying, Lexie Leen, Allie Van Heel, Leslie Francis, Kody Duffy, Oliver Rittmann, Daylan Mick, Kyan Robideau-Turk, Nicholas Chantry, Lauren Liebl, Madeline Neussendorfer, Josie Roering, Kathryn Stiegel and Morgan Paulson; (third row, from left) Ester Parks, Emma Johnson, Macy Castilleja, Natalie Gerads, Aneleise Martinson, Nicole Agre, Melissa Dickerson, Dylan Braucks, Reece Becker, Ryan Burgardt, Derek Durant, Lilianna Martini, Carter Hammerel, AnnieMae Westergren, Hailey Arnold, Sydnee Wick, Bethany Mears, Heidi Danielson and Elisabeth Julius; (back, from left) Savanna Youngren, Mary Bromenschenkel, Chloe Zeiszler, Emily Schloe, Lily Groover, Jenna Crnkovic, Travis Johnson, Caleb Euteneuer, Uriah Cook, William Nielsen, Dominic Kapinos, Bryant Neumann, Noah Rosenberger, Jaidev Lachmansingh, Jacob Blackmore, Bryce Paulson, Drew Burling, Alison Thomas, Kaitlyn Lewis, Alyssa Tasto, Alexa Martin and Kennedy Pederson.

(320) 252-9972 | Fax (320) 253-4160 1428 2nd St. No., PO Box 660, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 WWW.STJSK.C OM

Band Family Owned & Operated Since 1978

The Haller Team, SUPPORTS ALL STORM ACTIVITIES. GO STORM

Dave Anderson Realtor

320.249.7026

DAnderson@HallerRealtyHomes.com www.HallerRealtyHomes.com

1310 2ND STREET NORTH SAUK RAPIDS, MN 56379

Come see why Motor Works Auto is Central MN’s #1 in Auto Service! • Computer Diagnostics • Tune Ups • Air Conditioning/Heating • Oil Changes • TransmissionEmergency Repairs 24 Hour • Exhaust Repair & Replacements Services • Brakes • Tires and more!

Sheet Metal & Heating, Inc. WHATEVER IT TAKES Mon–Fri: 7:30 am - 5:30 pm

5 Time Recipient for Medal of Excellence

320.253.2262

Call for Free 2 Estimate!

Residential/Commercial • Sales • Service • Installation • Heating & Air Conditioning

Benton Dr. S

www.lyonheating.com

Sauk Rapids, MNDr., 56379 235 Stearns Sauk Rapids 320.252.1371

The 2019-20 Sauk Rapids-Rice High School concert band includes Aiden Smith (front, from left), Alexander Bradley, Hayle Buttweiler, Josie Miller, Julia Moreno, Macy Castilleja, Elizabeth Julius and Bryce Paulson; (second row, from left) Jack Weber, Lilli Berger, Lauren Liebl, Kennedy Pederson, Mary Bromenschenkel, Daylan Mick, Rhiannon Rubel, Anneka Meinke, Emma Athmann and Braedyn Leeb; (third row, from left) Maddison Maanum, Natalie Stiegel, Drew Burling, Dakota Hoeschen, Allyson Carstensen-Boe, Aneleise Martinson, Alexis Mesenbrink, Emma Johnson, Catherine Gilbertson, Audrey Morehouse, Elizabeth Cecil and William McKeever; (fourth row, from left) Kathryn Stiegel, Trinity Gill, Logan Lauderbaugh, Gloria Christianson, Esther Parks, Jacob Willie, Abigail Neisen, Adam Burton, Ryan Burgardt, Andrew Dusek, Audrey Tindal, Isaac Theis, Nicole Agre, Christian Iriarte and Dylan Boock; (fifth row, from left) Chloe Morrow, Olivia Macdonald, Madeline Neussendorfer, Morgan Paulson, Gavin Ogden, Jacob Wallin, David Stamm, Lucy Ahles, Carter Eckblad, Nicolas Chantry, Bryant Neumann, Tanner Janaszak and Ben Gilbertson; (back, from left) Aiden Morehouse, Caleb Wang, Gabriela Lietz, Elise Fedor, Bethany Mears, Aaron Reichard, Alex Sevre, Logan Eck, Bradley Kothman, Eric Maurus, Jayden Salzer Gibbs, Jacob Blackmore, Heidi Danielson, Hillarie Markfort, Simon Rosenberg and Bailey Ostendorf.

Show your love with life insurance. Tony Jarousek Agency 320-202-8688

Locations in St Cloud and Sauk Rapids

Life insurance offered through Allstate Life Insurance Company and Allstate Assurance Co., 3075 Sanders Road, Northbrook, IL 60062, and American Heritage Life Insurance Co., 1776 American Heritage Life Drive, Jacksonville, FL 32224. In New York, life insurance offered through Allstate Life Insurance Co. of New York, Hauppauge, NY. © 2018 Allstate Insurance Co.

GO STORM!

Go Storm! Supporting the Storm!

ACCEPT ING NEW CLIENTS! E

SINC

Stop in and try our great menu ! 320.253.0208 » 22 2nd Ave. N., Sauk Rapids, MN www.jimmyspourhouse.net

25 years of Experience!

Go storm!

320-774-2035 • www.k-kcpa.com 1139 Franklin Ave., Ste. 3, Sauk Rapids, MN

Commercial & Residential Services

Proud Supporter of the Sauk Rapids-Rice Boys Swim & Dive Team

10 Main St. East • Rice, MN • 320-393-9154

LAUNDROMAT & TANNING

torm! Good Luck SOPEN DAILY 15 North 2nd Ave. Sauk Rapids, MN www.washntan.com 320.259.0882

Laundry 6 am-9 pm Tanning 8 am-9 pm

Complete Plumbing Service and Repair 320-387-3540 St. Cloud Area

www.freds-plumbing.com

www.swcocpas.com St. Cloud • Albany • Little Falls • Monticello • Maple Lake

Working with People, not just Numb3rs

320.251.0286


NEWS

Page 14 | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | SAUK RAPIDS HERALD

Bringing the state online Broadband internet project receives significant grant BY EVAN MICHEALSON STAFF WRITER

of Benton Economic Partnership. “There are pockets of Benton County that don’t have reliFOLEY – The Bor- able broadband.” der-to-Border BroadThe last-mile projband Development Pro- ect’s cost exceeds $2.7 gram was initiated by million, but with a local the Minnesota Depart- match of over $1.7 milment of Employment lion Benton Communicaand Economic Devel- tions can afford to reach opment with the goal the state’s solidified inof bringing high-speed ternet speed goals. Walz internet to the lacking and the state of Minneareas of Minnesota. sota have set a mark for Minnesota Gov. Tim the end of 2022: Every Walz announced the lat- residence and business est push in that direc- in the state will have action Jan. 21, with DEED cess to download and upawarding a cumulative load speeds of 25 Mbps. total upwards of $23 With Benton Commillion to 30 broadband munications’ ability to projects across the Land offer higher speeds as of 10,000 Lakes. is, the belief is this stateIncludwide goal is ed in that more than atsubstantial tainable. project list “ O u r is Ramey minimum Phase I, a package is last-mile offering 25 project (Mbps), but bringing fiwe’ll be caber-optic inpable to offer ternet con250 (Mbps) nection to if needed,” areas of the said Cheryl Alberta and Scapanski, John Uphoff Granite Ledge town- general manager of Benships in Benton Coun- ton Communications. ty, along with sections “If the customer wants of Morrison and Mille 250-megabit service, we Lacs counties. would be able to offer Benton Communi- that.” cations, a Rice-based The necessity for eft e l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s ficient internet speeds is provider, will install a growing even in rural arfiber hookup, allowing eas. Whether it is checkspeeds of 25 megabits- ing market availability per-second download and equipment prices in and upload speeds to agriculture or working 253 households, nine from home, the grant businesses, two town program seeks to solve halls and 97 farms frustrations and make within the Ramey ILEC life easier for those in exchange. the underserved portions “I think anybody of Minnesota. that’s doing business toCheryl Pick, direcday needs to be on the tor of food services at internet, whether they’re Foley Public Schools, a farmer or small busi- lives in Morrill Townness owner regardless ship in Morrison County of where they are,” said in the heart of the Ramey John Uphoff, executive ILEC exdirector

PHOTO SUBMITTED

A construction crew clears the way for cables in spring 2019 in Benton County. Benton Communications will be hooking up fiber-optic internet of at least 25 megabits-persecond in both Alberta and Granite Ledge townships.

