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The Story of Gabriel an~ Marie Maupin Huguenot Refugees to Virginia in 1700 Based on Research Gathered by Dr. Socrates Maupin (1837) and Continued from 1919-1944 by Eugene Maupin

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Compiled, edited and expanded by

DOROTHY MAUPIN SHAFFETT

EGLISE REFORMEE WALLONNE D' AMSTERDAM 1578

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~ GATEWAY PRESS, INC. '-路~-""""==-----""""=--.~.Baltimore, MD 2000


The Story of Gabriel and Marie Maupin Huguenot Refugees to Virginia in 1700 Based on Research Gathered by Dr. Socrates Maupin (1837) and Continued from 1919-1944 by Eugene Maupin

+

I

Compiled, edited and expanded by

DOROTHY MAUPIN SHAFFETI

EGLISE REFORMEE WALLONNE D' AMSTERDAM I) 7 8

~ IGATEWAY PRESS, INC. IL-.~===---.:::!!!!!:::......J. Baltimore, MD 2000


TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Copyright © 1993 by Dorothy Maupin Shaffett .. All rights reserved. Corrections and additions copyright © 1994 by Dorothy Maupin Shaffett All rights reserved. First printing, Baltimore, 1993 Second printing, Baltimore, 1994 Third printing, Baltimore, 2000 Permission to reproduce in any form must be secured from the author. Please direct all correspondence and book orders to: Dorothy Maupin Shaffett 1819 N. 82nd Street Kansas City, KS 66112-2005 Library of Congress Control Number 93-79302 Published for the author by Gateway Press, Inc. 1001 N. Calvert Street Baltimore, MD 21202

Foreword . . . • • • . • . . . . . • . • . • . . . • . • . • • • The First Reformation • . . . . . . • • . . • . . . • . . • • The Second Reformation • . • . • . • . • . • • . . • . • . • Early French History . • • . • • . • . . . . . . • . . . . . King Henry IV and the Edict of Nantes • . • . . . • . • Revocation of the Edict of Nantes • . . . . . . . . • . • Records of Maupins in France . . . . • . • • • . . . . . The Maupin Name . . . . . . . • • . . • . . . . . . . • . • . 1985 Huguenot Tour - England • • . • • . • . • . • . • The Search . . • • . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . • • Gary Maupin - His Contribution . . • . • . • • . . • . Voyage of Gabriel Maupin • . • . . . . . . . • . • • . . . Gabriel Maupin - Story of His Three Inns . . . • . • Will of Gabriel Maupin . . . . . . • . . • . • . . . . . . . . Indenture - York Co. VA Records • . . . • . . . . . • .

7 14 15 18 22 27 28 29 31 33 49 57 60 64 66

Part I Daniel, son of Gabriel and Marie Maupin

69

Section I Gabriel and Ann Ballard . • . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . Section II John and Frances Dabney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . Section III Daniel and Mary Elizabeth Dabney . . . . . . . . . . Section IV William and Mildred White Section V Zachariah and Elizabeth Jarman . . . . . . . • . . . Section VI Jesse and Lucy Jones Section VII Mary and Matthew Mullins Section VIII Jean and Samuel Rea (Ray) Section IX Margaret and Robert Miller . . . . . • . • . • . . . .

............

85 139

243 285

321 337 393

403 409

Part II Gabriel, son of Gabriel and Marie Maupin

419

Maupin Family Re-unions Bibliography . . . . . . . . Index

435 439 441

Printed in the United States of America

....j


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Copyright © 1993 by Dorothy Maupin Shaffett All rights reserved. Corrections and additions copyright © 1994 by Dorothy Maupin Shaffett All rights reserved. First printing, Baltimore, 1993 Second printing, Baltimore, 1994 Third printing, Baltimore, 2000 Permission to reproduce in any form must be secured from the author. Please direct all correspondence and book orders to: Dorothy Maupin Shaffett 1819 N. 82nd Street Kansas City, KS 66112-2005 Library of Congress Control Number 93-79302 Published for the author by Gateway Press, Inc. 1001 N. Calvert Street Baltimore, MD 21202

Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The First Reformation . • • . . . • . . . . • • • • • . . . . The Second Reformation . . • . • • • . • . • . • . • . • . . Early French History • . • . • . . . . . . • . . • . • . . . King Henry IV and the Edict of Nantes • . • . . . • • • Revocation of the Edict of Nantes • . . . . • . . . • . . Records of Maupins in France • . . . . . • . • . • . • . The Maupin Name . . • • • • . • . . . . . . . . • . . • • . . 1985 Huguenot Tour - England . . • . . . . . • . • . • The Search . . . . . . . . • . • . . . . . . . . . . . • • • • Gary Maupin - His Contribution • . • . • . • . • . . . Voyage of Gabriel Maupin . • • . . . . . . . • . . . . . . Gabriel Maupin - Story of His Three Inns . • . • . • Will of Gabriel Maupin . . • . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . Indenture - York Co. VA Records . . . . • . . . • . • .

7 14 15 18 22 27 28 29 31 33 49 57 60 64 66

Part I Daniel, son of Gabriel and Marie Maupin . . . . . . .

69

Section I Gabriel and Ann Ballard • . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . • Section II John and Frances Dabney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Section III Daniel and Mary Elizabeth Dabney . . . . . . . . • . Section IV William and Mildred White . . . . . . . . • • • . . . . . Section V Zachariah and Elizabeth Jarman . . . . . . • • . . . Section VI Jesse and Lucy Jones . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . Section VII Mary and Matthew Mullins . . . . • . . . . • . • . . . Section VIII Jean and Samuel Rea (Ray) . . . . . . • . • . • . . . • Section IX Margaret and Robert Miller . . . . . . . • . . . . . .

409

Part II Gabriel, son of Gabriel and Marie Maupin

419

85 139 243 285 321 337 393 403

Printed in the United States of America

Maupin Family Re-unions . . . . . • . • . • . . . . . • . 435 Bibliography . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . • . 439 Index 441


PREFACE As several books have been published on the Gabriel Maupin Family the reasons for this publication should be given. They are: FIRST:

To honor and preserve the work of the early researchers, especially EUGENE MAUPIN, whose work was published without due credit given to him.

SECOND: To either prove or disprove the family traditions and other facts which have been published, namely:

1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

7. THIRD:

That Gabriel's wife was Mary Spencer, an English woman. That Mary's father was the Earl of Spencer. That Gabriel was a General in the French Army. That Gabriel's family came from Navarre. That Gabriel's father was Amos, a descendant of Firmin Maupin. That Gabriel II was the elder son. That daughter Mary married a Presnell.

To document the true facts.

FOURTH: To give a better understanding to all family members of our wonderful Huguenot heritage and the contributions of the French Protestants to our country and the world in religious, artistic and political values.

,

'

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' PREFACE

#

As several books have been published on the Gabriel Maupin Family the reasons for this publication should be given. They are: FIRST:

To honor and preserve the work of the early researchers, especially EUGENE MAUPIN, whose work was published without due credit given to him.

SECOND: To either prove or disprove the family traditions and other facts which have been published, namely: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. THIRD:

That Gabriel's wife was Mary Spencer, an English woman. That Mary's father was the Earl of Spencer. That Gabriel was a General in the French Army. That Gabriel's family came from Navarre. That Gabriel's father was Amos, a descendant of Firmin Maupin. That Gabriel II was the elder son. That daughter Mary married a Presnell.

To document the true facts.

FOURTH: To give a better understanding to all family members of our wonderful Huguenot heritage and the contributions of the French Protestants to our country and the world In religious, artistic and political values.

,


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS After nearly 20 years of researching, corresponding, listening and learning about our MAUPIN family history, It is time to put it all in readable form, to tell how answers came to puzzling questions and give credit where credit is due. Certainly there is due to so many because our history covers many years and persons that no one person could possibly have It all. My work on this book has been no less than a labor of love - a special love of family, an ingredient that needs to be nurtured and Instilled in this present generation to preserve the future of our county. First, I am thankful that God gave me a curious mind - that in the beginning I began to doubt and search for answers to puzzling questions. We all acknowledge our debt to Dr. Socrates Maupin, our first researcher, who in 1837 put down the first history of the family for the descendants of Daniel Maupin, son of the immigrant, Gabriel Maupin and his wife, Marie. From Daniel's brother, Gabriel II to his descendant, Dr. George Washington Opie Maupin for his family research. The work of Eugene Maupin, William Harris Miller, Boyce Miller, Margaret Lewis Maupin and Mildred Holladay who followed along behind the early researchers to further our knowledge of Maupin history. The contribution to my fund of knowledge was broadened by many times with the gift from the daughters of Eugene Maupin, Madelaine Weisenborn and Jean Margaraet Timbrook, of all of Eugene's correspondence, files, and papers along with a copy of the final draft copy of his work. My appreciation to Florence Mary Maupin, Portsmouth, VA, for her work and encouragement; to Eulalia Blau, San Gabriel, CA, for her fine research, continuous sharing and for her special item of Identifying the house on Lot #352 in Colonial Williamsburg, the present Taliferro-Cole house, as belonging at the time of his death to Gabriel Maupin. To Carolyn Farmer, Houston, TX, for locating York County, VA, docurpents that tell us much about the life of Gabriel Maupin. To Bill Albertson, Kansas City, for sharing his intensive research. And to Dottie Lotker, Oberlin, KS, for her research, compiling and sharing on the Mosias Maupin Line; to Phyllis Bauer, McHenry, IL, for her efficient research, her help with computer labels, lists, and encouragement. To Patty Brown, Oberlin, KS, an "adopted" Maupin for her many hours at the computer typing on the first draft of this book when I was unable to use my right hand. To Lester Robinson, Plymouth, Ml, for his transcripts and videos; to Gary Maupin, Fairfax, VA, for sharing his trip to France in talk and film and his fine contribution in sponsoring Kevin Kertscher on a summer In France to do research on the Maupin family which provided much information. The most important


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS After nearly 20 years of researching, corresponding, listening and learning about our MAUPIN family history, It is time to put it all in readable form, to tell how answers came to puzzling questions and give credit where credit is due. Certainly there is due to so many because our history covers many years and persons that no one person could possibly have It all. My work on this book has been no less than a labor of love - a special love of family, an ingredient that needs to be nurtured and Instilled in this present generation to preserve the future of our county. First, I am thankful that God gave me a curious mind - that In the beginning I began to doubt and search for answers to puzzling questions. We all acknowledge our debt to Dr. Socrates Maupin, our first researcher, who In 1837 put down the first history of the family for the descendants of Daniel Maupin, son of the immigrant, Gabriel Maupin and his wife, Marie. From Daniel's brother, Gabriel II to his descendant, Dr. George Washington Opie Maupin for his family research. The work of Eugene Maupin, William Harris Miller, Boyce Miller, Margaret Lewis Maupin and Mildred Holladay who followed along behind the early researchers to further our knowledge of Maupin history. The contribution to my fund of knowledge was broadened by many times with the gift from the daughters of Eugene Maupin, Madelaine Weisenborn and Jean Margaraet Timbrook, of all of Eugene's correspondence, files, and papers along with a copy of the final draft copy of his work. My appreciation to Florence Mary Maupin, Portsmouth, VA, for her work and encouragement; to Eulalia Blau, San Gabriel, CA, for her fine research, continuous sharing and for her special item of Identifying the house on Lot #352 in Colonial Williamsburg, the present Taliferro-Cole house, as belonging at the time of his death to Gabriel Maupin. To Carolyn Farmer, Houston, TX, for locating York County, VA, docurpents that tell us much about the life of Gabriel Maupin. To Bill Albertson, Kansas City, for sharing his intensive research. And to Dottie Lotker, Oberlin, KS, for her research, compiling and sharing on the Moslas Maupin Line; to Phyllis Bauer, McHenry, IL, for her efficient research, her help with computer labels, lists, and encouragement. To Patty Brown, Oberlin, KS, an "adopted" Maupin for her many hours at the computer typing on the first draft of this book when I was unable to use my right hand. To Lester Robinson, Plymouth, MI, for his transcripts and videos; to Gary Maupin, Fairfax, VA, for sharing his trip to France In talk and film and his fine contribution in sponsoring Kevin Kertscher on a summer In France to do research on the Maupin family which provided much information. The most important

-L ..


being the location of the town of JARGEAU (Formerly Gargeau called "Gargau" by the Archives in Amsterdam). To the Societe de L'Histoire du Protestantisme Francais, Paris for information, suggestions and help in securing researchers and last but not least to my husband and family for the patience and understanding and to all the enthusiastic family members who have written and shared their history, my thanks and appreciation.

INTRODUCTION

'

I have been asked a number of times why I pursue and enjoy this "new" hobby of genealogy. My answer Is simple - it is not something "new" but as a Christian I was eager to know more about those who had gone before me and given me a Huguenot heritage. So we turn to the Scriptures. The New Testament begins with the Gospel of Matthew - Chapter 1 verses 1-11. It reads: "The book of the generations of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham, Abraham begat Isaac and Isaac begat Jacob". The begats go on through the generations to Jesus who Is called "Christ". The fact that Matthew began his gospel with the family tree of Jesus might seem to be useless to us but not so as it tells us things we need to know. Matthew knew his readers would be interested first of all because if they were good Hebrews they would see names they would recognize and say "So that is who Jesus was"! The Hebrews were very concerned about who a man was and kept the most careful genealogical records of any ancient peoples. They were as interested in genealogical tables as any of the modern lineage societies ever will be. This was true up to the time the Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed. You had to be in the right lineage to be in the Priesthood and if you claimed to be the Messiah you must surely be of the lineage of David. You remember the Christmas story begins by telling us that Joseph went up to the city of David which is called Bethlehem "because he was of the house at'ld lineage of David". And in Luke we find Mary's lineage back to David, through Abraham. In looking over the people in the lineage we find some questionable characters which could lead us to believe that the writers of the Gospels had some other message for us. My feeling Is that when God decided to come to earth in a human person he decided to do it in such a manner as really to identify himself with the human race. So we have Jesus working and living in a family like other men. That was God's way of identifying himself with us. Jesus had a family whose lineage could be traced, but like most families, there were fine people In it and there were some who almost anybody in their day and time would be ashamed to admit as their own. If Jesus had ancestors II ke Abraham and Jacob, he also had Rahab the harlot, Tamar the seducer and Bathsheba, for whom murder was committed and Ruth who was not a Jew but a Moabite. But there is something more subtle in the list of names that Matthew gives us - a truth that carries hope for all of us. When we look at the ancestors of Jesus we see some great and good people. Abraham, Isaac and others not so good. This is true for all of us and this Is an answer for those who ask "What if you find skeletons In your family tree?". And you do


INTRODUCTION

being the location of the town of JARGEAU (Formerly Gargeau called "Gargau" by the Archives in Amsterdam). To the Societe de L'Histoire du Protestantisme Francais, Paris for information, suggestions and help in securing researchers and last but not least to my husband and family for the patience and understanding and to all the enthusiastic family members who have written and shared their history, my thanks and appreciation. '

'

I have been asked a number of times why I pursue and enjoy this "new" hobby of genealogy. My answer is simple - it is not something "new" but as a Christian I was eager to know more about those who had gone before me and given me a Huguenot heritage. So we turn to the Scriptures. The New Testament begins with the Gospel of Matthew - Chapter 1 verses 1-17. It reads: "The book of the generations of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham, Abraham begat Isaac and Isaac begat Jacob". The begats go on through the generations to Jesus who is called "Christ". The fact that Matthew began his gospel with the family tree of Jesus might seem to be useless to us but not so as it tells us things we need to know. Matthew knew his readers would be interested first of all because if they were good Hebrews they would see names they would recognize and say "So that is who Jesus was"! The Hebrews were very concerned about who a man was and kept the most careful genealogical records of any ancient peoples. They were as interested in genealogical tables as any of the modern lineage societies ever will be. This was true up to the time the Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed. You had to be in the right lineage to be in the Priesthood and if you claimed to be the Messiah you must surely be of the lineage of David. You remember the Christmas story begins by telling us that Joseph went up to the city of David which is called Bethlehem "because he was of the house al'ld lineage of David". And in Luke we find Mary's lineage back to David, through Abraham. In looking over the people in the lineage we find some questionable characters which could lead us to believe that the writers of the Gospels had some other message for us. My feeling Is that when God decided to come to earth In a human person he decided to do it in such a manner as really to identify himself with the human race. So we have Jesus working and living in a family like other men. That was God's way of identifying himself with us. Jesus had a family whose lineage could be traced, but like most families, there were fine people in it and there were some who almost anybody in their day and time would be ashamed to admit as their own. If Jesus had ancestors like Abraham and Jacob, he also had Rahab the harlot, Tamar the seducer and Bathsheba, for whom murder was committed and Ruth who was not a Jew but a Moabite. But there is something more subtle in the list of names that Matthew gives us - a truth that carries hope for all of us. When we look at the ancestors of Jesus we see some great and good people. Abraham, Isaac and others not so good. This is true for all of us and this is an answer for those who ask "What if you find skeletons in your family tree?". And you do

....&.c...


get that question. You will notice that the only women mentioned in the list, Tamar, Rahab, Bathsheba and Ruth, were women about whom there were some questions. The mere fact that the women were mentioned at all Is remarkable in view of the fact that among ancient peoples, Including the Hebrews, women were not worth mentioning. Women had no legal rights. They were treated as "things" and not as persons. They were possessed, owned by father or husband. In the genealogy of Jesus every woman listed had a question about her. For three of them it was morals and the fourth was not Jewish. Matthew is saying to people who have a taint In the blood or a family heritage which is doubtful that you路 don't have to settle for that. It Is true we cannot pick our biological ancestors but we can pick the spiritual ones to follow. In Matthew's Gospel we can read this family history of Jesus and become aware of the love of God. If we feel there is evil back in our family history that we are ashamed of or even in our own personal life which will keep us from being what we ought to be- we can take heart from this Scripture. The lineage of Jesus was not perfect and neither is our own. God knows this and it makes me so thankful for the Christian heritage given to us by our Huguenot ancestors, Gabriel and Marie Hersent Maupin. In my thankfulness for a Christian upbringing, I began to read everything I could find on the history of Christianity. Other religions, such as Islam, were studied as well. How did Islam gain such a following from the 7th century until now when it is such a force in the world? What was wrong with the Church in those early centuries that caused so much dissension and brought on religious wars? History shows that from man's beginnings the sins of greed, love and misuse of power, intolerance and prejudice have been with us. The lines of the royal families in France and England were of special interest to me because of the family tradition that Gabriel had a royal lineage and possibly his wife, Marie, in England. I have put down in the next chapters some of the facts I have learned, to share with my readers who perhaps have not had the opportunity to read and to better understand and appreciate our French ancestry and Huguenot heritage.

FOREWORD Like a lot of people I did not become interested in our Maupin Family history until the older members of my family were gone. In 1965 I found William Harris Miller's "History and Genealogies" in our Kansas City, Mo. Public Library. Mr. Miller had written mostly about the Kentucky Maupins. My grandfather, Silas Bernard Maupin was listed in it and that started me on my search. I enrolled in a Jr. college class in genealogy and right away started taking every class and seminar I could get. About 1962 Mrs. Nell Sherman published "The Maupin Family" and in 1969 Ruby Heard Maupin of Missouri (now Utah) published a book on the family. I got the books and literally memorized them. Ruby, I knew from our Maupin reunions and I talked several times on the phone with Mrs. Sherman in Illinois. In 1973, I went to Charlottesville, VA, and while there visited the Alderman Library of the University of Virginia. I learned some very interesting things that were contrary to the information I had used as documentation to join several lineage organizations. This information was from published books and articles such as "History and Genealogies" and the Virginia Magazine. The new information came from the papers of Dr. Socrates Maupin listed under File #6069 there in the Virginia Library. This started me on my great search for the truth. ' I learned that the first family historian for the descendants of Daniel, son of Gabriel and Marie Maupin, was Dr. Socrates Maupin. His father was Chapman White Maupin and his mother was Mary Graves Spencer, daughter of John Spencer and Rosanna Graves. She was one of the three Spencer sisters, Mary, Sarah and Anna, who married Maupin men. In 1837, Dr. Socrates married Sally Hay Washington. With his mother's name being Spencer and his wife's Washington family connection to the Spencer family in England, he began putting down the history of his family. In reading his work over and over again, I became curious about the fact that NOWHERE in it did he give a surname for Gabriel's wife, Marie. He said nothing about her being English. In fact, he starts by writing in his fine small hand (I have original copies of his handwriting so know what is his) "Gabriel Maupin and his wife, Marie, FRENCH HUGUENOTS". From his records we have the first generations of the Daniel Maupin family, son of the immigrant, Gabriel. I have in my possession an original chart made in 1837 by Dr. Socrates showing the Daniel descendants with the title at the top of the chart "GABRIEL MAUPIN and MARY of FRANCE". Sometime before he was killed in an accident in 1871, he started working on the Maupin history with Dr. George Washington Opie Maupin of Portsmouth, VA, a descendant of the immigrant's younger son, Gabriel II. Together they made a chart of the family showing

7


get that question. You will notice that the only women mentioned in the list, Tamar, Rahab, Bathsheba and Ruth, were women about whom there were some questions. The mere fact that the women were mentioned at all Is remarkable in view of the fact that among ancient peaples, Including the Hebrews, women were not worth mentioning. Women had no legal rights. They were treated as "things" and not as persons. They were possessed, owned by father or husband. In the genealogy of Jesus every woman listed had a question about her. For three of them it was morals and the fourth was not Jewish. Matthew is saying to people who have a taint In the blood or a family heritage which is doubtful that you路 don't have to settle for that. It is true we cannot pick our biological ancestors but we can pick the spiritual ones to follow. 路 In Matthew's Gospel we can read this family history of Jesus and become aware of the love of God. If we feel there is evil back in our family history that we are ashamed of or even in our own personal life which will keep us from being what we ought to be- we can take heart from thiS Scripture. The lineage of Jesus was not perfect and neither is our own. God knows this and it makes me so thankful for the christian heritage given to us by our Huguenot ancestors, Gabriel and Marie Hersent Maupin. In my thankfulness for a Christian upbringing, I began to read everything I could find on the history of Christianity. Other religions, such as Islam, were studied as well. How did Islam gain such a following from the 7th century until now when It is such a force in the world? What was wrong with the Church in those early centuries that caused so much dissension and brought on religious wars? HistorY shows that from man's beginnings the sins of greed, love and misuse of power, Intolerance and prejudice have been with us. The lines of the royal families in France and England were of special interest to me because of the family tradition that Gabriel had a royal lineage and possibly his wife, Marie, in England. I have put down In the next chapters some of the facts I have learned, to share with my readers who perhaps have not had the opportunity to read and to better understand and appreciate our French ancestry and Huguenot heritage.

FOREWORD Like a lot of people I did not become interested in our Maupin Family history until the older members of my family were gone. In 1965 I found William Harris Miller's "History and Genealogies" in our Kansas City, Mo. PubJic Library. Mr. Miller had written mostly about the Kentucky Maupins. My grandfather, Silas Bernard Maupin was listed in it and that started me on my search. I enrolled in a Jr. college class in genealogy and right away started taking every class and seminar I could get. About 1962 Mrs. Nell Sherman published "The Maupin Family" and in 1969 Ruby Heard Maupin of Missouri (now Utah) published a book on the family. I got the books and literally memorized them. Ruby, I knew from our Maupin reunions and I tal ked several times on the phone with Mrs. Sherman in Illinois. In 1973, I went to Charlottesvi lie, VA, and while there visited the Alderman Library of the University of Virginia. I learned some very interesting things that were contrary to the information I had used as documentation to join several lineage organizations. This information was from published books and articles such as "History and Genealogies" and the Virginia Magazine. The new information came from the papers of Dr. Socrates Maupin listed under File #6069 there in the Virginia Library. This started me on my great search for the truth. 路 ' I learned that the first family historian for the descendants of Daniel, son of Gabriel and Marie Maupin, was Dr. Socrates Maupin. His father was Chapman White Maupin and his mother was Mary Graves Spencer, daughter of John Spencer and Rosanna Graves. She was one of the three Spencer sisters, Mary, Sarah and Anna, who married Maupin men. In 1837, Dr. Socrates married Sally Hay Washington. With his mother's name being Spencer and his wife's Washington family connection to the Spencer family in England, he began putting down the history of his family. In reading his work over and over again, I became curious about the fact that NOWHERE in It did he give a surname for Gabriel's wife, Marie. He said nothing about her being English. In fact, he starts by writing in his fine small hand (I have original copies of his handwriting so know what is his) "Gabriel Maupin and his wife, Marie, FRENCH HUGUENOTS". From his records we have the first generations of the Daniel Maupin family, son of the immigrant, Gabriel. I have in my possession an original chart made in 1837 by Dr. Socrates showing the Daniel descendants with the title at the top of the chart "GABRIEL MAUPIN and MARY of FRANCE". Sometime before he was killed in an accident in 1871, he started working on the Maupin history with Dr. George Washington Ople Maupin of Portsmouth, VA, a descendant of the immigrant's younger son, Gabriel II. Together they made a chart of the family showing

7


descendants of both sons, Daniel and Gabriel II. On the written history and the chart made by the two doctors NO surname is given for Marie (Mary). So how did these differences occur in the later publications? That was the puzzle I set out to solve. From the time of the death of Dr. Socrates in 1871 and the death of Dr. George Washington Opie Maupin in 1887, nothing had been published on the Maupin history. In June, 1901 there appeared in the VIRGINIA MAGAZINE published by the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond, VA, in Volume VIII, beginning on page 216 an article entitled "The MAUPIN FAMILY" listing as the author only "Communicated". This information I had used on my lineage papers. It reads as follows: "Some years ago the writer commenced to trace his Maupin ancestry back to the French Huguenot who fled from France and settled in Virginia. For over two years he wrote to every Maupin that he could learn anything about or whose post office address he could obtain. All that he could find was that the family was of French origin and they were descendants of a Daniel Maupin. Finally after almost giving up in despair a copy of the Maupin family tree was obtained from Dr. Maupin of Portsmouth, VA, a member of the elder branch of the family. This tree gave a complete list of the great-grandchildren of Gabriel Maupin, and including whom they married, as well as the family tree of the elder branch of the family down to within the last generation. Gabriel Maupin, the French Exile, was a French Officer who incurred the displeasure of the King on account of his religion and fled the Kingdom in 1699, with his wife, and son Gabriel. Gabriel Maupin remained in England with his father-in-law, Earl Spencer, an English Nobleman, for several months during which time a second son, Daniel, was born in 1700. He emigrated to Virginia in the year 1700 and settled in Williamsburg. The will of Gabriel Maupin (1st) dated September 2, 1719, with a codicil dated December 1, 1719 was proven in General Court at the Capitol, April 20, 1720, his wife Mary being executrix. How long the latter survived her husband is not known, nor is it known when his daughter Mary was born or what became of her. It is not the intention of the writer to give the tree as was obtained but that as it relates to the younger branch, the descendants of Daniel Maupin and the following is an exact copy, except that part in brackets." END OF QUOTE. The Virginia Magazine is a highly respected publication but here now in 1901 appears facts about the Maupin family that were evidently unknown to the first researchers, Dr. Socrates and Dr. George Washington Opie Maupin who were years closer to the immigrant than the author "Communicated." The new facts in the article were: 1. That Gabriel was a French officer. 2. That he had left France with a wife and a son, Gabriel. 3. That his father-in-law was Earl Spencer, an English Nobleman, which meant that Mary's surname was Spencer. I wrote to the

8

Virginia Historical Society in Richmond to see if they could give me the name of the person who was writing as "Communicated". They answered that due to the length of time lapsed there was no way they could tell me who was "Communicated." In 1907, another publication appeared that I had used in my lineage papers along with the Virginia Magazine article. It was "History and Genealogies: by William Harris Miller. Part V of the book is Maupin history beginning on page 388. He repeats some of the same information as given in the Virginia Magazine with this difference, Gabriel Maupin is called a "General" in the French Army. He repeats that Gabriel's wife was Marie Spencer, daughter of Earl Spencer, an English Nobleman. Mr. Miller's work had been done without the knowledge of Dr. Socrates' papers and concerned itself mostly with those families who had migrated to Kentucky. Another puzzle to solve - Gabriel was In 1920, Miss Nannie now a "General" in the F"rench Army! Maupin of Portsmouth, VA, a Gabriel II descendant, saw one of Mr. Miller's books and wrote to him. This was Mr. Miller's first contact with the Portsmouth descendants of Gabriel II, brother of Daniel. In 1976, I was privileged to be included in the Bi-Centennial Genealogical Seminar at the National Archives In Washington, D.C. We had the tops in each field as our instructors. Frank Smith, an English genealogist, was there and I asked him about the possibility of Gabriel's wife being of the Earl of Althrop (Spencer) family. He was very doubtful because he said that line had been so thoroughly researched. After that I started my search in earnest to find the answers to these differences. Noting that Mrs. Sherman and Ruby Maupin had published very similar stories in 1962 and 1969, I called Mrs. Sherman to ask if they had a common source. She was very ill but told me her information had come from a very early researcher, a EUGENE MAUPIN, of Clarence, MO, and that he had two daughters and gave me the name of one of them. She lived in north Missouri. I made a trip there and that opened up a whole new area of research. Both Mrs. Sherman and Ruby Maupin had used Eugene Maupin's unpublished material. This early researcher, EUGENE MAUPIN, was born in 1888 in Clarence, MO, the son of Samuel Rice Maupin. In 1911, he married Frankie Woods Maupin, daughter of Nathaniel Maupin. He began his study about 1919 - he died suddenly in 1944 before he could publish his history. In 1920, he and William Harris Miller got together and they kept up a lively correspondence, exchanging information and trying to get their records correct. Mr. Miller was so pleased to at last have access to the information given by Dr. Socrates Maupin and with Miss Nannie Maupin about the Gabriel II descendants. Another person joined these two researchers, Margaret Lewis Maupin, granddaughter of Dr. Socrates Maupin. She supplied them with many original writings and letters of her grandfather.

9


descendants of both sons, Daniel and Gabriel II. On the written history and the chart made by the two doctors NO surname is given for Marie (Mary). So how did these differences occur in the later publications? That was the puzzle I set out to solve. From the time of the death of Dr. Socrates in 1871 and the death of Dr. George Washington Opie Maupin in 1887, nothing had been published on the Maupin history. In June, 1901 there appeared in the VIRGINIA MAGAZINE published by the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond, VA, in Volume VIII, beginning on page 216 an article entitled "The MAUPIN FAMILY" listing as the author only "Communicated". This information I had used on my lineage papers. It reads as follows: "Some years ago the writer commenced to trace his Maupin ancestry back to the French Huguenot who fled from France and settled in Virginia. For over two years he wrote to every Maupin that he could learn anything about or whose post office address he could obtain. All that he could find was that the family was of French origin and they were descendants of a Daniel Maupin. Finally after almost giving up in despair a copy of the Maupin family tree was obtained from Dr. Maupin of Portsmouth, VA, a member of the elder branch of the family. This tree gave a complete list of the great-grandchildren of Gabriel Maupin, and including whom they married, as well as the family tree of the elder branch of the family down to within the last generation. Gabriel Maupin, the French Exile, was a French Officer who incurred the displeasure of the King on account of his religion and fled the Kingdom in 1699, with his wife, and son Gabriel. Gabriel Maupin remained in England with his father-in-law, Earl Spencer, an English Nobleman, for several months during which time a second son, Daniel, was born in 1700. He emigrated to Virginia in the year 1700 and settled in Williamsburg. The will of Gabriel Maupin (1st) dated September 2, 1719, with a codicil dated December 1, 1719 was proven in General Court at the Capitol, April 20, 1720, his wife Mary being executrix. How long the latter survived her husband is not known, nor is it known when his daughter Mary was born or what became of her. 路 It is not the intention of the writer to give the tree as was obtained but that as it relates to the younger branch, the descendants of Daniel Maupin and the following is an exact copy, except that part in brackets." END OF QUOTE. The Virginia Magazine is a highly respected publication but here now in 1901 appears facts about the Maupin family that were evidently unknown to the first researchers, Dr. Socrates and Dr. George Washington Opie Maupin who were years closer to the immigrant than the author "Communicated." The new facts in the article were: 1. That Gabriel was a French officer. 2. That he had left France with a wife and a son, Gabriel. 3. That his father-in-law was Earl Spencer, an English Nobleman, which meant that Mary's surname was Spencer. I wrote to the

8

Virginia Historical Society in Richmond to see if they could give me the name of the person who was writing as "Communicated". They answered that due to the length of time lapsed there was no way they could tell me who was "Communicated." In 1907, another publication appeared that I had used in my lineage papers along with the Virginia Magazine article. It was "History and Genealogies: by William Harris Miller. Part V of the book is Maupin history beginning on page 388. He repeats some of the same information as given in the Virginia Magazine with this difference, Gabriel Maupin is called a "General" in the French Army. He repeats that Gabriel's wife was Marie Spencer, daughter of Earl Spencer, an English Nobleman. Mr. Miller's work had been done without the knowledge of Dr. Socrates' papers and concerned itself mostly with those families who had migrated to Kentucky. Another puzzle to solve - Gabriel was now a "General" in the F'rench Army! In 1920, Miss Nannie Maupin of Portsmouth, VA, a Gabriel II descendant, saw one of Mr. Miller's books and wrote to him. This was Mr. Miller's first contact with the Portsmouth descendants of Gabriel II, brother of Daniel. In 1976, I was privileged to be included in the Bi-Centennial Genealogical Seminar at the National Archives In Washington, D.C. We had the tops in each field as our instructors. Frank Smith, an English genealogist, was there and I asked him about the possibility of Gabriel's wife being of the Earl of Althrop (Spencer) family. He was very doubtful because he said that line had been so thoroughly researched. After that I started my search in earnest to find the answers to these differences. Noting that Mrs. Sherman and Ruby Maupin had published very similar stories in 1962 and 1969, I called Mrs. Sherman to ask if they had a common source. She was very ill but told me her information had come from a very early researcher, a EUGENE MAUPIN, of Clarence, MO, and that he had two daughters and gave me the name of one of them. She lived in north Missouri. I made a trip there and that opened up a whole new area of research. Both Mrs. Sherman and Ruby Maupin had used Eugene Maupin's unpublished material. This early researcher, EUGENE MAUPIN, was born in 1888 in Clarence, MO, the son of Samuel Rice Maupin. In 1911, he married Frankie Woods Maupin, daughter of Nathaniel Maupin. He began his study about 1919 - he died suddenly in 1944 before he could publish his history. In 1920, he and William Harris Miller got together and they kept up a lively correspondence, exchanging information and trying to get their records correct. Mr. Miller was so pleased to at last have access to the information given by Dr. Socrates Maupin and with Miss Nannie Maupin about the Gabriel II descendants. Another person joined these two researchers, Margaret Lewis Maupin, granddaughter of Dr. Socrates Maupin. She supplied them with many original writings and letters of her grandfather.

9


Unfortunately Eugene Maupin died in 1944 before he could publish his work. After the death of Eugene's wife in 1968, the two publications referred to in the beginning of this article appeared. They were in reality the work of Eugene maupin with additions. The first one, "The Maupin Family" by Mrs. Nell Sherman who had written to Eugene a few years before his death and he had given her permission to use whatever he had shared with her. The other publication by Ruby Heard Maupin had come to her through Mr. Harris Dickey, a fellow researcher of Eugene's. Eugene used his own system of numbering the family members by generations so it is easy to find Eugene's work in the book by Ruby Maupin which was re-arranged in alphabetical order. The same numbering system will be shown in this book to IDENTIFY Eugene's work which continued through most of the fifth and some of the sixth generations. What this writer has tried to do is to correct known errors and then go back and fill in the information on the early generations that was not known to the early researchers and has been supplied by the present day descendants. Names in the early generations that have an asterisk (*) before them are the lines of descendants who have given me their information. It is added later rather than being inserted into Eugene's work. It is to be emphasized that the information supplied by the present descendants HAS NOT been documented by this writer. What has been the goal of this writer was to document all the early history of the family because it was felt that some of the early traditions were not correct. Also, because of the scope of this endeavor no individual family pictures will be included. It is hoped that family members, using the documented material for the early beginnings will continue on with their own individual family record, telling their own interesting family events and including their pictures. In 1980, I answered a query in the DAR Magazine from a Florence Mary Maupin of Portsmouth, VA, asking for help on the surname of one of her grandmothers, Judith, wife of Gabriel II. Being very happy to find someone working on the line of the immigrant's son, Gabriel II, I answered promptly. This began a lively correspondence and exchange of information that continues to this day. It resulted in Florence Mary's publication of her family papers in 1981. They contain much interesting information but of course do not reflect the changes that have been found in these later years. Copies were placed in these libraries: DAR Library, Washington, D.C.; Huguenot Library College of William and Mary; Virginia Historical Society; Virginia State Library, University of Virginia; University of Kansas and University of Missouri. It was also in 1980 that Mrs. Carol Farmer of Houston, TX, visited the courthouse of York Co. VA, and discovered some interesting documents in relation to 10

"

Gabriel Maupin. They will be described and where to find them as they fit into the history. Following Mrs. Sherman's advice, I made the trip to north Missouri to meet with Eugene's daughters, Mrs. Madeline Weisenborn and Mrs. Jean Margaret Timbrook. They were delightful hosts and we had a wonderful time visiting. They had not known their father's work had been published. They offered me a copy of his history of the Maupin family if I could do an update of his work that路 I would give him full credit that he deserves. This I promised to do. To these two daughters I owe a deep debt of gratitude because of their generosity in giving me their father's files with all his notes, letters and other correspondence. Many answers have come from these files. One important answer found in Eugene's files was the name of the author "Communicated" that appeared in the Virginia Magazine in 1901. It was Mr. J. A. Bishop of Selma, AL. He wrote Eugene in 1922 saying that the information on the chart had been sent to him by Dr. Maupin of Portsmouth, VA. Then he gave his own lineage, that of his Mother who was from John and Frances Dabney Maupin and that of his stepfather who raised him, Daniel and Betsy Gentry Maupin. Those two lines had been enlarged upon in the article and in brackets. He then told of a later visit to Portsmouth and Norfolk, VA, with Dr. Maupin and being entertained at the home of Dr. Maupin's brother, William Ashton Maupin. It must be explained here that the Dr. Maupin Mr. Bishop is writing about is not the Dr. George Washington Opie Maupin that worked with Dr. Socrates Maupin on the family chart. This is his son, Dr. George Washington Opie Maupin, Jr. and his brother, William Ashton Maupin. In order for the article to have been published in the Virginia Magazine in 1901 the information would have had to have been given to Mr. Bishop sometime before or around 1900. This Dr. Maupin does appear in the June 1900 census living in Portsmouth. The chart is correct but the other information whether misunderstood by Bishop or given incorrectly by Dr. Maupin we will never know but since later research has proved it to be false it can now be forgotten. For the next question - where did Mr. Miller get the information for his book on the beginnings of the Maupin family? None other than from Mr. Bishop who wrote Eugene that he shared his information from Dr. Maupin with his "friend and kinsman" William Harris Miller. How and why Mr. Miller promoted Gabriel to a "General" I do not know. Also in Eugene's files are a dozen or more letters from Dr. Socrates' nephew, Charles Smith Maupin who until he was about 15 years old, lived with his grandmother, Mary Graves Spencer Maupin, Dr. Socrates' mother. He relates how the three Spencer girls who married Maupins, Mary, Sarah, and Anna, that THEIR father, John Spencer, was a descendant of the Earl of Spencer and because his ancestor was a second son he was let out of the 11

_A


I"

Unfortunately Eugene Maupin died in 1944 before he could publish his work. After the death of Eugene's wife in 1968, the two publications referred to in the beginning of this article appeared. They were in reality the work of Eugene maupin with additions. The first one, "The Maupin Family" by Mrs. Nell Sherman who had written to Eugene a few years before his death and he had given her permission to use whatever he had shared with her. The other publication by Ruby Heard Maupin had come to her through Mr. Harris Dickey, a fellow researcher of Eugene's. Eugene used his own system of numbering the family members by generations so it is easy to find Eugene's work in the book by Ruby Maupin which was re-arranged in alphabetical order. The same numbering system will be shown in this book to IDENTIFY Eugene's work which continued through most of the fifth and some of the sixth generations. What this writer has tried to do is to correct known errors and then go back and fill in the information on the early generations that was not known to the early researchers and has been supplied by the present day descendants. Names in the early generations that have an asterisk (*) before them are the lines of descendants who have given me their information. It is added later rather than being inserted into Eugene's work. It is to be emphasized that the information supplied by the present descendants HAS NOT been documented by this writer. What has been the goal of this writer was to document all the early history of the family because it was felt that some of the early traditions were not correct. Also, because of the scope of this endeavor no individual family pictures will be included. It is hoped that family members, using the documented material for the early beginnings will continue on with their own individual family record, telling their own interesting family events and including their pictures. In 1980, I answered a query in the DAR Magazine from a Florence Mary Maupin of Portsmouth, VA, asking for help on the surname of one of her grandmothers, Judith, wife of Gabriel II. Being very happy to find someone working on the line of the immigrant's son, Gabriel II, I answered promptly. This began a lively correspondence and exchange of information that continues to this day. It resulted in Florence Mary's publication of her family papers in 1981. They contain much interesting information but of course do not reflect the changes that have been found in these later years. Copies were placed in these libraries: DAR Library, Washington, D.C.; Huguenot Library College of William and Mary; Virginia Historical Society; Virginia State Library, University of Virginia; University of Kansas and University of Missouri. It was also in 1980 that Mrs. Carol Farmer of Houston, TX, visited the courthouse of York Co. VA, and discovered some interesting documents in relation to

Gabriel Maupin. They will be described and where to find them as they fit into the history. Following Mrs. Sherman's advice, I made the trip to north Missouri to meet with Eugene's daughters, Mrs. Madeline Weisenborn and Mrs. Jean Margaret Timbrook. They were delightful hosts and we had a wonderful time visiting. They had not known their father's work had been published. They offered me a copy of his history of the Maupin family if I could do an update of his work that I would give him full credit that he deserves. This I promised to do. To these two daughters I owe a deep debt of gratitude because of their generosity in giving me their father's files with all his notes, letters and other correspondence. Many answers have come from these files. One important answer found in Eugene's files was the name of the author "Communicated" that appeared in the Virginia Magazine in 1901. It was Mr. J. A. Bishop of Selma, AL. He wrote Eugene in 1922 saying that the information on the chart had been sent to him by Dr. Maupin of Portsmouth, VA. Then he gave his own lineage, that of his Mother who was from John and Frances Dabney Maupin and that of his stepfather who raised him, Daniel and Betsy Gentry Maupin. Those two lines had been enlarged upon in the article and in brackets. He then told of a later visit to Portsmouth and Norfolk, VA, with Dr. Maupin and being entertained at the home of Dr. Maupin's brother, William Ashton Maupin. It must be explained here that the Dr. Maupin Mr. Bishop is writing about is not the Dr. George Washington Opie Maupin that worked with Dr. Socrates Maupin on the family chart. This is his son, Dr. George Washington Opie Maupin, Jr. and his brother, William Ashton Maupin. In order for the article to have been published in the Virginia Magazine in 1901 the information would have had to have been given to Mr. Bishop sometime before or around 1900. This Dr. Maupin does appear in the June 1900 census living in Portsmouth. The chart is correct but the other information whether misunderstood by Bishop or given incorrectly by Dr. Maupin we will never know but since later research has proved it to be false it can now be forgotten. For the next question - where did Mr. Miller get the information for his book on the beginnings of the Maupin family? None other than from Mr. Bishop who wrote Eugene that he shared his information from Dr. Maupin with his "friend and kinsman" William Harris Miller. How and why Mr. Miller promoted Gabriel to a "General" I do not know. Also in Eugene's files are a dozen or more letters from Dr. Socrates' nephew, Charles Smith Maupin who until he was about 15 years old, lived with his grandmother, Mary Graves Spencer Maupin, Dr. Socrates' mother. He relates how the three Spencer girls who married Maupins, Mary, Sarah, and Anna, that THEIR father, John Spencer, was a descendant of the Earl of Spencer and because his ancestor was a second son he was let out of the

10 11

_..,

..


inheritance and came to the Colonies. This tradition sounds very reasonable to me and one I hope to be able to research and prove at a later date. All descendants who have these three Spencer sisters as ancestors should do what they can to prove this tradition. At the bottom of Dr. Socrates' 1837 family chart he has his mother's Spencer line showing "Richard Spencer, from England Jan. 2, 1634 (prob)" which would mean he was doubtful about either the date or the first name of his Spencer ancestor. This needs to be verified. This shows how the incorrect information from Mr. Bishop's article in the Virginia Magazine and then passing it to Mr. Miller for his book in 1907 was taken as Gospel and passed down. Also In Eugene's files are about thirty letters from Dr. Socrates' granddaughter, Margaret Lewis Maupin. She is the one who put her grandfather's papers in the Virginia library with some additions from other persons. Eugene Maupin's writings reflect the traditions of both the Virginia Magazine and Mr. Miller's work. Another very important piece of information in the files was in one letter from William Miller. He writes that in 1920 he received from Miss Nannie Maupin of Portsmouth, VA, a copy of the genealogy of a French family of Navarre, de Poussemothe, en Bern, a Paris et an Bretagne. In this genealogy is recorded that Jean de Poussemothe married in Paris the 30th September 1549, Genevieve le Maupin, daughter of Firmin le Maupin, Sieur of Bouvaque, Avocat au Parlement et Jeanne d'Aibisse. It is believed that this information is the source of the tradition that Gabriel came from Navarre but that subject will be covered in the information about Gabriel's birth and parents. Eugene's files have been a great source of interest and knowledge for me. I appreciate greatly his neat, painstaking work with file folders for each correspondent and subject. We have to remember that the researcher of those early days did not have all the aids and conveniences we have today - no indexed census books to hurry the process along - no computer printouts to make the job quick and easy - a lot of person to person visitations and going to whatever courthouses were available to them. I feel Dr. Socrates, Dr. Washington Maupin, Mr. Miller and Eugene would be much interested in some of the information on documents which have been recently found on the Maupin family and how they were acquired. Eugene expressed some doubts in his writings- one was that the Mary Maupin who married a Pressnel was not Gabriel's daughter and he was right! All the Maupin family owe Eugene and William Miller much because of their early research that could be added to the beginnings given to us by Dr. Socrates and Dr. George WAshington Opie Maupin. Our history would not be so complete without their work. I will close this section with a quote from one of Eugene's letters to William Harris Miller. "If I do not get a book published I will copy my notes in a connected form and send them to you to put with your other manuscripts and maybe 12

some day some future historian of the family will find our work and bless us as I do those whose notes unravel so many hard knots for me". And I say, "Eugene, I do bless you and your two daughters, Madeline and Jean Margaret, for sharing you and your work with the whole Maupin family, descendants of Gabriel and Marie Maupin.

13


inheritance and came to the Colonies. This tradition sounds very reasonable to me and one I hope to be able to research and prove at a later date. All descendants who have these three Spencer sisters as ancestors should do what they can to prove this tradition. At the bottom of Dr. Socrates' 1837 family chart he has his mother's Spencer line showing "Richard Spencer, from England Jan. 2, 1634 (prob)" which would mean he was doubtful about either the date or the first name of his Spencer ancestor. This needs to be verified. This shows how the incorrect information from Mr. Bishop's article in the Virginia Magazine and then passing it to Mr. Miller for his book in 1907 was taken as Gospel and passed down. Also In Eugene's files are about thirty letters from Dr. Socrates' granddaughter, Margaret Lewis Maupin. She is the one who put her grandfather's papers in the Virginia library with some additions from other persons. Eugene Maupin's writings reflect the traditions of both the Virginia Magazine and Mr. Miller's work. Another very important piece of information in the files was in one letter from William Miller. He writes that in 1920 he received from Miss Nannie Maupin of Portsmouth, VA, a copy of the genealogy of a French family of Navarre, de Poussemothe, en Bern, a Paris et an Bretagne. In this genealogy is recorded that Jean de Poussemothe married in Paris the 30th September 1549, Genevieve le Maupin, daughter of Firmin le Maupin, Sieur of Bouvaque, Avocat au Parlement et Jeanne d'Aibisse. It is believed that this information is the source of the tradition that Gabriel came from Navarre but that subject will be covered in the information about Gabriel's birth and parents. Eugene's files have been a great source of interest and knowledge for me. I appreciate greatly his neat, painstaking work with file folders for each correspondent and subject. We have to remember that the researcher of those early days did not have all the aids and conveniences we have today - no indexed census books to hurry the process along - no computer printouts to make the job quick and easy - a lot of person to person visitations and going to whatever courthouses were available to them. I feel Dr. Socrates, Dr. Washington Maupin, Mr. Miller and Eugene would be much interested in some of the information on documents which have been recently found on the Maupin family and how they were acquired. Eugene expressed some doubts in his writings -one was that the Mary Maupin who married a Pressnel was not Gabriel's daughter and he was right! All the Maupin family owe Eugene and William Miller much because of their early research that could be added to the beginnings given to us by Dr. Socrates and Dr. George WAshington Opie Maupin. Our history would not be so complete without their work. I will close this section with a quote from one of Eugene's letters to William Harris Miller. "If I do not get a book published I will copy my notes in a connected form and send them to you to put with your other manuscripts and maybe

some day some future historian of the family will find our work and bless us as I do those whose notes unravel so many hard knots for me". And I say, "Eugene, I do bless you and your two daughters, Madeline and Jean Margaret, for sharing you and your work with the whole Maupin family, descendants of Gabriel arid Marie Maupin.

12

13


THE FIRST REFORMATION The first French Reformation, which was clearly an attempt to separate the Church of Christ from its feudal trappings and to acquire for it a new freedom with a personal access to God, took place in the French city of Lyon more than 300 years before Martin Luther and John Calvin. In the year 1174 a rich merchant of that city, named Waldo, discovered that Christ had told the rich young man who came to him asking how he may have eternal life, "to sell all his belongings and give to the poor". (Matt. 19:21 ). Taking this scripture to the letter Waldo sold all his possessions, had the Gospel according to Matthew translated from the Latin into French and began to preach the need for a more scriptural Christianity. His followers became known as "Waldensians" who spread the message of the Bible and virtues of poverty. As he gathered friends and disciples rapidly his implied "criticism" df the riches and excesses of the Church soon brought him into conflict with the Bishop of Lyon. The greatest objections of the organized Church to the Waldensians was their unauthorized preaching of the bible and their rejection of the intermediary role of the clergy. The Waldensians rejected holy water, liturgies, pilgrimages, indulgences- all these they deemed unnecessary. Waldo and his group moved to the south of France where their message spread quickly. In 1208 the Catholics began to persecute the followers of Waldo as "heretics". Their heresy consisted mainly as open rebellion against the hierarchy of the organized church and its practices. After the persecutions started only a small group remained in southern France. The majority migrated to the nearby Alps where they felt more secure from attack. These new ideas were beginning to reach into the inner circle of the organized church. Francis of Assisi, deeply influenced by the teaching of Waldo which he receive almost certainly through his mother who was French, attempted a similar revolution in central Italy in the year 1206. His evangelical movement failed because his ideas were taken over by the Roman Curia and he was not condemned but was in fact later elevated to the state of sainthood. The Waldension movement continued to grow, spreading out even to central Europe. In 1532 the Waldensians joined the Calvinist Reformation and suffered even more cruel persecution than ever before. As through a miracle the Waldensians still exist in Italy and France. Their headquarters are near Turin, Italy, where Huguenot groups from the United States have visited them. From:

The Cross of Languedoc - February 1990.

THE SECOND FRENCH REFORMATION It's Leader and Beliefs Christians in France who in the 16th century followed the religious leadership of John Calvin are called "Huguenots" (which means French Protestant). The word Huguenot is of uncertain origin. John Calvin was born at Noyon, Picardy in 1509 and he died 27 May 1564. He was a student at Orleans and the University of Paris where he was a brilliant scholar. There he met other students, German Lutherans, and he ti ked their Ideas. But his keen mind was not completely satisfied and he began to think things out for himself very carefully. The University authorities discovered that Calvin no longer believed in the Catholic Church and he had to flee Paris and France. He went to the Swiss city of Geneva where there was a great deal of religious argument going on. Calvin was asked to stay and help the Protestant preachers in Geneva. He agreed and then began to teach his own ideas which were very stern and very thorough. Calvin set his ideas down in 1535 in a book called "The Institute of the Christian Religion". This turned out to be a tremendously important book - a book which was to guide the lives of millions of people and to change the history of many lands and it was the work of a young scholar of 26 years. In Calvin's church he felt there should not be titles such as bishops but just plain ministers whose main duty was to preach the scriptures. Calvin, like other reformers, thought that ornaments and ceremonies harmed people, taking their minds from the sermon. He believed the inside of the Protestant church should be plain, services simple with the music being singing of hymns and the psalms. Calvin believed in a good education especially for ministers. All the congregation was taught to work hard, be honest and not to waste money on fine clothes or drink. It is not surprising that many Huguenots became rich. John Calvin continued to lead his reformation from Geneva. One historian of the Reformation wrote: "John Calvin did three things for Geneva, all of which went beyond its walls. He gave the church a trained and tested ministry, its homes an educated people who could give a reason for their faith and to the whole city a heroic soul which enabled them to stand as a refuge for the oppressed Protestants of Europe." On the continent those who followed Calvin were called Reformed Churches. In English speaking lands Calvin's followers were usually Presbyterians or Puritans. One of the most important leaders in the Geneva church was a man named John Knox who on his return to his native Scotland established the Presbyterian church there according to the teachings and traditions of John Calvin. But everywhere Calvinistic worship was characterized by its simplicity and its Bible centered theme. They replaced the alter with the pulpit.

15 14


THE FIRST REFORMATION The first French Reformation, which was clearly an attempt to separate the Church of Christ from its feudal trappings and to acquire for it a new freedom with a personal access to God, took place in the French city of Lyon more than 300 years before Martin Luther and John Calvin. In the year 1174 a rich merchant of that city, named Waldo, discovered that Christ had told the rich young man who came to him asking how he may have eternal life, "to sell all his belongings and give to the poor". (Matt. 19:21 ). Taking this scripture to the letter Waldo sold all his possessions, had the Gospel according to Matthew translated from the Latin into French and began to preach the need for a more scriptural Christianity. His followers became known as "Waldensians" who spread the message of the Bible and virtues of poverty. As he gathered friends and disciples rapidly his implied "criticism" of the riches and excesses of the Church soon brought him into conflict with the Bishop of Lyon. The greatest objections of the organized Church to the Waldensians was their unauthorized preaching of the bible and their rejection of the intermediary role of the clergy. The Waldensians rejected holy water, liturgies, pilgrimages, indulgences- all these they deemed unnecessary. Waldo and his group moved to the south of France where their message spread quickly. In 1208 the Catholics began to persecute the followers of Waldo as "heretics". Their heresy consisted mainly as open rebellion against the hierarchy of the organized church and its practices. After the persecutions started only a small group remained in southern France. The majority migrated to the nearby Alps where they felt more secure from attack. These new ideas were beginning to reach into the inner circle of the organized church. Francis of Assisi, deeply influenced by the teaching of Waldo which he receive almost certainly through his mother who was French, attempted a similar revolution in central Italy in the year 1206. His evangelical movement failed because his ideas were taken over by the Roman Curia and he was not condemned but was in fact later elevated to the state of sainthood. The Waldension movement continued to grow, spreading out even to central Europe. In 1532 the Waldensians joined the Calvinist Reformation and suffered even more cruel persecution than ever before. As through a miracle the Waldensians still exist in Italy and France. Their headquarters are near Turin, Italy, where Huguenot groups from the United States have visited them. From: The Cross of Languedoc - February 1990.

THE SECOND FRENCH REFORMATION It's Leader and Beliefs Christians in France who in the 16th century followed the religious leadership of John Calvin are called "Huguenots" (which means French Protestant). The word Huguenot is of uncertain origin. John Calvin was born at Noyon, Picardy in 1509 and he died 27 May 1564. He was a student at Orleans and the University of Paris where he was a brilliant scholar. There he met other students, German Lutherans, and he liked their Ideas. But his keen mind was not completely satisfied and he began to think things out for himself very carefully. The University authorities discovered that Calvin no longer believed in the Catholic Church and he had to flee Paris and France. He went to the Swiss city of Geneva where there was a great deal of religious argument going on. Calvin was asked to atay and help the Protestant preachers in Geneva. He agreed and then began to teach his own ideas which were very stern and very thorough. Calvin set his ideas down in 1535 in a book called "The Institute of the Christian Religion". This turned out to be a tremendously important book - a book which was to guide the lives of millions of people and to change the history of many lands and it was the work of a young scholar of 26 years. In Calvin's church he felt there should not be titles such aa bishops but just plain ministers whose main duty was to preach the scriptures. Calvin, like other reformers, thought that ornaments and ceremonies harmed people, taking their minds from the sermon. He believed the inside of the Protestant church should be plain, services simple with the music being alnglng of hymns and the psalms. Calvin believed in a good education especially for ministers. All the congregation was taught to work hard, be honest and not to waste money on fine clothes or drink. It is not surprising that many Huguenots became rich. John Calvin continued to lead his reformation from Geneva. One historian of the Reformation wrote: "John Calvin did three things for Geneva, all of which went beyond its walls. He gave the church a trained and tested ministry, its homes an educated people who could give a reason for their faith and to the whole city a heroic soul which enabled them to stand as a refuge for the oppressed Protestants of Europe." On the continent those who followed Calvin were called Reformed Churches. In English apeaklng lands Calvin's followers were usually Presbyterians or Puritans. One of the most important leaders in the Geneva church was a man named John Knox who on his return to his native Scotland established the Presbyterian church there according to the teachings and traditions of John Calvin. But everywhere Calvinistic worship was characterized by its simplicity and its Bible centered theme. They replaced the alter with the pulpit.

15 14


Their idea of equality before God, of direct access to Him by the individual, of the necessity that a God fearing person should be in the seat of government opened up a whole new avenue in the western world. We can see that the teachings of Calvin were not only religious but also political. It was the basis for democratic movements whose roots are in the basic ideas of democracy, decency and morality before God. It was the democratic politics of Calvinism which were brought to New England by the Puritans who in turn deeply influenced the American desire for freedom and democracy in 1776. Twenty of the presidents of the United States of America are descendants of Huguenots beginning with George Washington. On November 15, 1980, The National Huguenot Society placed a plaque at St. John's Church, Lafayette Square, Washington, D.C. St. John's is called the "Church of the Presidents". The plaque reads "To honor the following United States Presidents of French Protestant descent and their Huguenot ancestors who contributed so much to the moral and cultural development of these United States of America. The presidents are: George Washington, John Adams, John Quincy Adams, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, Ulysses S. Grant, James A. Garfield, Grover Cleveland, Benjamin Harrison, Theodore Roosevelt, William H. Taft, John C. Coolidge, Herbert C. Hoover, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford. The Huguenots were persecuted because they believed fervently in what we call today "Human Rights". In France where the State and Church were one there were no human rights. People were told what to believe and what to do. Because France was strongly Catholic the pattern of reform there was very different than in Switzerland and Germany. As a result the first French Protestants suffered death or exi I e. The first Reformed congregation in France had been formed at Paris and soon other groups began to form covering the whole of France. This resulted in a series of civil wars because this newly found Biblical faith had set noblemen against King Francis I of France when in 1534 he found a pamphlet in his apartments writing against the Holy Mass. He then began his persecution of the Huguenots. He arrested about 150 followers of the new faith, carefully choosing them among the lower classes; 27 were burned at the stake, 18 had their tongues cut out and some recanted. In 1535 he issued an edict for the "extermination of the heretics". Yet in spite of all the persecution the number of Reformed Christians grew rapidly, mostly among the nobility but also among the rising artisans of the cities who saw in the new faith an opportunity to exert a much desired freedom and new personal responsibility. Some historians estimate that by the time of Calvin's death in 1564 approximately 50% of the important land owning French nobles

16

were Huguenots. For some of these nobles their taking the Reformed faith was for political reasons, many others were truly converted. Far more significant than these statistics was the nature of those who became Protestants. In that group were the most alert, intelligent and aggressive members of the nobility who most resented being overwhelmed by the State and the Church. We must remember with gratitude the Huguenot heritage passed down to us from John Calvin whose teachings for Christians was different; a new set of values that were special In family life, work, friends, and our worship to show that we are Christian. We must continue to maintain these values in our lives and pass them on to our next generations to be true to our Huguenot heritage. Cross of Languedoc, February 1990 Notes from lecture and sermon given October 1985 to commemorate the Tercentenary of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes. ...&.

17


Their idea of equality before God, of direct access to Him by the individual, of the necessity that a God fearing person should be in the seat of government opened up a whole new avenue in the western world. We can see that the teachings of Calvin were not only religious but also political. It was the basis for democratic movements whose roots are in the basic ideas of democracy, decency and morality before God. It was the democratic politics of Calvinism which were brought to New England by the Puritans who in turn deeply influenced the American desire for freedom and democracy in 1776. Twenty of the presidents of the United States of America are descendants of Huguenots beginning with George Washington. On November 15, 1980, The National Huguenot Society placed a plaque at St. John's Church, Lafayette Square, Washington, D.C. St. John's is called the "Church of the Presidents". The plaque reads "To honor the following United States Presidents of French Protestant descent and their Huguenot ancestors who contributed so much to the moral and cultural development of these United States of America. The presidents are: George Washington, John Adams, John Quincy Adams, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, Ulysses s. Grant, James A. Garfield, Grover Cleveland, Benjamin Harrison, Theodore Roosevelt, William H. Taft, John C. Coolidge, Herbert C. Hoover, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford. The Huguenots were persecuted because they believed fervently in what we call today "Human Rights". In France where the State and Church were one there were no human rights. People were told what to believe and what to do. Because France was strongly Catholic the pattern of reform there was very different than in Switzerland and Germany. As a result the first French Protestants suffered death or exi Ie. The first Reformed congregation in France had been formed at Paris and soon other groups began to form covering the whole of France. This resulted in a series of civil wars because this newly found Biblical faith had set noblemen against King Francis I of France when in 1534 he found a pamphlet in his apartments writing against the Holy Mass. He then began his persecution of the Huguenots. He arrested about 150 followers of the new faith, carefully choosing them among the lower classes; 27 were burned at the stake, 18 had their tongues cut out and some recanted. In 1535 he issued an edict for the "extermination of the heretics". Yet in spite of all the persecution the number of Reformed Christians grew rapidly, mostly among the nobility but also among the rising artisans of the cities who saw in the new faith an opportunity to exert a much desired freedom and new personal responsibility. Some historians estimate that by the time of Calvin's death in 1564 approximately 50% of the important land owning French nobles

16

were Huguenots. For some of these nobles their taking the Reformed faith was for political reasons, many others were truly converted. Far more significant than these statistics was the nature of those who became Protestants. In that group were the most alert, intelligent and aggressive members of the nobility who most resented being overwhelmed by the State and the Church. We must remember with gratitude the Huguenot heritage passed down to us from John Calvin whose teachings for Christians was different; a new set of values that were special In family life, work, friends, and our worship to show that we are Christian. We must continue to maintain these values in our lives and pass them on to our next generations to be true to our Huguenot heritage. Cross of Languedoc, February 1990 Notes from lecture and sermon given October 1985 to commemorate the Tercentenary of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.

17


EARLY FRENCH HISTORY This chapter is being written to share some of the history given in 1985 on the Huguenot Tour of the land of our Maupin ancestors which today we call "France". I learned many things that gave me a better understanding of their times and the conditions which would cause people to flee and seek refuge in a far away unknown land. They knew there would be no returning. We were extremely fortunate in that on four of the ten days we spent there, to have for our guide, a young, beautiful French girl, named Bernadette. She not only spoke English with a delightful accent, but she was so knowledgeable of French history. It was almost like watching a movie. She made history come alive. She tal ked constantly but not too fast so that notes could be taken. Along that line, I would encourage readers to enjoy some good books on French history from your library. You will find them fascinating, as I have. She told us of a time before Christ when the pagans living there were cave dwellers. Then came the Celts or Gauls as the Romans called them, as these peoples were conquered by the Romans. We were shown in Paris the remanents of Roman buildings and baths. Gaul remained under Rome for about 500 years or until the fall of the Roman Empire in 476 A.D. The Roman influence was great - in language, buildings, roads and law. Some Christians had come into the land in the first century. In Gaul this new religion brought great persecutions by the pagan peoples as it did in the rest of the Roman Empire. They too enjoyed the spectacle of the early Christians being thrown to the wild animals. In the 4th century Christianity came to Rome as it was accepted by the Emperor and then in Gaul. She told that during the persecutions about 250 A.D. a Christian missionary named Denis had his head chopped off because his missionary zeal offended those who worshiped other gods. But he picked up his head, carried it in his hand until he found his nearby eternal resting place. We wen~ taken a few miles outside of Paris where a chun:;h had been built as a memorial to his martyrdom. Denis became the patron saint of France and the monast~ry of Saint Denis became the burial place of kin~:; and queens. The place where Denis was murdered whicr. IS now in the city of Paris became known as the Mount of the Martyrs or "Montmartre", and is noted for its cafes and night life. To make it more interesting the hotel where we were staying was right in the middle of this district - next to an ancient cemetery which was just outside our hotel window and we walked through it reading the old stones, hoping to maybe find the name "Maupin". No luck. Bernadette told us that the most common name in France is Martin. He was an ex-soldier who after converting to Christianity gave his cloak to a beggar. From that experience

18

~e had a vision and he began to preach and evangelize in every town and village he could travel to. Many people and churches took his name. We were told briefly about the Moors, the mighty warriors of Islam. They had conquered Spain and then advanced north into the land of France. We were shown remanents of Moorish architecture that had become and still is well known in Spain. In the 8th century it took a man by the name of Charles Martel to drive these Moors out of France and finally the whole area. The exploits of the great Charlemagne were told followed by the coming of the men in the long boats from the North. The subject ..-路.f the migration of the ancient peoples has been for me a sense f wonderment and mystery. These long boat people were the Norseman who invaded a large area which today we call Normandy. They took over the land, the language and soon became thoroughly "French". We are all familiar with the story of William the Conqueror, a descendant of these Norsemen, who in 1066 decided to take England and won the battle of Hastings in 1066. About 50 years after the Normandy invasion of England, the French took up the banner to drive the infidels out of the Holy Land. That was the First Crusade and it was started by the French but other countries joined in. Most of the Crusades that followed were in reality political or had economic traits but we were told about the First Crusade because it was religious and French. There have been documentaries on television retracing the route of the Crusades and it is almost beyond belief that not only knights in armor but women and children took part in this long hard journey. From the beginning of the Roman Church in the 4th century there had been dissenters to the church. There were several different groups, but one in particular started in 1170 in France, called the Waldensians is discussed in a separate chapter. It has been called "The First Reformation" and it is important because of its effect on France and other countries. It was then as it is today. The land boundaries and peoples of Europe were changing all the time. France of that day was just an area around Paris called "IIe de France". All the other land was held by dukes or nobles, who were strong enough to take the area and hold it for their own. In our visit to The Louvre we were told that in these socalled "Dark Ages" many great and magnificent buildings came into being as was the Louvre which was built about 1200 and then we went on to the Cathedral of Notre Dame which was begun about 1160. The other cathedrals we visited, for which I didn't put down a name, were awesome in the beauty of the stain glass windows. Some of them told a story or would give scripture and it was said that was done in that manner because so many of the people could not read but they could get the story of Christ from the windows. You can be overcome with the

19


EARLY FRENCH HISTORY This chapter is being written to share some of the history given in 1985 on the Huguenot Tour of the land of our Maupin ancestors which today we call "France". I learned many things that gave me a better understanding of their times and the conditions which would cause people to flee and seek refuge in a far away unknown land. They knew there would be no returning. We were extremely fortunate in that on four of the ten days we spent there, to have for our guide, a young, beautiful French girl, named Bernadette. She not only spoke English with a delightful accent, but she was so knowledgeable of French history. It was almost like watching a movie. She made history come alive. She talked constantly but not too fast so that notes could be taken. Along that line, I would encourage readers to enjoy some good books on French history from your library. You will find them fascinating, as I have. She told us of a time before Christ when the pagans living there were cave dwellers. Then came the Celts or Gauls as the Romans called them, as these peoples were conquered by the Romans. We were shown in Paris the remanents of Roman buildings and baths. Gaul remained under Rome for about 500 years or until the fall of the Roman Empire in 476 A.D. The Roman influence was great - in language, buildings, roads and law. Some Christians had come into the land in the first century. In Gaul this new religion brought great persecutions by the pagan peoples as it did in the rest of the Roman Empire. They too enjoyed the spectacle of the early Christians being thrown to the wild animals. In the 4th century Christianity came to Rome as it was accepted by the Emperor and then in Gaul. She told that during the persecutions about 250 A.D. a Christian missionary named Denis had his head chopped off because his missionary zeal offended those who worshiped other gods. But he picked up his head, carried it in his hand until he found his nearby eternal resting place. We wen:~ taken a few miles outside of Paris where a churc;h had been built as a memorial to his martyrdom. Denis became the patron saint of France and the monasttdry of Saint Denis became the burial place of kin~s and queens. The place where Denis was murdered whict'i is now in the city of Paris became known as the Mount of the Martyrs or "Montmartre", and is noted for its cafes and night life. To make it more interesting the hotel where we were staying was right in the middle of this district - next to an ancient cemetery which was just outside our hotel window and we walked through it reading the old stones, hoping to maybe find the name "Maupin". No luck. Bernadette told us that the most common name in France is Martin. He was an ex-soldier who after converting to Christianity gave his cloak to a beggar. From that experience

18

he 'had a vision and he began to preach and evangelize in every town and village he could travel to. Many people and churches took his name. We were told briefly about the Moors, the mighty warriors of Islam. They had conquered Spain and then advanced north into the land of France. We were shown remanents of Moorish architecture that had become and still is well known in Spain. In the 8th century it took a man by the name of Charles Martel to drive these Moors out of France and finally the whole area. The exploits of the great Charlemagne were told followed by the coming of the men in the long boats from the North. The subject _-.f the migration of the ancient peoples has been for me a sense 路路f wonderment and mystery. These long boat people were the Norseman who invaded a large area which today we call Normandy. They took over the land, the language and soon became thoroughly "French". We are all familiar with the story of William the Conqueror, a descendant of these Norsemen, who in 1066 decided to take England and won the battle of Hastings in 1066. About 50 years after the Normandy invasion of England, the French took up the banner to drive the infidels out of the Holy Land. That was the First Crusade and it was started by the French but other countries joined in. Most of the Crusades that followed were in reality political or had economic traits but we were told about the First Crusade because it was religious and French. There have been documentaries on television retracing the route of the Crusades and it is almost beyond belief that not only knights in armor but women and children took part in this long hard journey. From the beginning of the Roman Church in the 4th century there had been dissenters to the church. There were several different groups, but one in particular started in 1170 in France, called the Waldensians is discussed in a separate chapter. It has been called "The First Reformation" and it is important because of its effect on France and other countries. It was then as it is today. The land boundaries and peoples of Europe were changing all the time. France of that day was just an area around Paris called "IIe de France". All the other land was held by dukes or nobles, who were strong enough to take the area and hold it for their own. In our visit to The Louvre we were told that in these socalled "Dark Ages" many great and magnificent buildings came Into being as was the Louvre which was built about 1200 and then we went on to the Cathedral of Notre Dame which was begun about 1160. The other cathedrals we visited, for which I didn't put down a name, were awesome in the beauty of the stain glass windows. Some of them told a story or would give scripture and it was said that was done in that manner because so many of the people could not read but they could get the story of Christ from the windows. You can be overcome with the

19


grandeur and height of these magnificent buildings and your first thought is - how did they do it? We were told that in one century about 1150 to 1250 A.D. the French built eighty cathedrals and hundreds of churches in the cathedral design. In a special tour of the Loire valley we made a visit to the beautiful Chartes Cathedral. We were fortunate in having Malcolm Miller, lecturer and guide of the Cathedral to tell us about the history and meaning of the medieval glass and sculpture of the cathedral. Besides the cathedrals, France became an intellectual center. The University of Paris was a center of learning in the 12th century. We were taken by the Sorbonne, which was founded in 1257 and is today still a busy university. I wanted so much to go inside. There are no modern, tall sky scrapers in that city of two thousand years, Paris. This now brings us up to the 13th century when we have the first written records of our MAUPIN family in Normandy but that information will be covered in a later writing. The 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries found France plagued with wars and trouble in the Roman church. At times there were even three popes and also much corruption. It was also the most active time of the inquisitions against the "heretics", the early dissenters of-the Roman church, the Cathars, Waldensians and others. -Some of the troubles came with the intermarriage of the monarchs. Some preferred to "marry" the land rather than to fight for it. Edward III of England, a nephew of the last French Capetian ruler laid claim to the throne of France and gave a start to the Hundred Years War. When the war started in 1327, the only French territory held by the English king was the duchy of Aquitaine. On the Huguenot Tour we were taken to the Abbaye de Fontevraud where Richard the Lion Hearted, Eleanor d'Aquitaine, Isabel d'Angouleme and Henry II, the first Plantagenet King of England are buried. We were able to view their tombs. Some of our group seemed surprised that English kings would be buried in France but perhaps they had not remembered their history. It was during this Hundred Years War that Joan of Arc was convicted of witchcraft and heresy and burned at the stake. In 1453, the English were finally driven out of France. But France's troubles were not over. There was more bloodshed, cunning, and craftiness between the lords of the land and the monarchy. Their struggle for power, authority, and the riches controlled by the Roman Church was constantly between the nobles and the kings. In our time, in the valley of the Loire River we visited the great Chateau Amboise, the home of many French kings. It was here that the feud between the de Guise family, champion of the Catholic faith, and the Conde group who believe in the Huguenot cause, took place. We were shown the balcony where the Huguenot nobles were hung in 1560. We were also shown the 20

rooms where Leonardo de Vinci spent his last years there at Ambolse. He is buried In the chapel on the grounds. His drawings are on display. The man was a genius In making designs that were hundreds of years ahead of his time. King Francis II also died in 1560 leaving the kingdom In turmoil. His younger brother, 10 year old Charles, could not become king, so his mother, Catherine de Medicls, took over as Regent of France creating tremendous turmoil under the pretense of religion. She spent a good amount of time at CHENONCEAU Castle, called a "jewel of the Renaissance". We visited the castle and saw her bedroom, study, library and Chapel. The architecture, tapestries and grounds of the castle are outstanding. Queen Catherine built the most unusual gallery which Is 65 yards long at the back of the castle which spans the River Cher. King Henry IV, son-in-law of Catherine, brought his "favourite" mistress Gabreille De'Estress to the castle and we were shown her rooms. Their son became the owner of the castle in 1624. For myself, a most interesting part of our time in France was a visit to the Palace of Versailles. We were taken there because much of the beautiful work done on the various buildings In woodworking, paintings on walls and ceilings, gold leafing and textiles was done by Huguenot artisans. After the death of King Henry IV in 1610 his son, Louis XIII took the throne. Versailles was then just used as a hunting lodge. It was not until 1643 when Louis XIV, grandson of Henry IV came to the throne that it began to change. In 1659, Louis XIV married Marie Therese of Spain. As in all royal marriages at that time it was an arranged affair. The kings would then have a collection of mistresses. King Louis XIV was no exception. For the children of his second favorite mistress, Marquise de Montespon, Madame de Malntenon was chosen as their Governess. All through the years the additions, lavish decorations and furnishings of the Palace continued. In 1682, it was declared the seat of Government. In 1683 came the death of Queen Marie Therese and in 1685 King Louis XIV married Madame de Maintenon, the former Francois d'Aublgne, granddaughter of Agrippa d'Aubigne, one of the most intimate friends of King Henry IV and a great Huguenot. Two large portraits of Francois in Versailles show her to be a handsome woman. She was very pious and much in disapproval of the homosexuality and "vices of pleasure" of the French Court. It is said she felt compassion for the Huguenots even though she influenced the King on the revocation of the Edict. She survived the King who died In 1715. A question- is she related to our Dabney (d'Aublgne) family?

21


grandeur and height of these magnificent buildings and your first thought is - how did they do it? We were told that in one century about 1150 to 1250 A.D. the French built eighty cathedrals and hundreds of churches in the cathedral design. In a special tour of the Loire valley we made a visit to the beautiful Chartes Cathedral. We were fortunate in having Malcolm Miller, lecturer and guide of the Cathedral to tell us about the history and meaning of the medieval glass and sculpture of the cathedral. Besides the cathedrals, France became an intellectual center. The University of Paris was a center of learning in the 12th century. We were taken by the Sorbonne, which was founded in 1257 and is today still a busy university. I wanted so much to go inside. There are no modern, tall sky scrapers in that city of two thousand years, Paris. This now brings us up to the 13th century when we have the first written records of our MAUPIN family in Normandy but that information will be covered in a later writing. The 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries found France plagued with wars and trouble in the Roman church. At times there were even three popes and also much corruption. It was also the most active time of the inquisitions against the "heretics", the early dissenters of the Roman church, the Cathars, Waldensians and others. ~Some of the troubles came with the intermarriage of the monarchs. Some preferred to "marry" the land rather than to fight for it. Edward III of England, a nephew of the last French Capetian ruler laid claim to the throne of France and gave a start to the Hundred Years War. When the war started in 1327, the only French territory held by the English king was the duchy of Aquitaine. On the Huguenot Tour we were taken to the Abbaye de Fontevraud where Richard the Lion Hearted, Eleanor d'Aquitaine, Isabel d'Angouleme and Henry II, the first Plantagenet King of England are buried. We were able to view their tombs. Some of our group seemed surprised that English kings would be buried in France but perhaps they had not remembered their history. It was during this Hundred Years War that Joan of Arc was convicted of witchcraft and heresy and burned at the stake. In 1453, the English were finally driven out of France. But France's troubles were not over. There was more bloodshed, cunning, and craftiness between the lords of the land and the monarchy. Their struggle for power, authority, and the riches controlled by the Roman Church was constantly between the nobles and the kings. In our time, in the valley of the Loire River we visited the great Chateau Am boise, the home of many French kings. It was here that the feud between the de Guise family, champion of the Catholic faith, and the Conde group who believe in the Huguenot cause, took place. We were shown the balcony where the Huguenot nobles were hung in 1560. We were also shown the

rooms where Leonardo de Vinci spent his last years there at Amboise. He is buried in the chapel on the grounds. His drawings are on display. The man was a genius in making designs that were hundreds of years ahead of his time. King Francis II also died in 1560 leaving the kingdom in turmoil. His younger brother, 10 year old Charles, could not become king, so his mother, Catherine de Medicis, took over as Regent of France creating tremendous turmoil under the pretense of religion. She spent a good amount of time at CHENONCEAU Castle, called a "jewel of the Renaissance". We visited the castle and saw her bedroom, study, library and Chapel. The architecture, tapestries and grounds of the castle are outstanding. Queen Catherine built the most unusual gallery which is 65 yards long at the back of the castle which spans the River Cher. King Henry IV, son-in-law of Catherine, brought his "favourite" mistress Gabreille De'Estress to the castle and we were shown her rooms. Their son became the owner of the castle in 1624. For myself, a most interesting part of our time in France was a visit to the Palace of Versailles. We were taken there because much of the beautiful work done on the various buildings in woodworking, paintings on walls and ceilings, gold leafing and textiles was done by Huguenot artisans. After the death of King Henry IV in 1610 his son, Louis XIII took the throne. Versailles was then just used as a hunting lodge. It was not until 1643 when Louis XIV, grandson of Henry IV came to the throne that it began to change. In 1659, Louis XIV married Marie Therese of Spain. As in all royal marriages at that time it was an arranged affair. The kings would then have a collection of mistresses. King Louis XIV was no exception. For the children of his second favorite mistress, Marquise de Montespon, Madame de Maintenon was chosen as their Governess. All through the years the additions, lavish decorations and furnishings of the Palace continued. In 1682, it was declared the seat of Government. In 1683 came the death of Queen Marie Therese and in 1685 King Louis XIV married Madame de Maintenon, the former Francois d'Aubigne, granddaughter of Agrippa d'Aubigne, one of the most intimate friends of King Henry IV and a great Huguenot. Two large portraits of Francois in Versailles show her to be a handsome woman. She was very pious and much in disapproval of the homosexuality and "vices of pleasure" of the French Court. It is said she felt compassion for the Huguenots even though she influenced the King on the revocation of the Edict. She survived the King who died in 1715. A question - is she related to our Dabney (d'Aubigne) family?

21


The life of Henry IV (Henry of Navarre) was given in lecture on the Huguenot Tour of 1985 at Tours because of his importance to all Huguenots but to some members of the Maupin family it can have a special, interesting meaning. From the time of Francis I, when the rebellion against the Church first was gaining ground in France to the time when Henry II died in 1559 making his Italian wife, Catherine de Medicis, the Regent of France, there was constant turmoil between the nobles and the monarchy. The Protestant nobles were led by Admiral Gaspard de Coligy and the Prince de Conde, who wanted the restoration of their ancient rights and privileges. On the other side was the powerful Roman Catholic element led by the de Guise family who not only hated the Huguenots but even more wanted to rule France. So the Queen Mother Catherine had to make the right moves. She felt the Huguenots did not want to seek the throne and their demands were modest therefore the de Guise family was the greater menace. Queen Catherine had a daughter named Margaret, besides her three sons. Margaret was considered the loveliest woman of her day. But history proved her to be as cunning as her mother. Queen Catherine knew the power of the Catholic de Guise family and something had to be done. So her beautiful Margaret's marriage to the young King Henry of Navarre would be arranged. There was nothing in the background of this young man to indicate that he would grow into the greatest leader France had known in her long history. Henry was born in the little town of Pau in the Pyrenees on December 14, 1553, the son of Antoine de Bourbon, a nobleman of high social standing but without power. He was a descendant of Louis IX, so he and Henry could claim a king of France as their ancestor. Henry's mother was Jeanne d'Aibret, Queen of Navarre, which was a tiny kingdom on the border of France and Spain. Its traditions and language were French and its people had early accepted the teachings of John Calvin with great enthusiasm. Practically the whole kingdom, nobles and commoners alike, were Protestant as was Henry. Henry very early in life showed courage and leadership and when he joined the Protestant Army it was under the command of the great Admiral de Coligny. Henry learned well the life of a soldier and he learned to study human nature. In 1572, Henry's mother died which made him King Henry of Navarre. Queen Catherine decided to make her move. Even though she did not like the idea of having a "heretic" in her family she wanted the King Henry of Navarre, a Protestant stronghold, under her control where she could keep an eye on him. So the proposal was made and Henry accepted. The wedding was held in a chapel at the Louvre. The Catholic Church could not

publicly approve of the marriage of Princess Margaret, sister of King Charles of France, to a "heretic" so the wedding could not be he I d in Notre Dame. By this time Henry of Navarre had become the symbol of the Huguenots. Dozens of Protestant noblemen accepted the invitation to his wedding. The presence of so many of these heretics under one roof gave Queen Catherine an idea as wicked as it was cruel. They could, the Queen Mother decided, destroy two enemies at once. Bands of hired murderers could kill off all the Huguenot leaders. This would render the ordinary Protestants helpless and their movement would collapse. At the same time, this assault on the "heretics" would prove to the Catholics of France that King Charles IX and the Queen Mother Catherine were the true protectors of their faith and the influence of the de Guise family could be defeated. A series of balls, receptions, and other social activities were planned before and after the wedding. Queen Catherine decided to have all the Huguenot leaders killed at the same time during the festivities. Then the plans changed to include all the Huguenots living in Paris. Several troops were assigned to the task. Margaret took an active part in the conspiracy. She was to keep her new husband in her quarters to be ready for the killer's knives. But it did not happen that way. On the morning of August 23, 1572, Henry _of Navarre quarreled with his wife and left her quarters for a walk with his Huguenot friend, Agrippa d'Aubigne. The assassins who rushed into Margaret's suite did not find Henry but the carnage of the Huguenots known as the St. Bartholomew"s Day Massacre had begun that day. The Massacre gathered speed throughout Paris and Protestants were slaughtered everywhere from the Louvre to their own modest homes, with 10,000 being killed in France. A crowd caught Admiral de Coligny outside his house and knifed him in cold blood. On Sunday, October 13, 1985, we members of the Huguenot Tour were participants in a Communion service with an inspiring sermon at the Protestant Temple de L'Oratori re du Louvre in Paris. Following the service, a wreath was laid outside the church below the statue of Admiral Gaspard de Coligny to commemorate his sacrifice of his life for the Huguenot cause. The wreath dedication speech and a beautiful prayer, thanking our Heavenly Father for our Huguenot ancestors who gave of themselves, their earthly goods, home, kinsmen, country, and even life itself, was made. It was a beautiful day. On this August 23, 1572, Henry of Navarre having left his wife's quarters, was walking with his Huguenot friend, Agrippe d'Aubigne near Notre Dame when the rioting started and they heard the shouts "Death to all Huguenots"! Knowing he would be recognized and killed, he reacted instantly. They hurried into the cathedral and Henry stripped off his cape of gold cloth, his rings, and other signs of wealth. Clad only in the doublet,

22

23

KING HENRY IV AND THE EDICT OF NANTES

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The life of Henry IV (Henry of Navarre) was given in lecture on the Huguenot Tour of 1985 at Tours because of his importance to all Huguenots but to some members of the Maupin family it can have a special, interesting meaning. From the time of Francis I, when the rebellion against the Church first was gaining ground in France to the time when Henry II died in 1559 making his Italian wife, Catherine de Medicis, the Regent of France, there was constant turmoil between the nobles and the monarchy. The Protestant nobles were led by Admiral Gaspard de Coligy and the Prince de Conde, who wanted the restoration of their ancient rights and privileges. On the other side was the powerful Roman Catholic element led by the de Guise family who not only hated the Huguenots but even more wanted to rule France. So the Queen Mother Catherine had to make the right moves. She felt the Huguenots did not want to seek the throne and their demands were modest therefore the de Guise family was the greater menace. Queen Catherine had a daughter named Margaret, besides her three sons. Margaret was considered the loveliest woman of her day. But history proved her to be as cunning as her mother. Queen Catherine knew the power of the Catholic de Guise family and something had to be done. So her beautiful Margaret's marriage to the young King Henry of Navarre would be arranged. There was nothing in the background of this young man to indicate that he would grow into the greatest leader France had known in her long history. Henry was born in the little town of Pau in the Pyrenees on December 14, 1553, the son of Antoine de Bourbon, a nobleman of high social standing but without power. He was a descendant of Louis IX, so he and Henry could claim a king of France as their ancestor. Henry's mother was Jeanne d'Aibret, Queen of Navarre, which was a tiny kingdom on the border of France and Spain. Its traditions and language were French and its people had early accepted the teachings of John Calvin with great enthusiasm. Practically the whole kingdom, nobles and commoners alike, were Protestant as was Henry. Henry very early in life showed courage and leadership and when he joined the Protestant Army it was under the command of the great Admiral de Coligny. Henry learned well the life of a soldier and he learned to study human nature. In 1572, Henry's mother died which made him King Henry of Navarre. Queen Catherine decided to make her move. Even though she did not like the idea of having a "heretic" in her family she wanted the King Henry of Navarre, a Protestant stronghold, under her control where she could keep an eye on him. So the proposal was made and Henry accepted. The wedding was held in a chapel at the Louvre. The Catholic Church could not

publicly approve of the marriage of Princess Margaret, sister of King Charles of France, to a "heretic" so the wedding could not be held in Notre Dame. By this time Henry of Navarre had become the symbol of the Huguenots. Dozens of Protestant noblemen accepted the invitation to his wedding. The presence of so many of these heretics under one roof gave Queen Catherine an idea as wicked as it was cruel. They could, the Queen Mother decided, destroy two enemies at once. Bands of hired murderers could kill off all the Huguenot leaders. This would render the ordinary Protestants helpless and their movement would collapse. At the same time, this assault on the "heretics" would prove to the Catholics of France that King Charles IX and the Queen Mother Catherine were the true protectors of their faith and the influence of the de Guise family could be defeated. A series of balls, receptions, and other social activities were planned before and after the wedding. Queen Catherine decided to have all the Huguenot leaders killed at the same time during the festivities. Then the plans changed to include all the Huguenots living in Paris. Several troops were assigned to the task. Margaret took an active part in the conspiracy. She was to keep her new husband in her quarters to be ready for the killer's knives. But it did not happen that way. On the morning of August 23, 1572, Henry _of Navarre quarreled with his wife and left her quarters for a walk with his Huguenot friend, Agrippa d'Aubigne. The assassins who rushed into Margaret's suite did not find Henry but the carnage of the Huguenots known as the St. Bartholomew"s Day Massacre had begun that day. The Massacre gathered speed throughout Paris and Protestants were slaughtered everywhere from the Louvre to their own modest homes, with 10,000 being killed in France. A crowd caught Admiral de Coligny outside his house and knifed him in cold blood. On Sunday, October 13, 1985, we members of the Huguenot Tour were participants in a Communion service with an inspiring sermon at the Protestant Temple de L'Oratorire du Louvre in Paris. Following the service, a wreath was laid outside the church below the statue of Admiral Gaspard de Coligny to commemorate his sacrifice of his life for the Huguenot cause. The wreath dedication speech and a beautiful prayer, thanking our Heavenly Father for our Huguenot ancestors who gave of themselves, their earthly goods, home, kinsmen, country, and even I ife itself, was made. It was a beautiful day. On this August 23, 1572, Henry of Navarre having left his wife's quarters, was walking with his Huguenot friend, Agrippe d'Aubigne near Notre Dame when the rioting started and they heard the shouts "Death to all Huguenots"! Knowing he would be recognized and killed, he reacted instantly. They hurried into the cathedral and Henry stripped off his cape of gold cloth, his rings, and other signs of wealth. Clad only in the doublet,

22

23

KING HENRY IV AND THE EDICT OF NANTES


breeches, and boots he looked like a student. He g prayer book from a young priest and with his dis escaped. But there was more trouble for Henry Catherine would have him imprisoned in the Louvre. I have included this story for a special reason an for the name of Henry's friend, Agrippa d'Aubigne. known that two of the immigrant Gabriel Maupin's g married women with the name Dabney (d'Aubigne). Tha is, John Maupin married Frances Dabney and Daniel Maupin mar ied Mary Elizabeth Dabney, both daughters of Cornelius Dabney (d'Aubigne). That this Cornelius Dabney is a descendant of Agrippa d'Aubigne has been a subject of contention over the years but it is my desire to someday have the solid evidence that he is, if it can be found. It is known that Agrippa d'Aubigne had a son had by his first wife, Ann Marchant, a son, Theodore. this Theodore that the Cornelius Dabney whose married Maupins is descended. Constant had a From that marriage were three children, one of t Francoise d'Aubigne, who was to renounce her upbringing and become Madame de Maintenon and I wife of King Louis XIV after the death of Queen The..,.o~A said that Madame de Maintenon was influential in u Louis to revoke the Edict of Nantes in 1685. We h~ard much about her on the Huguenot Tour, especially at Versai~les, where two large portraits of her hang. Let us return to the story of Henry of Navarre. E en though he escaped being killed in the St. Barthelomew M ssacre his troubles were not over. His mother-in-law, Queen Catherine, kept him a prisoner in the Louvre. She knew it w uld be too dangerous for her to try to have him murdered after the Massacre was over. It was during this period that h conceived the document that was to become the Edict of Nantes. According to the diaries of Agrippe d'Aubigne, who remained at the Louvre with him, he dreamed of forcing Frenchmen of II religious beliefs to accept universal tolerance. Other Hugueno s managed, one by one, to escape from closely guarded P ris. Even d'Aubigne finally managed to get out and to carry he word to the Protestant nobles that their leader was waiting o join them. On February 2, 1576, Henry of Navarre managed o get by his guards and ride through the gates of Paris. Ever where huge crowds greeted him and everywhere he repeated is message; he sought religious freedom for men of all faith , Catholics, Protestants, and Jews- all would be equal under hi leadership. Many enlisted in his service - large numbers of Cat olic leaders joined him. All were sick of Queen Catherine's cr elty and the greed of the de Guise family. They wanted a peaceful, prosperous, and united France. Henry of Navarre ffered them that hope. The stage was set for one of hi tory's most remarkable dramas.

In 1576, Henry of Navarre formed a mighty army. In it he accepted all men of good faith, Huguenots and Catholics alike, If they would accept those of other faiths as their equals. And for the first time in the history of France, Jews were encouraged to join. A man's faith was his own business, declared Henry. He was responsible only to God for his religious beliefs. This concept was unique. Henry's concern was not only spiritual but political as he wanted France to be united to end the civil wars and have a prosperous France. In order to meet all his goals he needed religious freedom. The struggle went on for a dozen years with Henry gaining more ground all the time. Finally it was down to conquering Paris, the capital, and it was held by the Catholic League. Henry knew he had two choices, put Paris under siege and starve them into submission or become a Catholic and be acceptable to the Catholic leaders. Paris was strongly Catholic. It has been said that Henry made the statement "that Paris was worth a Mass". In February 1594, Henry received word that the Pope had accepted his conversion and agreed to accept him into the Church. So in March, 1594, Henry, as King Henry IV, rode in triumph through the streets of Paris to the Louvre where years before he had spent time as a prisoner of Queen Catherine. This began the remarkable reign of Henry IV. He threw out the corrupt and incompetent office holders, took care of the nation's debts, encouraged foreign trade, gave aid to the farmers, and introduced new industries into France such as the manufacture of silk, wool, and glassware. Under his leadership the potential of the New World was broadened, the explorers and fur traders came to Canada and the central part of what is now the United States. France was becoming the wealthiest and most powerful country in Europe. King Henry instigated policies that Great Britain, Holland, and Spain did not copy for many decades. One important thing he accomplished; he destroyed the old feudal system. All authority was centered in the crown. The Huguenots had been granted a few rights but King Henry IV realized in a political way that they would never have real peace in France until the civil wars were ended. His idea was simple: He wanted to grant guarantees of freedom of worship, plus the other privileges that the Catholics enjoyed without taking away anything from the Catholics. This was a radical idea because no where in Europe did men live together as equals. So in 1597, King Henry appointed a commission, composed of both Catholic and Protestant men, to draw up a truly revolutionary document, The Edict of Nantes.

25

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breeches, and boots he looked like a student. He grabbed a prayer book from a young priest and with his disguise he escaped. But there was more trouble for Henry ahead. Queen Catherine would have him imprisoned in the Louvre. I have included this story for a special reason and that is for the name of Henry's friend, Agrippa d'Aubigne. It is well known that two of the immigrant Gabriel Maupin's grandsons married women with the name Dabney (d'Aubigne). That is, John Maupin married Frances Dabney and Daniel Maupin married Mary Elizabeth Dabney, both daughters of Cornelius Dabney (d'Aubigne). That this Cornelius Dabney is a descendant of Agrippa d'Aubigne has been a subject of contention over the years but it is my desire to someday have the solid evidence that he is, if it can be found. It is known that Agrippa d'Aubigne had a son Constant who had by his first wife, Ann Marchant, a son, Theodore. It is from this Theodore that the Cornelius Dabney whose daughters married Maupins is descended. Constant had a second wife. From that marriage were three children, one of them being Francoise d'Aubigne, who was to renounce her Huguenot upbringing and become Madame de Maintenon and later the last wife of King Louis XIV after the death of Queen Theresa. It is said that Madame de Maintenon was influential in urging King Louis to revoke the Edict of Nantes in 1685. We heard much about her on the Huguenot Tour, especially at Versailles, where two large portraits of her hang. Let us return to the story of Henry of Navarre. Even though he escaped being killed in the St. Barthelomew Massacre his troubles were not over. His mother-in-law, Queen Catherine, kept him a prisoner in the Louvre. She knew it would be too dangerous for her to try to have him murdered after the Massacre was over. It was during this period that he conceived the document that was to become the Edict of Nantes. According to the diaries of Agrippe d'Aubigne, who remained at the Louvre with him, he dreamed of forcing Frenchmen of all religious beliefs to accept universal tolerance. Other Huguenots managed, one by one, to escape from closely guarded Paris. Even d'Aubigne finally managed to get out and to carry the word to the Protestant nobles that their leader was waiting to join them. On February 2, 1576, Henry of Navarre managed to get by his guards and ride through the gates of Paris. Everywhere huge crowds greeted him and everywhere he repeated his message; he sought religious freedom for men of all faiths, Catholics, Protestants, and Jews- all would be equal under his leadership. Many enlisted in his service- large numbers of Catholic leaders joined him. All were sick of Queen Catherine's cruelty and the greed of the de Guise family. They wanted a peaceful, prosperous, and united France. Henry of Navarre offered them that hope. The stage was set for one of history's most remarkable dramas.

In 1576, Henry of Navarre formed a mighty army. In it he <.epted all men of good faith, Huguenots and Catholics alike, r they would accept those of other faiths as their equals. And r, Jt the first time in the history of France, Jews were •·ttcouraged to join. A man's faith was his own business, dPclared Henry. He was responsible only to God for his r ·~ligious beliefs. This concept was unique. Henry's concern w<ts not only spiritual but political as he wanted France to be tmited to end the civil wars and have a prosperous France. In rJtder to meet all his goals he needed religious freedom. The ·,truggle went on for a dozen years with Henry gaining more <Jround all the time. Finally it was down to conquering Paris, the capital, and it was held by the Catholic League. Henry knew he had two choices, put Paris under siege and starve them into :~ubmission or become a Catholic and be acceptable to the Catholic leaders. Paris was strongly Catholic. It has been said that Henry made the statement "that Paris was worth a Mass". In February 1594, Henry received word that the Pope had accepted his conversion and agreed to accept him into the Church. So in March, 1594, Henry, as King Henry IV, rode in triumph through the streets of Paris to the Louvre where years before he had spent time as a prisoner of Queen Catherine. This began the remarkable reign of Henry IV. He threw out the corrupt and incompetent office holders, took care of the nation's debts, encouraged foreign trade, gave aid to the farmers, and introduced new industries into France such as the manufacture of silk, wool, and glassware. Under his leadership the potential of the New World was broadened, the explorers and fur traders came to Canada and the central part of what is now the United States. France was becoming the wealthiest and most powerful country in Europe. King Henry instigated policies that Great Britain, Holland, and Spain did not copy for many decades. One important thing he accomplished; he destroyed the old feudal system. All authority was centered in the crown. The Huguenots had been granted a few rights but King Henry IV realized in a political way that they would never have real peace in France until the civil wars were ended. His idea was simple: He wanted to grant guarantees of freedom of worship, plus the other privileges that the Catholics enjoyed without taking away anything from the Catholics. This was a radical idea because no where in Europe did men live together as equals. So in 1597, King Henry appointed a commission, composed of both Catholic and Protestant men, to draw up a truly revolutionary document, The Edict of Nantes.

24

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The Edict of Nantes was the first written promise to grant specific religious freedoms to a persecuted minority. Few documents in human history have had a greater â&#x20AC;˘ong range effect upon mankind. It was issued by King Henry IV on April 13,1598, at Nantes. If Catholics, Protestants, and Jews are now coming closer, if there is a greater spirit of brotherhood, the Edict of Nantes is partly responsible. It was a long tedious document, put together by a commission that included both Catholic and Protestant (Reformed, as they were called in France). Even though King Henry had renounced his Huguenot faith for political reasons there is some doubt about how he really felt. If he had only political feelings in his conversion it could have stopped right there but after he reached some of his goals for his country he turned back to his beginnings. The committee had to struggle to pound out policies that would be fair to all and for the good of France but Henry kept about them until it was finally issued In 1598. The Edict was a complicated document with each group or class of people getting something different from it. Its intent was religious tolerance but for some it was purely political or economics. It gave protection to those of the Catholic faith as well as the Reformed faith to live and abide in the kingdom without being compelled to do anything contrary to their consciences. The Reformed members were given freedom to exercise religion in their homes. It also protected children from being taken from their parents to be baptized in a faith contrary to their parents beliefs. Another important decree that there would be no difference or distinction made in respect to the Reformed religion In subjects to be instructed in universities, colleges, and schools and in receiving the sick and the poor into hospitals and public charities. King Henry IV was a monarch who understood his people; the poor, middle class, nobles, and clergy and he wanted a decree that would help each class in some way. The Edict of Nantes was his way of doing just that. It was his idea, his guidance and persistence that brought it to be. He knew that it was a religious document but also a political one. He was a great statesman, soldier, and defender of France. How do we know what other great things he could have accomplished if he had not been knifed through the heart by an assassin in 1610?. It would be the grandson of Henry IV, King Louis XIV, who would revoke this important document in 1685.

By the time Henry IV was killed in 1610, the people of France had accepted the Edict of Nantes and lived together in peace under its terms. Never had a nation enjoyed a time of such growth and prosperity. France had become a great power. Some historians are convinced that the rights given to the Protestants played a major part in the growth of France. The Edict had given the Protestants the right to exercise their religion and their civic duties. Services could be held in many places. With many nobles being Protestant, as the years went by, feuds began to arise and such things as the siege of La Rochelle in 1628 and other conflicts occurred. This resulted in military privileges being taken from the Huguenots. There was to be no more Huguenot army after 1629. Cannon, small arms, powder, and ammunition were no longer supplied to them. Most of the other rights given by the Edict were retained by the Huguenots and for some 50 years France was reasonably peaceful. Then in 1643, a new king ascended the throne of France, King Louis XIV, called the "Sun King". In his long reign his need for power was overwhelming. He was strongly Catholic and the fact that there were "heretics" in his kingdom disturbed him very much. He wanted France to become still greater and he felt that the best way to do that was to have a nation of one faith, the Catholic faith. Some of his advisers suggested that they try again to convert the Huguenots to Catholicism. This the King agreed with and set about the plan. The Huguenots resisted and their stubborn attitude infuriated King Louis, so he gradually brought more and more pressure, economic and social, to bear on them. As their privileges were gradually being taken away, their places of worship being torn down, and being urged always to recant, the Huguenots began to see the handwriting on the wall. Many of them began to flee to Switzerland,to the Netherlands, and to England, taking with them their talents and ski lis. In 1683, Kl ng Louis lost his short temper. He Issued a decree authorizing the stationing of royal troops in the home of Huguenots for the purpose of forcing them to listen to those who were trying to convert them. This merely strengthened the resistance of the Huguenots. Fighting back, they cited the Edict of Nantes, which gave them rights under the law. King Louis XIV had an answer for that - he would just revoke the Edict which he did in 1685. It is said that this was done on the urging of Madame de Maintenon. Deprived of their rights and being persecuted by the King, Huguenots realized that there was no future for them in France.

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' THE EDICT OF NANTES

REVOCATION OF THE EDICT OF NANTES

The Edict of Nantes was the first written promise to grant specific religious freedoms to a persecuted minority. Few documents in human history have had a greater tong range effect upon mankind. It was issued by King Henry IV on April 13, 1598, at Nantes. If Catholics, Protestants, and Jews are now coming closer, if there is a greater spirit of brotherhood, the Edict of Nantes is partly responsible. It was a long tedious document, put together by a commission that included both Catholic and Protestant (Reformed, as they were called in France). Even though King Henry had renounced his Huguenot faith for political reasons there is some doubt about how he really felt. If he had only political feelings in his conversion it could have stopped right there but after he reached some of his goals for his country he turned back to his beginnings. The committee had to struggle to pound out policies that would be fair to all and for the good of France but Henry kept about them until it was finally Issued In 1598. The Edict was a complicated document with each group or class of people getting something different from it. Its intent was religious tolerance but for some It was purely political or economics. It gave protection to those of the Catholic faith as well as the Reformed faith to live and abide In the kingdom without being compelled to do anything contrary to their consciences. The Reformed members were given freedom to exercise religion in their homes. It also protected children from being taken from their parents to be baptized in a faith contrary to their parents beliefs. Another Important decree that there would be no difference or distinction made in respect to the Reformed religion In subjects to be Instructed in universities, colleges, and schools and in receiving the sick and the poor into hospitals and public charities. King Henry IV was a monarch who understood his people; the poor, middle class, nobles, and clergy and he wanted a decree that would help each class in some way. The Edict of Nantes was his way of doing just that. It was his idea, his guidance and persistence that brought it to be. He knew that it was a religious document but also a political one. He was a great statesman, soldier, and defender of France. How do we know what other great things he could have accomplished If he had not been knifed through the heart by an assassin in 1610?. It would be the grandson of Henry IV, King Louis XIV, who would revoke this important document In 1685.

By the time Henry IV was killed In 1610, the people of France had accepted the Edict of Nantes and lived together in peace under its terms. Never had a nation enjoyed a time of such growth and prosperity. France had become a great power. Some historians are convinced that the rights given to the Protestants played a major part in the growth of France. The Edict had given the Protestants the right to exercise their religion and their civic duties. Services could be held in many places. With many nobles being Protestant, as the years went by, feuds began to arise and such things as the siege of La Rochelle in 1628 and other conflicts occurred. This resulted in military privileges being taken from the Huguenots. There was to be no more Huguenot army after 1629. Cannon, small arms, powder, and ammunition were no longer supplied to them. Most of the other rights given by the Edict were retained by the Huguenots and for some 50 years France was reasonably peaceful. Then in 1643, a new king ascended the throne of France, King Louis XIV, called the "Sun King". In his long reign his need for power was overwhelming. He was strongly Catholic and the fact that there were "heretics" in his kingdom disturbed him very much. He wanted France to become still greater and he felt that the best way to do that was to have a nation of one faith, the Catholic faith. Some of his advisers suggested that they try again to convert the Huguenots to Catholicism. This the King agreed with and set about the plan. The Huguenots resisted and their stubborn attitude infuriated King Louis, so he gradually brought more and more pressure, economic and social, to bear on them. As their privileges were gradually being taken away, their places of worship being torn down, and being urged always to recant, the Huguenots began to see the handwriting on the wall. Many of them began to flee to Switzerland,to the Netherlands, and to England, taking with them their talents and skills. In 1683, King Louis lost his short temper. He issued a decree authorizing the stationing of royal troops in the home of Huguenots for the purpose of forcing them to listen to those who were trying to convert them. This merely strengthened the resistance of the Huguenots. Fighting back, they cited the Edict of Nantes, which gave them rights under the law. King Louis XIV had an answer for that - he would just revoke the Edict which he did In 1685. It is said that this was done on the urging of Madame de Maintenon. Deprived of their rights and being persecuted by the King, Huguenots realized that there was no future for them in France.

27

26

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' RECORDS of MAUPINS in FRANCE, THEIR ORIGINS AND NAME Excerpts from the published writings of Florence Mary Maupin of Portsmouth, VA. There are numerous written records of the MAUPIN Family in France. The first two are Recherches Genealogi que Sur les Q__QJIL~_ยง__<_:LEO!~Dthie_lJ~~--BoulQ_gJis de Guines et Pay~ Cir:GLIIIIYQLsjQ_ยง, Vol. II by L-E de Gorgue-Rosny, published 1875 in France, chapter "MAUPIN" pg. 967-968 and Nobiliare de Ponthieu et de Vimeu, by the Marquis Rene de Belleval, published 1876 in France, chapter "MAUPIN" pg. 690-693. Photographs of the two relevant pages of these French county histories were sent to William Gabriel Maupin of Portsmouth, VA in 1932 by Charles Morrisette, at that time a well known Heraldist, who had been retained to do research on the family. Another important source is 6rmorial Get!_eral by J. B. Rietstap, first published in Gouda, Holland in 1884. Rietstap in his monumental work gives the "provenance" of the Maupins as PONTHIE U as does de Gorgue-Rosny and de Belleval. The provenance of a noble family, of the knightly class or above, is where they own their land. They held this land only as long as they were sworn to fight for their overlord. The overlord of the Maupi ns, at least at times, seems to have been the King himself. Paris is only 80 miles from the county seat of Ponthieu, which is Abbevi lie, a port on the Somme, 12 miles from the English Channel. Both de Belleval and de Gorgue-Rosny are more specific about the origins of the family. They both use the word "originate" and say that the family originated in Drucat, a village not far from Abbeville. Neither de Gorgue-Rosny nor de Belleval attempted to give what we would call a real genealogy. The name Gabriel or Daniel does not appear in either work. De Gorgue-Rosny's "Maupin" is divided into two sections. The first section is simply a selection of lists, some military, some deed or land records. Some 45 Maupins are named in this section over some 500 years. The earliest being Jean de Maupin, Lord of Friville in 1256 and the latest being Master Louis de Maupin, deputy public prosecutor of Rou in 1725. The second section of his work deals with what was clearly the most famous branch of the family, the dynasty of the Maupins of LA BOUVACQUE. These seven men, for seven generations, each being the heir of his predecessor, were the leading men at Abbeville, county seat of the district of Ponthieu. For almost 250 years they "intermarried with the leading families of our country" (de Belleval) and at least two of them had dealings with the King at Paris. This information that the Lords (owners) of the estate called "La Bouvacque" located in pontt]Jeu and NOT in Navarre puts to rest the family tradition that the Maupins came from Navarre. The La Bouvacque dynasty in Ponthieu ran from about 1380 to 1618. So far as is known, there are no records in France connecting the Maupins to Navarre.

28

In an inquiry to the Archives at Pau ir "'"""""",..""' "'h"Ut the Maupin name the answer was "The Mau1= known here, it will be found in the Normandy-Pic 1ich is 'n northern F ranee). THE_~AUPIN

NAME

The name "de Maupin" or "le Maupin "le" is often earlier) is a Shield-name. A shiel rname adopted by a family in Medieval Europe, a ightly class or above, as a short-hand term c jevice which was customarily painted on the fi )f the family's mounted warriors. All shield re in Europe, are unique ones. It was punis ..- any other family to use either the device ~d to describe it. Armed men could on I y be heir shields; their helmets either partly or er ces. To avoid the unauthorized use of another ful I ists were kept of the devices. These tt::>L;:,, 111 1 1 u1 ~..::e, culminated in Rietstap's monumental work "Armorial General" published in 1884 and still considered the definite work on the subject. How old the Maupin surname is, is not known. The earliest so-far-known Maupin was Jean de Friville in 1256 (de Gorgue-Rosny ). It is general! y believed that shield-names are not older than the use of painted shields, perhaps in the early 1100's. Most shield-names describe some object, often a natural object. Very common are trees, plants, birds, real or imaginary beasts. Most, but not all, shield-names are menacing in nature. The surname was also the war-cry - it was meant to dismay the enemy in the field. As a group more French shield-names are truly brutal sounding than English ones are. "Maupin" and all the many "Mau" shield-names in French are names i;, this later class. The name "Maupin" is an Old F: ench name. Old French usually written as OF is a ::ialect of Latin that gradually turned into the language nsw called French. It developed slowly in the cent 1 ~ i'ies before and somewhat after the turn of the first Mil":.mnium A D. "Mau" is an Old French word, the best translation for which is probably "Baneful". "Pin" means "Pinetree" in both Old French and Modern Ft-ench (the whole tree not the pine cones). De Belle val says that some of the early Maupins- he does not say which- used to paint the whole pinetree on their blood-red shields in Golden yellow. Since he also gives the crest as it is now used, with the three pine cones, and neither de Gorgue-Rosny nor Rietstap give any other crest except the three pine cone one, the use of this other would seem to be early. The whole pinetree would have been confusing too, as trees look much alike in rough drawings. It \vould have been much to the advantage of the Maupins to soon have changed to depicturing the most distinctive featut-e of

29

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RECORDS of MAUPINS in FRANCE, THEIR ORIGINS AND NAME Excerpts from the published writings of Florence Mary Maupin of Portsmouth, VA. There are numerous written records of the MAUPIN Family in France. The first two are Recherches Genealogique Sur les Comtes dE? Ponthieu, de __Boulogn_g,_ de Guines et Pay~ Qi_r::~_ymvQL?ln_ยง, Vol. II by L-E de Gorgue-Rosny, published 1875 in France, chapter "MAUPIN" pg. 967-968 and Nobiliare de Ponthieu et de Vimeu, by the Marquis Rene de Belleval, published 1876 in France, chapter "MAUPIN" pg. 690-693. Photographs of the two relevant pages of these French county histories were sent to William Gabriel Maupin of Portsmouth, VA in 1932 by Charles Morrisette, at that time a well known Heraldist, who had been retained to do research on the family. Another important source is Armorial General by J. B. Rietstap, first published in Gouda, Holland in 1884. Rietstap in his monumental work gives the "provenance" of the Maupins as PONTHIE U as does de Gorgue-Rosny and de Belleval. The provenance of a noble family, of the knightly class or above, is where they own their land. They held this land only as long as they were sworn to fight for their overlord. The overlord of the Maupins, at least at times, seems to have been the King himself. Paris is only 80 miles from the county seat of Ponthieu, which is Abbeville, a port on the Somme, 12 miles from the English Channel. Both de Belleval and de Gorgue-Rosny are more specific about the origins of the family. They both use the word "originate" and say that the family originated in Drucat, a village not far from Abbeville. Neither de Gorgue-Rosny nor de Belleval attempted to give what we would call a real genealogy. The name Gabriel or Daniel does not appear in either work. De Gorgue-Rosny's "Maupin" is divided into two sections. The first section is simply a selection of lists, some military, some deed or land records. Some 45 Maupins are named in this section over some 500 years. The earliest being Jean de Maupin, Lord of Friville in 1256 and the latest being Master Louis de Maupin, deputy public prosecutor of Rou in 1725. The second section of his work deals with what was clearly the most famous branch of the family, the dynasty of the Maupins of LA BOUVACQUE. These seven men, for seven generations, each being the heir of his predecessor, were the leading men at Abbeville, county seat of the district of Ponthieu. For almost 250 years they "intermarried with the leading families of our country" (de Belleval) and at least two of them had dealings with the King at Paris. This information that the Lords (owners) of the estate called "La Bouvacque" located in ponttl_ieu and NOT in Navarre puts to rest the family tradition that the Maupins came from Navarre. The La Bouvacque dynasty in Ponthieu ran from about 1380 to 1618. So far as is known, there are no records in France connecting the Maupins to Navarre.

28

In an inquiry to the Archives at Pau in Navarre about the Maupin name the answer was "The Maupin name is unknown here, it will be found in the Normandy-Picardy area" (which is in northern France). THE MAUPIN NAME The name "de Maupin" or "le Maupin" (the use of "le" is often earlier) is a Shield-name. A shield-name is a surname adopted by a family in Medieval Europe, always of the knightly class or above, as a short-hand term describing the device which was customarily painted on the fighting shields of the family's mounted warriors. All shield-names, anywhere in Europe, are unique ones. It was punishable by law for any other family to use either the device or the term used to describe it. Armed men could only be recognized by their shields; their helmets either partly or entirely hid their faces. To avoid the unauthorized use of another family's shield, careful lists were kept of the devices. These lists, in France, culminated in Rietstap's monumental work "Armorial General" published in 1884 and still considered the definite work on the subject. How old the Maupin surname is, is not known. The earliest so-far-known Maupin was Jean de Friville in 1256 (de Gorgue-Rosny). It is generally believed that shield-names are not older than the use of painted shields, perhaps in the early 1100's. Most shield-names describe some object, often a natural object. Very common are trees, plants, birds, real or imaginary beasts. Most, but not all, shield-names are menacing in nature. The surname was also the war-cry - it was meant to dismay the enemy in the field. As a group more French shield-names are truly brutal sounding than English ones are. "Maupin" and all the many "Mau" shield-names in French are names in this later class. The name "Maupin" is an Old F: ench name. Old French usually written as OF is a C:ialect of Latin that gradually turned into the language new called French. It developed slowly in the centuries before and somewhat after the turn of the first Mill~nnium A D. "Mau" is an Old French word, the best translation for which is probably "Baneful". "Pin" means "Pinetree" in both Old French and Modern French (the whole tree not the pine cones). De Belleval says that some of the early Maupins- he does not say which- used to paint the whole pinetree on their blood-red shields in Golden yellow. Since he also gives the crest as it is now used, with the three pine cones, and neither de Gorgue-Rosny nor Rietstap give any other crest except the three pine cone one, the use of this other would seem to be early. The whole pinetree would have been confusing too, as trees look much alike in rough drawings. It would have been much to the advantage of the Maupi ns to soon have changed to depicturing the most distinctive feature of

29

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their chosen tree, its cones. Here is Rietstap's description of the full device. "The shield: red, shows three gold pine cones. The crest: a unicorn rising; The supports: two savages, girth with green". Contrary to common belief most shield-devices were traditional. They were not awards for any sort of valor. Soon after the use of painted shields followed the use of painted ponchos worn over armor. These were literally coats, of course, and were called "Coats of Arms".

a

MAUPIN. En Ponthieu. Porte de gueules 3 pommes de pin d'or, tiPrceltf d'argent. ( Waignart.) Originaire de Drncat. En 1256, Jean Maupin, Sr de Friville, vend a l'abbaye de Sery 12 j• de terre aud. lieu. (Darsy.) - Ernoul, homme-lige de Helicourt, 1311. Bernard, Jean, Pierre, Watier, Wibert et Willaume, a Helicourt, 1311. Jacques et Aline Maupine, It Durcat, 1311. (Cart. de Ponthieu.) - Ernoul, fieffe de la prevote du Vimeu, est convoque pour laguerre en 1337. (D. Grenier.)- Philippe, Jean, Bernard et Willot tiennent terres de Drucat en 1378. ( Aveu de Drucat.)- Jean Mowin, potier a Abbeville en 1447. -Jean, auditcur, 1452. - Jean, bourgeois d'Abbeville, Freminot, Jean candellier, et Jean, pretre; comparaissent comme fieffes a Abbeville en 1465. (Arch. d'Abb.)- Jean, maitre des o~vrages de la ville, Fremin, boucher. Laurent et Jean, mayeurs de banmere, 1470, 1473. (Reg. de l'tfchevinage.)- Jean, auditeur, 1519.- Nicolas de Maupin, dem1 en SLGilles, pere de Antoine, baptise le 11 janv' 1570, nomme par Antoine de Le Gorgue, et Jeanne de Le Gorgue, et de Nicolas, baptise le 24 janvr 1569, nomme par Jacques deLe Gorgue et Clerette Chevalier. - Nicolas, Fran<;ois, Toussains, Anne, Jeanne, Marie, femme de Antoine Froissart, et les enfants de Henri Maupin, heritiers de hon. hom. Charles d'Yonval, demt 8. Abbeville, leur oncle, par son testament du 8 oct. 1600. -Claude de Maupin, echevin d'Abbeville en 1501. - N., prieur de Remiencourt signe la coutume de Boves ; Simon et Jean, procureur de Jean de Miannay, signent celle de Drucat en 1507. (Gout. Zoe. baill. d'Amiens.)- Jean, Sr de Haravesne et du Colombier en 157 5, fiefs appartenant en 170·) aux Maupin, de Drucat. - Nob. hom. Jean; M• Fran<;ois, Jean et Laurens, a Abbeville en 1609. Pierre, marie en mars 1609 a Marguerite de Lavergne. Nicolas et Fran<;ois, son frere, 1610. ( Vu.}- M• Louis, substitut de M' le Procureur du Roi, a Rue en 1699, puis procr 'du B.oi, ancien mayeur en 1725, allie a Marie-Anne France; fils de hon. hom. Louis de Maupin. (D. Grenier, Waignart .... ) Jenn Maupin ou de Maupin, echevin d'Abbeville en 1408, 16, 17, mayeur en 1419, Sr de La Bouvacgue, par son mariage avec Dl• de Biencourt, fille de Hugues; pere de Eustache, Sr de Le Bouvacgue, allie a Alix de Beaurains, d'ou Hugues; Fremine; Fremin; Hugues; Guillaume; Jean, procureur en la senechaussee de Ponthieu, lieutenant du bailli d'Abbeville en 1431, mayeur de la. ville en 1442, allie a Barbe Le Boucher ; Jacqueline, femme de Colard du Pont, puis de Robert de Marcheville ; et Alix, allier. a Jean Carue, dont trois filles mariees ; led. Jean eut de Barbe Le Boucher, Jacqueline, femme de Hue de Mouloutiers, et Jeanne, femme d'Eustache au Coste. Hugues l'atne, Sr de La Bouvacgue, echevin d'Abbeville, 1420, 21, 22, bailli en 1430, 37, heritier de Jean de Maupin, epousa Jeanne du Luquet, d'ou Jean, Firmin, chanoine de StVulfranc qui a.vait en La Bouvacque, de Jean de Maupin, ecuyer, allitS a

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30

1985 HUGUENOT TOUR - ENGLAND .! I !ill·!

In order to give a broader concept of our Huguenot heritage 1t is necessary to return to the Huguenot Tour In 1985 to Commemorate the 300th Anniversary of the Revocation of the f diet of Nantes. In 1885, there had been a commemoration of this event held in England by Huguenot descendants. From that observance came the formation of the Huguenot Society of london and it was that Society and the Museum of London which did so much to make the 1985 event so memorable. It was eight days of celebration for those of us on the Tour but for England 1t was celebrated the whole of 1985 and covered all of England. The migration of the Huguenots to England had begun in the middle of the 1500's - it is believe that over 40,000 refugees came to England in the reign of Elizabeth I. The Huguenots rapidly established a reputation for their creative skills and hard work. As a part of their Calvinistic teaching they regarded work as a self-discipline and a means to avert temptation. The democratic organization of their church encouraged a strong individual sense of responsl billty. This produced the Huguenot traits of reverence, sobriety, frugality, honest and excellence. The effects of the Huguenot's migration were felt in many areas of English life, in finance, the army, science and the arts. The refugees often combined their talent for science and craftsmanship by making instruments and watches, in textiles, glass, papermaking and many forms of manufacturing. Their skills transformed old methods. They did all this in such a quiet, unassuming way that the term "THE QUIET CONQUEST" was given for the title of the exhibition of the Museum of London which will be described later. After 1685, even though the borders were being watched large numbers left France, going to the Netherlands, to the Protestant states of Germany and to England. All of these countries welcomed them, knowing the skills and talents they possessed. Most of them were not able to bring out of France any of their possessions but the ideas, talents and concepts of their Calvinistic teaching would go with them. Unwittingly, King Louis had driven the "flower of France" from his country but the rest of Europe and the New World would be the greater for it. This pilgrimage of 1985 was not only a commemoration but a memorial with thanksgiving to our Huguenot ancestors who fled their homes leaving behind their material possessions and often family members in order to avoid conversion and persecution and to be able to continue to worship as they believed. It has been said that over 200,000 Huguenots fled France depleting it of many of its most gifted and talented artisans, professional and military persons. England was by far the greatest recipient of these refugees.

31

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their chosen tree, its cones. Here is Rietstap's description of the full device. "The shield: red, shows three gold pine cones. The crest: a unicorn rising; The supports: two savages, girth with green". Contrary to common belief most shield-devices were traditional. They were not awards for any sort of valor. Soon after the use of painted shields followed the use of painted ponchos worn over armor. These were literally coats, of course, and were called "Coats of Arms". MAUPIN. En Ponthieu. Porte de gueules a 8 pommes de pin tierceltf d'argent. ( Waignart.) Originaire de Drncat. En 1256, Maupin, S• de Friville, vend a l'abbaye de Sery 12 jx de terre a.ud. (Darsy.} - Ernoul, homme-lige de Helicourt, 1311. Bernard,

d'or,

Jeim lieu. Jean, Pierre, Watier, Wibert et Willaume, a Helicourt, 1311. Jacques et Aline Maupine, R. Durcat, 1311. (Cart. de Ponthieu.} - Ernoul, fi.effe de la prev6te du Vimeu, est convoque pour laguerre en 1337. (D. Grenier.)- Philippe, Jean, Bernard et Willot tiennent terres de Drucat en 1378. ( .Aveu de Drucat.)- Jean Mop:pin, potier 8. Abbeville en 144:7. -Jean, auditcur, 1452.- Jean, bourgeois d'Abbeville, Freminot, Jean candellier, et Jean, pretre; comparaissent comme fi.effes a Abbeville en 1465. (.Arch. rl .Abb.}- Jean, maitre des ouvrages de la ville, Fremin, boucher. Laurent et Jean, mayeurs de banniere, 1470, 1473. (Reg. de 1 Uchevinage.)- Jean, auditeur, 1519.- Nicolas de Maupin, dem en 8 1-Gilles, pere de Antoine, baptise le 11 janv• 1570, nomme par Antoine deLe Gorgue, et Jeanne deLe Gorgue, et de Nicolas, baptise le 24 janvr 1569, nomme par Jacques deLe Gorgue et Clarette Chevalier. - Nicola.c~, Fran~ois, Toussains,. Anne, Jeanne, Marie, femme de Antoine Froissart, et les enfants de Henri Maupin, heritiers de hon. hom. Charles d'Yonval, demt II. Abbeville, leur oncle, par son testament du 8 oct. 1600. -Claude de Maupin, echevin d'Abbeville en 1501. - N., prieur de Remiencourt signt> la. coutume de Boves; Simon et Jean, procureur de Jean de Mia.nnay, signent celle de Druca.t en 1507. (Oout. loc. du baill. d'.Amiens.}- J ea.n, S• de Ha.ra.vesne et du Colombier en 157 5, fiefs appartenant en 170·) aux Maupin, de Drucat. - Nob. hom. Jean; M• Fran~ois, Jt>an et Laurens, a. Abbeville en 1609. Pierre, marie en mars 1609 a Marguerite de Lavergne. Nicolas et Fran<;ois, son frere, 1610. (Vu.}- M~ Louis, substitut de M' le Procureur du Roi, a Rue en 1699, puis procr 'du ltoi, a.ncit>n ma.yeur en 1725, a.llie a Marie-Anne France; fils de hon. hom. Louis de Maupin. (D. Grenier, Waignart .... ) Jenn Maupin ou de Maupin, echevin d'Abbeville en 1408, 16, 17, :mayeur en 1419, §r de La. Bouvacgue, par son ma.riage avec Dl• de Biencourt, fi.lle de Hugues; pere de Eustache, Sr de Le Bouva.cgut~, a.llie a Alix de Beaura.ins, d'ou Hugues; Fremine; Fremin; Hugues; Guillaume; Jean, procureur en la senecha.uss~e de Ponthieu, lieutenant du bailli d'Abbeville en 1431, mayeur de la. ville en 1442, alliti a Barbe Le Boucher ; J a.cqueline, femme de Cola.rd du Pont, puis de Robert de Ma.rcheville ; et Alix, allier. a Jean Carue, dont trois filles mari~es ; led. Jean eut de Barbe Le Boucher, Jacqueline, femme de Hue de Mouloutiers, et Jeanne, femme d'Eul!tache au CosM. Hugues l'atn~, S• de La Bouvacgue, echevind'Abbeville, 1420, 21, 22, bailli en 1430, 37, Mritier de Jean d.a Maupin, epousa J.ea.nne du Luquet, d'ou Jean, Firmin, cha.noine de StVulfranc qui a.va.it en La Bouvacque, de Jean de Maupin, ecuyer, alli6 a

1985 HUGUENOT TOUR - ENGLAND In order to give a broader concept of our Huguenot heritage It is necessary to return to the Huguenot Tour In 1985 to Commemorate the 300th Anniversary of the Revoc.ation of the Edict of Nantes. In 1885, there had been a commemoration of this event held in England by Huguenot descendants. From that observance came the formation of the Huguenot Society of London and it was that SOciety and the Museum of London which did so much to make the 1985 event so memorable. It was eight days of celebration for those of us on the Tour but for England It was celebrated the whole of 1985 and covered all of England. The migration of the Huguenots to England had begun In the middle of the 1500's - it is believe that over 40,000 refugees came to England in the reign of Elizabeth I. The Huguenots rapidly established a reputation for their creative skills and hard work. As a part of their Calvinistic teaching they regarded work as a self-discipline and a means to avert temptation. The democratic organization of their church encouraged a strong individual sense of responsibility. This produced the Huguenot traits of reverence, sobriety, frugality, honest and excellence. The effects of the Huguenot's migration were felt in many areas of English life, in finance, the army, science and the arts. The refugees often combined their talent for science and craftsmanship by making Instruments and watches, in textiles, glass, papermaking and many forms of manufacturing. Their skills transformed old methods. They did all this in such a quiet, unassuming way that the term "THE QUIET CONQUEST" was given for the title of the exhibition of the Museum of London which will be described later. After 1685, even though the borders were being watched large numbers left France, going to the Netherlands, to the Protestant states of Germany and to England. All of these countries welcomed them, knowing the skills and talents they possessed. Most of them were not able to bring out of France any of their possessions but the ideas, talents and concepts of their Calvinistic teaching would go with them. Unwittingly, King Louis had driven the "flower of France" from his country but the rest of Europe and the New World would be the greater for it. This pilgrimage of 1985 was not only a commemoration but a memorial with thanksgiving to our Huguenot ancestors who fled their homes leaving behind their material possessions and often family members in order to avoid conversion and persecution and to be able to continue to worship as they believed. It has been said that over 200,000 Huguenots fled France depleting it of many of its most gifted and talented artisans, professional and military persons. England was by far the greatest recipient of these refugees.

31

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The first day of our eight day stay in England was a service at St. Paul's Cathedral by the Archbishop of Canterbury, followed by a reception at Goldsmith's Hall. This was to honor the Huguenots for their contribution to goldsmithing and silversmithing. Next to Greenwich, where prominent Huguenot families lived, giving their contributions to clocks and telescopes. The third day took us to the city of Canterbury for a worship service in the Huguenot Crypt at Canterbury Cathedral. The Huguenots first held services there about 1575. Of the several French settlements in the London area, we were taken to Spitalfields to learn of their huge contribution to the production of fabrics in weaving, lace making and tailoring in all phases. The Huguenots were unparalleled in their field of design In things of beauty. But the most outstanding of all was in the Museum of London, called "THE QUIET CONQUEST", an exhibition路 of Huguenot fine craftmanship in art, sculpture, silver, textiles and watches. It was a remarkable display, showing England's years of planning to exhibit the Huguenot institutions and churches, in science and industry. The book "THE QUIET CONQUEST, THE HUGUENOTS, 1685 TO 1985", published by the Museum of London in association with the Huguenot Society of London was purchased by this writer and it is a cherished possession. It is 325 pages of Huguenot history with pictures and articles about the talents and contributions of the Huguenots. England, being the greatest recipient of the talents of the Huguenots, showed their appreciation and gratitude In this beautiful commemoration. The talents of these Huguenots were shared with other countries. The Colonies benefited also beginning with the Pilgrims who had a Calvinistic background in their beliefs and to give路 a name the family of Priscilla Mullins were Huguenots. 路Later men of the Revolution like Paul Revere, a silversmith, who was a Huguenot. Down through our history persons of Huguenot ancestry have made their contribution to the arts. To name a few - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Henry David Thoreau, James J. Audubon and others. From our eight day visit In England, we came away with a new awareness of the great contributions of the Huguenots In the fields of textiles and dress, clocks and watches, goldsmiths, silversmith, gunmakers, furniture and woodwork, jewelers and ceramics. And in their faith, their discipline and way of life, we truly have a great heritage.

32

THE SEARCH Working on family history is sometimes like throwing a jig saw puzzle out of Its box onto the table and then trying to find the place to begin. Sometimes It is at the top, sometimes at the bottom or even in the middle if the piece looks "right". So it might seem as I relate how the pieces of the puzzle come together In our Maupin history. So I set out to find if Marie was a Spencer of England or not with this doubt cast upon it. I wanted to find a record of Gabriel and Marie's marriage if it was available and I knew If she was a Spencer of Althrop or Cople it would be on record. First the firm of Noel-Currier-Briggs in England was employed to search. Negative. Then in June 1981, I employed Mrs. Hickey, genealogist for the Huguenot Society of London. Negative She suggested I try "Debretts of London" (they do the Presidents' lineages). They worked 20 months for me. The Spencers of Althrop were eliminated right away so I asked them to search the Spencers of Cople. This is the family of the Nicholas Spencer who was the Governor of Virginia in the 1600's; then they searched the Spencers of South Mylls. They are the New England Spencers. All these lines proved Negative - no record of a Gabriel Maupin and Mary Spencer. This was all very disappointing but I knew I had to continue the search. Being familiar with the work of the Mormon church in Salt Lake City and of their filming all the available old church and genealogical records all over the world, I decided that a trip to Salt Lake City was a must. I went in January 1985 for eight days. I had searched all the possible counties in England for Gabriel and Marie, all of France that had been filmed, then Switzerland and on the 7th day I turned to the Netherlands. There was a listing of "Huguenot Immigration to the Netherlands". This was on fiche - index listings. Finding the right "M" roll #199888 was easy and I began to turn the film. After seven days of looking at the screen my eyes and arm were beginning to feel the strain, so I was not turning very fast. But all of a sudden, like a bolt from the blue, the name of "MAUPAIN, GABRIEL" appeared on the screen! I could not believe my eyes! That elusive name I had searched for so long was right before me! Not only one time but ten times! Even though we are supposed to be quiet in the library I could hardly keep from standing up and shouting "I have made a discovery"! I did restrain myself but called my friends to share my excitement. The spelling of our Maupin name as "MAUPAIN" was the same as appeared on the ship Le Nasseau passenger list given to us by Robert A. Brock in his book "Huguenot Immigration to Virginia". A page of that book showing "Gabriel Maupain sa femme and 3 enfans" will be shown. That meant that Gabriel brought his wife and 3 children - no names listed. For many

33


The first day of our eight day stay in England was a service at St. Paul's Cathedral by the Archbishop of Canterbury, followed by a reception at Goldsmith's Hall. This was to honor the Huguenots for their contribution to goldsmithing and silversmithing. Next to Greenwich, where prominent Huguenot families lived, giving their contributions to clocks and telescopes. The third day took us to the city of Canterbury for a worship service in the Huguenot Crypt at Canterbury Cathedral. The Huguenots first held services there about 1575. Of the several French settlements in the London area, we were taken to Spitalfields to learn of their huge contribution to the production of fabrics in weaving, lace making and tailoring in all phases. The Huguenots were unparalleled in their field of design In things of beauty. But the most outstanding of all was in the Museum of London, called "THE QUIET CONQUEST", an exhibition路 of Huguenot fine craftmanship in art, sculpture, silver, textiles and watches. It was a remarkable display, showing England's years of planning to exhibit the Huguenot institutions and churches, In science and Industry. The book "THE QUIET CONQUEST, THE HUGUENOTS, 1685 TO 1985", published by the Museum of Loridon in association with the Huguenot Society of London was purchased by this writer and it is a cherished possession. It Is 325 pages of Huguenot history with pictures and articles about the talents and contributions of the Huguenots. England, being the greatest recipient of the talents of the Huguenots, showed their appreciation and gratitude In this beautiful commemoration. The talents of these Huguenots were shared with other countries. The Colonies benefited also beginning with the Pilgrims who had a Calvinistic background t'n their beliefs and to give路 a name the family of Priscilla Mullins were Huguenots. 路Later men of the Revolution like Paul Revere, a silversmith, who was a Huguenot. Down through our history persons of Huguenot ancestry have made their contribution to the arts. To name a few - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Henry David Thoreau, James J. Audubon and others. From our eight day visit in England, we came away with a new awareness of the great contributions of the Huguenots In the fields of textiles and dress, clocks and watches, goldsmiths, silversmith, gunmakers, furniture and woodwork, jewelers and ceramics. And In their faith, their discipline and way of life, we truly have a great heritage.

32

THE SEARCH Working on family history is sometimes like throwing a jig

saw puzzle out of Its box onto the table and then trying to find the place to begin. Sometimes It is at the top, sometimes at the bottom or even in the middle if the piece looks "right". So It might seem as I relate how the pieces of the puzzle come together in our Maupin history. So I set out to find if Marie was a Spencer of England or not with this doubt cast upon it. I wanted to find a record of Gabriel and Marie's marriage if it was available and I knew If she was a Spencer of Althrop or Cople it would be on record. First the firm of Noel-Currier-Briggs In England was employed to search. Negative. Then in June 1981, I employed Mrs. Hickey, genealogist for the Huguenot Society of London. Negative She suggested I try "Debretts of London" (they do the Presidents' lineages). They worked 20 months for me. The Spencers of Althrop were eliminated right away so I asked them to search the Spencers of Cople. This Is the family of the Nicholas Spencer who was the Governor of Virginia in the 1600's; then they searched the Spencers of South Mylls. They are the New England Spencers. All these lines proved Negative - no record of a Gabriel Maupin and Mary Spencer. This was all very disappointing but I knew I had to continue the search. Being familiar with the work of the Mormon church In Salt Lake City and of their filming all the available old church and genealogical records all over the world, I decided that a trip to Salt Lake City was a must. I went in January 1985 for eight days. I had searched all the possible counties in England for Gabriel and Marie, all of France that had been filmed, then Switzerland and on the 7th day I turned to the Netherlands. There was a listing of "Huguenot Immigration to the Netherlands". This was on fiche - index listings. Finding the right "M" roll #199888 was easy and I began to turn the film. After seven days of looking at the screen my eyes and arm were beginning to feel the strain, so I was not turning very fast. But all of a sudden, like a bolt from the blue, the name of "MAUPAIN, GABRIEL" appeared on the screen! I could not believe my eyes! That elusive name I had searched for so long was right before me! Not only one time but ten times! Even though we are supposed to be quiet in the library I could hardly keep from standing up and shouting "I have made a discovery"! I did restrain myself but called my friends to share my excitement. The spelling of our Maupin name as "MAUPAIN" was the same as appeared on the ship Le Nasseau passenger list given to us by Robert A. Brock in his book "Huguenot Immigration to Virginia". A page of that book showing "Gabriel Maupain sa femme and 3 enfans" will be shown. That meant that Gabriel brought his wife and 3 children - no names listed. For many

33


r HUGUENOT EMIGRATION TO VIRGINIA.

29

ROLLE DES FRANCOIS, SUISSES. GENEVOIS, ALEI\IANS, ET FLAMANS EMBARQUES DAM LE NAVIRE NEMME LE NASSEAU POUR ALLER A LA VIRGINIE.

Mons'r Latane," Ministre, Madame sa femme un Enian unne Servante, Jean Leroy, Jacques Lacaze, Jean Dubroq, Catharine Basel, une fille, Ester Lefebre, · Ester 1\hrtin, un enfan, tfrancois Ribot, Joseph Molinie, sa femme, Leon Auguste Chareitit~ sa femme, Jean Bar~chin, sa femme, Joseph Caillau, and 53 femme, Jean Dauphin, Jeane Bellin, Margueritte Gautie, Marie Mallet, Thomas Deneille, 11 Jacques Macan, et sa femme, Jean Thomas1' and sa femme, Jean Robert, sa femme and une fille, Alexandre Madouy, Noel Richemon and sa femme, Jean ffonnielle and sa femme, Estienne Bocar, sa femme and 2 enfans, Jaques ffradot, Gabriel Maupain, 20 sa femme and 3 enfans, Jacob Sponge and sa Temme, w ---

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---- ----------11 Deneale, a well-known Fairfax county, Virginia, name, is probably a corruption of Deneille. 1 ' Baird, II, 41, states that Jean Thomas settled in South Carolina, and gi,·es from Lisle de·s Francois 1!1 Suisses Rifugiez in Caroline this extract: ,_Jean Thomas, n~ a St. Jean d' Angely in Saintonge, fils de Jean Thomas et d'Anne.Dupon. tO The name is now rendered Maupin in Virginia. An estimable representati•·e was the late Socrates Maupin, Professor of Chemistry in th-: University of Virgini;~ (I853-187f}, and chairman of its faculty (1854-I868); killed by a fall from his horse October 19, 1871. Daniel Maupin, doubtless a son of the refugee, was granted 1,188 acres of land in Albemarle county September 20, 1745· (Virginia Land Regis· iry, Book No. 31, page 652.) Gabriel Maupin was keeper of the public magazine at \Villiamsburg in 1791.

years Mr. Brock's passenger list was the only document known and it was supposed that the three children were Mary, Gabriel II, and Daniel. Then another document had surfaced - the "HEADRIGHTS DOCUMENT". This gave us the names of the children. In 1709 Gabriel applied for his "Headrights" in Henrico County, VA, where the Huguenot settlement of Manakin was located. By headrights is meant that each person imported could apply for 50 acres of land. Gabriel's record reads: "Upon the petition of Gabriel Maupin this is to certify that there is due unto him 250 acres of land for the importation of himself and Mary his wife, with Magdelaine, Mary, and Daniel his children into this Colony the same being legally proved in open Court". Now we have the names of the children who came with Gabriel and his wife but who is this Magdelaine and where is Gabriel II? This document had been seen first in 1950 by Mildred Holloday, a Gabriel II descendant, but was not known to the Daniel descendants until it was found in York County, VA, records by Carolyn Farmer of Houston, TX, in 1980. A portion of the whole document page will be shown. This is legal proof of the names of the children who came with Gabriel and Marie Maupin to Virginia. Returning to the films found in the LOS Library in Salt Lake City, there were ten separate entries and they are shown with more detail. But to describe them briefly, Gabriel is shown as being received in the Church at Amsterdam in October 1688 and again in February 1689 for "confession of faith". In December 1689 he applied for Dutch citizenship but that move was never completed. In August 1691 "Proclamation for marriage" or "Banns" were posted with the Marriage of Gabriel and Marie in September, 1691. The baptism of four children are listed, Magdelaine, 1692, Claude, 1694, Marie 1696 and Sara, 1698. Even though the first born on these records Magdelaine and Mary were the same as on the "Headrights" document, who was the son Claude and the daughter Sara Catherine and what had become of them and where was Daniel and Gabriel Jr.? But I felt it was surely our Gabriel and Marie even though I could not make out Marie's last name. I went directly to the attendant in the Netherlands section who was very helpful saying I should write to the Archives in Amsterdam and he gave me the address. I wrote sending them a copy of the film and they answered promptly saying "Yes" they could help and giving me the fee to start the search. My husband and I had made reservations for the upcoming International Huguenot Tour to Commemorate the 300th anniversary of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes to be held in England, Netherlands and France in September - October 1985. Two weeks before we were to leave the letter came from the Archives with the information about the family and the church. We left on the Tour and for 28 days we were filled with Huguenot history. This event will be discussed in other

35

34

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HUGUENOT EMIGRATION TO VIRGINIA.

29

ROLLE DES FRANCOIS, SUISSES, GENEVOIS, ALEl\IANS, ET FLAMANS EMBARQUES DAM LE NAVIRE NEMME LE NASSEAU POUR ALLER A LA VIRGINIE.

Mons'r Latane, 11 M inistre, Madame sa femme un En fan unne Servante, Jean Leroy, Jacques Lacaze, Jean Dubroq, Catharine Basel, une fille, Ester Lefebre, · • Ester 1\hrtin, un enfan, • ffrancois Ribot, Joseph Molinie, sa Iemme, Leon Auguste Chareiti•~ sa femme, • Jean Barachin, sa femme, Joseph Caillau, and 53 femme, Jean Dauphin, • · • Jeane Bellin, · Margueritte Gautie, Marie Mallet, • • • Thomas Deneille, 11 Jacques Macao, et sa femme, Jean Thomas 1' and sa femme, Jean Robert, sa femme and une fille, Alexandre Madouy, - ' Noel Richemon and .sa femme, Jean ffonnielle and sa femme, • • Estienne Bocar, sa femme and 2 enfans, • Jaques ffradot, Gabriel Maupain, 20 sa femme and 3 enfans, • Jacob Sponge and sa femme, _, ·- ·~----

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Deneale, a well-known Fairfax county, Virginia, name, is probably a corruption of Deneille. "Baird, II, 41, states that Jean Thomas settled in South Carolina, and gives from Lisle de·s Francois el Suisses Rifugiez in Caroline this extract: •· Jean Thomas, no! ll St. Jean d' Angely in Saintonge, fils de Jean Thomas et d'Anne.Dupon. 20 The name is now rendered Maupin in Virginia. An estimable representative was the late Socrates Maupin, Professor of Chemistry in th-.: University of Virgini<l ( I853-187r), and chairman of its faculty (1854·1868); killed by a fall from his horse October 19, 1871. Daniel l\1;tupin, doubtless a son of the refugee, was granted 1,188 acres of land in Albemarle county St:ptember 20, 1745· (Virginia Land Regis· iry, Book No. 31, page 652. J Gabriel Maupin was keeper of the public magazine at \Villiarnsburg in 1791.

years Mr. Brock's passenger list was the only document known and it was supposed that the three children were Mary, Gabriel II, and Daniel. Then another document had surfaced - the "HEADRIGHTS DOCUMENT". This gave us the names of the children. In 1709 Gabriel applied for his "Headrights" in Henrico County, VA, where the Huguenot settlement of Manakin was located. By headrights is meant that each person imported could apply for 50 acres of land. Gabriel's record reads: "Upon the petition of Gabriel Maupin this is to certify that there is due unto him 250 acres of land for the importation of himself and Mary his wife, with Magdelaine, Mary, and Daniel his children Into this Colony the same being legally proved in open Court". Now we have the names of the children who came with Gabriel and his wife but who is this Magdelaine and where is Gabriel II? This document had been seen first in 1950 by Mildred Holladay, a Gabriel II descendant, but was not known to the Daniel descendants until it was found in York County, VA, records by Carolyn Farmer of Houston, TX, in 1980. A portion of the whole document page will be shown. This is legal proof of the names of the children who came with Gabriel and Marie Maupin to Virginia. Returning to the films found in the LDS Library in Salt Lake City, there were ten separate entries and they are shown with more detail. But to describe them briefly, Gabriel is shown as being received in the Church at Amsterdam in October 1688 and again in February 1689 for "confession of faith". In December 1689 he applied for Dutch citizenship but that move was never completed. In August 1691 "Proclamation for marriage" or "Banns" were posted with the Marriage of Gabriel and Marie in September, 1691. The baptism of four children are listed, Magdelaine, 1692, Claude, 1694, Marie 1696 and Sara, 1698. Even though the first born on these records Magdelaine and Mary were the same as on the "Headrights" document, who was the son Claude and the daughter Sara Catherine and what had become of them and where was Daniel and Gabriel Jr.? But I felt it was surety our Gabriel and Marie even though I could not make out Marie's last name. I went directly to the attendant in the Netherlands section who was very helpful saying I should write to the Archives in Amsterdam and he gave me the address. I wrote sending them a copy of the film and they answered promptly saying "Yes" they could help and giving me the fee to start the search. My husband and I had made reservations for the upcoming International Huguenot Tour to Commemorate the 300th anniversary of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes to be held in England, Netherlands and France in September - October 1985. Two weeks before we were to leave the letter came from the Archives with the information about the family and the church. We left on the Tour and for 28 days we were filled with Huguenot history. This event will be discussed in other

35 34


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In reply to your letter mentioned above, forwarded to me for handling, I can give you the following information. August 18, 1691. Publication of the banns of Gabriel Maupin (from Gargau, tailor, 25 years old, living in the Bethanienstraat, parents deceased, witness: Louys Le Gendre, his cousin) and Marie Erssen (from Rouen, 25 years old, living in the Hartenstraat, parents deceased, witness: Francois Marie, her cousin). The marriage was solemnized at the Walloon Church • June 22, 1692. Baptism of Madelaine, daughter of Gabriel Maupin and Marie Ersan. Witnesses: Rene Angier and Madelaine Capper. April 4, 1694. Baptism of Claude, son of Gabriel Maupin and Marie Hersain. Witnesses: Claude and Jeanne Brousson. April 15, 1696. Baptism of Marie, daughter of Gabriel Maupin and Marie Hersan. Witnesses: Jerome Brousson and Marie de Ramet • April 6, 1698. Baptism of Sara Caterine, daughter of Gabriel Maupin and Marie Ersan. Witnesses: Roumelet and Geertruyd Delormes. The four children were all baptized at the Walloon Church. In 1587 the Amsterdam burgomasters confered the use of the former church of the brothers of St.Paul to the French speaking refugees from the southern Netherlands, The address of this church is Walenplein 157.

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give you the following information. August 18, 1691, Publication of the banns of Gabriel Maupin (from Gargau, tailor, 25 years old, living in the Bethanienstraat, parents deceased, witness: Louys Le Gendre, his cousin) and Marie Erssen (from Rouen, 25 years old, living in the Hartenstraat, parents deceased, witness: Francois Marie, her cousin). The marriage was solemnized at the Walloon Church. June 22, 1692. Baptism of Madelaine, daughter of Gabriel Maupin and Marie Ersan, Witnesses: Rene Augier and Madelaine Capper, April 4, 1694. Baptism of Claude, son of Gabriel Maupin and Marie Hersain. Witnesses: Claude and Jeanne Brousson, April 15, 1696, Baptism of Marie, daughter of Gabriel Maupin and Marie Hersan. Witnesses: Jerome Brousson and Marie de Ramet. April 6, 1698, Baptism of Sara Caterina, daughter of Gabriel Maupin and Marie Ersan, Witnesses: Roumelet and Geertruyd Delormes. The four children were all baptized at the Walloon Church. In 1587 the Amsterdam burgomasters confered the use of the former church of the brothers of St.Paul to the French speaking refugees from the southern Netherlands, The address of this church is Walenplein 157.

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38

39

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chapters. Although the Tour covered all of the Netherlands to my great disappointment we did not have time in Amsterdam to find the church and take some pictures. The bus driver said he was very sorry but the church was located in the very old part of Amsterdam and the streets were too narrow to allow a bus to use them. I was almost sick with disappointment not to get to see the church where Gabriel and Marie were married but as we were scheduled to be in Paris that evening we felt we should not leave the Tour. But sometimes when doors are closed to us it is for a definite reason. And it was so true in this instance. Our time in France was a wonderful experience and I did not want to miss one minute of it. It is covered in another chapter. A month after returning from the Huguenot Tour I received a notice that our school district from which I had retired would have a "Spring Break" tour to Amsterdam in March 1986. This was an answer to my prayers and perhaps the reason the door was closed to me earlier because if I had seen the church on the Huguenot Tour I might not have made the second trip. I began right away a correspondence with the pastor of the Walloon Church, Phillip Fromont, and in March returned to Amsterdam for eight wonderful days of visiting, going to the Archives, the Walloon Library where the original indexes of the films I had found in Salt Lake City were kept. This trip to Amsterdam in 1986, has to be given more attention because I feel that in the important events in my life this trip is very high on the list and I want to share it with my readers. With my school friends we flew from Kansas City to New York. When the appointed time of departure came we were told there would be a delay. So we waited, two hours in fact, and then after take-off we were told it was because of a flat tire on the plane. As is usually the case, this was a night flight, scheduled to arrive in Amsterdam at 7:20a.m. on a Sunday morning. After I knew I was to make the trip, I had corresponded with the Pastor of the church and he had sent me a church bulletin showing that their Sunday morning service would be at 11:00 a.m. and he was most cordial in his invitation that I attend. it would be my only chance as we would be leaving the next Sunday morning. This I felt would be a real highlight of the trip. As we hurtled along in the darkness, I felt perhaps the pilot was trying to make up our delayed time as we seemed to be thrashing about a lot. Then the lightning and rain appeared on the window. Having flown a number of times before, I tried not to be concerned but you still have the knowledge in the back of your mind that there is a big pond of water below you! Finally dawn came - that is there was no darkness out of the window but we could see nothing! Just thick fog! And even though I did not know where we were I could see my watch and it told me that we had passed our 7:30 arrival time in Amsterdam. The pilot came on telling us the cities we were

40

circling because of the fog and up to that time all planes were being diverted to Brussels, Belgium! My heart sank and even though I had not slept but prayed a lot of the night, I began to :;end the most urgent prayers to my Lord. Was it God's Will that for a second time I would not be able to get to the church? The c-:aptain's voice came on again telling us we would be the first plane to land in Amsterdam and we would be on the ground at 12:30 p.m. I knew that the 11:00 church service was over but will have to admit when the wheels touched down even though we could not see a thing out of the windows, I said, "Thank you l_ord" and somehow felt everything would be alright. We were taken quickly to our hotel and I immediately went to the desk clerk and asked for a taxi and showed her the address of the church. I was hoping that someone would still be around. The clerk said It would really be quicker for me if I could walk and she gave me the directions. My roommate was with me, we walked as fast as we could. Arriving at the church door we found it locked but we could hear organ music from the inside. There was a young man sitting nearby and I asked him if he knew how I could get the attention of someone on the inside. He went to a side door and very soon the front door of the church opened and there was Pastor Fromont, still in his church r-obes with his arms outstretched saying, "Welcome, Mrs. Shaffett, Come in, we have been waiting for you!" It was then 1 :30 p.m. His wife, their three children and the assistant pastor were there. The Pastor said, "Join hands and pray". The prayer was in French as he speaks only a little English and his wife none at all. And then I prayed and it truly came from the heart because we had come safely through a stormy night- five hours late in arriving and I had made it to the church even if it: was not on time! I told them of what we had experienced in the weather and they were very sympathetic. I had sent him a copy of the record of Gabriel and Marie Maupin from the Archives and he told me that the streets where they had lived were virtually unchanged since the 17th century, and were close to the church. The assistant pastor volunteered to take me there during the week. The Pastor said he had gifts for me and what an assortment of books, pamphlets and other information on the Huguenots! But the most prized gift was a record album of their beautiful organ music. On the album cover it told the history of the organ. It had been installed in 1680 and had very few changes except maintenance since that time. So as Gabriel and Marie were married in this church in 1691, it would have no doubt played for their wedding. And most assuredly they would have heard it each Sunday. He also to I d me that the church was bui It in 1409 and given to the Protestants in 1578. After awhile, because she did not speak English, the Pastor's wife took the children to their car and went home. The Pastor wanted to talk more and said he wanted to walk back to our

41


chapters. Although the Tour covered all of the Netherlands to my great disappointment we did not have time in Amsterdam to find the church and take some pictures. The bus driver said he was very sorry but the church was located in the very old part of Amsterdam and the streets were too narrow to allow a bus to use them. I was almost sick with disappointment not to get to see the church where Gabriel and Marie were married but as we were scheduled to be in Paris that evening we felt we should not leave the Tour. But sometimes when doors are closed to us it is for a definite reason. And it was so true in this instance. Our time in France was a wonderful experience and I did not want to miss one minute of it. It is covered in another chapter. A month after returning from the Huguenot Tour I received a notice that our school district from which I had retired would have a "Spring Break" tour to Amsterdam in March 1986. This was an answer to my prayers and perhaps the reason the door was closed to me earlier because if I had seen the church on the Huguenot Tour I might not have made the second trip. I began right away a correspondence with the pastor of the Walloon Church, Phillip Fromont, and in March returned to Amsterdam for eight wonderful days of visiting, going to the Archives, the Walloon Library where the original indexes of the films I had found in Salt Lake City were kept. This trip to Amsterdam in 1986, has to be given more attention because I feel that in the important events in my life this trip is very high on the list and I want to share it with my readers. With my school friends we flew from Kansas City to New York. When the appointed time of departure came we were told there would be a delay. So we waited, two hours in fact, and then after take-off we were told it was because of a flat tire on the plane. As is usually the case, this was a night flight, scheduled to arrive in Amsterdam at 7:20a.m. on a Sunday morning. After I knew I was to make the trip, I had corresponded with the Pastor of the church and he had sent me a church bulletin showing that their Sunday morning service would be at 11:00 a.m. and he was most cordial in his invitation that I attend. it would be my only chance as we would be leaving the next Sunday morning. This I felt would be a real highlight of the trip. As we hurtled along in the darkness, I felt perhaps the pilot was trying to make up our delayed time as we seemed to be thrashing about a lot. Then the lightning and rain appeared on the window. Having flown a number of times before, I tried not to be concerned but you still have the knowledge in the back of your mind that there is a big pond of water below you! Finally dawn came - that is there was no darkness out of the window but we could see nothing! Just thick fog! And even though I did not know where we were I could see my watch and it told me that we had passed our 7:30 arrival time in Amsterdam. The pilot came on telling us the cities we were

40

circling because of the fog and up to that time all planes were being diverted to Brussels, Belgium! My heart sank and even though I had not slept but prayed a lot of the night, I began to send the most urgent prayers to my Lord. Was it God's Will that for a second time I would not be able to get to the church? The Captain's voice came on again telling us we would be the first plane to land in Amsterdam and we would be on the ground at 12:30 p.m. I knew that the 11:00 church service was over but will have to admit when the wheels touched down even though we could not see a thing out of the windows, I said, "Thank you Lord" and somehow felt everything would be alright. We were taken quickly to our hotel and I immediately went to the desk clerk and asked for a taxi and showed her the address of the church. I was hoping that someone would still be around. The clerk said It would really be quicker for me if I could walk and she gave me the directions. My roommate was with me, we walked as fast as we could. Arriving at the church door we found it locked but we could hear organ music from the inside. There was a young man sitting nearby and I asked him if he knew how I could get the attention of someone on the inside. He went to a side door and very soon the front door of the church opened and there was Pastor Fromont, still in his church robes with his arms outstretched saying, "Welcome, Mrs. Shaffett, Come in, we have been waiting for you!" It was then 1:30 p.m. His wife, their three children and the assistant pastor were there. The Pastor said, "Join hands and pray". The prayer was in French as he speaks only a little English and his wife none at all. And then I prayed and it truly came from the heart because we had come safely through a stormy night- five hours late in arriving and I had made it to the church even if it was not on time! I told them of what we had experienced in the weather and they were very sympathetic. I had sent him a copy of the record of Gabriel and Marie Maupin from the Archives and he told me that the streets where they had lived were virtually unchanged since the 17th century, and were close to the church. The assistant pastor volunteered to take me there during the week. The Pastor said he had gifts for me and what an assortment of books, pamphlets and other information on the Huguenots! But the most prized gift was a record album of their beautiful organ music. On the album cover it told the history of the organ. It had been installed in 1680 and had very few changes except maintenance since that time. So as Gabriel and Marie were married in this church in 1691, it would have no doubt played for their wedding. And most assuredly they would have heard it each Sunday. He also told me that the church was built in 1409 and given to the Protestants in 1578. After awhile, because she did not speak English, the Pastor's wife took the children to their car and went home. The Pastor wanted to talk more and said he wanted to walk back to our 41


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Interior of the Reformed Church in Amsterdam. It was built in 1409, confered to the French speaking refugees in 1587. The present beautiful organ was installed in 1680. Gabriel and Marie Maupin were married here in 1691 and it was their church until they left Amsterdam. It is located at Walenplein 157 , a short walk from Hartenstraat where Marie 1 ived. The Ass 1 t Pastor of the church took me there. It is a short, nar r ow street, virtually unchanged from the 17th century.

42

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43


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Interior of the Reformed Church in Amsterdam. It was built in 1409, confered to the French speaking refugees in 1587. The present beautiful organ was installed in 1680. Gabriel and Marie Maupin were married here in 1691 and it was their church until they left Amsterdam. It is located at Walenplein 157, a short walk from Hartenstraat where Marie 1 ived. The Ass't Pastor of the church took me the re. It is a short, narrow street, virtually unchanged from the 17th century.

42

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43


hotel with us. As my roommate was a widow of a minister, she was very interested in what he had to say. She had known little about the Huguenots. He set a time to pick me up on Tuesday to go to the Huguenot Library and meet some Huguenot friends and then again to meet on Thursday and Friday. After getting back to the hotel, I was able to look more closely at the record album and knowing they had some they wanted to sell I asked the desk clerk to call the Pastor for me. In expressing my thanks I told him I thought the album would make wonderful gifts to take home and could he please bring five of them when he came to pick me up on Tuesday? He said he would be happy to. To give an example of how language can lead you astray sometimes - Pastor Fromont was right on time on Tuesday and I was waiting in the lobby. He greeted me with a smile and said "Mrs Shaffett, I have brought the albums!" And he pulled five BOOKS out of a bag! I said, "Oh Pastor, I wanted the albums!" "This is an album", he answered. I said, "I wanted the organ music". His answer, "I am so sorry - you wanted the platters!" Then we both laughed. In my gift on Sunday had been two nice sized books and he thought that was what I was asking for. So he said the "platters" would be ready for me when I came to the church on Thursday. And what wonderful gifts they made! I had mine put on tape so it can be enjoyed while in the car or anywhere I happen to be and want to relive those wonderful feelings and memories of that Sunday in the Walloon Church in Amsterdam when the organ music and the prayers seemed to enfold me. I truly felt God's presence and an answer to my prayers. The trip to the Huguenot Library on Tuesday was wonderful. I was able to look at the original records that had been filmed by the LOS Church and marked reel :11:199888, where the Gabriel Maupin information was found. The Pastor introduced me to the President of the Protestant Society of the Netherlands, Mademoiselle M.F.G. Corbier, a French lady who makes her home in Amsterdam and speaks beautiful English. She was with me at the Huguenot Library and looked over all the Maupin papers I had brought with me. She could find no reason for the Gabriel and Marie Maupin found in the records of the Walloon Church in Amsterdam not to be those of the couple who came as Huguenot refugees to Virginia in 1700. There were too many similarities not to be the same couple. She was very interested in the "Headrights" document giving the names of the children imported to Virginia- Magdelaine, Mary, and Daniel, comparing it to the baptismal record from the church in Amsterdam which also showed Magdelaine as the oldest child. She noted that Daniel, being listed first in his father's Will would indicate he was the oldest living son. She went on to explain that Gabriel and Marie had some important names as friends or relatives on the baptism of their children. Claude Brousson was the famous Huguenot martyr. Jeanne was his mother. Jerome Brousson was

44

the son of Claude's brother, Daniel Brousson, also a famous Huguenot minister. Gabriel's cousin Louys Le Gendre was his witness for his marriage. The LeGendre family was the leading banking fami I y in France. They were Huguenots and headquartered In Rauen. His cousin Phillip Le Gendre was another Huguenot minister in Rotterdam. Mademoiselle Corbier also noted that Gabriel worked as a "tailor" while in Amsterdam. She said it was not unusual for the refugees to take whatever kind of work they could, especially if they had a family and did not necessarily indicate that this was their vocation in France. She explained that the surname of Marie appearing on the church records as "Ersen" and other spellings was because in French both an "H" and "T" are silent and whoever took down their information wrote it as it sounded. Marie's surname "Hersent" is a fairly common French name. She also advised me to write the Protestant Society of France in Paris, giving me the address and the person to contact. Mile Cor bier had been one of the principal speakers on Huguenot history in Paris in 1985 at the 300th Commemoration. The afternoon spent at the Walloon Library with this new Huguenot friend was very enlightening and much appreciated. On Thursday the day was spent in the Archives of Amsterdam. The building is old but all the inside plus the equipment had been recently renovated and was a delightful place to work. They speak English and are very helpful. I was looking for any mention of Gabriel and Marie after the church entry of 1698, birth of Sara Catherine, to possibly tell something about how or where they spent the two years from 1698 to 1700. We knew they sailed from England to Virginia but when did they leave Amsterdam? The attendant told me that Gabriel had applied for Dutch citizenship but it was never completed and that deaths were not in church records. Another question they could not answer for me - where in France was the town "Gargau" that Gabriel had said he was from. The attendant checked all the old maps and books available and finally said it could be a village or part of a city too small to record. It will be several years before this answer is given to us. I asked about the fact that both parents of Gabriel and Marie were listed as "deceased". He said that was not unusual and it was done to protect the family or others of their faith who were left behind in France from persecution. On Friday another day was spent at the church with the Pastor and his assistant. It was his assistant who took me to the streets where Gabriel and Marie each lived before their marriage as shown on the Church record. I did not know the exact houses in which they lived but took pictures of several houses. The streets are short, it could be any one of them. The houses in Amsterdam are all connected together - we call them "townhouses" today and think we have something new! as I walked those cobblestones, I was overcome with pleasure and

45

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hotel with us. As my roommate was a widow of a minister, she was very interested in what he had to say. She had known little about the Huguenots; He set a time to pick me up on Tuesday to go to the Huguenot Library and meet some Huguenot friends and then again to meet on Thursday and Friday. After getting back to the hotel, I was able to look more closely at the record album and knowing they had some they wanted to sell I asked the desk clerk to call the Pastor for me. In expressing my thanks I told him I thought the album would make wonderful gifts to take home and could he please bring five of them when he came to pick me up on Tuesday? He said he would be happy to. To give an example of how language can lead you astray sometimes - Pastor Fremont was right on time on Tuesday and I was waiting in the lobby. He greeted me with a smile and said "Mrs Shaffett, I have brought the albums!" And he pulled five BOOKS out of a bag! I said, "Oh Pastor, I wanted the albums!" "This is an album'', he answered. I said, "I wanted the organ music". His answer, "I am so sorry - you wanted the platters!" Then we both laughed. In my gift on Sunday had been two nice sized books and he thought that was what I was asking for. So he said the "platters" would be ready for me when I came to the church on Thursday. And what wonderful gifts they made! I had mine put on tape so it can be enjoyed while in the car or anywhere I happen to be and want to relive those wonderful feelings and memories of that Sunday in the Walloon Church in Amsterdam when the organ music and the prayers seemed to enfold me. I truly felt God's presence and an answer to my prayers. The trip to the Huguenot Library on Tuesday was wonderful. I was able to look at the original records that had been filmed by the LOS Church and marked reel #199888, where the Gabriel Maupin information was found. The Pastor introduced me to the President of the Protestant Society of the Netherlands, Mademoiselle M.F.G. Corbier, a French lady who makes her home in Amsterdam and speaks beautiful English. She was with me at the Huguenot Library and looked over all the Maupin papers I had brought with me. She could find no reason for the Gabriel and Marie Maupin found in the records of the Walloon Church in Amsterdam not to be those of the couple who came as Huguenot refugees to Virginia in 1700. There were too many similarities not to be the same couple. She was very interested in the "Headrights" document giving the names of the children imported to Virginia- Magdelaine, Mary, and Daniel, comparing it to the baptismal record from the church in Amsterdam which also showed Magdelaine as the oldest child. She noted that Daniel, being listed first in his father's Will would indicate he was the oldest living son. She went on to explain that Gabriel and Marie had some important names as friends or relatives on the baptism of their children. Claude Brousson was the famous Huguenot martyr. Jeanne was his mother. Jerome Brousson was

44

the son of Claude's brother, Daniel Brousson, also a famous Huguenot minister. Gabriel's cousin Louys Le Gendre was his witness for his marriage. The Le Gendre family was the leading banking family in France. They were Huguenots and headquartered In Rouen. His cousin Phillip Le Gendre was another Huguenot minister in Rotterdam. Mademoiselle Corbier also noted that Gabriel worked as a "tailor" while in Amsterdam. She said it was not unusual for the refugees to take whatever kind of work they could, especially if they had a family and did not necessarily indicate that this was their vocation in France. She explained that the surname of Marie appearing on the church records as "Ersen" and other spellings was because in French both an "H" and "T" are silent and whoever took down their information wrote it as it sounded. Marie's surname "Hersent" is a fairly common French name. She also advised me to write the Protestant Society of France in Paris, giving me the address and the person to contact. Mile Corbier had been one of the principal speakers on Huguenot history in Paris in 1985 at the 300th Commemoration. The afternoon spent at the Walloon Library with this new Huguenot friend was very enlightening and much appreciated. On Thursday the day was spent in the Archives of Amsterdam. The building is old but all the inside plus the equipment had been recently renovated and was a delightful place to work. They speak English and are very helpful. I was looking for any mention of Gabriel and Marie after the church entry of 1698, birth of Sara Catherine, to possibly tell something about how or where they spent the two years from 1698 to 1700. We knew they sailed from England to Virginia but when did they leave Amsterdam? The attendant told me that Gabriel had applied for Dutch citizenship but it was never completed and that deaths were not in church records. Another question they could not answer for me - where in France was the town "Gargau" that Gabriel had said he was from. The attendant checked all the old maps and books available and finally said it could be a village or part of a city too small to record. It will be several years before this answer is given to us. I asked about the fact that both parents of Gabriel and Marie were listed as "deceased". He said that was not unusual and it was done to protect the family or others of their faith who were left behind in France from persecution. On Friday another day was spent at the church with the Pastor and his assistant. It was his assistant who took me to the streets where Gabriel and Marie each lived before their marriage as shown on the Church record. I did not know the exact houses in which they lived but took pictures of several houses. The streets are short, it could be any one of them. The houses in Amsterdam are all connected together - we call them "townhouses" today and think we have something new! as I walked those cobblestones, I was overcome with pleasure and

45


curiosity about this young couple - what did they look like how did they meet - possibly at church, I thought. It was a wonderful experience. Saturday was a day for last minute sightseeing and saying farewell to a beautiful week in my lifea wonderful spiritual experience. I will never forget Amsterdam! After my return from Amsterdam in 1986, I wrote to the Protestant Society in Paris and found a researcher, Pasteur Denis Vantil of Poiters, France. He knew the MAUPIN family was from Normandie but could find no information on Gabriel. This is his answer on Marie, "I think I can identify your ancestor, Marie Hersent. She is said to have been from Rouen at the time of her marriage in Amsterdam in 1691. However, there was not a single baptism, marriage or death in the name of Hersent found in the Protestant state register in Rouen. The indication "from Rouen" signified that she came from the church of Rouen and not necessarily that she was born there. I have found a Marie Hersent who was born in Guevres near Dieppe and baptized at the temple of Luneray on Sept. 15, 1664. She was the eldest daughter of Louis Hersent and Marie Pillon. What led me to her identity was finding the marriage of her cousin, Francois Marie, witness to her marriage. Francois Marie was born in 1641 and married in Rouen December 3, 1682 to Marguerite Chapperon who was the daughter of Pierre Chapperon and Marguerite LARCHEVASQUE. Louis Hersent, Marie's father, was the son of David Hersent (1600-1671) and Anne LARCHEVASQUE. Marguerite and Anne were therefore closely related, sisters or cousins. The Hersent family of the region of Dieppe were craftsmen, shoemakers, rope makers, cloth makers and weavers. The mother of Marie Hersent, Marie Pillion, belongs to a family of rather wealthy laborers. Her father, Pierre Pillon, was as well as a laborer, a manager of the workers of Marfauville and of Coudry. That is to say he received taxes from the peasants for his employers. In 1681 the Protestants being excluded from all offices Pillon had to resign". Then Pasteur suggested that I inquire at the Central Genealogy Bureau at Le Hague. This I did with no new results. I then wrote to the Archives of Abbeville and Rouen and they each answered in the same way that Protestant records were very few and those available were not indexed making them very difficult to locate. Neither of these Archives could identify the town or village of "GARGAU" that Gabriel had said he was from on the records in Amsterdam. The answer to that puzzle was still in the future. PARIS - April 1988 In April 1988, I went to Paris for 8 days to research or to find someone to do it for me. Before going I had written to the Protestant Society in Paris, giving them the name of my hotel and asking to employ a researcher or someone to act as my guide and spokesperson while there. I asked at the hotel if there were messages for me and being none, called the phone

46

number of the Society and getting no answer, went to their address. The door was locked - no response. This was very disappointing. So, I went out on my own. Before going further, this explanation needs to be given in credit to the Society. After I returned from Paris, they sent me a letter making an apology for what had happened. Their Society, like many here, is staffed by volunteers. Somehow, my letter had been picked up by someone and got put aside not being opened until I had left Paris. Also during the days I was there, they had been closed for a I ittle renovation. I understood the situation and want to explain what happened and to say that I have the highest praise for the Society -they have been most helpful a number of times with suggestions and researchers. Even though I had been to Paris in 1985 it was with the Huguenot Tour so this was different! Armed with a city map and using the METRO, I found getting around Paris quite easy and fun - even alone! The National Library was a challenge. As a foreign visitor you are limited to two days at the library. It took about 2 hours to be admitted. First there is a vtait for a personal interview as to the reason and purpose of the visit. Then you are photographed and given a card that looks like a driver's license. It is all for security reasons. I found nothing there on the Maupins that I did not already have. On my visit to their National Archives I found the Archivist to be helpful. She could speak English. I showed her the information I had with me - they had both histories written by de Gorgue and de Belleval. I explained that the purpose of my trip was to document the tradition of Gabriel Maupin's parentage. Dr. Socrates Maupin, the earliest historian gave no hint whatsoever of the parentage of Gabriel in his writings from 1837 to his death in 1871. The article in the Virginia Magazine in 1901 and in William Harris Miller's "Histories and Genealogies" in 1907 also did not give a clue. It appears for the first time in the writing of Eugene Maupin in the late 1920's. This is what Eugene wrote under the title "TRADITIONS" -Quote "The first written records concerning the family are those dealing with Firmin le Maupin, Squire of Bouvacque in Navarre. His wife was Jean d'Aibisse and he was a member of Parliament about the middle of the 16th century. He had a son, Ambrose, and a daughter, Genevieve le Maupin. There is a record of the marriage of this daughter to John de Poussemothe, the marriage taking place in Paris, September 30, 1549. Tradition takes over this written record and says that Ambrose de Maupin, son of Firmin le Maupin, had a son, Amos, who is supposed to have been the father of Gabriel Maupin". End of quote. I had carried with me to the Archives a copy of this French genealogy of the de POUSSEMOTHE family which gives the marriage of Genevieve le Maupin, daughter of Firmin le Maupin, Sieur (owner) of Bouvacque (which is in Ponthieu and not Navarre) and his wife Jeanne d'Aibisse. The Archivist had this

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curiosity about this young couple - what did they look like how did they meet - possibly at church, I thought. It was a wonderful experience. Saturday was a day for last minute sightseeing and saying farewell to a beautiful week in my lifea wonderful spiritual experience. I will never forget Amsterdam! After my return from Amsterdam in 1986, I wrote to the Protestant Society in Paris and found a researcher, Pasteur Denis Vantil of Poiters, France. He knew the MAUPIN family was from Normandie but could find no information on Gabriel. This is his answer on Marie, "I think I can identify your ancestor, Marie Hersent. She is said to have been from Rouen at the time of her marriage in Amsterdam in 1691. However, there was not a single baptism, marriage or death in the name of Hersent found in the Protestant state register in Rouen. The indication "from Rouen" signified that she came from the church of Rouen and not necessarily that she was born there. I have found a Marie Hersent who was born in Guevres near Dieppe and baptized at the temple of Luneray on Sept. 15, 1664. She was the eldest daughter of Louis Hersent and Marie Pillon. What led me to her identity was finding the marriage of her cousin, Francois Marie, witness to her marriage. Francois Marie was born in 1641 and married in Rouen December 3, 1682 to Marguerite Chapperon who was the daughter of Pierre Chapperon and Marguerite LARCHEVASQUE. Louis Hersent, Marie's father, was the son of David Hersent (1600-1671) and Anne LARCHEVASQUE. Marguerite and Anne were therefore closely related, sisters or cousins. The Hersent family of the region of Dieppe were craftsmen, shoemakers, rope makers, cloth makers and weavers. The mother of Marie Hersent, Marie Pillion, belongs to a family of rather wealthy laborers. Her father, Pierre Pillon, was as well as a laborer, a manager of the workers of Marfauville and of Coudry. That is to say he received taxes from the peasants for his employers. In 1681 the Protestants being excluded from all offices Pillon had to resign". Then Pasteur suggested that I inquire at the Central Genealogy Bureau at Le Hague. This I did with no new results. I then wrote to the Archives of Abbeville and Rouen and they each answered in the same way that Protestant records were very few and those available were not indexed making them very difficult to locate. Neither of these Archives could identify the town or village of "GARGAU" that Gabriel had said he was from on the records in Amsterdam. The answer to that puzzle was still in the future. PARIS - April 1988 In April 1988, I went to Paris for 8 days to research or to find someone to do it for me. Before going I had written to the Protestant Society in Paris, giving them the name of my hotel and asking to employ a researcher or someone to act as my guide and spokesperson while there. I asked at the hotel if there were messages for me and being none, called the phone

number of the Society and getting no answer, went to their address. The door was locked - no response. This was very disappointing. So, I went out on my own. Before going further, this explanation needs to be given in credit to the Society. After I returned from Paris, they sent me a letter making an apology for what had happened. Their Society, like many here, is staffed by volunteers. Somehow, my letter had been picked up by someone and got put aside not being opened until I had left Paris. Also during the days I was there, they had been closed for a little renovation. I understood the situation and want to explain what happened and to say that I have the highest praise for the Society -they have been most helpful a number of times with suggestions and researchers. Even though I had been to Paris in 1985 it was with the Huguenot Tour so this was different! Armed with a city map and using the METRO, I found getting around Paris quite easy and fun- even alone! The National Library was a challenge. As a foreign visitor you are limited to two days at the library. It took about 2 hours to be admitted. First there is a vtait for a personal interview as to the reason and purpose of the visit. Then you are photographed and given a card that looks like a driver's license. It is all for security reasons. I found nothing there on the Maupins that I did not already have. On my visit to their National Archives I found the Archivist to be helpful. She could speak English. I showed her the information I had with me - they had both histories written by de Gorgue and de Belleval. I explained that the purpose of my trip was to <;Jocument the tradition of Gabriel Maupin's parentage. Dr. Socrates Maupin, the earliest historian gave no hint whatsoever of the parentage of Gabriel in his writings from 1837 to his death in 1871. The article in the Virginia Magazine in 1901 and in William Harris Miller's "Histories and Genealogies" in 1907 also did not give a clue. It appears for the first time in the writing of Eugene Maupin in the late 1920's. This is what Eugene wrote under the title "TRADITIONS" -Quote "The first written records concerning the family are those dealing with Firmin le Maupin, Squire of Bouvacque in Navarre. His wife was Jean d'Aibisse and he was a member of Parliament about the middle of the 16th century. He had a son, Ambrose, and a daughter, Genevieve le Maupin. There is a record of the marriage of this daughter to John de Poussemothe, the marriage taking place in Paris, September 30, 1549. Tradition takes over this written record and says that Ambrose de Maupin, son of Firmin le Maupin, had a son, Amos, who is supposed to have been the father of Gabriel Maupin". End of quote. I had carried with me to the Archives a copy of this French genealogy of the de POUSSEMOTHE family which gives the marriage of Genevieve le Maupin, daughter of Firmin le Maupin, Sieur (owner) of Bouvacque (which is in Ponthieu and not Navarre) and his wife Jeanne d'Aibisse. The Archivist had this

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information and after checking other records her answer was that this Firman who had a daughter named Genevieve DID NOT have a son named Ambrose. So where did this tradition come from? And why did Eugene record it? From a study of his files I have gathered this information. In 1920 a copy of this genealogy of the Poussemothe family was sent to William Harris Miller from Miss Anna Marie (Nannie) Maupin of Portsmouth, VA. Miller sent this information to Eugene in 1922. Another family member who had this tradition was Charles Smith Maupin of Oklahoma City, Okla. He was born in Albemarle County, VA in 1846, a grandson of Mary Graves Spencer Maupin and a nephew of Dr. Socrates Maupin. So it is correctly understood this information was sent to Eugene Maupin in letters written by Dr. A.A. Maupin, son of Charles Smith Maupin who was at that time too old and sick to write. Neither Eugene Maupin nor William Harris Miller ever met Charles S. Maupin in person. In a letter written in October 1923 to Eugene, Mr. Maupin writes for his father "Now what I cannot at this time prove but it is family history or tradition handed down in our line. Firmin Maupin, a member of French Parliament in Henry III time had a son named Ambrose who married a daughter of one of the Capets. They had a son named Amos who married a granddaughter of the King of Navarre and they were the parents of Gabriel Maupin, our ancestor". Now what is the SOURCE of this tradition? Of all the traditions, I have felt bound to document this one for several reasons. First, it would put Gabriel in royal lines of France. Those lines are all well documented and the Maupin name does not appear in them unless it would be from an illegitimate birth of which there are many in royal lines. The timing is not right, that is, Firmin had a daughter of marriageable age in 1549 could he have had a grandson born in 1661? And what about the genealogy at the Archives which says that this Firmin, father of Genevieve did not have a son named Ambrose? These facts are being recorded because some of the Maupin family members hold this tradition to be a truth but it needs to be resolved in the same manner that Gabriel's wife, Marie, was said to be the daughter of an Earl Spencer in England and that has been disproved. Could it be that someone wanted to "elevate" Gabriel's lineage to royalty? After reading a good number of the royal histories, that for me is not a desired ancestry- give me our Huguenot background any time. Charles Smith Maupin died in 1925 and William Harris Miller in 1928, so why Eugene Maupin recorded this tradition in the 1930's, I do not know. Perhaps he heard from another source not found in his files. This tradition needs to be resolved.

,Af~Y M~UPIN__=-l:iiS

IMPORJAJH

CONJRI~lJliQti

Gary Maupin of Fairfax, '/irginia, by sponsoring research in :tnce to find the parents and birthplace of our immigrant tncestor, Gabriel Maupin, has found what I believe to be a key i'·H·t of the puzzle. In the summer of 1988 Gary sponsored Kevin Ketscher, an •utstanding young man who "lived on the Lawn" as a senior at the University of Virginia. That is the honor going to the very t•JP seniors at Virginia University who live in the 19th century Jt:fferson designed rooms along the lawn below the Rotunda. I hat gives you an idea of his capabilities. Kevin visited many 'ities and towns in France, wrote a report on each and a final : ummary, giving his contacts, comments and conclusions. Gary ~rad provided him with the traditions and information that was .tvailable. Kevin's report will be summarized. 1

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Kevin's search began at the Archives in Rouen. On the marriage record from Amsterdam for Gabriel and Marie, each qave the city they were "from" -that did not necessarily mean that they were born there. Gabriel gave his town as "Gargau" which no one seemed to be able to identify. Marie, however, said she was from Rouen so that was the starting point. His first question for them was about "Gargau" - did anyone know if it was part of the city of Rouen in present or ancient times or where in France it might be. After looking extensively on two separate occasions, the people working there found no record of it. All the cross-reference material was checked and no mention of the name Maupin or Hersent. There were. however, a lot by the name of le Gendre, and that is probably because the Le Gendre family were the leading bankers in France at the time of King Louis XIV with headquarters in Rouen and they were Huguenots. The witness for Gabriel at his marriage was his cousin, Louys Le Gendre from Rouen. Many of their family went to Holland. Kevin was assisted by Paul Rouet, Head of the "Genealogical Circle of Picardie" and he discounted any connection between the Maupi ns and King Anthony of Navarre because he says the lineage of Anthony of Navarre has been thoroughly documented and he found no mention of Maupins in it. It is true that Rouen was a prominent Protestant center at this time of history and it is the city where Joan of Arc was burned at the stake but for Maupin research for Gabriel it did not prove fruitful.

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ABB_E:Vl_LLE Kevin had access there to both French history books by Gorgue-Rosny and de Believe! which gave the history of the

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information and after checking other records her answer was that this Firman who had a daughter named Genevieve DID NOT have a son named Ambrose. So where did this tradition come from? And why did Eugene record it? From a study of his files I have gathered this information. In 1920 a copy of this genealogy of the Poussemothe family was sent to William Harris Miller from Miss Anna Marie (Nannie) Maupin of Portsmouth, VA. Miller sent this information to Eugene in 1922. Another family member who had this tradition was Charles Smith Maupin of Oklahoma City, Okla. He was born in Albemarle County, VA in 1846, a grandson of Mary Graves Spencer Maupin and a nephew of Dr. Socrates Maupin. So it is correctly understood this information was sent to Eugene Maupin in letters written by Dr. A.A. Maupin, son of Charles Smith Maupin who was at that time too old and sick to write. Neither Eugene Maupin nor William Harris Miller ever met Charles S. Maupin in person. In a letter written in October 1923 to Eugene, Mr. Maupin writes for his father "Now what I cannot at this time prove but it is family history or tradition handed down in our line. Firmin Maupin, a member of French Parliament in Henry III time had a son named Ambrose who married a daughter of one of the Capets. They had a son named Amos who married a granddaughter of the King of Navarre and they were the parents of Gabriel Maupin, our ancestor". Now what is the SOURCE of this tradition? Of all the traditions, I have felt bound to document this one for several reasons. First, it would put Gabriel in royal lines of France. Those lines are all well documented and the Maupin name does not appear in them unless it would be from an i I legitimate birth of which there are many in royal lines. The timing is not right, that is, Firmin had a daughter of marriageable age in 1549 could he have had a grandson born in 1661? And what about the genealogy at the Archives which says that this Firmin, father of Genevieve did not have a son named Ambrose? These facts are being recorded because some of the Maupin family members hold this tradition to be a truth but it needs to be resolved in the same manner that Gabriel's wife, Marie, was said to be the daughter of an Earl Spencer in England and that has been disproved. Could it be that someone wanted to "elevate" Gabriel's lineage to royalty? After reading a good number of the royal histories, that for me is not a desired ancestry- give me our Huguenot background any time. Charles Smith Maupin died in 1925 and William Harris Miller in 1928, so why Eugene Maupin recorded this tradition in the 1930's, I do not know. Perhaps he heard from another source not found in his files. This tradition needs to be resolved.

r;ARY MAUPIN - HIS

IMPORJAJ~lT CONTRI~UTI_Qt'l_

Gary Maupin of Fairfax, Virginia, by sponsoring research in 1-r路ance to find the parents and birthplace of our immigrant ancestor, Gabriel Maupin, has found what I believe to be a key part of the puzzle. In the summer of 1988 Gary sponsored Kevin Ketscher, an outstanding young man who "lived on the Lawn" as a senior at the University of Virginia. That is the honor going to the very top seniors at Virginia University who live in the 19th century .Jefferson designed rooms along the lawn below the Rotunda. That gives you an idea of his capabilities. Kevin visited many cities and towns in France, wrote a report on each and a final summary, giving his contacts, comments and conclusions. Gary had provided him with the traditions and information that was available. Kevin's report will be summarized.

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ROUEN Kevin's search began at the Archives in Rouen. On the marriage record from Amsterdam for Gabriel and Marie, each gave the city they were "from" - that did not necessarily mean that they were born there. Gabriel gave his town as "Gargau" which no one seemed to be able to identify. Marie, however, said she was from Rouen so that was the starting point. His first question for them was about "Gargau" - did anyone know if it was part of the city of Rouen in present or ancient times or where in France it might be. After looking extensively on two separate occasions, the people working there found no record of it. All the cross-reference material was checked and no mention of the name Maupin or Hersent. There were, however, a lot by the name of le Gendre, and that is probably because the Le Gendre family were the leading bankers in France at the time of King Louis XIV with headquarters in Rouen and they were Huguenots. The witness for Gabriel at his marriage was his cousin, Louys LeGendre from Rouen. Many of their family went to Holland. Kevin was assisted by Paul Rouet, Head of the "Genealogical Circle of Picardie" and he discounted any connection between the Maupi ns and King Anthony of Navarre because he says the I i neage of Anthony of Navarre has been thorough I y documented and he found no mention of Maupins in it. It is true that Rouen was a prominent Protestant center at this time of history and it is the city where Joan of Arc was burned at the stake but for Maupin research for Gabriel it did not prove fruitful.

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ABBEVILLE Kevin had access there to both French history books by Gorgue-Rosny and de Bellevel which gave the history of the

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Maupin family in the Abbeville area. It is located about 80 miles West-路NW of Paris. In ancient times it was in the county of Ponthieu. It was probably the most important city in that part of France. Today it is in the Department of Somme which has its seat at Amiems where their Archives are located. Drucat is a town a few kilometers to the North. The estate La Bouvacque, owned by Maupins for hundreds of years, lies between Drucat and Abbeville. In the 1500 and 1600's there seems to have been many Maupins in this area and still a lot today. l<.evin told of walking to the "Pare f'.1unicipal de Ia Bouvaque" and his impressions of this old Maupin estate that is now a municipal park. He found that there were gardening plots for the use of the residents but in the middle of the park was a beautiful setting with a creek running down one side with geese and swans swimming about. Everything looked so green, even the tall trees that were planted close together in perfect lines along the path had light green moss all over their trunks. These were all about 80-100 feet tall -they looked very old. The name "Bouvaque" as described by the lady in the tourist office implied that it was once a place for beef and dairy cattle. This tells us something about our early Maupins and their livelihood. Kevin had the assistance of Paul Rouet but no connection could be found to our immigrant Gabriel in this area. There, as elsewhere in France, Protestant records are very scarce, especially in this area because of the intense bombing in World War II. PARJS At the National Archives and Library Kevin's experience was much the same as mine- not very productive- finding only the material that was already known. The legal documents which had been filmed were not readable - both from the poor copy and the writing either in Old French or New French ~.;as not legible. The name "Maupin" appeared and in some cases it could be distinguished but no given names appeared with it. The Protestant Society Library in Paris was again very helpful. It was at their library that a report of Synods or meetings of the protestant churches was found. In 1559 the first General Synod of the Reformed Church in France was attended by representatives of seventy-two churches. As a result of the Synod, over one hundred ministers were trained in Geneva under the teachings and leadership of Calvin and took up formal duties at the new French churches. In a Synod in 1641 there appeared a DANIEL MAUPIN, Elder of the church at Gergeau (Gargeau) along with a Francois de La Galere looking for a pastor to fill a vacancy at their church in Gargeau! At the same meeting was also a Samuel Le Gendre. The路 路name Le Gendre appears on Gabriel's marriage record as a witness. As Gargeau

50

was in the Department of Loriet with Archives in Orleans that was Kevin's next visit! LORIET - ARCHIVES at ORLEANS Orleans is a short distance southwest of Paris. It was there that for the long looked for answer to the question of what or where was the town of "GARGAU" that Gabriel had said he was from when he went to Amsterdam. It was from the town of "Gargeau" now changed from the Old French spelling to New French "Jargeau"! It is located a few miles east of Orleans. There for the first time in Kevin's research did he find a record of the given name of Daniel or Gabriel for a Maupin. In the book "Le Protestantisme a Jargeau de 1601-1685" by P. A. LeRoy published in Orleans 1898 we find this record of baptisms with parents and godparents listed. Baptized 1628 a Daniel Maupin whose father is also a Daniel Maupin. Baptized in 1622 a Gabriel Maupin whose father was Estienne Maupin (Stephen). He also was the father of Elizabeth. Daniel was also the father of Marguerite and Suzanne. It is true that as of yet we do not have the names of the parents of our Gabriel Maupin but it is logical to assume that as he listed he was from "Gargau"- (the "e" left out of the Dutch record) he very well could be from this area and from one of these two men, most likely the Daniel, baptized in 1628 whose father, Daniel, attended the Synod in 1641 looking for a pastor for his church. The Daniel baptized In 1628 would be about 36 years of age when our Gabriel was born in 1664. I later sent all this Information to the Protestant Society Library in Paris for their study and opinion and it was their conclusion that this must certainly be the right place to find our ancestor and his parent was most likely Daniel. The Immigrant Gabriel named their oldest living son, Daniel, which would follow the pattern of the time to name that son after the paternal grandfather. It is true that in Amsterdam they named their first born son, "Claude" but feel that was to honor the name of the godfather, Claude Brousson, the great Huguenot minister and soon to be martyr. They no doubt were very pleased and honored to have this great Protestant minister with his mother, Jeanne Brousson, to be witnesses to their son's baptism. Against warnings of the danger Claude Brousson returned to France to try to be of help to the Protestants left there. He was arrested and executed on the wheel and rack on 4 November 1698. It was between 1698 and 1700 that Gabriel and Marie left Amsterdam for England. How do we know what affect this execution of their friend might have influenced the young couple to seek refuge in the new world? We have no record of son Claude after his baptism in Amsterdam so he must have died as an infant. The church in Amsterdam did not record deaths. We do know however, that our Daniel according to his obituary In the Virginia Independent Chronicle was born 25 March 1700

51

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Maupin family in the Abbeville area. It is located about 80 miles West-NW of Paris. In ar.cient times it was in the county of Ponthieu. It was probablY the most important city in that part of ~="ranee. Today it is in the Department of Somme which has its seat at Amiems where their Archives are located. Drucat is a town a few kilometer-s to the North. The estate La Bouvacque owned by Maupins for hundreds of years, lies between Drucat and ,ll,bbeville. In the 1500 and 1600's there seems to have been many Maupins in this area and still a lot today. Kevin told of walking to the "Pare tv1unicipal de Ia Bouvaque" and his impressions of this old ty1aupin estate that is now a municipal park. He found that there were gardening plots for the use of the residents but in the middle of the park was a beautiful setting with a creek rut1ning down one side with geese and swans swimming about. everything looked so green, even the tall trees that were planted close together in perfect I i nes along the path had light green moss all over their trunks. These wer·e all about 80-100 feet tall -they looked very old. The name "Bouvaque" as described by the ladY in the tourist office implied that it was once a place for beef and dairy cattle. This tells us something about our early Maupins and their livelihood. Kevin had the assistance of Paul Rouet but no connection could be found to our immigrant Gabriel in this area. There, as elsewhere in France, protestant re~ords are very scarce, especially in this area because of the 1ntense bombing in World War II. E/>.RTS

,.\t the National Archives and LibrarY Kevin's experience was much the same as mine- not very productive- finding only the material that was alreadY known. The legal documents which had been filmed were not readable - both from the poor copy and the writing either it1 Old French or New French was not legible. The name "Maupin" appeared and in some cases it could be distinguished but no given names appeared with it. The Protestant Society LibrarY in Paris was again very helpful. It was at their librat~y that a report of synods or meetings of the protestant churches was found. In 1559 the first General Synod of the Reformed Church in France was attended by representatives of seventy-two churches. As a result of the Synod, over one hundred ministers were trained in Geneva under the teachings and leadership of Calvin and took up formal duties at the new French churches. In a Synod in 1641 there appeared a DANIEL MAUPIN, Elder of the church at Gergeau (Gargeau) along with a Francois de La Galere looking for a pastor to fill a vacancy at their church in Gargeau! At the same meeting was also a samuel Le Gendre. The ·name Le Gendre appears on Gabriel's marriage record as a witness. As Gargeau

50

wns in the Department of Loriet with Archives in Orleans that was Kevin's next visit!

11'1.::1

l

ORIET - ARCHIVES at ORLEANS

•I

IIIIi:

Orleans is a short distance southwest of Paris. It was there that for the long looked for answer to the question of what or where was the town of "GARGAU" that Gabriel had said he was from when he went to Amsterdam. It was from the town of "Gargeau" now changed from the Old French spelling to New 1 rench "Jargeau"! It is located a few miles east of Orleans. I here for the first time in Kevin's research did he find a record l)f the given name of Daniel or Gabriel for a Maupin. In the book "Le Protestantisme a Jargeau de 1601-1685" by P. A. LeRoy published in Orleans 1898 we find this record of baptisms with pttrents and godparents listed. Baptized 1628 a Daniel Maupin whose father is also a Daniel Maupin. Baptized in 1622 a Gabriel Maupin whose father was Estienne Maupin (Stephen). He also was the father of Elizabeth. Daniel was also the father of Marguerite and Suzanne. It is true that as of yet we do not have the names of the parents of our Gabriel Maupin but It Is logical to assume that as he listed he was from "Gargau" (the "e" left out of the Dutch record) he very well could be from this nrea and from one of these two men, most likely the Daniel, baptized in 1628 whose father, Daniel, attended the Synod in 1641 looking for a pastor for his church. The Daniel baptized in 1628 would be about 36 years of age when our Gabriel was born in 1664. I later sent all this Information to the Protestant ~;ociety Library in Paris for their study and opinion and it was their conclusion that this must certainly be the right place to find our ancestor and his parent was most likely Daniel. The Immigrant Gabriel named their oldest living son, Daniel, which would follow the pattern of the time to name that son after the paternal grandfather. It is true that In Amsterdam they named their first born son, "Claude" but feel that was to honor the name of the godfather, Claude Brousson, the great Huguenot minister and soon to be martyr. They no doubt were very pleased and honored to have this great Protestant minister with his mother, Jeanne Brousson, to be witnesses to their son's baptism. Against warnings of the danger Claude Brousson returned to France to try to be of help to the Protestants left there. He was arrested and executed on the wheel and rack on 4 November 1698. It was between 1698 and 1700 that Gabriel and Marie left Amsterdam for England. How do we know what affect this execution of their friend might have influenced the young couple to seek refuge in the new world? We have no record of son Claude after his baptism in Amsterdam so he must have died as an infant. The church in Amsterdam did not record deaths. We do know however, that our Daniel according to his obituary in the Virginia Independent Chronicle was born 25 March 1700

51

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Aux notaires de ceste ville qui ont faict promptement recouvrer Ia somme de 27,000 lines parisis constitues de rente des tresoriers qui l'ont fournye • • • . • , , • • • • , • • • • • • • A•1 cocher du d. s. d'Orleans pour Ia conduicto en Ia carousse du d. s. des voiages faicts au d. Jargueau • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pour estate d'nrmes dclinees nux soldats des compagnies au d. siege de Jargueau qui n'estaient armes. • • . . . • . • • • . . • . • . • • .

IV X Ll

EXTRAITS flU JtEOISTRF: DES DAPTEMKS DE DIONNE CONCimNANT JAROEAU

LXXU• BAPTISI<~S

XIII: V[ll XII•

(At·c!tives muntcipales. Orleans, C. C. 209) c Nous, Fran9ois, etc ••••• 1 certiftions quo lea moire et eschevins de Ia ville d'Orleans ont par notre advis et en nostre presence fourny co jour d'huy par leur depputez aux sieurs de Boubiers, Damours et Du Mesnil qui commnndaient en Ia ville de Jargueau, Ia somme de vingtqnatre mil livres et pour lea disposer A obeir au roy et sortir avecq leurs soldats de Ia d. ville ce qu'ils ont faict A !'instant dont les diets mnire et eschevins nons ont requis lour donner coste prel'ente attestation nfin de par eulx so pourveoir par devers Sa Majeste pour le recouvrement de Ia d. somme ct en tesmoing de ce nons l'avons signa et faict eceller du sci de nos armcs en Ia d. ville de Jargueau ce jourd'huy vingt-quatricrnc jour de may mil six cons vingt un. (Signature).

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ET S!!S ENVIRONS

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(Archives depm·tementales. Loit·et}

..f<)oi~)''S

PAHENTS

l'AUHAINS

(PI~RE ET IIIERE)

ET MARRAINES

Hector Vallee, fils do M. des Barreaux.

1U071Jncques Avril.

162-IIAnne des Barreaux. !Hector des Barreaux, ecuyer, sieur de Merouville. Oil• Suzanne Bigot, sa 1 femme. Louis de Gueribaldc, Jehan Buisf!on. Jehan Buil!son. Sieur du Drucl. Rachel Mefloi. 16221 Estienno Lemaistre. Samue! Lemaistre chi-~J can Berch e. ru-g•en 1\ Gergeau. Marie de Bury. Estienne Maupin Je Gabriel .Maupin. jeune, procureur a Jargcau. Fran9ois Argis, noAnne Granet. tairo royal. i6351Suzanne Bonpaillard.IPierre Bonpaillard. Jacquetta :Mesnager 1 sa femme. !Suzanne de Biziou. jJehnn de Biziou (1)-,Pie~ro du !?ou!Uroy, Marie Bonpaillard, sa Sumr de E crollce. Suzanne Br·npaillard. femme. ·16251Elisabeth Maupin. IEstienne eusnomme. Pierre du Couldroy, susnomme. Charlotte Gaye. !Guy Gaye. Charlotte do SaintMesmin (tillo de M. de Ia Queuvre). Pierre Bonpaillard. IJehan Bonpaillard. Elisabeth de Villiers (de l'eglise de Gergcau).

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(1) Jehan de Biziou, ~cuyer, sieur de Louzesses, commissaire ordinaire de l'artillerie de France, 4!tait 1 en 1618, gouverneur du chateau de Sully.

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52

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IV

Aux notaires de coste ville qui ont faict promptement recouvrer Ia somme de 27,000 lines pa~ risis constitues de rente des tresoricrs qui l'ont fouroye • • • . • • • • . • • • • • • . • • • A•1 cocher du d. s. d'Orlenns pour Ia conduicto en Ia cnrousse du d. s. des voinges faicts au d. J argueau • • • . • . • • • • . • • • • . • ,

(Arc/lives depm·tementales. Loi1·et} X Ll

ET

LXXII•

. Pour . .... .. .. . . ... . .. .. estate d'armes dclinees nux soldata des

compagoies au d. siege de Jnrgueau qui n'estaient armes. • • . . . • . • • • . . • . • . . • .

XIII: Vlll XII"

II

(At·cMves mun1cipales. Orleans,

c.

C. 209)

c Nous, Francois, etc ••••• , certiflions que lea maire et eschevins de Ia ville d'Orleans ont par notre advis et en nostre presence fourny co jour d'huy par leur depputez aux sieurs de Boubiers, Damours et Du llesnil qui commandaient en Ia ville de Jargueau, Ia somme de vingtqnntre mil livres et pour lea disposer A obeir au roy et sortir avecq lours soldats do Ia d. ville co qu'ila ont faict A l'inslant dont lea diets maire et eschevins noua ont roqilis leur donner coste prel'ente attestation nfin do par cub: so pourveoir par devers Sa Majeste pour Je recouvremeot de Ia d. somme ct eo tesmoing de co nous l'nvoos signe et faict ecellcr du sci de nos armea en Ia d. ville de Jargueau co jourd'huy vingt-quatricmc jour de may mil six coos vingt un. (Signature).

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BAPTISI<~S

SI~S

PAUEN'l'S

PAHHAINS

{I'I~RE ET .MERE)

ET )IARRAINES

Hector Vallee, fils de M. des JJarrenu:s:.

10071Jncqucs Avril.

16211Anoe des Barreaux. !Hector des Bnrrcaux, ecuyer, sieur de Merouville. on• Suzanne Digot, sa femme. ) Louis de Gueribaldo, Jehnn Buisson. Jehan Buisson. Sieur du Druel. Rachel Mefloi. 16221Estieone Lemaistre. Samue! Lemaistre chi-~Jcan Berche. ru~g1cn A Gergeau. Marie de Bury. Estienne Maupin Je Gabriel Maupin. jeune, procureur a Jnrgeau. Fran9ois Argis, noAnne Graoct. tairo royal. 16351Suzaone Donpaillard.l Pierre Bonpaillnrd. Jacquetta .ltlesnager, en femme. 1Suzaone de Biziou. jJehnn de Biziou (1)·1Pierre du Coult.lroy, Marie Boopaillard, sa Sieur de l!'crolles. femme. Suzanne Br·npaillard. ·I6251Elisabeth Maupin. IEstienoe susnomme. Pierre du Couldroy, susnomme. Charlotte Gaye. !Guy Gaye. Charlotte de SaintMcsmin (fille de 1\I. de Ia Queuvre). Pierre Boopaillard. IJ ehan Bonpaillard. Elisabeth de Villiers (de l'eglise de Gergeau). (1) Jehan de Biziou, l!cuyer, sieur de Louzesses, commissaire ordinaire de l'artillerie de France, ~tait, en 1618, gouverneur du cbUeau de Sully.

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52

ENVJRONS

53


llAPTISI~S

PAHENTS

PAHHAINS

(rimE ET )limE)

MAitltAINI'::.

BAPTISES

1G251Marie de Villiers.

Mathieu rle Villiers, Fergent-royal aChA teauneuf. 16261 Daniel llonp1.illord. Pierre Do~poillard. Daniel Maupin. Jerome l\fesnager. 1 Jacques du Coni.Jroy.jLnncelot dn Couldroy.jJncques de Penn. Siet~r de Ferolles. Magdeleine de Louync Marie du Tertre, sal femme de M. de femme. Ia Taille. Elisabeth llonpaillardjPierre Donpaillard. Guy Argi~. Helene 1\lazumi.. fem·~niei l\lau__1!.!.!!.,_ npothicaire r Gergean. M. de ChenailleP, pre16271Frnn9ois Gaye. Guy Gaye. Marie de Bury, Fa' aident au bureau dee femme (de Ger· finances. on• de Launay, femgenu). me rle M. de Gucribalrle, sieur du Druel. IIi :lSI Hector Donpaillanl. IJ can Donpuillard. !~Iisabeth de Villiers, sa femme, demeurnnt a Gergeau. Daniel Maupin. jDaniel ~1nupin, sus-~Ezechias MarguerittP., nomme. Jaequette Mesnagcr, femme de P~ Bonpaillard. · 10291Margueritc lllaupin.IDaniel susnommc. De Gueriliiilde, sicur des Chapelles. Judith du Couldroy. Lnncelot dn Conldroy, Judith du Tertre, sienr de In Derthes- tante de !'enfant. che· Fcrolles. Marie du Tertre, sa femme snsnomrnes. Jacques llerche. .] can Derche. '!'rnn9ois. Argis, sus· Marie Chesneau, en nomme. femme. Jacques de Ia Dar-IFeu Jacques de laiDnniel Argis, notuire Bartoche. a Jnrgeau. toe he, Magdeleine Sigonneau.

-Hi2UIJean llonpaillard.

I

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54

PARENTS

(r.BnE E'r

~

Mimr~)

PABHAINS In' llfARRAINI>S

Jean Bonpaillnrd, chirurgien :\ Gergeau, eusnomme. Elisabeth du Coul- Pierre dn Couldroy, sieur de Fcrolles. droy. Esther de Louynee, sa femme. Suzanne Maupin. Daniel Maupin, snsnomme. 1 Fran9ois Argis. Michel Argis. /Pierre DcRhoys et t.fnrie Des Bois sa dame Suzanne Tasfemme. ' sin, femme de l!,rnn90is Argis, de l'eglise de Gergeau. J can Berehe. 16321 Paul Berehe. i\l,uie Chesneau, eusnotumes. 16351Ciaude Paris. Daniel Paris, de l'e-,J ehanne Paris, de glise de Gergeau. l'eglise de Gergeau. Esther Morisset, sa femme. 16361 Marie Le Maistre. S~muel Lc l\laistre le Pierre Olivier dit Lesjeune, maiHtre chi- pine et Marie Garrurgien iJ. Gergenu. rean. tous deux de Eli5abeth Maupin, sa l'cgliee de Gcrgeau. fetnme.Magdeleine Argis. !Jacques Argis. Samuel Lo l\laietre Magdeleine Lemaire 1 l'aisne, maistre chisa femme. rurgien iJ. Gergeau. Magdeleine de Gue·IJean de Gucribnlde, Paul de Gncribalde, rib~lde. chevalier, sieur de chevalier, sieur du (bapttsee au Bruel) Doisgrenier. Bruel. Magdeleino de l\Ieaux, Magdeleine de 13oular, sa femme. dame do lllarigny. !Samuel Le .Maistre, Jacque11 de Penn, IG371Anne Le ft'Inistre. maitre chirurgien 0 ccuyer, sieur de Gergeau. Vernillon • Elisabeth Desbois. Anne Vallee, fillo do dcfunt Mons. de Merou ville.

55


llAPTISI~S

1G251Mnrie de Villiers.

PAHENTS

PAHHAINS

(rimE ET AJimi•:)

MAIIIIAINI':~

Mat hi en rle

DAPTISES

Villiers, aChA

·1G2UIJeo.n Bonpaillard.

~ergent-royal

tenunenf.

16261 Daniel llonpr.illnrd.

IPierre Bo~pnillard.

IDaniel Maupin.

Jerllme l\lesnager. 1 Jacques du Coul•Jroy.j Lance lot dn Conlclroy.,JacqneR cle Pcan. Siet~r de Ferolles. Magdcleine de Louyno Marie du Tertre, sal femme de M. de femme. Ia Taille. Elisabeth llonpaillard IPierre Bonpaillard. Guy Argi_s. Helene 1\lazu..r_:.~!. fem'ffie de Daniel .l\lau~ np6ihicaire Gcrgcan. M. de ChcnaillcP, pre16271Fnm\)ois Gaye. Guy Guye. i\Iaric de Bury, Fnl sident au bureau des (de Ger· finance~. femme on• de Launay, femgenu). me de M. do Gncribalde, sieur du Bruel. IIi :lSI Hector Bonpaillard. IJ can Bonpnillard. l~lisabeth cle Villiers, sa femme, demeurant a Gergeo.u. jDaniel ~1nupin, sus-jEzechias MarguerittP.. Daniel Maupin. nomme. Jacquelte Mesnn~cr, femme de· P!,!!I.IP Bonpaillard. · De 'Guerihal(i;, sicur 1G291Margucrite l\laupin.IDaniel susnomme. des Chapelles. Judith du Couldroy. Lancclot dn Conldroy, Judith dn Tertre, sicur de Ia Berthes- tonte de )'enfant. che-Fcrollcs. Marie. du 'l'ertre, sa femme snsnommes. J acqucs Berche. '!'rnn<;ois Argis, sus.] ean Berche. Marie Chesneau, sn nomme. femme. Jacques de Ia Bar-II<'eu Jacques de la,Danicl Argis, notniro a Jargeau. Bartoche. toe he. Magdeleine Sigonneau.

a

I

54

PARENTS (rimE ET Mimi~)

~

PAUllAINS 1!'1' ltfARRAfNES

Jean Bonpaillnrd, chirnrgicn 1\ Gcrgeo.u, susnomme. Elisabeth du Coul- Pierre du Couldroy, sicur do Fcrollcs. droy. Esther de Louynes, sa femme. Suzanne Maupin. Daniel l\Iaupin, susnomme. I Fran~ois Argis. Michel Argis. /Pierre DeRboys et Mnrie Des Bois sa dame Suzanne Tasfemme. ' sin, femme de .l!'rnn~ois Argis, de l'eglise de Gergeau. 16321Po.ul Derche. Jean Derche. i\111ric Chcsneau, eusnommcs. 16351Ciaude Paris. Daniel Paris, de l'c-~J ehanne Paris, de l't\glise de Gergeau. glise de Gergeau. Esther Morissct, sa femme. 1 63GI.Marie Le Mo.islre. S~muel Lo Maislre lc Pic1·re Olivier dit Lcsjeunc, maiHtre chi- pine et Marie Garrurgicn a Gergeau. roan. tons deux de Elisabeth Maupin, sa l'cglise de Gcrgcau, femme.Magdeleine Argis. !Jacques Argis. Samuel Lo Maistro Magdeleine Lemaire 1 l'aisne, maistrc chisa femme. rurgien A Gcrgeau. Mo.~deleine de Gue-,Jean de Gucribalde, Paul de Gueribalde, rtb~lde. chevalier, sieur de chevalier, sicur du (bapt1see au Druel) lloisgrenier. llruel. Magdelcino de Meaux, Magdeleino de Doular, sa femme. dame de Marigny. 1G371Anno Le lllnistre. !Samuel Lo Maistre, Jacquet! de Pean, maitre chirurgien il ccnyer, sieur de Gcrgeau. Yernilloo • Anne Vallee, fille de Elisabeth Desbois. dCfunt Mons. de Mcrou ville.

55


and was the oldest living son. We know definitely that Gabriel came "from" Gargeau and it can well be assumed, until we get definite proof, that he was born there or very close by. G.ARY MAUPIN GOES TO FRANCE AND JARGEAU Not only did Gary Maupin sponsor research in France during 1988 but in the summer of 1989 he took his wife and two daughters there. We were privileged to share his experiences in slides, pictures and talk at our Maupin Reunion in Colonial Williamsburg in November 1991. While in the Jargeau area he met a Daniel Maupin, 54 years old, married with two daughters. He could speak English so they were able to visit but could not make a family connection even though it might be there. I later wrote to this Daniel and received a nice answer with a good number of pictures of the city of Jargeau. He wrote that his daughters have come to the United States to study. Just as some of the other puzzles in our family history have been solved, I believe that Gabriel's parents will be found - it might take a little time. It is true that when he went to Amsterdam he listed his parents as "deceased" as did Marie but that was not unusual as it was sometimes done to protect from persecution family members left behind. Another objective is to find where Gabriel and Marie stayed during their time in England. Raymond Foster, an English researcher, has searched for me all the Huguenot records around London and the city of Blackwall from where they sailed. The results were negative. A family named Hersent has been found in the French Protestant Church in Southhampton. This might have an answer and will be pursued. It is logical that a young couple with small children would look for relatives to live with while waiting passage to the New World.

VOYAGE OF GABRIEL MAUPIN FROM ENGLAND TO VIRGINIA The following copies of old manuscripts relating to the voyage of Le Nasseau from England to Virginia are worded as the original manuscripts themselves. The original papers are in the Bodleian Library, having been bequeathed to the library by Rawlinson, the collector, who had them from the estate of Dr. Daniel Coxe. The latter was court physician to Queen Anne and was the principal promoter of the Huguenot emigration to America. The papers are bound in vellum and are endorsed, "Original Papers Relating to the French Plantations in the West Indies." They have the original signature of Dionisius Wright, Secretary to the Council in Virginia at the time of Gov. Francis Nicholson. Charter for the Voyage of the Nasseau (extracts) "This chart party, Indented - made the third day of Dec., Anno Domini, 1700, and in the twelfth yeare of the reign of our Sovereign Lord, William the Third, King of Eng. etc., between Sir William Phipard of the town of Pool, in the county of Dorset, Knight, owner of the Ship called the Nasseau of Pool, of the burthen of ffive hundred tuns or thereabouts, now in the River of Thames, of the one part, and Moses Jaquean, Isaac Bellet, Matthew Perodin, Abraham Perodin, Peter Bouvot, and John Hamilton, all of London, Merchants, of the other part, witnesseth, that (for the consideration hereunder mentioned) the said owner doth hereby for himself, his Executors and administrators, covenant and grant and agree to, and with, the said Moses Jaquean, etc., That by the fifth day of this Instant, month of December, the said ship shall, at the said owner's charge, be fitted and equipped with all stores requisite for the voyage hereunder mentioned; and also at like cost and charges be vitualled for carrying passengers hereunder mentioned to James Towne, in Virginia, with the same sort of provision as those for the ship's company, and that the said ship shall, by the said fifth day of December, be fitted, and have fitted, and made ready, convenient lodgings or cabbins for the said passengers, for two in each apartment, or with hammocks to hold and carry at least 150 in number, and shall stay at or near Blackwall three days after the said fifth of December, to receive and take in all such ffrench Passengers, with their apparel! and household goods or so many of them as she may conveniently carry, and with them, or as many of them as may be willing to goe, shall then, as wind and weather permit, salle and make the best of her way directly unto James Towne, in Virginia, to the usuall place of Shipsunlading there, and then sett and carry on shoar all the said passengers, with their said goods brought thither, and so end

**********

*****

56

57


and was the oldest living son. We know definitely that Gabriel came "from" Gargeau and it can well be assumed, until we get definite proof, that he was born there or very close by. G.ARY MAUPIN GOES TO FRANCE AND JARGEAU Not only did Gary Maupin sponsor research in France during 1988 but in the summer of 1989 he took his wife and two daughters there. We were privileged to share his experiences in slides, pictures and talk at our Maupin Reunion in Colonial Williamsburg in November 1991. While in the Jargeau area he met a Daniel Maupin, 54 years old, married with two daughters. He could speak Eng I ish so they were able to visit but could not make a family connection even though it might be there. I later wrote to this Daniel and received a nice answer with a good number of pictures of the city of Jargeau. He wrote that his daughters have come to the United States to study. Just as some of the other puzzles in our family history have been solved, I believe that Gabriel's parents will be found -it might take a I ittle time. It is true that when he went to Amsterdam he listed his parents as "deceased" as did Marie but that was not unusual as it was sometimes done to protect from persecution family members left behind. Another objective is to find where Gabriel and Marie stayed during their time in England. Raymond Foster, an English researcher, has searched for me all the Huguenot records around London and the city of Blackwall from where they sailed. The results v4ere negative. A family named Hersent has been found in the French Protestant Church in Southhampton. This might have an answer and will be pursued. It is logical that a young couple with small children would look for relatives to live with while waiting passage to the New World.

VOYAGE OF GABRIEL MAUPIN FROM ENGLAND TO VIRGINIA The following copies of old manuscripts relating to the voyage of Le Nasseau from England to Virginia are worded as the original manuscripts themselves. The original papers are in the Bodleian Library, having been bequeathed to the library by Rawlinson, the collector, who had them from the estate of Dr. Daniel Coxe. The latter was court physician to Queen Anne and was the principal promoter of the Huguenot emigration to America. The papers are bound in vellum and are endorsed, "Original Papers Relating to the French Plantations in the West Indies." They have the original signature of Dionisius Wright, Secretary to the Council in Virginia at the time of Gov .. Francis Nicholson. Charter for the Voyage of the Nasseau (extracts) "This chart party, Indented - made the third day of Dec., Anno Domini, 1700, and in the twelfth yeare of the reign of our Sovereign Lord, William the Third, King of Eng. etc., between Sir William Phipard of the town of Pool, in the county of Dorset, Knight, owner of the Ship called the Nasseau of Pool, of the burthen of ffive hundred tuns or thereabouts, now in the River of Thames, of the one part, and Moses Jaquean, Isaac Bellet, Matthew Perodin, Abraham Perodin, Peter Bouvot, and John Hamilton, all of London, Merchants, of the other part, witnesseth, that (for the consideration hereunder mentioned) the said owner doth hereby for himself, his Executors and administrators, covenant and grant and agree to, and with, the said Moses Jaquean, etc., That by the fifth day of this Instant, month of December, the said ship shall, at the said owner's charge, be fitted and equipped with all stores requisite for the voyage hereunder mentioned; and also at like cost and charges be vitualled for carrying passengers hereunder mentioned to James Towne, in Virginia, with the same sort of provision as those for the ship's company, and that the said ship shall, by the said fifth day of December, be fitted, and have fitted, and made ready, convenient lodgings or cabbins for the said passengers, for two in each apartment, or with hammocks to hold and carry at least 150 in number, and shall stay at or near Blackwall three days after the said fifth of December, to receive and take in all such ffrench Passengers, with their apparell and household goods or so many of them as she may conveniently carry, and with them, or as many of them as may be willing to goe, shall then, as wind and weather permit, salie and make the best of her way directly unto James Towne, in Virginia, to the usual! place of Shipsunlading there, and then sett and carry on shoar all the said passengers, with their said goods brought thither, and so end

**********

*****

56

57


her said employment, the dangers of the seas and Enemyees always excepted; ****** and will truly pay or cause to be paid *****at and after the rate of 5 pound sterling per head. ***** Memorandum:- it is agreed, that, although it is mentioned that the passengers shall have the same allowance as the Ship's Company, it is understood the intent and meaning of the said parties y't they shall have the allowance as followeth: every passenger above the age of six years, to have 7 pounds of Bread every weeke, and to a mess, 8 passengers in a mess, to have 2 peeces of Porke at two pounds each peece 5 days in a weeke with pease; two dayes in a week to have 2 four pound peeces of beef a day with pease; and at any time if it shall happen that they are not willing that the Kettle should be boyled or by bad weather cannot, In such case every passenger shall have 1 pound of cheese every such day. And such children as are under 6 yeares of age to have such allowances of flower, oatmeal, fruit, sugar and butter as the overseers of them shall judge convenient. The Nasseau was a ship of five hundred tons burden commanded by Capt. Tragian. It was a stormy passage and the voyage took from December until March. A tradition is handed down in the family as follows: The ship sprung a leak a few days off the Virginia coast as a result of a violent storm. The pumps were manned and an effort made to clear the hold of water but to no avail. Finally the crew and passengers were exhausted and gave up the work in despair. The Rev. M. Latane and Gabriel Maupin offered up prayers to the God of the seas and finally the waters ceased to rise in the ship. The pumps were put to work again and soon the ship was freed from water. The leak was patched over and when the ship arrived in the York River an investigation was made and a huge fish was found securely wedged in the broken planks, stopping the flow of water through the leak. All Maupins firmly believe this legend so reverently handed down through these hundreds of years and no matter what their rel1 gion or creed, this is one miracle they all accept. The papers relating to this voyage of the Nasseau are still in existence in the Bodelian Library in England and the Virginia Historical Library has issued a book in which copies of these papers are to be found. A VIRGINIA COUNCIL MEETING At a Council held at the Hon'ble Mr. Auditor Byrd's March 9th, 1700. Present: His Excellency in Council. Ordered, that a proclamation issue to the severall countyes of this, his Majesty's Colony and Dominion of Virginia, requireing ye Burgesses of each respective countye to call in the Briefs,

58

with the subscription and Donation given to the reliefe of the French Protestant Refugees, and that they return an account thereof to the hon'ble Mr. Auditor Byrd and Benjamin Harrison, who are appointed to distribute the same. Whereas, several! ffrench Protestant Refugees are lately arrived in the York River in the Nasseau, Capt. Tragian, Comm'r, concerning which his Excellency hath received no particular intelligence or Commands from his most sacred Majesty, save only a letter from the Lord Bishop of London concerning one Mr. Latane, who comes in the quality of a monister and one other letter from Mr. Blaithwayte concerning one John Boyer, a french Gentleman; and the aforesaid ffrench Refugees making no application nor proposals to the government in their own behalf, His Excellency and Council ******find means for their support. Do therefore order that such and so many of them as are willing to go and to inhabit at Manakintowne where several! ffrench are already settled, may and shall receive relief from the Contributions****** and so many of them as are not willing to go thither be Lycenced and permitted to disperse themselves among the inhabitants of this country ****** This Council, held soon after the arrival of the Nasseau in Virginia, gives the approximate date of the arrival of the Maupins in America, or early in March 1700. It shows, regardless of the wording of the charter of the Nasseau, that the ship came to Yorktown instead of Jamestown. The confusion of dates is again evident. According to the charter, the Nasseau was to leave England in December 1700 and yet it is evident from the above record that the ship arrived in Virginia in March 1700. That it was the same voyage is certain since the Council speaks of the Minister Latane, who came in the Nasseau at the same time as Gabriel Maupin.

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NOTE: An explanation for the confusion on the dates of the ship leaving England in December 1700 and arriving in Virginia in March 1700 results from the fact that in that period of history in England the legal year began with March 25. In 1751 English Parliament enacted the law that the legal year should begin with the 1st of January 1752. The Gregorian Calendar now in general use in most parts of the world was first prescribed in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII to correct the Julian year to the solar year. It was not adopted by England until September 3/14 1752. There is an eleven day difference between the Julian "Old Style" and the Gregorian "New Style" calendars. (Copied from the Britannica World Language Dictionary.)

59

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her said employment, the dangers of the seas and Enemyees always excepted; ******and will truly pay or cause to be paid *****at and after the rate of 5 pound sterling per head. ***** Memorandum:- it is agreed, that, although it is mentioned that the passengers shall have the same allowance as the Ship's Company, it is understood the intent and meaning of the said parties y't they shall have the allowance as followeth: every passenger above the age of six years, to have 7 pounds of Bread every weeke, and to a mess, 8 passengers in a mess, to have 2 peeces of Porke at two pounds each peece 5 days in a weeke with pease; two dayes in a week to have 2 four pound peeces of beef a day with pease; and at any time if it shall happen that they are not willing that the Kettle should be boyled or by bad weather cannot, In such case every passenger shall have 1 pound of cheese every such day. And such children as are under 6 yeares of age to have such allowances of flower, oatmeal, fruit, sugar and butter as the overseers of them shall judge convenient. The Nasseau was a ship of five hundred tons burden commanded by Capt. Tragian. It was a stormy passage and the voyage took from December until March. A tradition is handed down in the family as follows: The ship sprung a leak a few days off the Virginia coast as a result of a violent storm. The pumps wer·e manned and an effort made to clear the hold of water but to no avail. Finally the crew and passengers were exhausted and gave up the work in despair. The Rev. M. Latane and Gabriel Maupin offered up prayers to the God of the seas and finally the waters ceased to rise in the ship. The pumps were put to work again and soon the ship was freed from water. The leak was patched over and when the ship arrived in the York River an investigation was made and a huge fish was found securely wedged in the broken planks, stopping the flow of water through the leak. All Maupins firmly believe this legend so reverently handed down through these hundreds of years and no matter what their religion or creed, this is one miracle they all accept. The papers relating to this voyage of the Nasseau are stili in existence in the Bodelian Library in England and the Virginia Historical Library has issued a book in which copies of these papers are to be found. A VIRGINIA COUNCIL MEETING At a Council held at the Hon'ble Mr. Auditor Byrd's March 9th, 1700. Present: His Excellency in Counci I. Ordered, that a proclamation issue to the several! countyes of this, his Majesty's Colony and Dominion of Virginia, requi rei ng ye Burgesses of each respective countye to call in the Briefs,

58

with the subscription and Donation given to the reliefe of the French Protestant Refugees, and that they return an account thereof to the hon'ble Mr. Auditor Byrd and Benjamin Harrison, who are appointed to distribute the same. Whereas, several! ffrench Protestant Refugees are lately arrived in the York River in the Nasseau, Capt. Traglan, Comm'r, concerning which his Excellency hath received no particular intelligence or Commands from his most sacred Majesty, save only a letter from the Lord Bishop of London concerning one Mr. Latane, who comes in the quality of a monister and one other letter from Mr. Blaithwayte concerning one John Boyer, a french Gentleman; and the aforesaid ffrench Refugees making no application nor proposals to the government in their own behalf, His Excellency and Council ******find means for their support. Do therefore order that such and so many of them as are willing to go and to inhabit at Manakintowne where several! ffrench are already settled, may and shall receive relief from the Contributions ****** and so many of them as are not willing to go thither be Lycenced and permitted to disperse themselves among the inhabitants of this country ****** This Council, held soon after the arrival of the Nasseau in Virginia, gives the approximate date of the arrival of the Maupins in America, or early in March 1700. It shows, regardless of the wording of the charter of the Nasseau, that the ship came to Yorktown instead of Jamestown. The confusion of dates is again evident. According to the charter, the Nasseau was to leave England in December 1700 and yet it is evident from the above record that the ship arrived in Virginia in March 1700. That it was the same voyage is certain since the Council speaks of the Minister Latane, who came in the Nasseau at the same time as Gabriel Maupin. NOTE: An explanation for the confusion on the dates of the ship leaving England in December 1700 and arriving in Virginia in March 1700 results from the fact that in that period of history in England the legal year began with March 25. In 1751 English Parliament enacted the law that the legal year should begin with the 1st of January 1752. The Gregorian Calendar now in general use in most parts of the world was first prescribed in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII to correct the Julian year to the solar year. It was not adopted by England until September 3/14 1752. There is an eleven day difference between the Julian "Old Style" and the Gregorian "New Style" calendars. (Copied from the Britannica World Language Dictionary.)

59

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GABRIEL MAUPIN, the Immigrant: THE STORY OF HIS THREE INNS The NASSEAU landed in Yorktown on March 8, 1700, old style dating (Virginia Council Meeting held at Hon. Auditor Byrd's March 8, 1700. Also see Documents, Chiefly Unpublished, Relating to the Huguenot Emigration to VA by Robert A. Brock, Richmond, VA, 1886.) Where Gabriel Maupin was for the next 8 years Is unknown. Gabriel was naturalized in Williamsburg, with 4 other Frenchmen, April 18, 1705. (Executive Journal of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. 1, pg. 411) This does not tell us his residence at the time; he could have "come In" for his naturalization. It would be interesting to know, in this year, where he was; since Gabriel II was probably born in this year. Wherever Gabriel was, he was not in Manakin. It Is incredible that he would have delayed his Headright Claim, as valuable as it was, if he had been living anywhere in Henrico Co. (where Manakin then was). But 1708 - a bad year for Gabriel - reveals his whereabouts at that time. On March 25 of that year Gabriel sues Thomas Haly for debt. Neither party appears at the hearing. This was in Williamsburg but Gabriel was not living in the city it seems but instead out in York County in the lower precincts of Bruton Parish, not too far away. The Will of William Hansford, dated October 28 of that year mentions his plantation. In that district, "where Gabriel Maupin now lives" Refs: The Haly matter: York County Deeds, Orders, Wi Its, etc. #13, 1706-1716 page 130 but date is on pg 127. But out on Hansford's plantation Gabriel was already in trouble by September 24. A month before his landlord's death Gabriel had been accused of "retailing liquors without a lycense contrary to Act of Assembly". When the matter came to trial on September 24, 1708, Gabriel claimed to be "Not Guilty" which automatically took the matter into a jury trial. Being a sensible man, he must have had some sort of claim concerning his business, whatever it consisted of. The most logical guess is that he had been running a boarding house- supplying, as his granddaughter was to do "Board, washing and Lodging" since no license would have been required for a boarding-house. Whatever the truth of the matter, he was convicted. Ref. York Co. Deeds, Orders, Wills No. 13, 1706-1710; pg. 169 but date is on pg. 168. Within nine months of his conviction and eight months of his former landlord's death, Gabriel is in Henrico County having collected what legal proof he needs for a Headright Claim. "Upon the petition of Gabriel Maupin (spelled Moupen) these are to certify that it is due unto him two hundred and fifty acres of land for the importation of himself and Mary his wife with Magdalen, Mary and Daniel his children, into this Colony the

60

same being legally proved in open Court". Date: June 1, 1709, Ref. Henrico County Court Orders, 1107-1709, Reel 65, pg. 154. Since Gabriel already had an enterprise of some sort going on at the Hansford plantation, he never expected to live in Henrico County. At this juncture, did Gabriel realize that he would never be prosperous unless he had a legally sufficient "ordinary" on land bought by himself? Did he buy the late Hansford's land or land very close by? (since he remained in that district) Gabriel now had a year and a half to prepare his legallysufficient "ordinary" (inn) before he received his liquor "lycense" in 1711. Ref. is York Co. Deeds, Orders, Wills, etc., 14, Part I, 1709-1716. His enterprise, presumably still conducted, could not have been flagrantly illegal because he is appointed ~·constable of the Lower Precincts of Bruton Parish". This makes it virtually certain that he was still on or near the late Hansford's property which was in the lower precincts of Bruton Parish. This was May 25, 1711; ref. is York Co. Orders, Wi lis, 14, Part I, 1709-1716, Reel 6; pg. 83 but date is on pg. 81. This was Gabriel's first Inn, then in the county, its inauguration celebrated by the honor of a public office. But Gabriel enjoyed this first Inn only about three years. "He was living in Williamsburg by 1714 for in that year he was granted a license to keep an ordinary at his dwelling house in Williamsburg by the York County Court and he renewed his license each year through 1719". (Travis House, letter to Mrs. Robert J. Hogan, Oct. 3, 1951 ). But this dwelling-house could not, in 1714, have been the James Morris house at 352 Duke of Gloucester St. since that one was not purchased until 1718. This then, was Gabriel's second Inn at some unknown address in Williamsburg itself. In 1718 - day and month not known to this writer - Gabriel bought the house that had belonged to James Morris, an architect brought from England by Philip Ludwell to design Bruton Parish Church. (Ref., Jones Papers, Reel 1, cop. at Library of Congress) Mr. Jones had been authorized to "sell at outcry, to Maupin" the house and lot. More about James Morris appears in Tyler's Williamsburg). This house, 352 Duke of Gloucester St., on the corner of Nassau St., is (according to Travis House records of the house) described in some early records as "across from the church"; a better description of its location would be just beyond, and across from the very back of the church's graveyard. The house is now called the Taliaferro-Cole House. It must have been here that it was "Ordered that there be paid to Gabriel Maupin the sum of one pound, two shillings, six pence out of his Majesty's revenue of two s per hhd & c. It being for the diet and accommodation of a Catawba Indian Woman during the time she staid in Williamsburg waiting for the opportunity to be sent home to her nation". (ref., Executive

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GABRIEL MAUPIN, the Immigrant: THE STORY OF HIS THREE INNS The NASSEAU landed in Yorktown on March 8, 1700, old style dating (Virginia Council Meeting held at Hon. Auditor Byrd's March 8, 1700. Also see Documents, Chiefly Unpublished, Relating to the Huguenot Emigration to VA by Robert A. Brock, Richmond, VA, 1886.) Where Gabriel Maupin was for the next 8 years Is unknown. Gabriel was naturalized in Williamsburg, with 4 other Frenchmen, April 18, 1705. (Executive Journal of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. 1, pg. 411) This does not tell us his residence at the time; he could have "come In" for his naturalization. It would be interesting to know, in this year, where he was; since Gabriel II was probably born in this year. Wherever Gabriel was, he was not in Manakin. It Is incredible that he would have delayed his Headright Claim, as valuable as it was, if he had been living anywhere in Henrico Co. (where Manakin then was). But 1708 - a bad year for Gabriel - reveals his whereabouts at that time. On March 25 of that year Gabriel sues Thomas Haly for debt. Neither party appears at the hearing. This was in Williamsburg but Gabriel was not living in the city it seems but instead out in York County in the lower precincts of Bruton Parish, not too far away. The Will of William Hansford, dated October 28 of that year mentions his plantation. In that district, "where Gabriel Maupin now lives" Refs: The Haly matter: York County Deeds, Orders, Wills, etc. #13, 1706-1716 page 130 but date is on pg 127. But out on Hansford's plantation Gabriel was already in trouble by September 24. A month before his landlord's death Gabriel had been accused of "retailing liquors without a lycense contrary to Act of Assembly". When the matter came to trial on September 24, 1708, Gabriel claimed to be "Not Guilty" which automatically took the matter Into a jury trial. Being a sensible man, he must have had some sort of claim concerning his business, whatever it consisted of. The most logical guess is that he had been running a boarding house - supplying, as his granddaughter was to do "Board, washing and Lodging" since no license would have been required for a boarding-house. Whatever the truth of the matter, he was convicted. Ref. York Co. Deeds, Orders, Wills No.13, 1706-1710; pg. 169 but date is on pg. 168. Within nine months of his conviction and eight months of his former landlord's death, Gabriel is in Henrico County having collected what legal proof he needs for a Headright Claim. "Upon the petition of Gabriel Maupin (spelled Moupen) these are to certify that it is due unto him two hundred and fifty acres of land for the importation of himself and Mary his wife with Magdalen, Mary and Daniel his children, into this Colony the

60

same being legally proved in open Court". Date: June 1, 1709, Ref. Henrico County Court Orders, 1707-1709, Reel 65, pg. 154. Since Gabriel already had an enterprise of some sort going on at the Hansford plantation, he never expected to live in Henrico County. At this juncture, did Gabriel realize that he would never be prosperous unless he had a legally sufficient "ordinary" on land bought by himself? Did he buy the late Hansford's land or land very close by? (since he remained in that district) Gabriel now had a year and a half to prepare his legallysufficient "ordinary" (inn) before he received his liquor "lycense" in 1711. Ref. is York Co. Deeds, Orders, Wills, etc., 14, Part I, 1709-1716. His enterprise, presumably still conducted, could not have been flagrantly illegal because he is appointed ~路constable of the Lower Precincts of Bruton Parish". This makes it virtually certain that he was still on or near the late Hansford's property which was in the lower precincts of Bruton Parish. This was May 25, 1711; ref. is York Co. Orders, Wills, 14, Part I, 1709-1716, Reel 6; pg. 83 but date ison pg. 81. This was Gabriel's first Inn, then in the county, its inauguration celebrated by the honor of a public office. But Gabriel enjoyed this first Inn only about three years. "He was living in Williamsburg by 1714 for in that year he was granted a license to keep an ordinary at his dwelling house in Williamsburg by the York County Court and he renewed his license each year through 1719". (Travis House, letter to Mrs. Robert J. Hogan, Oct. 3, 1951 ). But this dwelling-house could not, in 1714, have been the James Morris house at 352 Duke of Gloucester St. since that one was not purchased until 1718. This then, was Gabriel's second Inn at some unknown address in Williamsburg itself. In 1718 - day and month not known to this writer - Gabriel bought the house that had belonged to James Morris, an architect brought from England by Philip Ludwell to design Bruton Parish Church. (Ref., Jones Papers, Reel 1, cop. at Library of Congress) Mr. Jones had been authorized to "sell at outcry, to Maupin" the house and lot. More about James Morris appears in Tyler's Williamsburg). This house, 352 Duke of Gloucester St., on the corner of Nassau St., is (according to Travis House records of the house) described in some early records as "across from the church"; a better description of its location would be just beyond, and across from the very back of the church's graveyard. The house is now called the Taliaferro-Cole House. It must have been here that it was "Ordered that there be paid to Gabriel Maupin the sum of one pound, two shillings, six pence out of his Majesty's revenue of two s per hhd & c. It being for the diet and accommodation of a Catawba Indian Woman during the time she staid in Williamsburg waiting for the opportunity to be sent home to her nation". (ref., Executive

61

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Journal of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. III, p. 425) This was late in the year - Dec. 1 - so Gabriel probably already ow ned the house. If he had bought it late in the year, he enjoyed it very little more than a year maybe two years, whenever in 1718 he bought it. "In February 1719/1720 Mary Maupin applied to the York County Court for license to keep an ordinary In her dwelling house in Williamsburg, and continued to apply for such license each year through 1724." Note that this says her house. (Travis House, letter to Miss Margaret M. Rodgers, July, 1972) This means that Gabriel was already dead by February 1720 - or It would not have been Mary's house. After his death, It was her house; he had willed it to her. Mary remarries to Thomas Creas as shown in an indenture dated 1724 (York County Deeds and Bonds 3, Reel 13, 1713-1729, pp. 440-41.) This is the end of the story of the three Inns of Gabriel Maupin. Florence Mary Maupin Portsmouth, VA August, 1984

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Only a few of the passengers on the Nasseau settled in Manakintown. The Maupins were there but a short time. They returned to Williamsburg and made their home there. They seemed to have had friends in Virginia or possibly kin. It is surmised that Gabriel Maupin had a sister at Jamestown, possibly the Mary Maupin who married Jacob Pressnel. No doubt these kinsmen aided Gabriel Maupin in getting established at Williamsburg for within a very short time he was a noted tavern keeper there and active in Lodge work. On page 34 of Tyler's "Williamsburg the Old Capital" is this statement: "Among the inn keepers, the most prominent were Mrs. Mary Luke, widow of John Luke, formerly Collector of the Customs for the lower district of the James River; Gabriel Maupin and Jean Marot - the last two being Huguenot settlers in Virginia in 1700". On page 246 of the same book: "The annual meeting of the lodge, at which accounts ere settled and officers elected, was on the Feast Day of St. John the Baptist. Then the lodge was well attended; and the items in the accounts for sugar, rum, and brandy seem to indicate that there were merry hours spent in the tavern of Gabriel Maupin where the members met to dine on such occasion". Page 403, Vol. III, "Executive Journal of the Council of Colonial Virginia", gives this reference to Maupin's tavern - "Dec. 1st 1718 Present: The Governor, Edmund Jennings, Robt. Carter, James Blair, Phillip Ludwell, Wm. Cocke and Man Page, Esqrs." "Ordered that there be paid to Gabriel Maupin the sum of one pound, two shillings, six pence out of his Majesty's revenue of 2s per hhd & c. It being for the diet and accommodation of a Cattawba Indian Woman during the time she staid in Wmsburg waiting for an opportunity to be sent home to her Nation." From the same source, Vol. I, page 411: "Ap ri I 18th 1705 Present, His Excellcy Francis Nicholson Esq. & John Lightfoot, Robt. Carter, John Curtis, Phillip Ludwell, William Bassett, Henry Duke, John Smith, John Lewis, Esq. A petition of Joseph Chermeson and a petition of Jean de Jarnal, Gabriel Maupin, Jean Delaune, Jean James Veillon, and John Guy Rey praying for Naturalizacon were read & referred to ye Consideracon of the House of Burgesses." Dr. Socrates Maupin says that Gabriel Maupin had the Frenchman's aversion to corn bread, then the staple food of the colony. This aversion was a common one among the French refugees. He declared he would starve before he would eat it but his wife reminded him that he ought to be thankful to eat anything in order to live in a land where he could worship God as he pleased.

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Journal of the Council of Colonial Virginia, Vol. III, p. 425) This was late in the year - Dec. 1 - so Gabriel probably already ow ned the house. If he had bought it late in the year, he enjoyed it very little more than a year maybe two years, whenever in 1718 he bought it. "In February 1719/1720 Mary Maupin applied to the York County Court for license to keep an ordinary In her dwelling house in Williamsburg, and continued to apply for such license each year through 1724." Note that this says her house. (Travis House, letter to Miss Margaret M. Rodgers, July, 1972) This means that Gabriel was already dead by February 1720 - or It would not have been Mary's house. After his death, it was her house; he had willed it to her. Mary remarries to Thomas Creas as shown in an indenture dated 1724 (York County Deeds and Bonds 3, Reel 13, 1713-1729, pp. 440-41.) This is the end of the story of the three Inns of Gabriel Maupin. Florence Mary Maupin Portsmouth, VA August, 1984

Only a few of the passengers on the Nasseau settled in Manakintown. The Maupins were there but a short time. They returned to Williamsburg and made their home there. They seemed to have had friends in Virginia or possibly kin. It is ;;urmised that Gabriel Maupin had a sister at Jamestown, possibly the Mary Maupin who married Jacob Pressnel. No doubt these kinsmen aided Gabriel Maupin in getting established ot Williamsburg for within a very short time he was a noted tavern keeper there and active in Lodge work. On page 34 of Tyler's "Williamsburg the Old Capital" is this statement: "Among the inn keepers, the most prominent were Mrs. Mary Luke, widow of John Luke, formerly Collector of the Customs for the lower district of the James River; Gabriel Maupin and Jean Maret - the last two being Huguenot settlers in Virginia in 1700". On page 246 of the same book: "The annual meeting of the lodge, at which accounts ere settled and officers elected, was on the Feast Day of St. John the Baptist. Then the lodge was well attended; and the items in the accounts for sugar, rum, and brandy seem to indicate that there were merry hours spent in the tavern of Gabriel Maupin where the members met to dine on such occasion". Page 403, Vol. III, "Executive Journal of the Council of Colonial Virginia", gives this reference to Maupin's tavern - "Dec. 1st 1718 Present: The Governor, Edmund Jennings, Robt. Carter, James Blair, Phillip Ludwell, Wm. Cocke and Man Page, Esqrs." "Ordered that there be paid to Gabriel Maupin the sum of one pound, two shillings, six pence out of his Majesty's revenue of 2s per hhd & c. It being for the diet and accommodation of a Cattawba Indian Woman during the time she staid in Wmsburg waiting for an opportunity to be sent home to her Nation."

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Gabriel Maupin died early in the year 1720 and he named his wife, Mary, as his executrix. Maupin's old French Bible and some of his furniture was in the possession of some of his descendants just prior to the Civil War. The greater part of his personal property was destroyed when the British occupied Yorktown. His sword, carried to Kentucky by one of his descendants, has also disappeared. His will was destroyed by fire at Richmond, the 3rd and 4th of April 1865, following the evacuation of the capital of the Confederacy by Gen. Lee. However Dr. Socrates Maupin had found and copied the will about 1850. His affidavit is as follows: "The subscriber copied the will, codicil, etc., from the records of the General Court at Richmond, about twenty years ago. Said records were then deposited in the state courthouse on the southeast corner of Capitol square, and remained there until the disastrous conflagration of the 3rd and 4th of April 1865, when they were destroyed by fire together with the building". S. Maupin, May 14th 1870.

WILL OF GABRIEL MAUPIN "In the name of God, Amen. The second of Sept. 1719, I Gabriel Maupin, of Williamsburg, being sick of body but of a sound mind and memory, praise be to God for the same, do make this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following: - and first I bequeath my soul in to the hands of Almighty God, and my body to the earth to be decently buried according to the discretion of my executrix hereafter named, and as touching such worldly estate as it has pleased God to bless me with, I give and dispose of the same in the following manner and form: - first I will that all of my just debts be truly paid. Item, I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Mary Maupin, fifty pounds current money to be paid her at the decease of my loving wife, Mary Maupin. Item, I give and bequeath unto my loving wife Mary Maupin, the dwelling house and lot wherein I now dwell, during her natural life, and at her decease I appoint my two sons, Daniel Maupin and Gabriel Maupin, or the survivor of them, to sell the same to the highest bidder at public sale and the proceeds thereof I give to be equally divided amongst my three children and their heirs, - Item, all the rest of my estate of whatever nature or quality soever, I give to be equally divided amongst my wife, Mary, and my aforesaid three children, but my children's part not to be paid until after the decease of my loving wife, aforesaid. Lastly, do I appoint my loving wife, Mary Maupin, my whole and sole executrix of this my last Will and Testament, revoking all former wills and testaments and allowing this and no other to be my last Will and Testament.

64

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this day and year aforesaid. GABRIEL MAUPIN (seal) Signed, sealed, Published and declared by the said Gabriel Maupin (the words "or the survivor of them" and "I give" being first interlined) to be his last will and testament in the presence of the subscribers. Christo. Smith, Richard Brand, William Thorpe

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"Upon mature consideration I have thought fit to alter some parts of my will (viz) instead of dividing my estate equally among my children according to my last two devising paragraphs of the Will, I give to each of my sons (viz) Daniel and Gabriel, ten pounds current money to be paid them after the decease of my loving wife, Mary Maupin, -All the rest of my estate, both real and personal, I give and bequeath unto my loving wife, and her heirs forever, revoking whatever is contrary to this devise in any part of my will. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the first day of Dec. 1719. Gabriel Maupin (seal) Witnesses: Joseph Sutton John Davis Christo. Smith Virginia SS: At a General Court held at the Capitol, April 30th, 1720, this will of Gabriel Maupin, dec'd was this day proved in open court by the oaths of Richard Brand and Richard Thorpe, two of the witnesses to it, and the Codicil thereunto attached by the oaths of Joseph Sutton and John Davis, two of the witnesses to the same, Mary Maupin, the executrix, having made oath to said will and codicil according to law. Teste. C.C. Thatcher, Clk of Gen'l Court Truly worded. Teste C. C. Thatcher, C. G. C. April 30, 1720, date of the General Court to prove the Will of Gabriel Maupin, gives us an appoximate date of his death. It also gives son Daniel's name first which shows he is the eldest son. Daughter Mary is called Mary MAUPIN indicating she was unmarried. From earlier publications this daughter was listed as the wife of Jacob Pressnel. This cannot be as according to the Codicil of Gabriel's Will Mary is not mentioned and she is called "Mary MAUPIN, deceased" in the Indenture of 1724. The Indenture which follows is lengthy but important because it identifies the last home of Gabriel, Lot #352 (now called Taliferro-Cole house). It tells us that wife Marie re-marries to Thomas Creas, a gardener for William & Mary College. According to Colonial Williamsburg Guide Book Thomas Creas and his wife Mary, widow of Gabriel, owned and lived in this house until they died, Mary in 1748 and Creas in 1756.

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Gabriel Maupin died early in the year 1720 and he named his wife, Mary, as his executrix. Maupin's old French Bible and some of his furniture was in the possession of some of his descendants just prior to the Civil War. The greater part of his personal property was destroyed when the British occupied Yorktown. His sword, carried to Kentucky by one of his descendants, has also disappeared. His will was destroyed by fire at Richmond, the 3rd and 4th of April 1865, following the evacuation of the capital of the Confederacy by Gen. Lee. However Dr. Socrates Maupin had found and copied the will about 1850. His affidavit is as follows: "The subscriber copied the will, codicil, etc., from the records of the General Court at Richmond, about twenty years ago. Said records were then deposited in the state courthouse on the southeast corner of Capitol square, and remained there until the disastrous conflagration of the 3rd and 4th of April 1865, when they were destroyed by fire together with the building". S. Maupin, May 14th 1870.

WILL OF GABRIEL MAUPIN "In the name of God, Amen. The second of Sept. 1719, I Gabriel Maupin, of Williamsburg, being sick of body but of a sound mind and memory, praise be to God for the same, do make this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following: - and first I bequeath my soul in to the hands of Almighty God, and my body to the earth to be decently buried according to the discretion of my executrix hereafter named, and as touching such worldly estate as it has pleased God to bless me with, I give and dispose of the same in the following manner and form: - first I will that all of my just debts be truly paid. Item, I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Mary Maupin, fifty pounds current money to be paid her at the decease of my loving wife, Mary Maupin. Item, I give and bequeath unto my loving wife Mary Maupin, the dwelling house and lot wherein I now dwell, during her natural life, and at her decease I appoint my two sons, Daniel Maupin and Gabriel Maupin, or the survivor of them, to sell the same to the highest bidder at public sale and the proceeds thereof I give to be equally divided amongst my three children and their heirs, - Item, all the rest of my estate of whatever nature or quality soever, I give to be equally divided amongst my wife, Mary, and my aforesaid three children, but my children's part not to be paid until after the decease of my loving wife, aforesaid. Lastly, do I appoint my loving wife, Mary Maupin, my whole and sole executrix of this my last Will and Testament, revoking all former wills and testaments and allowing this and no other to be my last Will and Testament.

64

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this day and year aforesaid. GABRIEL MAUPIN (seal) Signed, sealed, Published and declared by the said Gabriel Maupin (the words "or the survivor of them" and "I give" being first interlined) to be his last will and testament in the presence of the subscribers. Christo. Smith, Richard Brand, William Thorpe

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Codicil to the Will of Gabriel Maupin "Upon mature consideration I have thought fit to alter some parts of my will (viz) instead of dividing my estate equally among my children according to my last two devising paragraphs of the Will, I give to each of my sons (viz) Daniel and Gabriel, ten pounds current money to be paid them after the decease of my loving wife, Mary Maupin, -All the rest of my estate, both real and personal, I give and bequeath unto my loving wife, and her heirs forever, revoking whatever is contrary to this devise in any part of my will. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the first day of Dec. 1719. Gabriel Maupin (seal) Witnesses: Joseph Sutton John Davis Christo. Smith Virginia SS: At a General Court held at the Capitol, April 30th, 1720, this will of Gabriel Maupin, dec'd was this day proved in open court by the oaths of Richard Brand and Richard Thorpe, two of the witnesses to it, and the Codicil thereunto attached by the oaths of Joseph Sutton and John Davis, two of the witnesses to the same, Mary Maupin, the executrix, having made oath to said will and codicil according to Jaw. Teste. C.C. Thatcher, Clk of Gen'l Court Truly worded. Teste C. C. Thatcher, C. G. C.

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April 30, 1720, date of the General Court to prove the Will of Gabriel Maupin, gives us an appoximate date of his death. It also gives son Daniel's name first which shows he is the eldest son. Daughter Mary is called Mary MAUPIN indicating she was unmarried. From earlier publications this daughter was listed as the wife of Jacob Pressnel. This cannot be as according to the Codicil of Gabriel's Will Mary is not mentioned and she is called "Mary MAUPIN, deceased" in the Indenture of 1724. The Indenture which follows is lengthy but important because it identifies the last home of Gabriel, Lot #352 (now called Taliferro-Cole house). It tells us that wife Marie re-marries to Thomas Creas, a gardener for William & Mary College. According to Colonial Williamsburg Guide Book Thomas Creas and his wife Mary, widow of Gabriel, owned and lived in this house until they died, Mary in 1748 and Creas in 1756.

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York County Virginia Deeds & Bonds 3, 1713-1729, Reel 13 Keith & Ferguson from Creas Release This Indenture made the Sixteenth day of December in the year of our Lord Jesus Christ One thousand Seven hundred & twenty four Between Thomas Creas of the City of Wmsburgh Gardiner and Mary his Wife on the one part and William Keith and Patrick Ferguson of the said City of Wmsburgh on the other part Witnesseth that the said Thomas Creas and Mary his said Wife for and in consideration of five Shillings of lawful money of Virginia to them in hand paid at & before the Ensealing and delivery of those presents by the sd William Keith & Patrick Ferguson in Receipt whereof they the said Thomas Creas & Mary his said Wife do hereby acknowledge & therefore do agree and discharge the sd William Keith & Patrick Ferguson their Extrs. & Admrs. by these presents and for direct other good causes considerations them the said Thomas Creas and Mary his sd Wife thereunto moving have given granted bargained sold enfeoffed & Confirmed and by this presents do give grant bargain Sell Enfeoff 1 and Confirm unto the sd William Keith and Patrick Ferguson in their actual possession now being by Virtue of a bargained Sale for one year to them the rest made by Indenture bearing date the day next before the day of the date of these presents and made or mentioned to be made between the sd Thomas Creas & Mary his said Wife on the one part and the said William Keith & Patrick Ferguson on the other part and of the statue for transferring uses into possession and to their Heirs ALL that Messuage 2 or dwelling house wherein the said Thomas Creas and Mary his said Wife now live & all that Lot or half acre of land described in the plat of said City of Wmsburgh by the figures 352 Situated and being in the said City of Wmsburgh and all Kitchens Stables Outhouses & buildings to the said Messuage and lot of land belongin or in any wise appurtaining and the Reversion and Reversions Remainder and remainders Rents Issues & proffitts there of To have & to ho 1d The said Messuage and Lot of Land and all and Singular other the premises with their & every of their Appurtenances and the Reversion and Reversions Remainder & Remainders there of and of every part there of to the said William Keith and Patrick Ferguson their Heirs & Assigns for Ever upon the trust & Confidence and to the uses and purposes herein after mentioned and declared and

1 enfeoff: To invest with a fief or fee. This is according to E. Kay Kirkham's book The Handwriting of American Records for a Period of 300 years, Logan, UT: The Everton Publishers, Inc., 3rd printing, 1981. 2 messuage: A dwelling house with adjacent lands and buildings, ibid.

66

for no other use trust or purpose whatsoever that is to Say intrust and for the only use and behoof of the said Thomas Creas and Mary his said Wife during the time of their natural lives and of the life of the longest liver of them without improachmt afar for any manner that & from suffer the death of the sd Thomas Creas and the sd Mary his sd Wife to the use and behoof of Daniel Maupin & Gabriel Maupin Sons of the sd Mary Creas by Gabriel Maupin late her husband deceased and of their heirs and assigns respectively until such time as they the said William Keith and Patrick Ferguson or the Survivor of them or the heirs or Assigns of such Survivor shall and do Sell and dispose of the sd Messuage Lot of Land & premisses. And it is hereby declared and agreed by and between all & Every the said parts to thesse presents that the said Messuage Lot of Land and premises Conveyed as above and to the said William Keith & Patrick Ferguson their Heirs & Assigns are so conveyed upon this further trust & Confidence in them reposed That the said William Keith and Patrick Ferguson and the survivor of them & the heirs and Assigns of such Survivor shall and wi 11 as soon as Conveniently may be after the respective deaths of the sd Thomas Creas & the sd Mary his said Wife make Sale & dispose of the Messuage Lot of Land & premisses for the price that can bona fide gotten for the home & that the money ariseing by Such a Sale & by the Rents Issues & profits of the sd Messuage Lot of Land & premises in the mean time until such Sale all reasonable charges & Expenses being first deducted shall be paid one moiety thereafter to the sd Daniel Maupin his Executors & Admrs. and the other moiety 3 to the said Gabriel Maupin brother of the sd Daniel Maupin his Excrs. & Admrs. upon this proviso and Condition that at and upon the death of the sd Mary Creas they the said Daniel Maupin & Gabriel Maupin their respective Excrs. & Admrs. shall and do release acquit & discharge the Excrs. & Admrs. of the sd Mary Creas of and from all the Right claim and aemand wch. they the sd Danl. Maupin & Gabriel Maupin or either of them their or either of their Excrs. or Admrs. shall or may have or lawfully claim of into or out of a Certain Legacy of fifty five pounds Current money of Virginia given and bequeathed to Mary Maupin deced Sister of the sd Daniel Maupin & Gabriel Maupin in and by the last Will and Testament of the sd Gabriel Maupin dece'd or to any part there of or in order all or any part or Share of the personal Estate of the sd Mary Maupin deced. And in case of either of them the said Daniel Maupin or Gabriel Maupin or their Several Excrs. or Admrs. shall refuse to give and execute such release and discharge as above mentioned that then & in Such Case they the said William Keith and Patrick Ferguson & the Survivor of them 3 moiety: One-half, two other joint tenants are said to take by moieties, ibid.

67


York County Virginia Deeds & Bonds 3, 1713-1729, Reel 13 Keith & Ferguson from Creas Release This Indenture made the Sixteenth day of December in the year of our Lord Jesus Christ One thousand Seven hundred & twenty four Between Thomas Creas of the City of Wmsburgh Gardiner and Mary his Wife on the one part and William Keith and Patrick Ferguson of the said City of Wmsburgh on the other part Witnesseth that the said Thomas Creas and Mary his said Wife for and in consideration of five Shillings of lawful money of Virginia to them in hand paid at & before the Ensealing and delivery of those presents by the sd William Keith & Patrick Ferguson in Receipt whereof they the said Thomas Creas & Mary his said Wife do hereby acknowledge & therefore do agree and discharge the sd William Keith & Patrick Ferguson their Extrs. & Admrs. by these presents and for direct other good causes considerations them the said Thomas Creas and Mary his sd Wife thereunto moving have given granted bargained sold enfeoffed & Confirmed and by this presents do give grant bargain Sell Enfeoff 1 and Confirm unto the sd William Keith and Patrick Ferguson in their actual possession now being by Virtue of a bargained Sale for one year to them the rest made by Indenture bearing date the day next before the day of the date of these presents and made or mentioned to be made between the sd Thomas Creas & Mary his said Wife on the one part and the said William Keith & Patrick Ferguson on the other part and of the statue for transferring uses into possession and to their Heirs ALL that Messuage 2 or dwelling house wherein the said Thomas Creas and Mary his said Wife now live & all that Lot or half acre of land described in the plat of said City of Wmsburgh by the figures 352 Situated and being in the said City of Wmsburgh and all Kitchens Stables Outhouses & buildings to the said Messuage and lot of land belongin or in any wise appurtaining and the Reversion and Reversions Remainder and remainders Rents Issues & proffitts there of To have & to ho 1d The said Messuage and Lot of Land and all and Singular other the premises with their & every of their Appurtenances and the Reversion and Reversions Remainder & Remainders there of and of every part there of to the said William Keith and Patrick Ferguson their Heirs & Assigns for Ever upon the trust & Confidence and to the uses and purposes herein after mentioned and declared and

1 enfeoff: To invest with a fief or fee. This is according to E. Kay Kirkham's book The Handwriting of American Records for a Period of 300 years, Logan, UT: The Everton Publishers, Inc., 3rd printing, 1981. 2 messuage: A dwelling house with adjacent lands and buildings, ibid.

66

for no other use trust or purpose whatsoever that is to Say intrust and for the only use and behoof of the said Thomas Creas and Mary his said Wife during the time of their natural lives and of the life of the longest liver of them without improachmt afor for any manner that & from suffer the death of the sd Thomas Creas and the sd Mary his sd Wife to the use and behoof of Daniel Maupin & Gabriel Maupin Sons of the sd Mary Creas by Gabriel Maupin late her husband deceased and of their heirs and assigns respectively until such time as they the said William Keith and Patrick Ferguson or the Survivor of them or the heirs or Assigns of such Survivor shall and do Sell and dispose of the sd Messuage Lot of Land & premisses. And it is hereby declared and agreed by and between all & Every the said parts to thesse presents that the said Messuage Lot of Land and premises Conveyed as above and to the said William Keith & Patrick Ferguson their Heirs & Assigns are so conveyed upon this further trust & Confidence in them reposed That the said Wi 11 i am Keith and Patrick Ferguson and the survivor of them & the heirs and Assigns of such Survivor shall and will as soon as Conveniently may be after the respective deaths of the sd Thomas Creas & the sd Mary his said Wife make Sale & dispose of the Messuage Lot of Land & premisses for the price that can bona fide gotten for the home & that the money ariseing by Such a Sale & by the Rents Issues & profits of the sd Messuage Lot of Land & premises in the mean time until such Sale all reasonable charges & Expenses being first deducted shall be paid one moiety thereafter to the sd Daniel Maupin his Executors & Admrs. and the other moiety 3 to the said Gabriel Maupin brother of the sd Daniel Maupin his Excrs. & Admrs. upon this proviso and Condition that at and upon the death of the sd Mary Creas they the said Daniel Maupin & Gabriel Maupin their respective Excrs. & Admrs. shall and do release acquit & discharge the Excrs. & Admrs. of the sd Mary Creas of and from all the Right claim and demand wch. they the sd Danl. Maupin & Gabriel Maupin or either of them their or either of their Excrs. or Admrs. shall or may have or lawfully claim of into or out of a Certain Legacy of fifty five pounds Current money of Virginia given and bequeathed to Mary Maupin deced Sister of the sd Daniel Maupin & Gabriel Maupin in and by the last Will and Testament of the sd Gabriel Maupin dece'd or to any part there of or in order all or any part or Share of the personal Estate of the sd Mary Maupin deced. And in case of either of them the said Daniel Maupin or Gabriel Maupin or their Several Excrs. or Admrs. shall refuse to give and execute such release and discharge as above mentioned that then & in Such Case they the said William Keith and Patrick Ferguson & the Survivor of them 3 moiety: One-half, two other joint tenants are said to take by moieties, ibid.

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and the heirs & Assigns of Such Survivor shall pay and Satisfy the said Moiety of the person refusing to give such Release and discharge as afore said unto the sd Thomas Creas his Excrs. & Admrs. to & for his & their own proper use & behoof And it is hereby further declared & agreed by & between all & Every of the partys to those presents that if after the death of the sd Mary Creas both of them the sd Daniel Maupin & Gabriel Maupin & their several Excrs. & Admrs. shall refuse to make & Execute Such Release & discharge as above said that those & from thenceforth they the sd William Keith &Patrick Ferguson their heirs & Assigns shall stand & be Seized of and in the said Messuage Lot of Land & premises to the Sole rise and behoof of the sd Thomas Creas his heirs & Assigns forever and to and for no other use or purpose whatsoever Provided always & it is hereby declared & fully agreed by & between all the sd parties to thesse presents that if the said Mary Creas shall happen to Survive the said Thomas Creas & shall at any time after that during her natural 1ife pay or bander unto the sd Wm. Keith & Patrick Ferguson or to either of them their or either of their heirs or Assigns the sum of one Shilling of lawful money the Curransy [sic] of Virginia for the making Void this present Indenture & the Grant to and of and in herein contained that then & from thenceforth this present Indenture to the Grants trusts & uses herein Contained shall cease and be void any thing herein Contained to the Contrary then Notwithstanding In Witness where of the parties first above named as thesse presents interchangeably their hands & Seals have Set the day & year first above written. Sealed & Delivered in presence of

Thomas Creas Mary Creas

(Seal) (Seal)

At Court held for York County Janry. the 18th 1724 Thomas Creas & Mary his Wife in open Court presented and acknowledged this their deed of Release of lands in Wmsburgh in this County to William Keith and Patrick Ferguson in trust and the said Mary being privately Examined freely Consented that the Houses & c in the said deed shall be sold to the uses therein mentioned wch. said deed is #######(at the said Keith & Ferguson's motion) admitted to record Phi Lightfoot Cl Cur This attorney certainly wanted to make sure that all the "t's" were crossed and the "i's" dotted! The examination for right of dower puts the document into the simplest of terms, i.e. Thomas and Mary Creas agreed to sell their property after their deaths to Keith and Ferguson.

68

Part I + Daniel, Son of Gabriel and Marie Maupin


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and the heirs & Assigns of Such Survivor shall pay and Satisfy the said Moiety of the person refusing to give such Release and discharge as afore said unto the sd Thomas Creas his Excrs. & Admrs. to & for his & their own proper use & behoof And it is hereby further declared & agreed by & between all & Every of the partys to those presents that if after the death of the sd Mary Creas both of them the sd Daniel Maupin & Gabriel Maupin & their several Excrs. & Admrs. shall refuse to make & Execute Such Release & discharge as above said that those & from thenceforth they the sd William Keith &Patrick Ferguson their heirs & Assigns shall stand & be Seized of and in the said Messuage Lot of Land & premises to the Sole rise and behoof of the sd Thomas Creas his heirs & Assigns forever and to and for no other use or purpose whatsoever Provided always & it is hereby declared & fully agreed by & between all the sd parties to thesse presents that if the said Mary Creas shall happen to Survive the said Thomas Creas & shall at any time after that during her natural life pay or bander unto the sd Wm. Keith & Patrick Ferguson or to either of them their or either of their heirs or Assigns the sum of one Shilling of lawful money the Curransy [sic] of Virginia for the making Void this present Indenture & the Grant to and of and in herein contained that then & from thenceforth this present Indenture to the Grants trusts & uses herein Contained shall cease and be void any thing herein Contained to the Contrary then Notwithstanding In Witness where of the parties first above named as thesse presents interchangeably their hands & Seals have Set the day & year first above written. Sealed & Delivered in presence of

Thomas Creas Mary Creas

(Seal) (Seal)

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This attorney certainly wanted to make sure that all the "t's" were crossed and the "i 's" dotted! The examination for right of dower puts the document into the simplest of terms, i.e. Thomas and Mary Creas agreed to sell their property after their deaths to Keith and Ferguson.

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At Court held for York County Janry. the 18th 1724 Thomas Creas & Mary his Wife in open Court presented and acknowledged this their deed of Release of lands in Wmsburgh in this County to William Keith and Patrick Ferguson in trust and the said Mary being privately Examined freely Consented that the Houses & c in the said deed shall be sold to the uses therein mentioned wch. said deed is #######(at the said Keith & Ferguson's motion) admitted to record

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DANIEL MAUPIN Son of Gabriel and Marie Hersent Maupin. On Wednesday, October 22, 1788, there appeared in the VIRGINIA INDEPENDENT CHRONICLE, a weekly newspaper published in Richmond, VA, the following obituary. It is in old style English with "s" written as an "f". On Friday the 20th ult. died at his feat in Albemarle DANIEL MAUPIN, who was born the 25th day of March in the year 1700. There is to be feen now living, of his offspring, upwards of 200, and the children of the fifth generation. His wife, now about the fame age, alive and hearty and never a female of her generation known to die under the age of 85 years that grew to be a woman. This very interesting and helpful piece of information was found by this writer at the Virginia State Library, Richmond, VA, in their old newspaper collection which has been put on film. Although it tells us when he was born it does not tell us WHERE Daniel was born but we do know that he was NOT born in Virginia because in the Headrights document he is reported by his father to have been "imported" with sisters, Magdalaine and Mary. From the baptismal records in Amsterdam of the first children born to Gabriel and Marie Maupin we find Daniel's birth on 25 March 1700 following true to the family birth pattern. It was the custom for the children to be baptized at the age of 2 or 3 weeks. The last three baptized in Amsterdam were Claude, April 4, 1694, Marie, April 16, 1696, and Sara, April 6, 1698 making their actual birth dates probably in March two years apart. Daniel continues the pattern, born 25 March 1700 and perhaps was baptized somewhere in April 1700. The obituary tells us also that his wife was "about the same age, alive and hearty". His wife was Margaret Via, believed to be the daughter of Amer Via from the Register of St. Peter's Parish in Hanover Co., VA, which records: "Judith, dau. of Amer Via baptized 11 Aug 1699; Margaret dau. of Amer Via baptized 3 Aug 1701; Mary, dau. of Amer Via, baptized 27 Feb 1703. Margaret survived her husband by one year and both are believed to be buried in the yard of their homestead. The date of their marriage is not known but certainly it must have been at an early age. And how did they meet if Daniel was in Williamsburg with his parents and Margaret in Hanover County? We know that Gabriel was granted 250 acres of land for himself, his wife and three children. This land was not In Williamsburg, possibly in Hanover County. Another mystery that is being investigated is: Who was the DANIEL MAUBAIN who was at Manakintown settlement as a tithable with a wife in 1710? Gabriel's name was spelled as Maupain on the ship passenger list. Could the "b" in

71


DANIEL MAUPIN Son of Gabriel and Marie Hersent Maupin. On Wednesday, October 22, 1788, there appeared in the VIRGINIA INDEPENDENT CHRONICLE, a weekly newspaper published in Richmond, VA, the following obituary. It is in old style English with "s" written as an "f".

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On Friday the 20th ult. died at his feat in Albemarle DANIEL MAUPIN, who was born the 25th day of March in the year 1700. There is to be feen now living, of his offspring, upwards of 200, and the children of the fifth generation. His wife, now about the fame age, alive and hearty and never a female of her generation known to die under the age of 85 years that grew to be a woman.

This very interesting and helpful piece of information was found by this writer at the Virginia State Library, Richmond, VA, in their old newspaper collection which has been put on film. Although it tells us when he was born it does not tell us WHERE Daniel was born but we do know that he was NOT born in Virginia because in the Headrights document he is reported by his father to have been "imported" with sisters, Magdalaine and Mary. From the baptismal records in Amsterdam of the first children born to Gabriel and Marie Maupin we find Daniel's birth on 25 March 1700 following true to the family birth pattern. It was the custom for the children to be baptized at the age of 2 or 3 weeks. The last three baptized in Amsterdam were Claude, April 4, 1694, Marie, April 16, 1696, and Sara, April 6, 1698 making their actual birth dates probably in March two years apart. Daniel continues the pattern, born 25 March 1700 and perhaps was baptized somewhere in April 1700. The obituary tells us also that his wife was "about the same age, alive and hearty". His wife was Margaret Via, believed to be the daughter of Amer Via from the Register of St. Peter's Parish in Hanover Co., VA, which records: "Judith, dau. of Amer Via baptized 11 Aug 1699; Margaret dau. of Amer Via baptized 3 Aug 1701; Mary, dau. of Amer Via, baptized 27 Feb 1703. Margaret survived her husband by one year and both are believed to be buried in the yard of their homestead. The date of their marriage is not known but certainly it must have been at an early age. And how did they meet if Daniel was in Williamsburg with his parents and Margaret in Hanover County? We know that Gabriel was granted 250 acres of land for himself, his wife and three children. This land was not in Williamsburg, possibly in Hanover County. Another mystery that is being investigated is: Who was the DANIEL MAUBAIN who was at Manakintown settlement as a tithable with a wife in 1710? Gabriel's name was spelled as Maupain on the ship passenger list. Could the "b" in

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this Daniel's name actually be "p" and a relative of Gabriel? Something could have drawn young Daniel to Hanover with Manakintown close by. It is recommended for those who want to know more about Manakintown to read "THE HUGUENOTS IN VIRGINIA" compiled by Richard L. Maury. It explains why most of the passengers from the ship Nasseau which brought our ancestors to Virginia did not go to Manakintown but scattered themselves elsewhere in Virginia. It is tradition that Daniel and Margaret's first son, Gabriel, was born in Williamsburg. That may be but it is believed that the other children were born in Hanover County which later became Louisa County. The children were raised there with two of their sons finding wives in Hanover, that is John and Daniel who married sisters, John married Frances Dabney and Daniel, Elizabeth Dabney, both daughters of Cornelius Dabney (d'Aubigne). With the Maupins French ancestry and their Dabney wives would it not be interesting to be able to hear their conversations - would it be French, English or a combination? And how were they taught in that remote region? One thing we can feel sure about Daniel and Margaret Maupin were of sturdy stock with all their children living to adulthood except one, Thomas. Each child with their large families will be covered in a separate section. They are: (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14)

Gabriel John Daniel Thomas William Zachariah Jesse Mary Jean Margaret -

married Ann Ballard married Frances Dabney married Elizabeth Dabney died unmarried married Mildred Mary White married Elizabeth Jarman married Lucy Jones married Matthew Mullins married Samuel Rea married Robert Miller

The last record of the family in Louisa County is May 1745.

The next extant record of Daniel Maupin Sr., is found in the Virginia Land Grant Register, Book 31, page 652. Here we find a grant to him of 1188 acres of land on Moormans River in Albemarle County. The date of this grant was Sept. 20th 1745. He did not occupy this land immediately and Dr. Socrates Maupin says the date of his arrival in Albemarle was probably 1749. However, it is more likely that he located in the county in 1747 as he purchased 320 acres of land, including a dwelling house, from Thomas Moorman in that year. Moorman was the first

settler in that section and was the original patentee of the land whereon the old home of Daniel Maupin was located. It was near the present site of Whitehall and on Moorman's River.

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When Daniel Maupin removed from Hanover to Albemarle he found the latter county on the frontier of white settlement. The county had just been organized and contained about 4000 inhabitants, black and white. But these settlers were not all in the confines of Albemarle as it is today. At that date Albemarle included Buckingham, Amherst, Nelson, Fluvanna, and parts of Appomattox and Campbell. The settlers on Moorman's River had to make a long disagreeable journey to the James in order to reach their supplies, and it was not until eighteen years after the settlement of Maupin in Albemarle that Charlottesville was laid out. Schools and churches were not to be found for several years and the schools when they did come were of a very primary nature. It is believed that the first Methodist church in the county was built on the lands of Daniel Maupin about 1770 or 1771. There is little certainty of this but it is known that the next Methodist church of the community was built on his land and was known as Maupin's Meeting House. This was the predecessor of the Mt. Moriah Methodist Church which stands on a lot deeded by Daniel's grandson, Saddler Daniel Maupin. Whitehall was first known as Maupin's Store and was owned by William Maupin, probably Daniel Maupin's son. During the revolution, some of the British troops captured at Saratoga were sent to Albemarle to be held until they were paroled or until the end of the war. Their barracks were not far from the home of Daniel Maupin. One of the British officers, a Thomas Anbury, published a series of letters concerning this period of confinement in Albemarle. In this way we may get a contemporary picture of the times, customs and of the country in general as they were shortly before the death of Daniel Maupin Sr., in 1788. Anbury was an enemy of our country and we may expect to find his descriptions overdrawn to our forefather's detriment but, allowing for this, we may see Albemarle, the cradle of the Daniel Maupin family, as it was over one hundred and fifty years ago. Says Anbury:"On our arrival in Charlottesville, no pen can describe the scene of misery and confusion that ensued; the officers of the First and Second brigades were in town and on our arrival added to their distress. This famous place we had heard so much about, consisted only of a courthouse, one tavern and about a dozen houses, all of which were crowded with officers. The bridges

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this Daniel's name actually be "p" and a relative of Gabriel? Something could have drawn young Daniel to Hanover with Manakintown close by. It is recommended for those who want to know more about Manakintown to read "THE HUGUENOTS IN VIRGINIA" compiled by Richard L. Maury. It explains why most of the passengers from the ship Nasseau which brought our ancestors to Virginia did not go to Manakintown but scattered themselves elsewhere in Virginia. It is tradition that Daniel and Margaret's first son, Gabriel, was born in Williamsburg. That may be but it is believed that the other children were born in Hanover County which later became Louisa County. The children were raised there with two of their sons finding wives in Hanover, that is John and Daniel who married sisters, John married Frances Dabney and Daniel, Elizabeth Dabney, both daughters of Cornelius Dabney (d'Aubigne). With the Maupins French ancestry and their Dabney wives would it not be interesting to be able to hear their conversations - would it be French, English or a combination? And how were they taught in that remote region? One thing we can feel sure about Daniel and Margaret Maupin were of sturdy stock with all their children living to adulthood except one, Thomas. Each child with their large families will be covered in a separate section. They are: (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) ( 14)

Gabriel John Daniel Thomas William Zachariah Jesse Mary Jean Margaret

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married Ann Ballard married Frances Dabney married Elizabeth Dabney died unmarried married Mildred Mary White married Elizabeth Jarman married Lucy Jones married Matthew Mullins married Samuel Rea married Robert Miller

The last record of the family in Louisa County is May 1745.

The next extant record of Daniel Maupin Sr., is found in the Virginia Land Grant Register, Book 31, page 652. Here we find a grant to him of 1188 acres of land on Moormans River in Albemarle County. The date of this grant was Sept. 20th 1745. He did not occupy this land immediately and Dr. Socrates Maupin says the date of his arrival in Albemarle was probably 1749. However, it is more likely that he located in the county in 1747 as he purchased 320 acres of land, including a dwelling house, from Thomas Moorman in that year. Moorman was the first

72

settler in that section and was the original patentee of the land whereon the old home of Daniel Maupin was located. It was near the present site of Whitehall and on Moorman's River.

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When Daniel Maupin removed from Hanover to Albemarle he found the latter county on the frontier of white settlement. The county had just been organized and contained about 4000 inhabitants, black and white. But these settlers were not all in the confines of Albemarle as it is today. At that date Albemarle included Buckingham, Amherst, Nelson, Fluvanna, and parts of Appomattox and Campbell. The settlers on Moorman's River had to make a long disagreeable journey to the James in order to reach their supplies, and it was not until eighteen years after the settlement of Maupin in Albemarle that Charlottesville was laid out. Schools and churches were not to be found for several years and the schools when they did come were of a very primary nature. It is believed that the first Methodist church in the county was built on the lands of Daniel Maupin about 1770 or 1771. There is little certainty of this but it is known that the next Methodist church of the community was built on his land and was known as Maupin's Meeting House. This was the predecessor of the Mt. Moriah Methodist Church which stands on a lot deeded by Daniel's grandson, Saddler Daniel Maupin. Whitehall was first known as Maupin's Store and was owned by William Maupin, probably Daniel Maupin's son. During the revolution, some of the British troops captured at Saratoga were sent to Albemarle to be held until they were paroled or until the end of the war. Their barracks were not far from the home of Daniel Maupin. One of the British officers, a Thomas Anbury, published a series of letters concerning this period of confinement in Albemarle. In this way we may get a contemporary picture of the times, customs and of the country in general as they were shortly before the death of Daniel Maupin Sr., in 1788. Anbury was an enemy of our country and we may expect to find his descriptions overdrawn to our forefather's detriment but, allowing for this, we may see Albemarle, the cradle of the Daniel Maupin family, as it was over one hundred and fifty years ago. Says Anbury:"On our arrival in Charlottesville, no pen can describe the scene of misery and confusion that ensued; the officers of the First and Second brigades were in town and on our arrival added to their distress. This famous place we had heard so much about, consisted only of a courthouse, one tavern and about a dozen houses, all of which were crowded with officers. The bridges

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were terrific, being only so many rough logs laid across beams without any safeguards on either side." He writes that the place where he was quartered was on an eminence commanding a prospect of thirty miles. The face of the country appeared as an immense forest, interspersed with plantations, four or five miles apart. He adds further, "The plantations are scattered here and there over the land, which is thickly covered with timber. On these there is a dwelling house in the center, with kitchen, smokehouse and other outhouses detached, and from various buildings each plantation has the appearance of a small village. At some distance from the houses are peach and apple orchards, and scattered over the plantation are negro huts, tobacco barns, which are large and built of wood for the cure of that article. The houses are most of them built of wood, the roof being covered with shingles, and not always lathed and plastered within; only those of the better sort are finished in that manner and painted on the outside; the chimneys are of brick but the generality of them are wood, coated on the inside with clay; the windows of the better sort are glazed, the rest of them having only wooden shutters. All taverns consist of a little house placed in a solitary situation in the middle of the woods. The entertainment there is very poor indeed; you are seldom able to procure other fare than bacon and eggs with Indian hoecake. The only liquors are peach brandy and whiskey. The majority of the inhabitants are, however, hospitable, generous and friendly; but want of proper knowledge of the world, and a good education as well as from their continual intercourse with their staves, over whom they are accustomed to tyrannize, with all their good qualities they are rude, ferocious and haughty, much addicted to gaming, and dissipation, particularly horse racing and cock fighting. In short, they form a most unaccountable combination of qualities, directly opposite and contradictory, many having them strangely blended with the best and worst of principles, many possessing elegant accomplishments and savage brutalities; and notwithstanding all of this inconsistency of character, numbers are valuable members of the community and few are deficient in intellectual faculties. Another class, a lower class, although rude, illiberal and noisy with a turbulent disposition, are generous, kind and hospitable, we imagine there is something peculiar in the climate of Virginia that renders all classes so hospitable in disposition." This picture, drawn by the pen of this British prisoner, gives us an insight into the lives and customs of those early days and

74

perhaps explains many of the traits and customs of the descendants of those pioneers of AI bemarte of almost two hundred years ago. From yet another source we may gather a few ideas of the life of those Virginians in the days of Daniel Maupin Sr. Charles Brown of Albemarle tells of those times in a letter written in 1848. His grandfather was Benjamin Brown of Brown's Cove, a neighbor of Daniel Maupin, who settled in the county at about the same time. His wife was a niece of Margaret Via, wife of Daniel, and no doubt the families were intimate and lived much the same kind of life. At the time of the settlement of the two families in the locality, Mr. Brown says the top of the Blue Ridge was the boundary line between the whites and the Indians. The latter were friendly and came often to visit with the settlers. Game was abundant at the time of the first settlement and buffalos were to be seen west of the ridge at tong intervals. The distance to a market was the greatest obstacle to prosperity in northwestern Albemarle but with the building of the roads and the founding of Charlottesville a great change for the better took place. According to Mr. Brown, Charlottesville was founded as follows: when the legislature agreed to divide Albemarle, which consisted of several of the counties of today, the courthouse was at Scottsville. As this was too far from the center of the new county, the legislature made Dr. Thomas Walker the agent to select the site of the new courthouse. Dr. Walker rode direct from Williamsburg to the home of Col. Nicholas Lewis, bought the land where Charlottesville now stands, laid off its streets and lots, fixed the site for the new courthouse, sold the lots for the new town and with the money received from the sate, built the courthouse,a county jail and paid the county levy for two years. Speaking of the main road to the James, he says, "The old Three Notched Road was the main center of travel by which the settlers of the northwestern part of Albemarle reached a market on the river. Charlesville was laid out on this road and from that point it led to Ivy Creek thence to Woods' Gap where there was a considerable settlement. The route was called the Three Notched Road because of the old trees between Charlottesville and Meechums". (1848) Along this road and to the north near Nixville, were the homes of the descendants of Daniel Maupin. Dr. Brown says further, "My recollection of the years following the Revolution are vivid. The people ate little meat except pork although they sometimes had beef in the fall and, at rare intervals, venison or bear meat. The main vegetables were cabbage, turnips, and Irish potatoes. Between 1795 and 1800, a few people began to grow beets, carrots, parsnips and tomatoes

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were terrific, being only so many rough togs laid across beams without any safeguards on either side." He writes that the place where he was quartered was on an eminence commanding a prospect of thirty mites. The face of the country appeared as an immense forest, interspersed with plantations, four or five miles apart. He adds further, "The plantations are scattered here and there over the land, which is thickly covered with timber. On these there is a dwelling house in the center, with kitchen, smokehouse and other outhouses detached, and from various buildings each plantation has the appearance of a small village. At some distance from the houses are peach and apple orchards, and scattered over the plantation are negro huts, tobacco barns, which are large and built of wood for the cure of that article. The houses are most of them built of wood, the roof being covered with shingles, and not always lathed and plastered within; only those of the better sort are finished in that manner and painted on the outside; the chimneys are of brick but the generality of them are wood, coated on the inside with clay; the windows of the better sort are glazed, the rest of them having only wooden shutters. All taverns consist of a little house placed in a solitary situation in the middle of the woods. The entertainment there is very poor indeed; you are seldom able to procure other fare than bacon and eggs with Indian hoecake. The only liquors are peach brandy and whiskey. The majority of the inhabitants are, however, hospitable, generous and friendly; but want of proper knowledge of the world, and a good education as well as from their continual intercourse with their slaves, over whom they are accustomed to tyrannize, with all their good qualities they are rude, ferocious and haughty, much addicted to gaming, and dissipation, particularly horse racing and cock fighting. In short, they form a most unaccountable combination of qualities, directly opposite and contradictory, many having them strangely blended with the best and worst of principles, many possessing elegant accomplishments and savage brutalities; and notwithstanding all of this inconsistency of character, numbers are valuable members of the community and few are deficient in intellectual faculties. Another class, a lower class, although rude, illiberal and noisy with a turbulent disposition, are generous, kind and hospitable, we imagine there is something peculiar in the climate of Virginia that renders all classes so hospitable in disposition." This picture, drawn by the pen of this British prisoner, gives us an insight into the lives and customs of those early days and

74

perhaps explains many of the traits and customs of the descendants of those pioneers of AI bemarle of almost two hundred years ago. From yet another source we may gather a few ideas of the life of those Virginians in the days of Daniel Maupin Sr. Charles Brown of Albemarle tells of those times in a letter written In 1848. His grandfather was Benjamin Brown of Brown's cove, a neighbor of Daniel Maupin, who settled in the county at about the same time. His wife was a niece of Margaret Via, wife of Daniel, and no doubt the families were intimate and lived much the same kind of life. At the time of the settlement of the two families in the locality, Mr. Brown says the top of the Blue Ridge was the boundary tine between the whites and the Indians. The latter were friendly and came often to visit with the settlers. Game was abundant at the time of the first settlement and buffatos were to be seen west of the ridge at tong intervals. The distance to a market was the greatest obstacle to prosperity in northwestern Albemarle but with the building of the roads and the founding of Charlottesville a great change for the better took place. According to Mr. Brown, Charlottesville was founded as follows: when the legislature agreed to divide Albemarle, which consisted of several of the counties of today, the courthouse was at Scottsville. As this was too far from the center of the new county, the legislature made Dr. Thomas Walker the agent to select the site of the new courthouse. Dr. Waf ker rode direct from Williamsburg to the home of Cot. Nicholas Lewis, bought the land where Charlottesville now stands, laid off its streets and lots, fixed the site for the new courthouse, sold the tots for the new town and with the money received from the sale, built the courthouse,a county jail and paid the county levy for two years. Speaking of the main road to the James, he says, "The old Three Notched Road was the main center of travel by which the settlers of the northwestern part of Albemarle reached a market on the river. Chartesville was laid out on this road and from that point it led to Ivy Creek thence to Woods' Gap where there was a considerable settlement. The route was called the Three Notched Road because of the old trees between Charlottesville and Meechums". (1848) Along this road and to the north near Nixville, were the homes of the descendants of Daniel Maupin. Dr. Brown says further, "My recollection of the years following the Revolution are vivid. The people ate little meat except pork although they sometimes had beef in the fall and, at rare intervals, venison or bear meat. The main vegetables were cabbage, turnips, and Irish potatoes. Between 1795 and 1800, a few people began to grow beets, carrots, parsnips and tomatoes

75


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but few people would eat any of the latter and considered parsnips and tomatoes poison. Tea was drunk at all times but I believe there was no coffee used prior to 1798. Brown sugar was used, perhaps fifty or a hundred pounds a year." The Indians were never troublesome in Albemarle but during the Colonial Wars they were very threatening along the western boundary and a company of troops was raised to protect the frontier and for service in Augusta where constant Indian raids were taking place. This company was organized In 1758 and three of Daniel Maupin's sons, a son-in-law and two grandsons were members of this company. They were John, Daniel Jr., and William Maupin, Matthew Mullins and his two sons, William and John Mullins was the husband of Daniel Maupin's eldest daughter, Mary Maupin (12). When the Revolution came, these three sons were again members of this company of State troops and Matthew Mullins and Robert Miller, Daniel's son-in-laws, served in the Continental Army as did several of his grandsons, two of whom were killed in battle. Old Daniel lived to see the nation established, dying in 1788. It is said that he had almost two hundred descendants living in a radius of twenty miles of him at the time of his death. This no doubt is an exaggeration but when one counts the wives and husbands of his descendants, it can be seen that it would run to a large figure. Daniel was buried in the yard of his old homestead and the next year, 1789, his wife, Margaret, was buried by his side. They were the last connecting link with the old world and henceforth the family was American by birth rather than by adoption. The estate of Daniel Maupin comprised 1500 acres lying along Moorman's River, some of which is still in the hands of the family. His descendants seem to have inherited a love of the land from Daniel and his wife, for a great majority of them have remained on the land, and many of them hold farms which have descended from father to son for generations. Daniel Maupin's will was probated Oct. 9th 1788, and was recorded at Charlottesville. A copy of the will is as follows: "In the name of God, Amen, I Daniel Maupin Senior, of Albemarle County, being in a low state of health, but of perfect mind and memory, leave this my last will and testament: I give and bequeath to my lawful wife, Margaret, all of my estate, real and personal, during her widowhood. And I give to son, Gabriel Maupin, and equal part of my estate; and I give to my son, Thomas, an equal part of my estate; and I give to my son, John Maupin, and equal part of my estate; and I give to my son, Daniel Maupin, an equal part of my estate; and I give to my son, William Maupin, an equal part of my estate; and I give to my son, Zachariah Maupin, an equal part of my estate; and I give to my son, Zachariah, five pounds extraordinary more than the rest of

76

my children; and I give to my son Jesse Maupin an equal part of my estate; and I give to my daughter, Mary Mullins, an equal part of my estate; and I give to my daughter, Jean Rea, an equal part of my estate; and I give to my daughter, Margaret Miller, an equal part of my estate; and my desire and will is, if there cannot be an equal division of my estate between my sons and daughters, that my estate may be sold at public auction and the money equally divided amongst my sons and daughters, and this being my last will, I hereby appoint my son John Maupin, his son, Daniel Maupin, and Maxey Ewell executors of this my last will. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my had this 26th day of August 1788. Daniel X Maupin William Jarman, Lewis Davis Jr., James Cone Teste. John Nicholas C.G.C. A copy. Teste W.L. Maupin, Clerk 1922 Before leaving a general history of the family, it may be worth while to give a little space to a general survey of the services of its members during our country's wars. Mention has been made of the several of the family who fought in the Revolution. A complete list is not possible at this date but from the names given it can be seen that over half of the able bodied men of the family fought for American Independence. It is a record of which the Maupins may well be proud. In the Civil War, as large a percentage followed the battle flags of the Confederacy from Bull Run to Appomattox. A Southern family, born and bred in a part of the nation where a state's rights were held as inviolable as an individual's liberty, it is little wonder that over fourscore Maupins and those of Maupin descent and lineage were found In the ranks of the South and not one on the opposing side. Virginia and Kentucky sent out the most of these Maupins to the ranks of the Confederate army, but the name was represented among the troops of almost every Southern state.

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Many Maupin families were almost wiped out by their casualties during this terrible war and the property loss of the family was enormous. Maupin blood was shed on most of the principal battlefields of the war, five losing their lives at Gettysburg. Two young Maupins died on the "Stone Wall" at Gettysburg in Pickett's Charge, and over a score of the name and lineage followed Gen. Morgan in his Ohio and Indiana raid, the Confederacy's farthest north. In the war of 1812, several Maupins participated. In the Spanish-American War, four of the name were engaged and one, Socrates Maupin, lost his life at Santiago, Aug. 13th 1898. During the World War, the Maupins furnished their quota, one Missouri County alone sending six. Our war record is excelled by no other family in America, and equalled by very few.

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but few people would eat any of the latter and considered parsnips and tomatoes poison. Tea was drunk at all times but I believe there was no coffee used prior to 1798. Brown sugar was used, perhaps fifty or a hundred pounds a year." The Indians were never troublesome in Albemarle but during the Colonial Wars they were very threatening along the western boundary and a company of troops was raised to protect the frontier and for service in Augusta where constant Indian raids were taking place. This company was organized in 1758 and three of Daniel Maupin's sons, a son-in-law and two grandsons were members of this company. They were John, Daniel Jr., and William Maupin, Matthew Mullins and his two sons, William and John Mullins was the husband of Daniel Maupin's eldest daughter, Mary Maupin (12). When the Revolution came, these three sons were again members of this company of State troops and Matthew Mullins and Robert Miller, Daniel's son-in-laws, served in the Continental Army as did several of his grandsons, two of whom were killed in battle. Old Daniel lived to see the nation established, dying in 1788. It is said that he had almost two hundred descendants living in a radius of twenty miles of him at the time of his death. This no doubt is an exaggeration but when one counts the wives and husbands of his descendants, it can be seen that it would run to a large figure. Daniel was buried in the yard of his old homestead and the next year, 1789, his wife, Margaret, was buried by his side. They were the last connecting link with the old world and henceforth the family was American by birth rather than by adoption. The estate of Daniel Maupin comprised 1500 acres lying along Moorman's River, some of which is still in the hands of the family. His descendants seem to have inherited a love of the land from Daniel and his wife, for a great majority of them have remained on the land, and many of them hold farms which have descended from father to son for generations. Daniel Maupin's will was probated Oct. 9th 1788, and was recorded at Charlottesville. A copy of the will is as follows: "In the name of God, Amen, I Daniel Maupin Senior, of Albemarle County, being in a low state of health, but of perfect mind and memory, leave this my last will and testament: I give and bequeath to my lawful wife, Margaret, all of my estate, real and personal, during her widowhood. And I give to son, Gabriel Maupin, and equal part of my estate; and I give to my son, Thomas, an equal part of my estate; and I give to my son, John Maupin, and equal part of my estate; and I give to my son, Daniel Maupin, an equal part of my estate; and I give to my son, William Maupin, an equal part of my estate; and I give to my son, Zachariah Maupin, an equal part of my estate; and I give to my son, Zachariah, five pounds extraordinary more than the rest of

76

my children; and I give to my son Jesse Maupin an equal part of my estate; and I give to my daughter, Mary Mullins, an equal part of my estate; and I give to my daughter, Jean Rea, an equal part of my estate; and I give to my daughter, Margaret Miller, an equal part of my estate; and my desire and will is, if there cannot be an equal division of my estate between my sons and daughters, that my estate may be sold at public auction and the money equally divided amongst my sons and daughters, and this being my last will, I hereby appoint my son John Maupin, his son, Daniel Maupin, and Maxey Ewell executors of this my last will. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my had this 26th day of August 1788. Daniel X Maupin William Jarman, Lewis Davis Jr., James Cone Teste. John Nicholas C.G.C. A copy. Teste W.L. Maupin, Clerk 1922

Before leaving a general history of the family, it may be worth while to give a little space to a general survey of the services of its members during our country's wars. Mention has been made of the several of the family who fought in the Revolution. A complete list is not possible at this date but from the names given it can be seen that over half of the able bodied men of the family fought for American Independence. It is a record of which the Maupins may well be proud. In the Civil War, as large a percentage followed the battle flags of the Confederacy from Bull Run to Appomattox. A Southern family, born and bred in a part of the nation where a state's rights were held as inviolable as an individual's liberty, it is little wonder that over fourscore Maupins and those of Maupin descent and lineage were found In the ranks of the South and not one on the opposing side. Virginia and Kentucky sent out the most of these Maupins to the ranks of the Confederate army, but the name was represented among the troops of almost every Southern state. Many Maupin families were almost wiped out by their casualties during this terrible war and the property loss of the family was enormous. Maupin blood was shed on most of the principal battlefields of the war, five losing their lives at Gettysburg. Two young Maupins died on the "Stone Wall" at Gettysburg in Pickett's Charge, and over a score of the name and lineage followed Gen. Morgan in his Ohio and Indiana raid, the Confederacy's farthest north. In the war of 1812, several Maupins participated. In the Spanish-American War, four of the name were engaged and one, Socrates Maupin, lost his life at Santiago, Aug. 13th 1898. During the World War, the Maupins furnished their quota, one Missouri County alone sending six. Our war record is excelled by no other family in America, and equalled by very few.

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PARTIAL LIST OF MAUPINS SERVING IN THE REVOLUTION

The following members of the Maupin family were with the Virginia troops during the colonial wars just preceding the Revolution. The wars were usually known as the French and Indian Wars:

Daniel Maupin (8)

Daniel Maupin (8) John Maupin (7) William Maupin (9) Matthew Mullins

William Maupin (9)

John Mullins William Mullins

served in Albemarle militia. served In Albemarle militia. served in Albemarle militia. husband of Mary Maupin (12). Served with the Albemarle troops. son of Matthew and Mary Mullins. He also served with the local Albemarle troops. brother of John Mullins and son of Mary Maupin (12). he also served in the Revolutionary army and was killed in battle.

Daniel Maupin (3) is supposed to have received his land grants in Albemarle for services in Indian troubles in the lower counties. No records seem to be available of the actions of the Albemarle militia company. The Indians became very threatening In Augusta County and the AI bemarle Company was formed to go to the assistance of the settlers in the adjoining counties. Chapman White Maupin, grandson of William Maupin (9), named above, says the company marched to Staunton where they joined a larger force of volunteers. If they were engaged with the Indians, he did not learn of it from his grandfather.

John Maupin (7)

Robert Miller

Matthew Mullins

William Mullins Gabriel Mullins Matthew Mullins

Cornelius Maupin

David Maupin Daniel Maupin (19)

William Maupin (21)

Son of Daniel Maupin and Margaret Via. Died previous to pension law. Served in Albemarle militia. Son of Daniel (3). Served In Virginia troops as an officer. McAllister's Virginia Militia, page 176 State Librarian's Report; page 67 Crozier's Colonial Militia. Son of Daniel (3). See Wood's History of Albemarle and Gilmer papers for services in Albemarle Militia. Son-in-law of Daniel (3). Continental Army, Capt. Reed's Company of the regiment of Col. Lewis of Albemarle. Son-in-law of Daniel (3). Sergeant in Capt. Croghan's Company of 4th, 8th and 12th Virginia under Col. Jas. Woods. Son of Mary Maupin (12) Continental Army. Killed in battle. Son of Mary Maupin (12) Continental Army. Pension Office records. Son of Mary Maupin (12). Served In VA Regiment of Col. Richardson, later commanded by Col. Lindsey. Fought at Yorktown. Pension Office records. Son of John (7). Served as private in company of Capt. Henry Burk under Major Nicholas Lewis of AI bemarle. Pension Office records. Son of Gabriel (6). Paid by certificate No. _ _ _ __ Son of John (7). Private In the company of Capt. Isaac Davis of the regiment of Col. Reuben Lindsey. Pension Office records. Son of John (7). Served in Virginia campaign and siege of Yorktown. Pension Office records.

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MAUPINS IN COLONIAL WARS

The following members of the Maupin family were with the Virginia troops during the colonial wars just preceding the Revolution. The wars were usually known as the French and Indian Wars: Daniel Maupin (8) John Maupin (7) William Maupin (9) Matthew Mullins John Mullins William Mullins

served in Albemarle militia. served In Albemarle militia. served in Albemarle militia. husband of Mary Maupin (12). Served with the Albemarle troops. son of Matthew and Mary Mullins. He also served with the local AI bemarle troops. brother of John Mullins and son of Mary Maupin (12). he also served in the Revolutionary army and was killed in battle.

Daniel Maupin (3) is supposed to have received his land grants in Albemarle for services in Indian troubles in the lower counties. No records seem to be available of the actions of the Albemarle militia company. The Indians became very threatening In Augusta County and the Albemarle Company was formed to go to the assistance of the settlers in the adjoining counties. Chapman White Maupin, grandson of William Maupin (9), named above, says the company marched to Staunton where they joined a larger force of volunteers. If they were engaged with the Indians, he did not learn of it from his grandfather.

PARTIAL LIST OF MAUPINS SERVING IN THE REVOLUTION

John Maupin (7) Daniel Maupin (8)

William Maupin (9)

Robert Miller

Matthew Mullins

William Mullins Gabriel Mullins Matthew Mullins

Cornelius Maupin

David Maupin Daniel Maupin (19)

William Maupin (21)

Son of Daniel Maupin and Margaret Via. Died previous to pension law. Served in Albemarle militia. Son of Daniel (3). Served In Virginia troops as an officer. McAllister's Virginia Militia, page 176 State Librarian's Report; page 67 Crozier's Colonial Militia. Son of Daniel (3). See Wood's History of Albemarle and Gilmer papers for services in Albemarle Militia. Son-in-law of Daniel (3). Continental Army, Capt. Reed's Company of the regiment of Col. Lewis of Albemarle. Son-in-law of Daniel (3). Sergeant in Capt. Croghan's Company of 4th, 8th and 12th Virginia under Col. Jas. Woods. Son of Mary Maupin (12) Continental Army. Killed in battle. Son of Mary Maupin (12) Continental Army. Pension Office records. Son of Mary Maupin (12). Served in VA Regiment of Col. Richardson, later commanded by Col. Lindsey. Fought at Yorktown. Pension Office records. Son of John (7). Served as private in company of Capt. Henry Burk under Major Nicholas Lewis of 路 Albemarle. Pension Office records. Son of Gabriel (6). Paid by certificate No. _ _ _ __ Son of John (7). Private In the company of Capt. Isaac Davis of the regiment of Col. Reuben lindsey. Pension Office records. Son of John (7). Served In Virginia campaign and siege of Yorktown. Pension Office records.

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Daniel Ma~pin (27)

Thomas Maupin (36)

Nicholas Maupin Gabriel Maupin (5)

Gabriel Maupin

Served throughout the war and took part in all battles from 1778 to Yorktown. Washington's messenger at Valley Forge. His great vitality during that trying period earned his name of "Tough Daniel Maupin". Son of Zachariah (10). Served in the company of Capt. John Miller under Col. Lindsey. Severely wounded in battle. Pension Office records. A grandson of Gabriel (6). Pension Office records. Captain in American army. Commanded the arsenal at Williamsburg. Granted lands by Virginia legislature for his services. Son of Capt. Gabriel Maupin (5). Granted lands In Kentucky for services in Virginia during the Revolution. Killed by Indians while trying to occupy his lands.

References Miller's History and Genealogies. McAllister's Virginia Militia in the Revolutionary War. Crozier's Colonial Militia. Virginia Land Grants for War Services. Wood's History of Albemarle. The Gi I mer Papers.

1~ MAUPINS FROM VIRGINIA TO KENTUCKY Daniel Maupin, oldest son of Gabriel Maupin, the emigrant, settled in Albemarle County, Virginia about the middle of the eighteenth century and was the founder of the family in that region. He reared a large family of children, many brave and brawny sons, who helped mightily in defending the frontier against the troublesome Indians and also took part in the French and Indian Wars. Old Daniel furnished several sons and grandsons to the American army during the Revolution, and these fought most valiantly for the overthrow of British rule and for liberty and freedom, a great many of this old pioneer's children remained in Virginia, but one of his sons, Daniel, and many of his children's children left their native home in Albemarle and came to Kentucky, settling in various places but mostly in Madison County. In their new home they exhibited the same spirit of patriotism and good citizenship as marked the family in Virginia. In the Kentucky wilderness they repeated the struggle against the Indians, the wild beasts and the forests such as their fathers had made while making Albemarle a civilized county of the old Dominion. Many of these Madison County Maupins later removed to Missouri but the Maupins that remained were many and their characteristics were the same no matter where they lived, whether it was in Mother Virginia, daughter Kentucky, or in Missouri, the last of the trio of states to be settled by these stalwart pioneers of the Blue Ridge. Ever you find the Maupin family full of high spirit, courageous, lovers of sport, true to their friends, generous to a fault, and, whatever their faults may be, they do not exceed the faults of other good families. No one, rich or poor, high or low, ever entered their portals without being received with hospitality and made to feel at home. The latch string always hangs on the outside of the home of a Maupin. They will not turn a hungry man away from their door without food and if he is naked they will cloth him. This is a well-known Maupin characteristic.

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Capt. H. c. Michie of Charlottesville, VA, who as captain of Company H, 56th Virginia infantry, led his men over the Stone Wall at Gettysburg, says:-"It was my good fortune to have several of the Maupin name in my Company during the Civil War. Whether in camp or on the march, or in battle, they were always ready for any duty, and no soldier carried his bayonet further in battle. Two of these gallant fellows, Corporal David Maupin and Carson Maupin, were killed at the "High Watermark" of the Rebellion (so called by the Yankees) in the charge of Pickett's Division at Gettysburg, and Serg. Jas. R. Maupin was wounded and captured at the same battle. Some of these gallant fellows

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Thomas Maupin (36)

Nicholas Maupin Gabriel Maupin (5)

Gabriel Maupin

Served throughout the war and took part In all battles from 1778 to Yorktown. Washington's messenger at Valley Forge. His great vitality during that trying period earned his name of "Tough Daniel Maupin". Son of Zachariah (10). Served In the company of Capt. John Miller under Col. Lindsey. Severely wounded In battle. Pension Office records. A grandson of Gabriel (6). Pension Office records. Captain in American army. Commanded the arsenal at Williamsburg. Granted lands by Virginia legislature for his services. Son of Capt. Gabriel Maupin (5). Granted lands In Kentucky for services in Virginia during the Revolution. Killed by Indians while trying to occupy his lands.

References Miller's History and Genealogies. McAllister's Virginia Militia in the Revolutionary War. Crozier's Colonial Militia. Virginia Land Grants for War Services. Wood's History of AI bemarle. The Gilmer Papers.

MAUPINS FROM VIRGINIA TO KENTUCKY Daniel Maupin, oldest son of Gabriel Maupin, the emigrant, settled in Albemarle County, Virginia about the middle of the eighteenth century and was the founder of the family in that region. He reared a large family of children, many brave and brawny sons, who helped mightily in defending the frontier against the troublesome indians and also took part in the French and Indian Wars. Old Daniel furnished several sons and grandsons to the American army during the Revolution, and these fought most valiantly for the overthrow of British rule and for liberty and freedom, a great many of this old pioneer's children remained in Virginia, but one of his sons, Daniel, and many of his children's children left their native home in Albemarle and came to Kentucky, settling in various places but mostly in Madison County. In their new home they exhibited the same spirit of patriotism and good citizenship as marked the family In Virginia. In the Kentucky wilderness they repeated the struggle against the Indians, the wild beasts and the forests such as their fathers had made while making Albemarle a civilized county of the old Dominion. Many of these Madison County Mauplns later removed to Missouri but the Maupins that remained were many and their characteristics were the same no matter where they lived, whether it was in Mother Virginia, daughter Kentucky, or in Missouri, the last of the trio of states to be settled by these stalwart pioneers of the Blue Ridge. Ever you find the Maupin family full of high spirit, courageous, lovers of sport, true to their friends, generous to a fault, and, whatever their faults may be, they do not exceed the faults of other good families. No one, rich or poor, high or low, ever entered their portals without being received with hospitality and made to feel at home. The latch string always hangs on the outside of the home of a Maupin. They will not turn a hungry man away from their door without food and If he is naked they will cloth him. This is a well-known Maupin characteristic. Capt. H. C. Michie of Charlottesville, VA, who as captain of Company H, 56th VIrginia infantry, led his men over the Stone Wall at Gettysburg, says:-"It was my good fortune to have several of the Maupin name in my Company during the Civil War. Whether in camp or on the march, or in battle, they were always ready for any duty, and no soldier carried his bayonet further in battle. Two of these gallant fellows, Corporal David Maupin and Carson Maupin, were killed at the "High Watermark" of the Rebellion (so called by the Yankees) in the charge of Pickett's Division at Gettysburg, and Serg. Jas. R. Maupin was wounded and captured at the same battle. Some of these gallant fellows

80

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left their blood on nearly every battle fought on Virginia or Maryland soil. One of them as a lieutenant of his company - a company which left thirteen dead at Gettysburg. There were many of the name in other companies of the Army of Northern Virginia and I never heard that there was a drone among them." H. c. Michie, Brigadier-General of Confederate Veterans. And we find the Madison County soldiers of the Maupin line and name, the same kind of fighters. Scores of them followed Gen. Morgan on his daring raid into Ohio, accomplishing a feat unparalleled in history. Three weeks in the saddle without rest or sleep except what they could get on horseback while on the march, and the horses they rode had nothing but what they could snatch up on the move - a bundle of oats there or a mouthful of wheat here. In times of peace, the families would be found in their homes, which they greatly loved and enjoyed, attentive to their farming interests and their stock, for the Madison County Maupins were mostly farmers. In the fall they usually enjoyed a deer hunt In the mountains for they were usually good marksmen, unerring shots. Always we find them a quiet, peaceful people unless wronged or mistreated in which case their greatest family fault was apt to come to light.

Richmond and they are buried on their old farm now owned (1924) by Thomas Chenault. John Maupin, a brother of Daniel, also lived in Madison County until 1819 when he moved to Boone County, Missouri. He lived east of Richmond on the Union road. He married his wife, Nancy Collins, in Madison and she and all of their children accompanied him to Missouri. Another Daniel Maupin, Jesse Maupin and Thomas Maupin, all sons of Zachariah Maupin, settled in Madison at an early date and three sons of Jesse Maupin, youngest son of old Daniel Maupin of Albemarle, as well as two sons of John Maupin and Frances Dabney, made the county their home. Many of their descendants still live there while others have moved on to new homes in the west, but ever they uphold and sustain that character and standing which has been handed down for generations from grand and noble sires. W. H. Miller Richmond, Kentucky Author of History and Genealogies The above article was written for Eugene Maupin by W. H. Miller in answer to a request for a sketch of the early Maupins in Kentucky.

The Madison County Maupins, as a rule, owned large estates, farmed on a large scale and lived In comfort and ease, entertaining in an easy home going way. They were sportive folks, fond of the chase and some of them kept fine blooded hounds, imported stock that was known far and wide, and all lovers of the chase are proud to own a Maupin hound. Many of this famous stock of hounds are still kept In the family In Kentucky but dozens of them have been transported to the south and west. Among the early pioneers of Kentucky, we find the name of Cornelius Maupin, who came in to the state when Harrodsburg was still a mere fort. He stopped here for a while then moved on to Otter Creek, near the present site of Richmond where he acquired lands. Time went on and the country filled with settlers. Like Boone, Maupin yearned for the frontier and once more took up his march. He settled in Howard County, Missouri, and here he died but his wife died on the trail from Kentucky to Missouri and was buried by the roadside.

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Daniel Maupin and his wife, Betsy Gentry, made their home in Bourbon County, and their lands adjoined those of Simon Kenton, the scout. Later, they settled three or four miles from

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left their blood on nearly every battle fought on Virginia or Maryland soil. One of them as a lieutenant of his company - a company which left thirteen dead at Gettysburg. There were many of the name in other companies of the Army of Northern Virginia and I never heard that there was a drone among them." H. c. Michie, Brigadier-General of Confederate Veterans. And we find the Madison County soldiers of the Maupin line and name, the same kind of fighters. Scores of them followed Gen. Morgan on his daring raid Into Ohio, accomplishing a feat unparalleled in history. Three weeks in the saddle without rest or sleep except what they could get on horseback while on the march, and the horses they rode had nothing but what they could snatch up on the move - a bundle of oats there or a mouthful of wheat here. In times of peace, the families would be found in their homes, which they greatly loved and enjoyed, attentive to their farming interests and their stock, for the Madison County Maupins were mostly farmers. In the fall they usually enjoyed a deer hunt in the mountains for they were usually good marksmen, unerring shots. Always we find them a quiet, peaceful people unless wronged or mistreated in which case their greatest family fault was apt to come to light.

Richmond and they are buried on their old farm now owned (1924) by Thomas Chenault. John Maupin, a brother of Daniel, also lived in Madison County until 1819 when he moved to Boone County, Missouri. He lived east of Richmond on the Union road. He married his wife, Nancy Collins, in Madison and she and all of their children accompanied him to Missouri. Another Daniel Maupin, Jesse Maupin and Thomas Maupin, all sons of Zachariah Maupin, settled in Madison at an early date and three sons of Jesse Maupin, youngest son of old Daniel Maupin of Albemarle, as well as two sons of John Maupin and Frances Dabney, made the county their home. Many of their descendants still live there while others have moved on to new homes in the west, but ever they uphold and sustain that character and standing which has been handed down for generations from grand and noble sires.

w. H. Miller Richmond, Kentucky Author of History and Genealogies The above article was written for Eugene Maupin by W. H. Miller in answer to a request for a sketch of the early Maupins in Kentucky.

The Madison County Maupins, as a rule, owned large estates, farmed on a large scale and lived In comfort and ease, entertaining in an easy home going way. They were sportive folks, fond of the chase and some of them kept fine blooded hounds, imported stock that was known far and wide, and all lovers of the chase are proud to own a Maupin hound. Many of this famous stock of hounds are still kept in the family In Kentucky but dozens of them have been transported to the south and west.

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Among the early pioneers of Kentucky, we find the name of Cornelius Maupin, who came in to the state when Harrodsburg was still a mere fort. He stopped here for a while then moved on to Otter Creek, near the present site of Richmond where he acquired lands. Time went on and the country filled with settlers. Like Boone, Maupin yearned for the frontier and once more took up his march. He settled in Howard County, Missouri, and here he died but his wife died on the trail from Kentucky to Missouri and was buried by the roadside. Daniel Maupin and his wife, Betsy Gentry, made their home in Bourbon County, and their lands adjoined those of Simon Kenton, the scout. Later, they settled three or four miles from

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THIRD GENERATION GABRIEL MAUPIN (6) Son of Daniel (3), grandson of Gabriel (1 ). Gabriel Maupin was born at Williamsburg at the home of his grandfather, Gabriel Maupin, the emigrant, in the year 1720, the year of his grandfather's death. He emigrated from Hanover to Albemarle County with his father, Daniel Maupin, and settled near Free Union in 1747. He was undoubtedly married at this time. Rev. Edgar Woods, in his History of Albemarle, confuses him with his Uncle Gabriel and speaks of him as a brother of Daniel Maupin, Senior. He died on his farm near Free Union, or Nixville, in 1794, aged 74 years. His will is recorded in the office of the clerk of AI bemarle under the date of 1794. He married Ann Ballard, daughter of Thomas Ballard, who obtained a patent for 320 acres of land near Piney Mountain in 1738. Thomas Ballard died in 1781. He was a grandson of Col. Thos. Ballard, Burgess from James City in 1666, member of the council in 1673, Speaker of the House of Burgesses in 1673 and Vestryman of Bruton Parish. The children of Gabriel and Ann Maupin were: * Daniel-

married Jane Via, daughter of Micajah Via and _____ Burnett. Micajah Via was the son of William Via. The emigrant, Wm. Via, was the grandfather according to Dr. Socrates Maupin, hence Micajah Via must have been a nephew of Margaret Via Maupin. There is some little doubt as to the emigrant Via's name. He is commonly spoken of as "William", but Dr. Maupin uses the name "William" but once and then only with a question mark. In the Register of St. Peter's Parish (which once included Hanover the home of the Vias) are the following entries:"Judith, Dau. of Amer Via baptiz. the 11 April!. Margaret, Dauter of Amer Via baptiz 3 Aug. 1701. Mary, daut. of Amer Via Baptiz. 17 Febry 1703/4" Inasmuch as Margaret Via, wife of Daniel Maupin, was born in 1701, it seems that she and the above named Margaret might be one and the same person. (17) Davidmarried Sarah Spencer, daughter of John Spencer. ( 18) Thomas- married Ann Spencer, sister of Sarah Spencer (above). (18a)Matthew- married Lucy Ballard.

Gabriel-

married 26 Aug 1791, Mary or Marah Mullins, daughter of John Mullins. The latter was a son of Matthew Mullins and Mary Maupin (12). Gabriel Maupin had several children. *Johnmarried, 7 Dec 1788, Betsy Mills, daughter of Henry Mills. They had ten children. *Blandmarried, 23 Dec 1794, Sarah Brown, daughter of Robert (Irish) Brown. They removed to Tennessee. They had ten children. Judithmarried David Apperson, who was killed in the Revolution. Her second husband was John Burch. They had three children. A granddaughter, Jane Burch, married Carr Maupin, son of John Maupin and Frances Dabney. Susanmarried Cyrus Jones. They had three children. Margaret- born June 12th 1763. She was one of the eldest children of Gabriel Maupin. On May 5th 1785, she married John Rush and they were the parents of eight children. John Rush was born June 26th 1764, probably in Albemarle. David Rush, a son of Margaret, married Susanna Miller, a sister of Samuel Miller (See Miller family under Bolivar Maupin (79). Wm. Marion Rush of Marion County, Missouri was a son of David and Susanna Rush. