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WINTER 2008

A PUBLICATION OF STARK STATE COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY FOR ALUMNI, FRIENDS OF THE COLLEGE AND THE COMMUNITY

Higher Learning Commission approves Stark State to offer complete online programs See pages 6 and 7 –––––– Enrollment increases 11.3% fall semester –––––– $9 million Health Sciences Building underway ––––––

Rolls-Royce Launches U.S. Fuel Cell Business at Stark State See page 6

Stark State College partners with Stark County and Akron Urban Leagues –––––– College receives charter for international honor society in education –––––– Automotive technology students receive $15,000 in scholarships from Greater Cleveland Auto Dealers’ Association –––––– Engineering students are “trailblazers” in developing defense metals –––––– A PUBLICATION OF STARK STATE COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY FOR ALUMNI, FRIENDS OF THE COLLEGE AND THE COMMUNITY


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STARK STATE REVIEW The Stark State Review is published for alumni, friends of the College and the community. Story ideas and articles are welcome from alumni, staff, faculty, administrators and friends of the College. Please send your correspondence to Stark State Review, 6200 Frank Ave. N.W., North Canton, OH 44720. Administration John O’Donnell, Ph.D., President Thomas A. Chiappini Vice President for Business and Finance Peter K. Kropp, Ph.D., Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs and Corporate and Community Services Para M. Jones, Vice President for Advancement, Planning, and College/Community Relations John J. Kurtz, Vice President for Information Technology Timothy Quinnan, Ph.D., Vice President for Student Services and Enrollment Management Board of Trustees Christopher Maurer, Chairman Michael Thomas, D.D.S., Vice Chairman Jeffrey Halm Penny Sherrod-Campanizzi Foundation Board of Directors Paul Feaser, President Larry Smerglia, Vice President Nancy McPeek, Secretary Jeffery Walters, Treasurer Hortense Bobbitt Donald Colaner Eugene DeChellis Sally Efremoff Irving Gordon, D.O. Monica Gwin Lynn Hamilton Alex Hays Christine Kruman George Lemon William Luntz, Emeritus Roger Mann John J. McGrath, Ed.D. John O’Donnell, Ph.D. James Powell, Emeritus Timothy Putman Ahmed Sabe, M.D. Terrence Seeberger Mary Jo Shannon Slick Shari Shiepis William Strohmenger Thomas Strouble Grace Wakulchik Frank Weinstock, M.D., Emeritus Charles West Ron Wilkof Frank Wittman Steve Yoder Editor Irene Lewis Motts Director of Marketing/Communications Graphic Design/Photography Beth Klein, Graphic Designer Editorial Assistant/Photography Sean Rutherford, Web/Communications Specialist

ON THE COVER See pages 6 and 7 to learn more about online programs.

Stark State College is committed to equal opportunity for all and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, gender, age, disability or veteran’s status.

President’s Message by John O’Donnell, President, Stark State College The Vision Statement of Stark State College states that “We advance quality of life through accessibility and business and community partnerships.” Stark State is fortunate to have many respected partners throughout Northeastern Ohio. Our joint goal is to educate a productive workforce that will keep our community strong and viable. Programs to advance opportunities for youth and young adults in our community, such as Early College, Upward Bound and FAME (Focus on African-American Youth), are just a few of the educational initiatives in which Stark State is involved. These community-based programs provide essential links to education and training for our youth and young adults. Educational partnerships with school districts, government and community agencies are evidenced through our satellite and course site locations. We currently offer classes in Alliance, downtown Canton, Carrollton, Navarre, Uniontown/Hartville and at R.G. Drage Career Technical Center in Massillon. Through a new partnership with the Canton City School District, we are working with select GED classes, with an eye on associate degree attainment. Degree transfer partnerships with many Ohio colleges and universities provide seamless transfer of Stark State associate degrees to baccalaureate programs. We continue to forge these transfer agreements to provide our graduates a variety of opportunities in their pursuit of higher degrees. Unique partnerships with foundations, business, industry and health care organizations, many of which you’ve read about in the Stark State Review over the years, drive our program development. Most recently, Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. and the Defense Metals Technology Center established headquarters on our campus and will provide curriculum opportunities for our students (see page 10). Longtime partnerships with the Timken Company, FirstEnergy Corp., General Motors, Toyota, Daimler Chrysler and Honda, just to name a few, have been beneficial to our students and to those companies. Health care organizations have supported the expansion of our health technologies and clinical sites, so that we may train the best health care personnel possible to meet community needs. And now, a new and exciting program involving Stark State College and the Stark County and Akron Urban Leagues provides educational opportunities in civil engineering and construction management to economically disadvantaged adults in Stark and Summit Counties. I encourage you to see page five of this issue to read about this unique program that will make an amazing difference in many lives. Strong business and education partnerships ensure that our students attain the knowledge they need to be well-educated, productive employees in today’s global marketplace. Stark State’s partnerships are many, and they are diverse. The success of these partnerships is evidenced throughout our College and in the community we serve. We believe Stark State is a community partner in advancing workforce development, economic development, social justice and social equity. We appreciate and salute our partners in this venture.


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A moment in history … Display recognizes Stark State’s Founders Thanks to the foresight of three strong community leaders nearly 50 years ago, Stark State College, as it is known today, went from a dream to reality! Originally founded in 1960 as the Stark County Technical Institute, it was the foresight and tenacity of Congressman Ralph Regula, Attorney Samuel Krugliak and Newspaperman Clayton G. Horn who led the community in the fulfillment of the dream to have a technical college serve the needs of Stark and surrounding counties. The College recently brought together Ralph and Mary Regula, Aurelia Krugliak, widow of Sam Krugliak, and Wendell and Jill Horn, son and daughter-in-law of the late Clayton Horn, for the hanging of a wall display to honor the College’s Founders. As they lunched together, they shared stories of a small technical college that got its start in downtown Canton. Their memories took them back to the late 1950s when the dream began. As Stark State College approaches its 50th Anniversary in 2010, the Founders Display hangs prominently, and proudly, adjacent to the President’s Board Room in the Student Center.

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Stark State College sets new enrollment record with 11.3% growth and 8521 students Stark State College continues to be Ohio’s largest technical college and one of the nation’s fastest-growing two-year mid-sized public colleges. Fall semester numbers set a record as the highest enrollment in the 47-year history of the College, with 8521 students on campus, an increase of 11.3% over the previous fall semester, representing an additional 863 new students. For the eighth consecutive fall semester, the College set an enrollment record; increasing 86.6% in headcount and 107% in FTE (full-time equivalent) since 2000. Stark State has experienced tremendous growth in e-learning courses and degree programs. “E-learning allows our students to learn at their convenience and at their own pace,” said Dr. Tim Quinnan, vice president for enrollment management and student services. “It fits the complex lives of our students, who often juggle family and job responsibilities while attending college.” Currently, five full degree programs and more than 130 courses are available online (see pages 6 and 7). Another impact on enrollment is the expansion of course offerings at satellite centers in Alliance, downtown Canton, Carrollton, Navarre, Uniontown/Hartville, and most recently at R.G. Drage Career Technical Center. “Stark State College is responding to the needs of these communities for affordable, accessible, quality education,” said Dr. John O’Donnell, Stark State president. “These centers provide the same high quality education, small classes, personal attention, experienced faculty and affordability as main campus, while providing transportation savings to our students,” O’Donnell explained. “The College’s sustained growth reflects the community’s recognition of Stark State’s quality and affordability,” said Quinnan, “We continue to educate the workforce of tomorrow with market-driven degree programs that meet the needs of our students and area employers.” Each year, over 90% of Stark State’s graduates are employed upon graduation. Stark State’s affordable tuition of $127 per semester hour is an advantage for local students and families, as well as the College’s wide range of scholarships and financial aid programs. About 60 percent of all students receive some type of financial aid.

Pictured left to right with the Founders Display are Jill Horn, Wendall Horn, Congressman Ralph Regula, Mary Regula and Aurelia Krugliak.

Stark State College of Technology now offers 48 associate degree programs and 12 one-year certificate programs in business, health, engineering technologies, information technologies, public service and general studies. The College also offers certificates of competency for credit, customized contract training services and noncredit/ continuing education programs.

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The Stark State College student chapter of the Institute of Management Accountants (IMA) has been named IMA’s “Outstanding Two-Year College Chapter in the Nation” for the seventh time in 10 years. The chapter received a trophy and a $1,000 cash award to be used for student scholarships at Stark State. Chapter advisor is Pamela Benner, CMA, CFM, instructor of accounting and finance technology. Judges based the annual award on the chapter’s success with educational meetings, community service projects, awareness projects, linkages to area businesses and more. J Richard Houze, an environmental health and safety student, received $1250 through the Ohio EPA’s Environmental Education Fund Scholarship. He was the only two-year college student to receive the award and was joined by 21 four-year college students from Ohio who also received scholarships. Houze, a Marine veteran, is an environmental technician intern with Marathon Petroleum in Canton and plans a career in environmental compliance. J Nancy Diehl, an occupational therapy assistant technology student, has received a $1000 award from the Coca-Cola Two-Year Colleges Scholarship Program. Diehl is a member of the Stark State chapter of Phi Theta Kappa. J Four Stark State College second-year dental hygiene students received first place honors and a combined $250 cash prize for their research presentation in the dental auxiliary category at the Ohio Dental Association (ODA) Annual Session. Megan Adorni, Melinda Bittner, Tara Slabach and Jadrian Watkins, presented their research entitled, “Oral Jewelry: Is it worth the cost?” In their first ODA competition, the group competed against students, educators and licensed practitioners from across Ohio. J Two Stark State dental hygiene students have received academic scholarships through the Ohio Dental Association, Akron Dental Society Claypool Barlow Fund. Kelly Greissing received $3,000 and Danielle Laria received $2,000. J Erica L. Hopson, a human and social services major, was recently named to the student advisory board of the Mentoring Network of Stark County. She is employed full-time with the United Way of Greater Stark County as a certified information and referral specialist. J Kudos to all these deserving students, their faculty and advisors! 4

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College receives charter for international honor society in education; inducts 63 charter members Stark State College recently inducted 63 members into the charter class of the Alpha Delta Kappa chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, the international honor society in education. Stark State received approval for the charter in October from the executive council of Kappa Delta Pi. Membership, by invitation only, is extended to undergraduate and graduate students, faculty and professional educators. Membership signifies recognition of academic achievement, leadership qualities and professional abilities, attributes that the Society promotes for and throughout the field of education. Members must have a 3.0 grade point average and 30 semester credit hours to qualify. Nationally, Kappa Delta Pi has more than 50,000 members in 550 collegiate and professional chapters throughout the United States and around the world. The organization recognizes and promotes excellence in education. The top 10% of those entering or working in the field of education are members of the Society. Alumni, current students and professional eduators were installed as part of the charter class at Stark State. They include: Theresa Ashley, Sabrina Brubaker, Melissa Dunlap and Dr. Douglas C. Peck, Akron; Kelly Betz, Nicholas Garvin, Germaine Hairston, April McMullen and Sandy Young, Alliance; Christina Reed, Barberton; Tricia Bradley, Joy Calhoun, Veronica Campbell, Jenny Chan, Sue Christman, Helen Green, Kima Johnson, Carla Kenney, Kimberlymarie Kessler, Natashia McClain, Camela Montana, Veronica Morgan, Heather Phillips, Charmaine Poulson, Jean Roby, Andrea Savage, Christy Simmons, Barbara Stevens, Priscilla Strong, Ronita Williams, Tracy Williams and Joan Zimmerman, Canton; Robin Oden-Miller, East Canton; Tiffany Myszka and Dr. J. Rabai Temu, Kent; Melissa Brown, Louisville; Amber Beckett, Patricia Britton, Margaret Keller, Sally Lautenschleger, Allison McIntyre, Megan Moore, Christine Potter and Victoria Schiavone, Massillon; Jaime Vandegrift, Minerva; Kimberly Gaug, Mogadore; Laura Parrot-Justice and Heather Studer, Navarre; Elizabeth Adams, Bernetta Armstead, Vanessa Boswell, Deborah Griggs and Lacey Wheeler, North Canton; Melissa Esper and Suzanne Robart, North Lawrence; Mackenzie Handy, Sebring; Lauren Lewis, Stow; Christina Yackey, Sugarcreek; Michelle Hughes, Uniontown; zMallory Keenan, Wadsworth; Natalie Woodin, Waynesburg; and Christopher Benjamin, Chapel Hill, NC. Chapter advisors are Carrilyn E. Long, department chair/associate professor of early childhood education, and Libby E. Roll, associate professor of early childhood education.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Semester Break Spring Open House May Commencement Summer Session Begins

March 17 - 22 April 13 • Noon - 3 p.m. May 18 • 3 p.m. June 2


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RN Completion program offered in Alliance

Stark State College partners with Stark County and Akron Urban Leagues

The Greater Alliance Foundation, Alliance City Schools, the Robert T. White School of Practical Nursing and Alliance Community Hospital have partnered with Stark State College to offer a registered nurse completion program for licensed practical nurses in Alliance. The associate degree program is housed at the Robert T. White School of Practical Nursing, which enables Stark State College to cost-effectively share facilities, equipment and laboratories. “Thanks to the generosity of the Greater Alliance Foundation and our other Alliance partners, Stark State is now able to fulfill our mission of providing educational access to LPNs who wish to advance their careers in nursing,” said John Thornton, dean of health technologies at Stark State. “This partnership is equally valuable to the health-related businesses and the community at large, which will benefit from more highly qualified registered nurses in the region.” Alliance Community Hospital also is critical to the partnership because of the need for clinical sites for students to gain the hands-on experience needed for licensure. The hospital has added clinical sites to accommodate the Stark State program. The Greater Alliance Foundation provided $34,000 to help Stark State launch this RN completion program in the greater Alliance area. The convenience of having the program in the greater Alliance community is a tremendous benefit because many of these students are busy working and raising families. Equally important to Stark State’s mission is student success. The RN completion program is identical to the program the College has been offering for more than 15 years on main campus. The program boasts a 99% completion rate, and graduates who sit for the licensure exam have very high pass rates that far exceed national averages. Judith L. Stauder is the director of the RN completion program. She has a bachelor of science in nursing from Southern Illinois University and a master of science in nursing from the University of Akron.

Stark State College and the Urban Leagues of Stark County and Akron have teamed up to provide educational opportunities in civil engineering and construction management to economically disadvantaged adults in Stark and Summit Counties. The program began last spring and currently serves 63 students from Stark and Summit counties. According to Dr. Frank Fuller, Stark State department chair and instructor of engineering technologies, Stark State’s role in the partnership is to provide the classroom and laboratory instruction. Students have the opportunity to earn a construction technician certificate of competency from Stark State, which is comprised of five courses from the civil engineering technology - construction management option curriculum. The “I love the opportunity here to help me go students take one course per semester further in life. I’d like to continue with my for five semesters. education and become an electrician.” “This is an outstanding opportunity — Tonya Strickland, Akron for minority students to enter the field of construction management, which is a high-growth, high-demand field,” said Dr. Fuller. “The program is a ‘career-ladder’ that provides students with the lab and classroom experiences required by the building trades apprenticeship program. These five courses also apply toward an associate degree in civil engineering technology – construction management option for students wishing to further their education, which leads to even “I’ve always had a goal in life to be greater job opportunities.” a carpenter and build my own home Stark State President John O’Donnell with my own hands. Right now, I feel said the program is one example of the like I’m heading in the right direction.” College’s mission in action. “We are — Richard Hill, Akron committed to providing access to education (On right, Associate Professor of Information Technology David Richard) to all individuals in our community. In visiting with students in the classroom, they expressed how enthusiastic and grateful they are for this educational opportunity, which can lead to rewarding employment that can change their lives and their families’ lives.” The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) is funding the initiative. Local organizations, such as Habitat for Humanity, provide “on-the-job-training” experiences for the students. “The opportunity here is very beneficial; I’m trying to make a career in construction and these are some of the skills I’m going to need.” — Tequia Lockett, Akron 5


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Higher Learning Commission approves Stark State to offer complete online programs E-learning is taking the world of higher education by storm and Stark State College

The increase of online students from

is offering over 130 online courses and five complete academic programs online to meet

fall 2006 to fall 2007 was 38%, including

this growing need. Online classes and degrees fit today’s busy lifestyles perfectly. Students

students nationwide. Currently, 123 Stark

learn on their own time, at their own location and reach their goals at a pace that fits

State students take all of their classes

their schedules.

online, while 1576 take one or more

“What began slowly in 2001 as an additional way to offer courses to students has evolved into the offering of full online degrees and certificates and national accreditation

online classes. In August, Stark State received approval

for our online programs, said Wendy Lampner, director of e-learning. Lampner was hired in

to offer complete online programs from

2004 when there were only 25 online courses offered and just 216 students taking an

the Higher Learning Commission of North

online course. Today, the number of students has increased by 630% and the number

Central Association (NCA) of Colleges and

of online offerings has increased by 560%.

Schools. In their approval letter the Accreditation Panel of the Higher Learning Commission stated: “The College has provided evidence of a well-structured and supported robust system to develop, deliver, assess and support quality distance education offerings. The College has pioneered a number of best practices components while continuing to set new goals for systemic improvement.”

The College currently offers these full programs online: > Computer Science and Engineering Technology > Computer Programming and Database Linda Morosko, e-learning instructional designer, conducts a training session for faculty who develop and teach online courses.

> Information Reporting Technology > Web Design and Development > Bookkeeping Certificate

Your time, your location, your goals. E-learning meets your needs.

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“We expect to offer additional online degrees and certificates in the near future,” Lampner said. E-learning is a unique alternative to traditional on-campus courses and suits the learning style of Stark State’s traditional and non-traditional students, many of whom juggle work and family responsibilities. Flexibility of time and place while

Director of E-learning Wendy Lampner assists Brent Ransom, a web design and development major, who is enrolled in several online courses.

maintaining access to faculty and other College services is vital to today’s student. Web classes may be more convenient for a student with a busy work, travel, home, or class schedule. They may also be more convenient for students who have problems with transportation or child care arrangements. E-learning students are required to participate in an online orientation,

The College has provided evidence of a “well-structured and supported robust system

and e-learning faculty must undergo specialized training. “E-learning is a perfect option for the

to develop, deliver, assess and support quality distance education offerings. The College has pioneered

student who has time to devote to class and studying, but may not be able to

a number of best practices components

commit to a specific day, time, and loca-

while continuing to set new goals

tion,” explained Linda Morosko, e-learning instructional designer. “And, many of our

for systemic improvement.

e-learners enjoy the interaction benefits online classes provide, such as being able

— As stated by the Accreditation Panel of the Higher Learning Commission

to communicate anytime, anyplace with other members of their class.” E-learning has also created a new global market for Stark State College. Currently, students in 10 states are taking online courses through Stark State, and that number is expected to grow now that the College is accredited to offer full programs online.

For more information or to find out if you’re ready for e-learning, visit www.starkstate.edu/elearning.

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Automotive technology students receive $15,000 in scholarships from Greater Cleveland Auto Dealers’ Association Ten Stark State College automotive technology students are the recipients of $15,000 in scholarship monies from the Greater Cleveland Automobile Dealers’ Association (GCADA). The Association provides annual scholarships to students who are enrolled in the College’s automotive technology program and who work for a new car dealership in Northeast Ohio. GCADA provides the scholarships to help students financially and to ensure that automobile dealers in northeast Ohio have the well-educated and technically proficient specialists they need to provide the highest quality service to customers. The Greater Cleveland Automobile Dealers’ Association represents 250 franchised motor vehicle dealers, including franchised new-car and truck, motorcycle and RV dealers in a 15-county region of northern Ohio. This year’s recipients and their dealerships are: Matthew Addis, Kensington, Lexus of Akron/Canton; Matthew Buca, Medina, Norris Automall; Joseph Goodrich, Akron, Fred Martin Chevrolet; Cody Kasserman, Wooster, Park Mazda Wooster; Damir Kahonjic, Akron, Park Acura; Ryan Miracle, Canal Fulton, Park Honda; Zane Murawski, Doylestown, Laria Chevrolet; Craig Richards, Wadsworth, Wadsworth Chevrolet; Daniel Smith, Clinton, Lexus of Akron/Canton and Bryan Thomas, Wadsworth, Mickey Miller Chevrolet. For more information or to apply for the Greater Cleveland Automotive Dealers’ Association scholarships, please call Stark State College’s Office of Financial Aid, 330-494-6170, Ext. 4301.

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Akron Children’s Hospital and Stark State Foundation Board support scholarships and health sciences programs Akron Children’s Hospital has established an endowed scholarship for nursing students at Stark State College with a gift of $50,000. “We appreciate the hospital’s strategic philanthropy in providing scholarships for nursing students,” said Stark State Foundation President Paul Feaser. “Akron Children’s is pleased to provide scholarships to encourage students to begin and complete Stark State’s nursing program,” said Grace Wakulchik, vice president of patient services at Akron Children’s and a Stark State Foundation board member. “This donation enables us to help individual students and, at the same time, benefit the entire community because nurses are critical to quality health care.” Feaser also announced more than $38,000 in leadership gifts from Foundation board members for scholarships and health sciences programs. “Foundation board members realize that our financial support encourages gifts from other individuals in the community who, like us, believe that education is a key to our economic future,” he said. “Most importantly, the College needs our financial support to improve academic programs and services that are greatly needed in the community.” Stark State President John O’Donnell praised Feaser and other Foundation board members for their leadership and philanthropy. “The Foundation’s support advances Stark State’s mission and strategic plan, which focusing on student access and success and economic vitality,” he said.

Public and private grants help Stark State serve community needs Public and private grants are critical to Stark State’s ability to continue meeting the educational needs of our community. The College recently received four grants that will benefit students and the community. They are: • U.S. Department of Education Upward Bound - $1.25 million over five years for a program to achieve academic success among low-income, first-generation-to-college students, particularly in math and science fields. • Stark County United Way grant - $43,000 for the College’s FAME (Focus on AfricanAmerican Males and Education) project. The program enables African-American males in Canton and Massillon high schools to earn college credit, thereby fostering academic success and increasing college-going rates. • HW Hoover Foundation grant - $70,000 for an Environmental/Chemistry Lab to support the College’s Environmental, Health and Safety program and numerous health programs. • The Greater Alliance Foundation - $34,000 to launch an RN Completion Program for licensed practical nurses who wish to complete an associate degree in nursing and obtain the registered nurse licensure. “Each of these grants is strategic in terms of providing resources the College needs to fulfill our mission of providing quality academic programs and services to students and the community,” said Para M. Jones, vice president for advancement, planning and college/ community relations. “The United Way grant supports our strategic goal of engaging more African American males in higher education, which also is a major goal for the state and nation. “The Upward Bound grant provides federal funding to support the College’s access mission, with a particular focus on recruiting and retaining African-American students. The H.W. Hoover Foundation grant supports our academic programs, in particular environmental science,” Jones said. “And the Greater Alliance Foundation grantsupports our goal of training highly-qualified health care professionals as well as outreach into the community by providing the program in Alliance.” About the Stark State College Foundation - The Stark State College Foundation is a non-profit, tax-exempt organization formed in 1986 to seek, receive, manage and distribute funds, equipment, property and other contributions for the benefit of the students and programs of Stark State College. The Foundation plays a crucial role in helping the College provide excellent educational services to the Greater Stark County community.


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Investing in the future … $9 million Health Sciences Building underway

A $9 million Health Sciences Building is underway at Stark State College and will help address the need for educated workers in high-growth, high-demand health fields. The College broke ground on the 47,500 square foot building in August. Additional classrooms and instructional laboratories for Stark State’s 12 associate degrees and five one-year certificates in health technology and biotechnology, as well as health technology faculty offices, will be housed in the new facility, scheduled for completion in 2009. College and community leaders were joined at the groundbreaking ceremonies by Ohio Governor Ted Strickland, U.S. Representative Ralph Regula (R-OH) and Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Eric Fingerhut. “Providing state-of-the-art education in the high-demand health sciences requires the latest instructional and laboratory equipment,” said Stark State President John O’Donnell. “Our students benefit from working on the same type of equipment currently used in hospitals and other health care facilities. That’s a win-win for our students and the employers who benefit from our well-prepared graduates.” High demand, job security and signing bonuses have fueled the record numbers of students enrolling in health programs. At Stark State College, about 40% of the College’s 8500 students are in health and pre-health programs. “As a result of the tremendous growth in our health technology enrollment, our health programs have outgrown their current classrooms and laboratories,” said O’Donnell. New classrooms and labs will be provided for programs in dental hygiene, emergency fire services, emergency medical services, health information, massage therapy, medical assisting, medical laboratory, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy and respiratory care therapy. New science labs will support anatomy and physiology, biology/science energy and the environment, biotechnology, cell culture, chemistry and microbiology. Funding for the new building was provided through state, federal and private funds. Medical Mutual, Aultman Health Foundation, the H.W. Hoover Foundation and Akron Children’s Hospital are lead private donors in supporting both current and new health programs at the College.

Gov. Ted Strickland, Cong. Ralph Regula and OBR Chancellor Eric Fingerhut joined area business and community leaders, faculty, staff and students for the groundbreaking of the $9 million Health Sciences Building scheduled for completion in 2009.

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Engineering students are “trailblazers” in developing defense metals

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Advisory boards aid development of new academic programs Exciting things are happening at Stark State College, including new academic programs, developed to meet community needs and employer demand. Program advisory boards are comprised of business individuals from the community who provide insight into community and employer needs. Working closely with those program advisory boards, many new associate degrees, one-year certificates and options were developed in 2007 and approved by the Ohio Board of Regents.

Stark State design engineering students Kenneth Engel Jr. (far left) and David Schrader Jr. (second from right), discuss their co-op with Stark State President John O’Donnell and DMTC Director Charles Clark (both center), along with Dr. Frank Fuller, Stark State department chair and instructor of engineering technologies (far right).

Trailblazers. That’s how some people refer to two Stark State students who are the first students in a new co-op program between The Defense Metals Technology Center (DMTC) and Stark State College. Kenneth Engel Jr. of Canton and David Schrader Jr. of Alliance, both design engineering technology majors, are spending spring semester at Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey. Their computer-aided design (CAD) training will be put to good use in the Virtual Prototyping Lab of the U.S. Army – Armament Research, Development & Engineering Center (ARDEC), learning and performing CAD functions on current Army projects. Ohio Congressman Ralph Regula (R-Ohio, 16th), secured federal funding last year to form the DMTC to connect local metals manufacturers with the strategic metals needs of the Department of Defense, thereby supporting the cost-effective manufacture of military hardware. Congressman Regula praised the DMTC and Stark State for taking the initiative in creating this defense metals co-op. “I hope the success of this first program will spawn additional workforce training programs at Stark State in titanium machining and titanium welding,” Regula said, adding that this program can promote the expanded use of specialty defense metals in our State’s manufacturing industries. DMTC Director Charles Clark explained that the benefits of the co-op program include: 12 paid credit hours of tuition/fees and books at Stark State, free lodging at the arsenal, travel reimbursement, a weekly monetary stipend and a laptop computer. Both Engel and Schrader met certain academic, work ethic and character qualifications required by the sponsors. Clark expects the co-op program to expand to six students next fall semester. Both Engel and Schrader are excited to be a part of a program that can potentially help keep current and future troops safer by developing prototypes using strong metals, like titanium. “I like the idea of working on something new in the field, working on titanium and with dyes,” said Schrader. He sees endless possibilities for the use of titanium, as does Engel. “If you build tankers with titanium, you won’t have road spills anymore,” said Engel. The students explained that titanium is stronger, lighter in weight and corrodes less than most metals. Stark State President John O’Donnell said “Stark State prides itself in responding to the needs of business and government. Every day we see how vulnerable our troops are and, through this co-op program, our students are working to develop defense metals to protect our troops, and can truly make a difference.” 10

New two-year programs include: • Associate of Technical Studies in Expanded Dental Auxiliary (EFDA) - Prepares students for professional careers as expanded functions dental auxiliary (EFDA) employed in private dental offices, dental clinics and public health facilities providing restorative dental services under the supervision of a licensed dentist. • Associate of Applied Science Degree in Corporate Finance - The financial manager can create value for the corporation through strong financial decisions. This program prepares graduates with knowledge and skills to add wealth to their companies. • Associate of Applied Science Degree in Computer Graphic Arts Technology Prepares graduates in the technology of visual communication to support print media, presentations and Web media for the advertising and marketing sectors. New options are: • Accounting – Forensics Option Forensic accounting is accounting that is suitable for legal review, offering the highest level of assurance regarding accounts and inventories, sustainable in judicial or administrative review. • Information Reporting – Scopist Scopists use specialized reporting software to review, edit and proofread court transcripts prepared by the court reporters. Scoping is an ideal career for someone needing flexible hours or a “work at home” job. In addition, a banking associate one-year certificate and a legal assisting 1+1 certificate have been added to the business technologies programs.


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Alumni Advisory Council sets pace for Alumni in Action Campaign ’64 Floyd Sense, ’64, electrical technology,

The Stark State College Alumni Advisory Council issued a challenge to all alumni by raising $13,300 to support the first annual Alumni in Action Campaign. “As Alumni Council members, we really wanted to step forward and lead this campaign,” said alumnus George Lemon, ’65 electrical engineering technology. A member of both the Alumni Advisory Council and Stark State Foundation Board, George suggested the challenge to fellow board members because, “Everyone loves a challenge, and in this case, everyone wins because the money is being raised for student scholarships.

is a retired systems engineer with IBM in Raleigh, NC. He would like to hear from his fellow 1964 graduates and can be contacted at floyd@k8ac.net. He and his wife of 44 years, Donna, reside in Angier, NC. ’84

of One Gentle Spirit Holistic Services (www.onegentlespirit.com) and has opened offices in Jackson Township and Garrettsville. Her services include hypnotherapy, Reiki, aromatherapy and natural health counseling. The Canton resident is also producing audio CDs for hypnosis at home.

“As alumni of Stark State College, we understand firsthand the importance of providing scholarships to support students of all ages who are pursuing their academic goals at Stark State,” he pointed out. “When our students graduate, the majority of them stay right here in the community, working for local business and industry and enhancing our local economy. George Lemon ’65

“On a personal level, Stark State has been helpful to me in my business career and this is an opportunity to ‘give back’ to my alma mater,” said Lemon.

’89

’98

The Alumni Advisory Council is seeking nominees for the 2008 Alumni Hall of Fame. Induction will be during the May Commencement ceremonies. Professional and personal achievements, and service to the community, are key attributes for nominees. To nominate a deserving alum, please go to www.starkstate.edu/alumnihof to learn more and to submit a nomination form by the April 4 deadline. ’01

Your input is important to us and to Ohio’s future! Thanks for taking time to share your views.

What’s new with you?

Jody (Madick) Norris, ’98, medical assisting, is a practice coordinator with

Summa Health Systems in Akron. She coordinates and manages the day-to-day operations of three medical practices in the Akron area. She and her husband James recently built a home in Franklin Township where they live with their three children.

Nominees sought for 2008 Alumni Hall of Fame

Attention Stark State Alumni:

Pamela Basford, ’89, medical laboratory technology, was recently hired into the

microbiology department for Quest Diagnostics in Chantilly, VA. She currently resides in Stafford, VA.

To learn more and/or contribute to the Alumni in Action Campaign, go to www.starkstate.edu or call Jayne Sterner, 330-494-6170, Ext. 4416, or Para Jones, 494-6170, Ext. 4258.

A few minutes of your valuable time can help guide future workforce and economic development efforts in Northeast Ohio. We want to know what factors impact your employment decisions. Please take a few minutes to complete a Cleveland State University (CSU) online survey at http://urban.csuohio.edu/publicmanagement/survey.shtml

Cathy (Menegay) Daniels, ’84, computer technology, is the owner and practitioner

Kristopher Shrewsberry, ’01, electronic engineering technology, is an electronic

technician and field service engineer with Daktronics in Copley. He served as scoreboard technician and video operator for each game of the women’s softball competition during the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece. He and his wife Rachael reside in Wadsworth. ’05

Abbie (Baringer) McDonald, ’05, administrative information technology,

a receptionist with Interstate Pump Co., Inc. in Salem, was married in September 2006. She and her husband William reside in Beloit.

If you’ve had a special event in your life recently, perhaps a new job, promotion or a special honor, please let your Stark State College of Technology friends know about it! Complete the form on the Web at www.starkstate.edu/whatsnew If you have a high resolution photograph send it to: Stark State College of Technology, Alumni Office - S200, 6200 Frank Ave. N.W., North Canton, OH 44720 or electronically to webmaster@starkstate.edu. 11


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Stark State goes “extreme” Stark State College wants to spark the entrepreneurial spirit in students. The new entrepreneurship option in the

To kick-off the new program, the school arranged for a visit by Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour, comprised of many of America’s top young entrepreneurs who have earned millions in business, sold a company for millions,

business management technology

and/or made a huge impact before the age of 30! The

degree is designed to do just that.

vision of the tour is for all to embrace an entrepreneurial mindset. About 200 current and prospective students gathered to hear savvy young entrepreneurs share their secrets for success. “Instead of looking for job opportunities, we want our graduates to have the opportunity to create more jobs, said Michael Bodnar, dean of business technologies at Stark State. “The risk-taking spirit is the future for our youth and the opportunity for growth in our community.”

Pictured left to right are: Michael Bodnar, dean of business technologies, Jerry Myers, department chair of management and marketing technology, and the founders of Extreme Entrepreneurship Tour, 25-year-olds Sheena Lindani and Michael Simmons.

For information about the new entrepreneurship option, call the Stark State’s Office of Admissions at 330-494-6170.


Stark State Review Winter 2008 Edition