The last-mile project’s cost exceeds $2.7 million, but with a local match of over $1.7 million Benton Communications can afford to reach the state’s solidified internet speed goals. change. Her position requires regular access to the internet, meaning the stability of her connection is a priority. “It plays a huge part in my life because at times I need to do things at home for my position I have for the district,” Pick said. “We do our food ordering online and also have other programs online that our important to the child nutrition program. That’s huge.” The ideal benefits for the program extend past occupations. According to data from the National Center for Education statistics, 33% of postsecondary students study in at least one distance learning course, meaning much of curriculum can be found online.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

An internet cable runs across the ground in spring 2019 in Benton County. By 2022, the state of Minnesota wants every business and home to receive access to highspeed internet service.

like Pick, who often face the wrath of sluggish internet speeds, the push for connectivity in all state sectors comes at a societal junction where Greater Minnesota is lacking the resources necessary to thrive. “There are times As a result, there is when depending on the an increased emphasis to place broadband service inside every household in the same vein as electricity or other utilities. “Today, internet access is no different than any other utility whether it’s electric or gas,” Uphoff said. “We need to get to the point where we understand that as a society either it gets funded the same way as the electrification process, or we continue to step in (with) local providers where the big ISPs (internet service providers) out there don’t seem to provide service.” The grant program is in its fifth year and has introduced broadband internet access to 49,900 homes and businesses in the state. It was bolstered by results from 2019’s legislative session when Walz placed his signature on onetime funds of over $40 million devoted towards the program’s broadband infrastructure endeavors. Benton Communications has been involved in the program from its introduction, with the recent grant total marking their fifth in as many years. “This would be our largest grant received to date,” Scapanski said. “Our company has committed to get increase speeds to all members and customers in the area.” And for residents

connection where we don’t have internet,” Pick said. “I think people would benefit from high speed internet. It would probably make their jobs easier because people look at technology so much now. It’s part of everyone’s life. There’s some things you can’t do unless you do it online.” Not all will be said and done when 2022 comes around. The state is aiming for even higher speeds within a successive four-year period, with download and upload speeds goals set for a minimum of 100 Mbps come 2026. Goal-setting has marked a path forward for several regions across the state, including Benton County. “The county should have some standard to be set; like, ‘OK, we want whatever this upload and download speed is,’” Uphoff said. “Then, the question becomes, ‘What can we do to help support that? What can the county do to move things along?’”


SAUK RAPIDS HERALD | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | Page 15 PHOTOS BY NATASHA BARBER

The commons of the Sauk Rapids-Rice High School is filled with students prior to the Speech Madness competition March 7 in Sauk Rapids. Twenty-seven schools entered roughly 600 students in the event.

Speech team ranks fourth at home meet

13 students place individually BY NATASHA BARBER STAFF WRITER

SAUK RAPIDS – Nooks and crannies of the Sauk Rapids-Rice High School were filled with high school speech participants as the Storm hosted Speech Madness March 7 in Sauk Rapids. Participants were found under stairwells, in hallways and between locker banks as they practiced their pieces for competition in the minutes leading up to the meet. The Sauk RapidsRice speech team placed fourth of 27 schools and roughly 600 students who performed at the home meet. “Our home speech meet went really well,” said Joanie Hauck, head speech coach. “Not only did the students compete with amazing professionalism, but their scores were top notch.” Speech, a Minnesota State High School League sponsored activity, consists of 13 competitive categories: creative expression, discussion, duo interpretation, improv duo acting,

SRR individual results:

- Bryce Paulson received second place in serious prose interpretation. - Lucy Ahles and Bryce Paulson received third place in duo interpretation. - Alexander Bradley received third place in great speeches. - Ellie Fedor received third place in storytelling. - Divya Subramaniam received third place (next-in) in duo interpretation. - Hannah Waytashek and Morgan Paulson received third place in improv duo acting. - Elizabeth Julius and Morgan Paulson received sixth place in duo interpretation. - Sara Gama received sixth place (next in) in original oratory. - Margaret Julius and Lillian Kuhn received seventh place in duo interpretation. - Bryce Paulson and Macy Castilleja received next-in finals in improv duo acting. - Ellie Fedor and Abigail Nelson received honorable mention in improv duo acting. - Hannah Waytashek received honorable mention in discussion. extemporaneous reading, extemporaneous speaking, great speeches, humorous interpretation, informative speaking, original oratory, serious drama interpretation, serious poetry interpretation, serious prose interpretation and storytelling. Students memorize pieces and perform them

Sophomores Lucy Ahles (left) and Bryce Paulson rehearse an excerpt of “A Monster Calls” in the locker banks March 7 at the Sauk Rapids-Rice High School in Sauk Rapids. The two placed third in duo interpretation at the Storm’s home meet Speech Madness.

in front of judges. Each category has specific rules and regulations. Due to the size of the SRR event, two sets of finalists are named and compete against each other. A top seven are named and then the remaining are named nextStudents rehearse for the Speech Madness competition March 7 in the halls of Sauk in top six. Rapids-Rice High School in Sauk Rapids. Many students performed in front of walls rather than peer audiences.

Elizabeth Julius and Morgan Paulson perform an excerpt from “The Emperor’s New Groove” March 7 prior to the Speech Madness competition at Sauk Rapids-Rice High School in Sauk Rapids. The two perform in duo interpretation and have a combined total of 10 years of A group of students compete in the discussion category of speech March 7 at Speech Madness in Sauk Rapids. In discussion, the group looks to problem solve and reach consensus through the exchange of facts and interpretations. experience in speech.



NEWS/PUBLIC NOTICES

SAUK RAPIDS HERALD | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | Page 17

Math Masters compete at SRRMS Schools places multiple students in top 20 SAUK RAPIDS – Sauk Rapids-Rice Middle School in conjunction with Math Masters hosted the 2020 Math Masters Competition Feb. 28 at the school in Sauk Rapids. Over 100 students, represented six area schools, registered to compete in the three-hour event. Twenty-one teams competed on eight sets of mathematical problems in the competition. SRRMS gave a strong effort as the team of Elka Sowada, Grace Thompson, Grace Smith, Taylor Janorschke and Brandon Miskowic finished in seventh place. In the fact drill portion, Taylor Janorschke and Mason Meyer-Thovson tied for 12th, and Grace Thompson and Leah Roesch tied for 17th. Individually, Grace Thompson placed 15th and Brandon Miskowic placed 19th. Math Masters began as a fifth-grade math competition program in 1989 with teams from 44 schools taking part. In 1995, the competition expanded to include sixth grade students, and this year there were approximately 5,500 fifth and sixth graders registered to compete at over 40 sites in Colorado, Minnesota and Wisconsin. Schools are encouraged to involve as many of their fifth and sixth grade students as possible in the use of the Math Masters packet of challenge preparation materials. A team selection test is provided to assist coaches in choosing students to represent their schools. Math Masters is designed to promote critical thinking and problem-solving abilities as well as provide recognition to students for academic effort and achievement.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

The 2020 Sauk Rapids-Rice Math Masters Team – Elka Sowada (front); (middle, from left) Brandon Miskowic, Grace Thompson, Taylor Janorschke, Grace Smith, Abby Burke and Dominic Thompson; (back, from left) Mason MeyerThovson, Levi Brenny, Trystan Getinger, Leah Roesch, Alicia Hovanes, Sophia Sinclair, Alexis Swanson, Luke Wiebe and coach Brad Rohlfs – gather Feb. 28 for competition at the Sauk Rapids-Rice Middle School in Sauk Rapids. The group includes fifth and sixth grade mathletes.

Public Notice

Public Notice ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS RECLAMATION AND WIDENING OF 105th St. NW WATAB TOWNSHIP, BENTON COUNTY, MINNESOTA Sealed proposals for the furnishing of all labor, materials and equipment for the reclamation and widening and bituminous surfacing of 3150 LF of 105TH St NW in WaTab Township, Benton County, will be received by the Watab Township Board of Supervisors at the Watab Township Hall, 660 75th St. NW, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379, until 7:00 pm on Tuesday April 7th, 2020. Shortly thereafter, at 7:15 pm bids will be opened at a regular Town Board Meeting and publicly read aloud. Major Items of work are: Common excavation 700 CY Pavement Reclamation 7,658 SY Type SP 12.5 Non-Wear Course Mix 1,253 Ton Granular Borrow 840 CY Aggregate Base Cl 5 2,032 Ton Erosion, sediment control and turf establishment items. The contract is a unit price contract and is described in detail in the Project Manual. All work included in the contract shall be completed

THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. Date: March 11, 2020 YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT: 1. Default has occurred in the conditions of that certain mortgage executed by and between Rodney T. Bemboom, as mortgagor, and Falcon National Bank, 183 Cedar Drive, Foley, Minnesota 56329, as mortgagee, dated February 22, 2018 and filed for record on March 2, 2018, as document number 428039, with the Office of the County Recorder in and for Benton County, Minnesota. 2. The mortgage has been assigned as follows: n/a 3. The original principal amount secured

within 20 working days of date of commencement as stated in the Notice to Proceed or by Aug. 14, 2020 whichever occurs first. Project Plans and Documents Proposal Forms, Contract Documents, Plans and Specifications as prepared by Bogart, Pederson & Associates, Inc., Civil Engineer, are on file in the office of said Engineer located at 13076 First Street, Becker, MN 55308. Copies of the specifications, bid documents, and plans for use by Contractors in submitting a bid may be downloaded at: https://www.questCDN.com for a $15.00 fee. Plans and specs are also available at: Bogart, Pederson & Associates, Inc.at the address listed above for a printed copy fee of $100.00. Bid documents obtained by any other means or from any other website may result in bids being rejected due to lack of response to project addendums, if any. The Township Board reserves the right to waive any informalities or to reject any or all bids or accept an individual component thereof. Each Bid must be accompanied by a Bid Bond in an amount equal to 5% of the total bid. Julie Johnson, Chair, Watab Twp. R-11-2B

NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE by the mortgage was: Range Thirty (30) $112,033.52. West, Fourth Principal 4. No action or Meridian, Benton County, proceeding at law is now Minnesota. pending to recover the debt Street Address: 3545 Little secured by the mortgage, or Rock Road NE, Sauk any part thereof. Rapids, MN 56379 5. The holder of the T a x - P a r c e l mortgage has complied with Identification Number: 07all conditions precedent 00101-00 to acceleration of the debt and will be sold by the secured by the mortgage and Sheriff of Benton County, foreclosure of the mortgage Minnesota at public auction and all notice and other on Tuesday, May 5, 2020, requirements of applicable at 10:00 o’clock a.m., at the statutes. Office of the Benton County 6. As of the date of Sheriff, 581 State Highway this notice, the amount due 23, Foley, Minnesota 56329. on the mortgage, and taxes, if 8. The time allowed any, paid by the holder of the by law for redemption of mortgage is: $119,481.26. mortgagor or mortgagor’s 7. Pursuant to personal r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s the power of sale in the or assigns is twelve (12) mortgage, the mortgage will months after the date of sale. be foreclosed on the land 9. The date on or described as follows: before which the mortgagor The Northwest or mortgagor’s personal Quarter (NW 1/4) of representatives or assigns Section Nine (9), Township must vacate the property Thirty-seven (37) North, if the mortgage is not

reinstated under Minn. Stat. § 580.30 or the property is not redeemed under Minn. Stat. § 580.23 is May 5, 2021, at 11:59 p.m. If the foregoing date is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, then the date to vacate is the next business day at 11:59 p.m. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Falcon National Bank, Mortgagee LATHROP GPM By: /s/ Andrew J. Steil Andrew J. Steil #387048 1010 West St. Germain Street Suite 500 St. Cloud, MN 56301 (320) 252-4414 Attorneys for Falcon National Bank R-11-6B

SAUK RAPIDS-RICE INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 47 SPECIAL BOARD MEETING Wednesday, February 19, 2020 A Special meeting of the Sauk Rapids-Rice ISD 47 Board of Education was called to order by Chair Butkowski Wednesday, February 19, 2020 at seven o’clock p.m. in the District Office Board Room. ROLL CALL Members present included Braun, Butkowski, Hauck, Holthaus, Loidolt, Morse, and Solarz. Others present were Interim Director of Human Resources and Administrative Services Watkins, Director of Business Services Johnson, Director of Teaching and Learning Bushman, Director of Buildings and Grounds Berghuis, Director of Community Education Wilke, SRRHS Principal Nohner, Interim SRRMS Principal Messerich, MHES Principal Peterson, Rice Principal Paasch, and PV Principal Froiland. APPROVAL OF MEETING AGENDA A motion was made by Hauck, seconded by Braun and unanimously carried to approve the meeting’s “Agenda”. SPECIAL BUSINESS Superintendent Candidates It was recommended the School Board accept the slate of candidates for first round interviews as agreed upon. The first round of candidates will be interviewed on February 20, beginning at 4:00 p.m. in the District Office Board Room. ACTION ADOPTION OF THE RESOLUTION APPROVING THE SLATE OF CANDIDATES FOR SUPERINTENDENT INTERVIEW Resolution to Accept Initial Candidates for Interviews Superintendent of Schools Sauk Rapids-Rice Public Schools On this 19th Day of February, 2020 A motion was made by Holthaus, seconded by Morse Be it Resolved, that following the review of the Superintendent candidate pool by the Sauk Rapids-Rice Board of Education and facilitated by Dr. Ken Dragseth (School Exec Connect), the Board of Education accepts and approves the following slate of candidates for initial interviews for the position of the Superintendent of Schools. Initial interviews will take place on Thursday, February 20, 2020. Candidate A Bradley Bergstrom Candidate B Timothy Truebenbach Candidate C Kristine Wehrkamp Candidate D Paul Neubauer Candidate E Dr. Ryan Laager Voting For: Hauck, Loidolt, Braun, Butkowski, Solarz, Holthaus, Morse Voting Against: None ADJOURNMENT With no further business appearing before the Board, a motion was made by Holthaus, seconded by Morse and unanimously carried to adjourn the meeting at 8:19 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Lisa J. Braun, Board of Education Clerk Sauk Rapids-Rice ISD 47 R-11-1B


NEWS/PUBLIC NOTICES

Page 18 | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | SAUK RAPIDS HERALD

NOTICE OF VOLUNTARY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO $52,152.00 VERIFICATION OF THE AMOUNT DUE DEBT AND IDENTITY AND CLAIMED TO BE OF THE ORIGINAL DUE AS OF DATE OF CREDITOR WITHIN THE NOTICE, INCLUDING TIME PROVIDED BY LAW TAXES, IF ANY, PAID IS NOT AFFECTED BY BY MORTGAGEE: THIS ACTION. $30,057.06 NOTICE IS HEREBY That prior to the GIVEN, that default has commencement of this occurred in conditions of mortgage foreclosure the following described proceeding Mortgagee/ mortgage: Assignee of Mortgagee DATE OF complied with all notice MORTGAGE: October 3, requirements as required 2016 by statute; That no action MORTGAGOR: Sarah or proceeding has been P. Leonard, unmarried. instituted at law or otherwise MORTGAGEE: U.S. to recover the debt secured Bank National Association. by said mortgage, or any part DATE AND PLACE OF thereof; RECORDING: Recorded PURSUANT to the October 25, 2016 Benton power of sale contained in County Recorder, Document said mortgage, the above No. 419070. described property will be ASSIGNMENTS OF sold by the Sheriff of said MORTGAGE: NONE county as follows: TRANSACTION DATE AND TIME OF AGENT: NONE SALE: April 30, 2020 at T R A N S A C T I O N 10:00 AM AGENT’S MORTGAGE PLACE OF SALE: I D E N T I F I C A T I O N Benton County Sheriff’s NUMBER ON Office, 581 Highway 23 MORTGAGE: NONE Northeast Foley, MN LENDER OR BROKER to pay the debt then secured AND MORTGAGE by said Mortgage, and taxes, ORIGINATOR STATED ON if any, on said premises, and MORTGAGE: U.S. Bank the costs and disbursements, National Association including attorneys’ fees R E S I D E N T I A L allowed by law subject to MORTGAGE SERVICER: redemption within twelve U.S. Bank National (12) months from the date of Association said sale by the mortgagor(s), M O R T G A G E D their personal representatives PROPERTY ADDRESS: or assigns unless reduced to 6780 Town Hall Road Five (5) weeks under MN Northeast, Sauk Rapids, MN Stat. §580.07. 56379 TIME AND DATE TO TAX PARCEL I.D. #: VACATE PROPERTY: If 070048700 and 070048600 the real estate is an ownerLEGAL DESCRIPTION occupied, single-family OF PROPERTY: dwelling, unless otherwise SITUATED IN provided by law, the date BENTON COUNTY, on or before which the M I N N E S O T A , mortgagor(s) must vacate the DESCRIBED AS property if the mortgage is FOLLOWS: LOTS 1 AND not reinstated under section 2, BLOCK 1, MOLITOR 580.30 or the property is ESTATES, BENTON not redeemed under section COUNTY, MINNESOTA. 580.23 is 11:59 p.m. on April SUBJECT TO ALL 30, 2021, unless that date E A S E M E N T S , falls on a weekend or legal C O V E N A N T S , holiday, in which case it is the C O N D I T I O N S , next weekday, and unless the RESERVATIONS, LEASES redemption period is reduced AND RESTRICTIONS OF to 5 weeks under MN Stat. RECORD, ALL LEGAL Secs. 580.07 or 582.032. HIGHWAYS, ALL RIGHTS M O R T G A G O R ( S ) OF WAY, ALL ZONING, RELEASED FROM BUILDING AND OTHER FINANCIAL OBLIGATION LAWS, ORDINANCES ON MORTGAGE:None AND REGULATIONS, ALL Dated: February 26, 2020 RIGHTS OF TENANTS IN U.S. Bank National POSSESSION, AND ALL Association REAL ESTATE TAXES Mortgagee/Assignee of AND ASSESSMENTS NOT Mortgagee YET DUE AND PAYABLE. USSET, WEINGARDEN BEING THE SAME AND LIEBO, P.L.L.P. PROPERTY CONVEYED Attorneys for Mortgagee/ BY DEED RECORDED Assignee of Mortgagee IN DOCUMENT NO. 4500 Park Glen Road #300 371537, OF THE BENTON Minneapolis, MN 55416 COUNTY, MINNESOTA (952) 925-6888 RECORDS. 17 - 19-008241 FC COUNTY IN WHICH THIS IS A PROPERTY IS LOCATED: C O M M U N I C A T I O N Benton FROM A DEBT O R I G I N A L COLLECTOR. PRINCIPAL AMOUNT R-10-6B OF MORTGAGE: Deluxe Pre-Finished - Zero Maintenance Storage Building ALL MATERIAL - ALL LABOR - ALL CONCRETE

Deluxe Storage Building 32x40x10 EVERYTHING INCLUDED

$29,900

ADD Interior Liner Steel & Insulation $8,619.00

Delivery included within 100 miles from Verndale

Other Sizes Available

SCHEDULE NOW FOR SPRING/SUMMER CONSTRUCTION These buildings meet the new building codes

JR CONSTRUCTION

Tel 218-631-1947 • 218-639-0732 • JRCONSTRUCTIONMN.COM • ND #43659 • MN LIC #BC270437

Storm Strong campaign wins Gold American Advertising Award SAUK RAPIDS – The Sauk Rapids-Rice Storm Strong campaign that was introduced to the student body, staff and faculty during the 2019 calendar year has earned a Gold American Advertising Award. WhiteBox Marketing, the marketing agency hired to create the new Storm logo, marketing collateral and campaign videos, submitted the work for judgement and accepted the award Feb. 29 at the College of St. Benedict in St. Joseph. “We have been very pleased with the messaging captured by WhiteBox Marketing for the Storm Strong campaign,” said Aaron Sinclair, superintendent of Sauk Rapids-Rice Public Schools. “Seeing our own staff, students and teachers talk about the strength of the Storm has been amazing, and it served to unite both us and the community

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Carrie Karki (from left), owner of WhiteBox Marketing of St. Cloud, along with team members Rachael Witt, Alison Fischer, Abbey Stemper and Jayme Donovan cheer to being the recipients of a Gold American Advertising Award at a banquet Feb. 29 at the College of St. Benedict in St. Joseph. The firm received the award for their Storm Strong campaign which highlights Sauk Rapids-Rice Public Schools.

as we build a brighter future through the passed referendum votes and the school’s strategic plan.” The annual American Advertising Awards is hosted by the American Advertising Federation

of Central Minnesota and serves to recognize the talent of local marketers and advertisers who submit their work for professional judging. WhiteBox Marketing is a privately-owned

marketing firm located in downtown St. Cloud. Founder and owner, Carrie Karki, is a Sartell resident who has been in the marketing industry for more than 20 years.

Public Notice NOTICE OF VOLUNTARY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that default has occurred in conditions of the following described mortgage: DATE OF MORTGAGE: July 17, 2007 MORTGAGOR: Sergio Sulier and Mindy Suzanne Sulier fka Mindy Suzanne Scott, husband and wife. MORTGAGEE: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for American Brokers Conduit. DATE AND PLACE OF RECORDING: Recorded August 1, 2007 Benton County Recorder, Document No. A350352. ASSIGNMENTS OF MORTGAGE: Assigned to: Aurora Loan Services LLC. Dated April 12, 2011 Recorded May 26, 2011, as Document No. 381852. And thereafter assigned to: Aurora Bank FSB. Dated September 4, 2015 Recorded November 30, 2015, as Document No. 413212. And thereafter assigned to: Selene Finance LP. Dated October 28, 2015 Recorded November 30, 2015, as Document No. 413214. And thereafter assigned to: Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, not in its individual or banking capacity, but solely as trustee for SRMOF II 20111 Trust. Dated October 28, 2015 Recorded November 30, 2015, as Document No. 413215. And thereafter assigned to: Trifera, LLC.

Dated March 3, 2019 Recorded March 11, 2019, as Document No. 434606, and by Corrective Assignment Dated December 20, 2019 Recorded February 4, 2020 Document No. 441157. And thereafter assigned to: Laelia, LLC. Dated March 8, 2019 Recorded March 11, 2019, as Document No. 434607. TRANSACTION AGENT: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. TRANSACTION AGENT’S MORTGAGE I D E N T I F I C AT I O N NUMBER ON M O R T G A G E : 100024200018245395 LENDER OR BROKER AND MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR STATED ON MORTGAGE: American Brokers Conduit RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE SERVICER: Selene Finance LP M O RT G A G E D PROPERTY ADDRESS: 112 5th Avenue South, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 TAX PARCEL I.D. #: R19.00778.00 L E G A L DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 10 except the Southeasterly 2.2 feet thereof, and Lot 9 except the Northwesterly 45 feet thereof, Block 6, Wood, Russell, and Gilman’s Addition to the Town (now city) of Sauk Rapids, according to the plat and survey thereof on file and of record in the office of the County Recorder in and for Benton County, Minnesota. COUNTY IN WHICH PROPERTY IS LOCATED: Benton O R I G I N A L PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE:

$128,000.00 AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE: $173,852.19 That prior to the commencement of this mortgage foreclosure proceeding Mortgagee/ Assignee of Mortgagee complied with all notice requirements as required by statute; That no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said mortgage, or any part thereof; PURSUANT to the power of sale contained in said mortgage, the above described property will be sold by the Sheriff of said county as follows: DATE AND TIME OF SALE: April 30, 2020 at 10:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: Benton County Sheriff’s Office, 581 Highway 23 Northeast Foley, MN to pay the debt then secured by said Mortgage, and taxes, if any, on said premises, and the costs and disbursements, including attorneys’ fees allowed by law subject to redemption within six (6) months from the date of said sale by the mortgagor(s), their personal representatives or assigns unless reduced to Five (5) weeks under MN Stat. §580.07. TIME AND DATE TO VACATE PROPERTY: If the real estate is an owneroccupied, single-family dwelling, unless otherwise provided by law, the date on or before which the mortgagor(s) must vacate the property if the mortgage is not reinstated under section 580.30 or the property is

not redeemed under section 580.23 is 11:59 p.m. on October 30, 2020, unless that date falls on a weekend or legal holiday, in which case it is the next weekday, and unless the redemption period is reduced to 5 weeks under MN Stat. Secs. 580.07 or 582.032. M O RT G A G O R ( S ) RELEASED FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION ON MORTGAGE:None “THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S P E R S O N A L R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES, SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED.” Dated: February 21, 2020 Laelia, LLC Mortgagee/Assignee of Mortgagee USSET, WEINGARDEN AND LIEBO, P.L.L.P. Attorneys for Mortgagee/ Assignee of Mortgagee 4500 Park Glen Road #300 Minneapolis, MN 55416 (952) 925-6888 107 - 18-001464 FC THIS IS A C O M M U N I C AT I O N FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR R-9-6B



PUBLIC NOTICES

Page 20 | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | SAUK RAPIDS HERALD SAUK RAPIDS-RICE INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 47 SPECIAL BOARD MEETING Monday, February 26, 2020 The Board of Education assembled at 5:00 p.m. to observe Superintendent Candidate Bergstrom’s facilitation of a community meeting at the Sauk Rapids Government Center. At 6:15 p.m. the Board of Education assembled with Candidate Bergstrom and Dr. Ken Dragseth socially for dinner at the Old Capital Tavern. At 7:30 p.m. the Special Meeting of the Sauk Rapids-Rice ISD 47 Board of Education, for Candidate Bergstrom’s interview process, was called to order by Chair Butkowski in the District Office Board Room. ROLL CALL Members present included Braun, Butkowski, Hauck, Holthaus, Loidolt, Morse, and Solarz. Others present were Interim Director of Human Resources and Administrative Services Watkins, Director of Teaching and Learning Bushman, Director of Business Services Johnson, Director of Buildings and Grounds Berghuis, Director of Community Education Wilke, SRRHS Assistant Principal Logrono, SRRHS Assistant Principal Wagner, SRRMS Interim Principal Messerich, MHES Principal Peterson, PV Principal Froiland, and Interim Director of Early Childhood Cash. APPROVAL OF MEETING AGENDA A motion was made by Braun, seconded by Morse and unanimously carried to approve the meeting’s “Agenda”. CANDIDATE INTERVIEW Board of Education Interview Process with Bradley Bergstrom This Special Meeting was called to provide an opportunity for members of the public to meet and ask questions of Candidate Bergstrom, a finalist for the position of Superintendent of Schools at the Sauk Rapids Government Center. Following the community portion of the meeting, the Board had dinner with Candidate Bergstrom at Old Capital Tavern, following dinner the Board returned to the District Office Board Room to conduct an interview with Candidate Bergstrom. Community Session 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Members of the public met and asked questions of Candidate Bergstrom at The Sauk Rapids Government Center located at 250 Summit Avenue North, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 Dinner Break 6:15 p.m. – 7:15 p.m. (No Board business will be conducted) Candidate Bergstrom, Dr. Ken Dragseth and the School Board had dinner at Old Capital Tavern located at 2 North Benton Drive, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 School Board Interview 7:30 p.m. Members of the School Board asked questions of Candidate Bergsrom at The District Office Board Room located at 1833 Osauka Road NE, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 ACTION AUTHORIZATION TO ENTER CONTRACT NEGOTIATIONS WITH SUPERINTENDENT CANDIDATE BERGSTROM A motion was made by Butkowski, seconded by Braun to enter contract negotiations with Bradley Bergstrom - finalist candidate for the position of Superintendent of Sauk RapidsRice Public Schools. By a roll call those: Voting For: Holthaus, Morse, Solarz, Braun, Loidolt, Hauck, Bukowski Voting Against: None ADJOURNMENT With no further business appearing before the Board, a motion was made by Morse, seconded by Hauck and unanimously carried to adjourn the meeting at 8:53 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Lisa J. Braun, Board of Education Clerk Sauk Rapids-Rice ISD 47 R-11-1B

City of Sauk Rapids Public Notice Sauk Rapids Seeks Comments on Environmental Assessment for Proposed Conversion of Land and Water Conservation Fund Lands in Sauk Rapids The City of Sauk Rapids is accepting public comments through April 12 on an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Proposed Conversion of Land and Water Conservation Fund Lands at Southside Park and a portion of unnamed land located on the Mississippi in Sauk Rapids that will become a future park. The City proposes to remove a small portion of land (approximately 21,000 square feet) designated as Section 6(f)(3) park land and replace it with comparable land in a different location for the purposes of constructing a building in Southside Park. Southside Park is located near the intersection of 1st Street South and River Avenue South, while the replacement land will be located on River Avenue North immediately north of Municipal Park. In order to construct the building, the underlying land would need to be converted out of Land and Water Conservation Fund status. The remainder of Southside Park would remain Section 6(f)(3) park land. A copy of the EA is available online at: h t t p s : / / w w w. c i . s a u k - r a p i d s . m n . u s / i n d e x . asp?SEC=8D5FFF9B-A710-455E-80D8-7154D7470B85 Additional copies may be requested by calling 320-258-5315. Written comments on the EA must be submitted no later than 10 a.m. Monday, April 13, to the attention of Todd Schultz, Development Director, City of Sauk Rapids, 250 Summit Avenue North, Sauk Rapids. Electronic or e-mail comments may be sent to tschultz@ci.sauk-rapids.mn.us with “Southside Park” in the subject line. Written comments may also be sent by fax to 320-258-5359. R-11-1B

NOTICE OF VOLUNTARY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that default has occurred in conditions of the following described mortgage: DATE OF MORTGAGE: J a n u a r y 27, 2006 MORTGAGOR: Nathan J Knutson, a single adult. MORTGAGEE: Bankvista. DATE AND PLACE OF RECORDING: Recorded February 9, 2006 Benton County Recorder, Document No. A335339. ASSIGNMENTS OF MORTGAGE: Assigned to: Minnesota Housing Finance Agency. Dated January 27, 2006 Recorded February 9, 2006, as Document No. A335340. TRANSACTION AGENT: NONE TRANSACTION AGENT’S MORTGAGE I D E N T I F I C AT I O N NUMBER ON MORTGAGE: NONE LENDER OR BROKER AND MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR STATED ON MORTGAGE: Bankvista RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE SERVICER:

U.S. Bank National Association M O RT G A G E D PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3251 Orchard Avenue Northeast, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 TAX PARCEL I.D. #: 190426000 L E G A L DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: LOT SIX (6), BLOCK TWO (2), FAIRVIEW FARM, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT AND SURVEY THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER IN AND FOR BENTON COUNTY, MINNESOTA. COUNTY IN WHICH PROPERTY IS LOCATED: Benton O R I G I N A L PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE: $130,700.00 AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE: $135,757.79 That prior to the commencement of this mortgage foreclosure proceeding Mortgagee/ Assignee of Mortgagee complied with all notice requirements as required by statute; That no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said mortgage, or any

part thereof; PURSUANT to the power of sale contained in said mortgage, the above described property will be sold by the Sheriff of said county as follows: DATE AND TIME OF SALE: April 14, 2020 at 10:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: Benton County Sheriff’s Office, 581 Highway 23 Northeast Foley, MN to pay the debt then secured by said Mortgage, and taxes, if any, on said premises, and the costs and disbursements, including attorneys’ fees allowed by law subject to redemption within six (6) months from the date of said sale by the mortgagor(s), their personal representatives or assigns unless reduced to Five (5) weeks under MN Stat. §580.07. TIME AND DATE TO VACATE PROPERTY: If the real estate is an owneroccupied, single-family dwelling, unless otherwise provided by law, the date on or before which the mortgagor(s) must vacate the property if the mortgage is not reinstated under section 580.30 or the property is not redeemed under section 580.23 is 11:59 p.m. on October 14, 2020, unless that date falls on a weekend or legal holiday, in which case it is the next weekday, and unless the redemption period is reduced to 5 weeks under MN Stat. Secs. 580.07

or 582.032. MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED FROM F I N A N C I A L OBLIGATION ON MORTGAGE:None “THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S P E R S O N A L R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES, SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED.” Dated: February 12, 2020 Minnesota Housing Finance Agency Mortgagee/Assignee of Mortgagee USSET, WEINGARDEN AND LIEBO, P.L.L.P. Attorneys for Mortgagee/ Assignee of Mortgagee 4500 Park Glen Road #300 Minneapolis, MN 55416 (952) 925-6888 135 - 19-009541 FC THIS IS A C O M M U N I C AT I O N FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. R-8-6B

NOTICE OF VOLUNTARY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that default has occurred in conditions of the following described mortgage: DATE OF MORTGAGE: April 3, 2018 MORTGAGOR: Quentin Markfort and Crystal Markfort, husband and wife. MORTGAGEE: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Everett Financial, Inc. D/B/A Supreme Lending. DATE AND PLACE OF RECORDING: Recorded April 6, 2018 Benton County Recorder, Document No. 428665. ASSIGNMENTS OF MORTGAGE: Assigned to: Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC. Dated January 14, 2020 Recorded February 7, 2020, as Document No. 441194. TRANSACTION AGENT: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. TRANSACTION AGENT’S MORTGAGE I D E N T I F I C AT I O N NUMBER ON M O R T G A G E : 100307110009143509 LENDER OR BROKER

AND MORTGAGE ORIGINATOR STATED ON MORTGAGE: Everett Financial, Inc. D/B/A Supreme Lending RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE SERVICER: M&T Bank M O RT G A G E D PROPERTY ADDRESS: 160 Dewey St, Foley, MN 56329 TAX PARCEL I.D. #: 13.00141.00 L E G A L DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: LOT ONE (1), BLOCK ONE (1), ALSO A STRIP OF LAND 40 FEET WIDE BY 150 FEET LONG, LYING EAST OF LOT 1, BLOCK 1 AND BEING THE WEST HALF (W 1/2) OF FIRST AVENUE (NOW VACATED) IN FOLEY’S REARRANGEMENT OF THE TOWN (NOW CITY) OF FOLEY, BENTON COUNTY, MINNESOTA. COUNTY IN WHICH PROPERTY IS LOCATED: Benton O R I G I N A L PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF MORTGAGE: $108,007.00 AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE: $109,690.23 That prior to the commencement of this mortgage foreclosure proceeding Mortgagee/ Assignee of Mortgagee complied with all notice requirements as required

by statute; That no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said mortgage, or any part thereof; PURSUANT to the power of sale contained in said mortgage, the above described property will be sold by the Sheriff of said county as follows: DATE AND TIME OF SALE: April 7, 2020 at 10:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: Benton County Sheriff’s Office, 581 Highway 23 Northeast Foley, MN to pay the debt then secured by said Mortgage, and taxes, if any, on said premises, and the costs and disbursements, including attorneys’ fees allowed by law subject to redemption within six (6) months from the date of said sale by the mortgagor(s), their personal representatives or assigns unless reduced to Five (5) weeks under MN Stat. §580.07. TIME AND DATE TO VACATE PROPERTY: If the real estate is an owneroccupied, single-family dwelling, unless otherwise provided by law, the date on or before which the mortgagor(s) must vacate the property if the mortgage is not reinstated under section 580.30 or the property is not redeemed under section 580.23 is 11:59 p.m. on October 7, 2020, unless that date falls on a weekend or legal holiday, in which case it is the next weekday, and unless the redemption period

is reduced to 5 weeks under MN Stat. Secs. 580.07 or 582.032. M O RT G A G O R ( S ) RELEASED FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION ON MORTGAGE:None “THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S P E R S O N A L R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES, SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED.” Dated: February 11, 2020 Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC Mortgagee/Assignee of Mortgagee USSET, WEINGARDEN AND LIEBO, P.L.L.P. Attorneys for Mortgagee/ Assignee of Mortgagee 4500 Park Glen Road #300 Minneapolis, MN 55416 (952) 925-6888 37 - 20-001478 FC THIS IS A C O M M U N I C AT I O N FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. R-8-6B


SPORTS/PUBLIC NOTICES

SAUK RAPIDS HERALD | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | Page 21

Collegiate athletics strong for Storm graduates 12 SRR alumni compete in winter sports BY ANNA HINKEMEYER STAFF WRITER

SAUK RAPIDS – Twelve Sauk RapidsRice High School graduates took their athletic careers from the home of the Storm to collegiate athletics that correspond with high school winter sports. The Sauk Rapids Herald features collegiate athletes three times each year following the fall, winter and spring high school sports seasons. Kobe Boraas, son of Kirk Boraas of Minneapolis and Crista and Jake Mrozek of Sauk Rapids, is a guard for the mens basketball team at Augsburg University in Minneapolis. He has earned eight points, three rebounds, two assists and two steals this season. He is a 2016 SRRHS graduate. Jack Grabinski, son of Jes and Michael Grabinski of Sauk Rapids, is a diver for the mens swim and dive team at St. John’s University in Collegeville. In his first season, Grabinski earned second in the 1-meter and 3-meter dives against Gustavus Adolphus College Jan. 25. He also earned top accolades at the 2020 Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference championships Feb. 12-15 at the Jean K. Freeman Aquatics Center at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, taking first in the 3-meter with a score of 505.05 points and second in the 1-meter with a score of 481.7. He is a 2019 SRRHS graduate. Ryan Kawlewski, son of Deb and Gary Kawlewski of Sauk Rapids, is a swimmer with the mens swim and dive team at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter. He specializes in freestyle and individual medley events. At the 2020 MIAC championships, he took sixth in the 500-yard freestyle with a time of 4 minutes, 42.32 seconds, sixth in the 400 individual medley with a time of 4:10.5 and fourth in the 1650

Kobe Boraas

Jack Grabinski

Ryan Kawlewski

Michaela Keller

Tyler Kranz

Cody Landwehr

Megan Mohr

Bailey Roscoe

Andrea Skillingstad

Tommy Steigel

Brooke Torvik

Jayson Valek

freestyle with a time of 16:19.99. Kawlewski is a 2018 SRRHS graduate. Michaela Keller, daughter of Diane and Jeff Keller of Sauk Rapids, is a co-captain of the dance team at St. Cloud State University in St. Cloud. The team competed in the game day competition for the first time at the Universal Dance Association College Nationals in Orlando, Florida, Jan. 31 and earned first in the category. The team also earned second in pom and eighth in jazz. Keller is a 2017 SRRHS graduate. Tyler Kranz, son of Jennifer Kranz of Sauk Rapids, is a forward for the mens basketball team at Augsburg University in Minneapolis. He has tallied 21 points, seven rebounds and two steals for the team this season. He is a 2017 SRRHS graduate. Cody Landwehr, son of Heidi and Aaron Landwehr of St. Cloud, is a forward for the mens basketball team at Bemidji State University in Bemidji. He has 119 points, 82 rebounds, seven assists, five blocks and four steals this season. He is a 2018 SRRHS graduate. Megan Mohr, daughter of Shelly and Chad Mohr of Sauk Rap-

ids, is a defender for the womens hockey team at Concordia College in Moorhead. She has scored three goals and four assists this season. She is a 2017 SRRHS graduate. Bailey Roscoe, daughter of Jennifer and Lane Nord of Sauk Rapids, is a guard for the womens basketball team at Hibbing Community College in Hibbing. She has scored 269 points, 79 rebounds, 33 assists, one block and 30 steals in her inaugural season. Roscoe is a 2019 SRRHS graduate. Andrea Skillingstad, daughter of Diane and Glen Skillingstad of St. Cloud, is a center for the womens basketball team at Mayville State University in Mayville, North Dakota. The team earned the 2020 North Star Athletic Association Conference championship. Skillingstad earned 81 points, 111 rebounds, eight assists, 39 blocks and 13 steals for the team this season. She is a 2016 SRRHS graduate. Tommy Steigel, son of Kirsten and Andy Steigel of Sauk Rapids, is a swimmer for the mens swim and dive team at the University of Wisconsin in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. He specializes in breaststroke, freestyle and relay events.

Steigel has a season-best time of 1:03.64 in the 100 breaststroke from the invite against St. Cloud State University Nov. 9, 2019, a seasonbest time of 2:22.87 in the 200 breaststroke from Nov. 16, 2019, in the St. Thomas University invitational and a season-best 24.07 in the 50 freestyle Nov. 15, 2019, from the St. Thomas University invitational. Steigel is a 2017 SRRHS graduate. Brooke Torvik, daughter of Joyce and Tom Torvik of Rice, is a guard for the womens basketball team at St. Catherine University in St. Paul. She has scored 66 points, 22 rebounds, 12 assists and nine steals this season. Torvik is a 2017 SRRHS graduate. Jayson Valek, son of Cathy and Tim Valek of St. Cloud, is a swimmer for the mens swim and dive team at St. John’s University in Collegeville, specializing in freestyle and butterfly events. At the 2020 MIAC championships, he took 18th in the 50 freestyle with a time of 22.28, 16th in the 100 butterfly with a time of 54.91 and 19th in the 200 butterfly with a time of 2:05.40. Valek is a 2016 SRRHS graduate.

Twins fifth starter battle breakdown With opening day only two weeks away, the Minnesota Twins do not have many question marks left on their roster. This is now a veteran team with surefire starters at almost every position, and there is not a lot of ambiguity around how the 26-man roster will look when the team flies out of Fort Myers, Florida. However, there is one fairly significant position battle by ANDY THAYER that has yet to be decided: Sports Columnist Who will break camp as the team’s fifth starting pitcher? At the start of spring training, there were four main contestants for the fifth starter spot: veteran Jhoulys Chacin, Uber driver extraordinaire Randy Dobnak, soft-tossing southpaw Devin Smeltzer and rookie left-hander Lewis Thorpe. However, in the first round of roster cuts Monday, Thorpe was somewhat surprisingly sent to minor league camp. Thorpe seemingly did not take the news well, posting a since-deleted tweet simply stating, “This is a joke.” However, Thorpe had missed 10 days of camp for personal reasons, and his performance reportedly was not exactly scintillating when he was present. This move makes sense for the Twins, as the 24-year-old probably could use additional work in Triple-A as he works to build endurance and feel for his pitchers after his extended absence. Removing Thorpe from the picture leaves Chacin, Dobnak and Smeltzer as the remaining contenders for the final starting spot. Jhoulys Chacin is a grizzled veteran whose lifeblood is his above-average slider. He was signed to a non-guaranteed minor league contract, which means he would have the option to leave the Twins if he does not make the opening day roster. Chacin had an awful season by anyone’s standards last year, posting a 6.01 ERA, 101 strikeouts and a grotesque 3-12 record in 103.1 innings over 24 starts with the Brewers and Red Sox. However, as recently as 2018, he posted a 3.50 ERA as the Brewers’ de facto ace, so the Twins are hoping he can turn back the clock and recapture the fastball command that allows his slider to become a legitimate out pitch. I am not highly confident that is going to happen for the 32-year-old whose best days might be in the rear-view mirror. Things are not looking great for Chacin thus far, as he allowed six earned runs in eight innings this spring. Randy Dobnak burst onto the scene as an unheralded rookie last summer and ended up starting a playoff game in Yankee Stadium for the Twins. He posted a tidy 1.59 ERA in 28.1 innings of work for the Twins last season, and his sinker-slider combination (and exquisite handlebar mustache) effectively keeps right-handed hitters off balance. Dobnak has posted a rock-solid 2.70 ERA thus far this spring, and if this fifth-starter decision was based solely on performance and likelihood of success, there is no doubt Dobnak would be the guy. Unfortunately for him, he has minor league options remaining and might get sent to Triple-A simply to give the team a chance to see what they have in Chacin while maintaining flexibility moving forward. Finally, Devin Smeltzer is still lingering in the fifth starter mix, although it feels like his odds of winning the spot are pretty slim. He has allowed nine earned runs in 9.1 innings this spring and lacks a goto pitch for putting away opposing hitters. Smeltzer thrives on his pinpoint command, but his lackluster stuff (upper 80s fastball and sweeping curveball) certainly does not scream major league starter to me. Smeltzer also has a minor league option remaining, and I would wager he will be the next pitcher to bow out of this race. Michael Piñeda will return from his suspension in mid-May, so the guys we discussed in this column are going to need to hold down this rotation spot until then. If the Twins can keep their starters healthy for the first couple months of the season, Dobnak and Chacin should be able to hold down the fort. However, if Homer Bailey stumbles out of the gates, or if someone else misses time for whatever reason, this situation is going to get ugly pretty quickly.


Page 22 | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | SAUK RAPIDS HERALD

Public Notice *Public Notice* The Benton County Ditch Authority will conduct a Public Hearing on April 7, 2020 starting at 10:30 in the Benton County Boardroom located at 531 Dewey Street, Foley MN. The Public Hearing is in regards to County Ditch No. 6 located in sections 25, 26, 27, and 28 in Graham Township. The purpose of the Public Hearing is to receive public comment in regards to Engineer’s Report to re-establish the Drainage System records. A copy of the Engineer’s Report is on File at the Benton County Public Works and can be viewed at 7752 Highway 25 NE Foley, MN. The report is also available on the Benton County Website at https://www.co.benton.mn.us/ If you are unable to attend the Public Hearing, you may submit comments in writing. However, to be read into the permanent record the comments must be received by the Auditor-Treasurer’s office before the published date and time of the Hearing. Written comments may be mailed to: Benton County Auditor-Treasurer Attn: County Ditch #6 Comments 531 Dewey St, P.O. Box 129 Foley, MN 56329 Please contact Public Works Director, Chris Byrd with any questions. He can be reached at (320)968-5051. R-11-3B

SAUK RAPIDS-RICE INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 47 SPECIAL BOARD MEETING Monday, February 24, 2020 The Board of Education assembled at 5:00 p.m. to observe Superintendent Candidate Wehrkamp’s facilitation of a community meeting at the Sauk Rapids Government Center. At 6:15 p.m. the Board of Education assembled with Candidate Wehrkamp and Dr. Ken Dragseth socially for dinner at the Old Capital Tavern. At 7:30 p.m. the Special Meeting of the Sauk Rapids-Rice ISD 47 Board of Education, for Candidate Wehrkamp’s interview process, was called to order by Chair Butkowski in the District Office Board Room. ROLL CALL Members present included Braun, Butkowski, Hauck, Holthaus, Loidolt, Morse, and Solarz. Others present were Interim Director of Human Resources and Administrative Services Watkins, Director of Teaching and Learning Bushman, Director of Business Services Johnson, Director of Buildings and Grounds Berghuis, Director of Community Education Wilke. APPROVAL OF MEETING AGENDA A motion was made by Braun, seconded by Morse and unanimously carried to approve the meeting’s “Agenda”. CONSENT AGENDA A motion was made by Holthaus, seconded by Morse and unanimously to approve the meeting’s “Consent Agenda”. CANDIDATE INTERVIEW Board of Education Interview Process with Kristine Wehrkamp This Special Meeting was called to provide an opportunity for members of the public to meet and ask questions of Candidate Wehrkamp, a finalist for the position of Superintendent of Schools at the Sauk Rapids Government Center. Following the community portion of the meeting, the Board had dinner with Candidate Wehrkamp at Old Capital Tavern, following dinner the Board returned to the District Office Board Room to conduct an interview with Candidate Wehrkamp. Community Session 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Members of the public met and asked questions of Candidate Wehrkamp at The Sauk Rapids Government Center located at 250 Summit Avenue North, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 Dinner Break 6:15 p.m. – 7:15 p.m. (No Board business will be conducted) Candidate Wehrkamp, Dr. Ken Dragseth and the School Board had dinner at Old Capital Tavern located at 2 North Benton Drive, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 School Board Interview 7:30 p.m. Members of the School Board asked questions of Candidate Wehrkamp at the District Office Board Room located at 1833 Osauka Road NE, Sauk Rapids, MN 56379 ADJOURNMENT Upon completion of the interview with Candidate Wehrkamp and with no further business appearing before the Board, a motion was made by Holthaus, seconded by Morse and carried by a margin of five (Solarz and Loidolt stepped out) to adjourn the meeting at 8:42 p.m. Respectfully submitted, Lisa J. Braun, Board of Education Clerk Sauk Rapids-Rice ISD 47 R-11-1B

SPORTS

Lumberjacks drop weekend series to end regular season Granite City has lost nine of last 14 games BY EVAN MICHEALSON STAFF WRITER

When the Granite City Lumberjacks punched their ticket to the 2020 Fraser Cup Playoffs with a 7-1 win over the Willmar Warhawks Jan. 26, they were positioned to not only make waves in the playoffs but also conquer the West Division title. A 3-7 slump since that fateful win, however, has drastically altered the Lumberjacks’ playoff position as the 2019-20 NA3HL regular season wraps up. They went 0-2 against the North Iowa Bulls over the weekend. North Iowa 5, Granite City 2 The regular season finale for the Lumberjacks summed up a dismal finish to the season for the three-time NA3HL champions. They fought hard, winning several puck battles and putting pressure on their opponent, firing 25 shots on net. They even held an electrifying offensive team to an 0-5 mark on the power play. And yet, despite all of those positives, Granite City closed out its regular season with a 5-2 stumble to the Bulls March 7 at Sports Arena East in Sauk Rapids. “I thought we played pretty well,” said D.J. Vold, Lumberjacks associate head coach. “Obviously, we would love a different result, but at the same time, I think we took a step forward going into the playoffs. Overall, I wasn’t upset with the effort; I just would have liked a different result.” Granite City looked primed to bounce back from a difficult-to-swallow overtime loss the night before, recording

One solution for oxygen at home, away, and for travel Introducing the INOGEN ONE – It’s oxygen therapy on your terms

Reclaim Your Freedom And Independence NOW!

Residential Heating & Air Conditioning Service & Installation

Call Inogen Today To Request Your FREE Info Kit

1-844-716-2411 SR11-1B-JF

© 2020 Inogen, Inc. All rights reserved.

MKT-P0108

320-252-4883

R10-tfnb-TV

No more tanks to refil . No more deliveries. No more hassles with travel. The INOGEN ONE portable oxygen concentrator is designed to provide unparalleled freedom for oxygen therapy users. It’s small, lightweight, clinically proven for stationary and portable use, during the day and at night, and can go virtually anywhere — even on most airlines. Inogen accepts Medicare and many private insurances!

www.curlysheating.com

two first-period goals in rapid succession. After North Iowa committed roughing and crosschecking penalties within 30 seconds of each other, Bailey Sommers and Carson Simon each tallied scores on the man-advantage to give the Lumberjacks a 2-0 lead. “It’s not their first year in the league,” Vold said. “Those two know what it takes to score goals at our level, and they’re really, really good at it. They’re guys we can lean on down the stretch.” The Bulls demonstrated excellent resilience throughout the weekend series and cut the lead in half under two minutes later with a tally from Joey Petronack. North Iowa, despite entering the penalty box four times in the first 20 minutes, outshot Granite City 11-9. The second period swayed slowly toward North Iowa’s favor, with the visitors compiling 15 shots in a rollicking period. Lucas Wahlin scored his team-leading 31st goal at 17 minutes, 12 seconds to even the contest before Nico Aguilera put the Bulls in front for good 55 seconds later. Matt Dahlseide earned three assists for the Bulls, who end an impressive campaign grasping a 38-7-2 record. “It’s tough to get the bounces when you take a period off and lately, we’ve done that,” Vold said. “It’s hard to win when you don’t play the whole thing. After each period, we need to refocus and reassess and go back at it.” It was another difficult night for Granite City goaltender Nate Johnston who gave up five goals for the third time in four appearances. Containing North Iowa’s firepower proved to be a challenge. “They’re normally very good offensively, and the team they have this year is no exception,” Vold said. “They have good team speed and skill, and they use that to their advantage.” No skater better emphasized that notion than Wahlin who scored another goal in the third period to clinch another win

over the battered Lumberjacks. The talented forward piled up seven goals against Granite City this season. “He’s a great, great skater,” Vold said. “He uses his speed well and uses it to put pressure on our whole team. I got to see it firsthand at the top prospects tournament, and he was one of the best players at the whole tournament.” Tal Halliday collected an apple for the Lumberjacks who concluded their campaign with a 3313-1 mark, good for second in the West Division. Granite City’s playoff opponent will be as familiar as any: The New Ulm Steel. “I think we can take what we did during the regular season against them,” Vold said. “We were 4-2 in the regular season (against them), and we can take that and build off that. It’s a slide, but nothing before this weekend matters now.” The Steel have been on a torrent in the second half of the season, stringing together a 15game winning streak to earn themselves a trip to the Fraser Cup Playoffs. They have continued to maintain a surging pace even as the streak ended, closing out the campaign with eight wins in their final 10 games. New Ulm is boosted by a dazzling trio of 60-point scorers: Jacob Halvorson, Michael Savelkoul and Keegan Bauman. “They’ve got one forward line that’s really, really good,” Vold said. “It will affect a lot of the outcome of the game if we can limit the chances that line gets, and frankly, if we make them play defense and get to their goalie, it should pan out well for us.” Experience is expected to be Granite City’s best friend come playoff time. With several second-year skaters and a string of high-impact games this season, the Lumberjacks hope they can execute strong defense when it matters. “As long as we play well in our own end, we’ve got a good chance to win the playoff series and hopefully win the whole thing,” Vold said. “That will be our strength along with our group of forwards that have played

in the playoffs. Those two things will add up to success for us.” The main question Granite City will need to answer is whether they can overcome their lateseason struggles. Playoff excitement could serve as a perfect remedy for lingering blues. “I think they’ve been waiting for this all year,” Vold said. “This is why kids come here, to play in big games, play in games that really matter. I think our group is excited to get it started and are looking forward to the challenge.” The semifinal round began with the Lumberjacks hosting the Steel in Sauk Rapids March 13. The series moves to New Ulm with game two kicking off at 7:45 p.m. Saturday, March 14, at the New Ulm Civic Center. North Iowa 5, Granite City 4 (OT) Another Granite City-North Iowa matchup, another taste of playoff hockey. Harrison Stewart fired a wrist shot past Bailey Huber seconds into overtime as the Bulls took the first game of a two-game series against the Lumberjacks March 6 at Sports Arena East in Sauk Rapids. Wahlin totaled two goals and helped set up the game-winning goal, feeding Stewart for an open look. Granite City outshot North Iowa 29-26 and connected on several of their chances to stay even with the West Division champions. Sommers, with a second-period power-play score, surpassed Aiden Verbeke for first-place on Granite City’s alltime career goals list. The Lumberjacks co-captain bested North Iowa goalie Evan Babekuhl twice on the night. After the Bulls took a 4-3 lead five minutes into the third period, Simon delivered in crunch time. The forward rocketed a one-timer over Babekuhl’s pads for the game-tying goal. Lumberjacks rookie goaltender Bailey Huber collected 21 saves but also relinquished five goals as North Iowa sent Granite City to its third loss in a row.


SPORTS

SAUK RAPIDS HERALD | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | Page 23

SAUK RAPIDS – Brady DeGagne will be the new head coach of the Sauk RapidsRice High School boys hockey team. NaDean Schroeder, activities director at SRRHS, made the announcement Feb. 28. The decision is pending school board approval in March. An open house to welcome head coach DeGagne will take place at 6 p.m. March 18 in the career center at SRRHS. This is an opportunity to meet the coach, hear about his experience and values, and ask questions. Community members and families are welcome. DeGagne, a 2006 Sauk Rapids-Rice High School alumnus, has worked as an assistant coach for the St. Cloud Area School District and, most recently, within the Storm Youth Hockey Association.

He has over six years of experience coaching and played hockey for the Storm from his youth through his graduation. He was a three sport athlete in high school, playing football and baseball in addition to hockey. He went on to play football and baseball at Concordia College in Moorhead for four years while obtaining a degree in exercise science and business. “Coach DeGagne is going to be a welcomed leader for the boys hockey program,” Schroeder said. “His ability to motivate today’s youth, partnered with his experiences as a coach and alumnus from SRR will only benefit our program to increase the competitiveness and culture within the community.” DeGagne serves as the manager of CareerSTART at the Boys

MIDWEST CLASSIFIED NETWORK To reach 9 states with your classified call 320-251-1971

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIN D. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. CALL 1-855-9777030 CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2002 and Newer. Competitive Offer! Nationwide FREE Pick Up! Call Now For a Free Quote! 888-366-5659 $1,380 WEEKLY or more mailing our sales letters from home. FT/PT No experience needed. All supplies provided. Genuine Opportunity! Free Information 1-888-9898588. TRAIN ON LIN E TO DO MEDICAL BILLIN G! Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 855-960-0997. (M-F 8am-6pm ET) BEST SATELLITE TV with 2 Year Price Guarantee! $59.99/ mo with 190 channels and 3 months free premium movie channels! Free next day installation! Call 855-824-1258. Get N FL Sunday Ticket FREE w/ DIRECTV Choice AllIncluded Package. $59.99/month for 12 months. 185 Channels PLUS Thousands of Shows/Movies On Demand. FREE Genie HD DVR Upgrade. Call 1-844-2452232 or satellitedealnow.com/MFCP. Earthlink High Speed Internet. As Low As $14.95/ month (for the first 3 months.) Reliable High Speed. Fiber Optic Technology. Stream Videos, Music and More! Call Earthlink Today 1-855-679-7096 DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. 1-844-316-8876. COMPUTER ISSUES? FREE DIAGNOSIS by GEEKS ON SITE! Virus Removal, Data Recovery! 24/7 EMERGEN CY $20 OFF ANY SERVICE with coupon 42522! Restrictions apply. 1-844-938-0797. Over $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 855-995-1557. ARE YOU BEHIN D $10k OR MORE ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax re-

Skid loader & Implement (Mounting Available)

Gilman Co-op Creamery FEED & FARM SUPPLY STORE

320-387-2770 Open M-F 7:30-7, Sat. 7:30-5

LARGE LITTLE FALLS, MN – PIERZ, MN AREA

COMPLETE DAIRY DISPERSAL

AUCTION

Loc. 8.5 miles east of Little Falls, MN or 2.5 miles west of Pierz, MN on MN State 27, then 2 miles south on County 37, then 4/10 mile west on 123rd St.

Brady DeGagne

SAT., MARCH 21ST, 2020 • 11:30 A.M. 129 HEAD OF VERY GOOD OFFICIAL DHIA HOLSTEIN & COMPOSITE DAIRY CATTLE SELL UNDERCOVER

HERD FACTS: Third generation herd established in the 1950’S. Official DHIA 2X 19,671 M, 3.8% 740F, 3.3% 652 P, 68 lb. tank ave, SCC ave. under 200,000. 30 years mating using leading AI sires along with limited use of herd sires from leading herds. Comlplete vac, program. Cows milked in tie stall facility.

For catalog with individual info. Please phone 320-760-2979 or veiw online at: www.midamericanauctioninc.com

Includes: 65 Young Well Uddered Cows, 52 1st and 2nd Lact. Incuding 15 Swiss & Montbeliarde Holstein Cross and Red and White Holstein cows. 10 Heifers due now through June 28 Short Bred Heifers (Bred Angus) 26 Fancy Open Heifers and Calves with more by sale date

JAMIE HAYES, OWNER

320-630-5567 • 23561 123RD ST. • PIERZ, MN MID -AMERICAN AUCTION CO., INC.

COLS:

AL WESSEL - LIC. NO. 77-60

PH. 320-760-2979

KEVIN WINTER -

LIC. NO. 77-18

PH. 320-760-1593, AUCTIONEERS

R11_1-B-MK

Community invited to open house March 18

& Girls Clubs of Central Minnesota. He resides in St. Cloud with his wife, Sondra, and their dogs, Louie and Lilly. His father, Jerry DeGagne, served as an assistant coach for the Storm from 1999 to 2006, and was an interim head coach from 2011-12.

TIRES

R6-tfn-BL

DeGagne named boys hockey head coach

FOR COMPLETE LISTING SEE: www.midamericanauctioninc.com

turns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 855211-8684 Struggling With Your Private Student Loan Payment? New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 855-238-4594 (Mon-Fri 9am-5pm Eastern) N ew FORD 3”, 21,000lb. adjustable height ball mount TRAILER Hitch. Tow Dollies; 15 different models of DUMP Trailers; Steel & Aluminum Utility trailers (mower, UTV, ATv, Golfcart), Aluminum 3 horse slant; Skidloader & Equipment trailers. For Prices & information: www.FortDodgeTrailerWorld.com or 515-972-4554. Are you or a loved one suffering from Depression, Anxiety, PTSD, OCD, Bipolar Disorder, Addictions or other mental or behavioral disorders? Our inpatient treatment services can help you reclaim your life and get back on track. We work with most PPO insurances. Please call 319-900-6879 Stay in your home longer with an American Standard Walk-In Bathtub. Receive up to $1,500 off, including a free toilet, and a lifetime warranty on the tub and installation! Call us at 1-855-372-3080 or visit www.walkintubquote.com/midwest **STOP STRUGGLING ON THE STAIRS** Give your life a lift with an ACORN STAIRLIFT! Call now for $250 OFF your stairlift purchase and FREE DVD & brochure! 1-877-3580034 DENTAL INSURANCE from Physicians Mutual Insurance Company. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures. Call 1-855-973-9175 for details. www. dental50plus.com/midwest 6118-0219. Portable Oxygen Concentrator May Be Covered by Medicare! Reclaim independence and mobility with the compact design and long-lasting battery of Inogen One. Free information kit! Call 844-716-2411. VIAGRA & CIALIS! 60 pills for $99. 100 pills for $150. FREE shipping. Money back guaranteed! 1-866-306-9928 Lung Cancer? Asbestos exposure in industrial, construction, manufacturing jobs, or military may be the cause. Family in the home were also exposed. Call 1-866-7953684 or email cancer@breakinginjurynews. com. $30 billion is set aside for asbestos victims with cancer. Valuable settlement moneys may not require filing a lawsuit.

NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self-publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 855-623-8796 Become a published author! Publications sold at all major secular & specialty Christian bookstores. CALL Christian Faith Publishing for your FREE author submission kit. 1-888-981-5761. DON ATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details. 855-7526680 FREE AUTO INSURANCE QUOTES for uninsured and insured drivers. Let us show you how much you can save! Call 855-648-7642. A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 1-888-894-7038 SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! Compare 20 A-rated insurances companies. Let us do the shopping & save you time & money. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/year! Call 855-697-1892. (M-F 8am8pm Central). Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! Strong recent work history needed. Call to start your application or appeal today! 1-866-276-3845 –Steppacher Law Offices LLC Principal Office: 224 Adams Ave Scranton PA 18503. Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-855-577-1268. FREE CASH That’s right! WE will send you $10 by cash app free right now! Text the words MID CASH to 706761-1745. Meet singles right now! N o paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now: 855-651-0114. SPRIN G TRAVEL SPECIAL! 7 Day / 6 N ight Orlando + Daytona Beach Vacation with Hertz Rental Car Included. Only $398.00. Call 844-277-5137 to Reserve. 12 Months to use.


Page 24 | SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 2020 | SAUK RAPIDS HERALD

SPORTS

Slow second half leads to season-ending loss

SRR falls to Apollo 72-53 BY ANNA HINKEMEYER STAFF WRITER

ed by Apollo, and then they ran the floor well and made some of those transition baskets.” Senior guard Kobe Lee built ground early in the game, sinking 20 of the Storm’s 35 points in

If one did not know the date during the March 6 Storm boys basketball game against the Eagles at Apollo High School in St. Cloud, one may have thought they were watching a re-run of a previous matchup. The Section 8AAA semifinal game between the two teams had an eerie familiarity: a Storm lead at half and then a less than stellar second half to allow Apollo to pull into the lead and throw Sauk Rapids-Rice behind to earn a win. “It’s simply the difference of our shots falling in the first half and not falling in the second half,” said Derek Peterson, SRR boys basketball head coach. “The shots Ethan Opsahl jumps to shoot a basket March 6 in St. we missed were rebound- Cloud. Opsahl banked 10 points for Sauk Rapids-Rice in the Section 8AAA semifinal game.

sive basketball career. Lee, Josh Schloe, Brayden Kotcho, Nathan Valek, Landry Seaman, Charlie Rucks, Josh Krebs and Nick Schmitt have been playing basketball together since third grade. “This group is special,” Peterson said. “They showed a lot of leadership and that helps the program and shows the younger kids what it takes. Our season was an overall success.”

SRR 35 18-53 Apollo 31 41-72 SRR: Lee 25 points,

Schloe 11, Ethan Opsahl 10, Landry Seaman 4 and Alex Harren 3. Carter Loesch searches for an open teammate March 6 at Apollo High School in St. Cloud. The Storm held a 35-31 lead at halftime but shots fell short in the second half to lead to a 19-point loss.

What can you bring to the table? 4th Annual Food Drive—All March Long Join us in our tradition of collecting food and money for our local food shelves. All through the month of March, you can bring your donations to any of our three locations, whether it be nonperishable food or money. We’ll match you item-for-item or dollar-for-dollar, up to $2,000 per location. You’ll also get a reusable grocery bag to keep while supplies last. Let’s help stock our local food shelves together, because friendly still counts!

FMpierz.com

Pierz

Sauk Rapids

Eden Valley

320.468.6422

320.252.5121

320.453.2000

NMLS #528169

Leading the Trace Wagner Parents: Steve and Londa Wagner Accomplishment: Senior DECA national qualifier in sales project and role play.

What is your favorite part about DECA? Getting to work What other activities are you involved in at school? with great friends on projects that will help me gain knowl- Trapshooting and Green Team. edge about real practices in business. How do you make a difference at school? By standing What is your best performance to date? My group’s per- up for what is right and creating a good example for younger formance at state, taking first in our sales project and second students by doing the right thing. in our role play. I double-qualified for the international conference but can only compete in one event, so we picked our Which teacher has impacted your education most? Mr. sales project. Bauer, my DECA advisor. He has taught me so many life lessons along with all the school lessons we covered. How do you prepare in the minutes leading up to performance? I take deep breaths and visualize the presenta- What is the best advice you have ever received? Mr. Neltion going the best it has ever gone before. son told me to always follow my passions and never give up, even after failing over and over again. What is your favorite Storm tradition? Homecoming and shirt sales which is what our sales project is about. What is your favorite meal, movie, social media and song? Chicken alfredo, the Star Wars series, Instagram and Saluting great accomplishments in Snapchat, and anything by Mike Stud, and ’80s and ’90s rock or hair bands. the Sauk Rapids-Rice High School

MEMBER FDIC

Sponsored by:

A Proud er Support of Storm s Athletic

Good Luck to All Sports Teams!

800-847-2502 • 320-632-2908

www.brandlmotors.com 14873 113th St., Little Falls, MN 56345

R11-1B-TV

PHOTOS BY ANNA HINKEMEYER

Josh Schloe grapples his way around an Apollo defender March 6 at Apollo High School in St. Cloud. Schloe scored 11 points against Apollo in the 72-53 loss.

the first half. Lee led the team with 25 points. Peterson said he was happy to see that Lee’s last game a positive one. Lee has been a strong player overall not only at the basket for scoring but on defense with rebounds, assists and ball handling. The game ended the season for the Storm. SRR started with three back-toback wins to open the season but then began falling short. The Storm won eight of its last 16 games to improve to a 5-11 Central Lakes Conference record with a 11-17 overall. “Our win-loss record was disappointing,” Peterson said. “We wanted to win more, and we had several close games that we could have won. I really think we played good basketball all year, but we had a tough schedule. Many of the teams we faced are fighting to go to state.” The team’s eight seniors have had an exten-

N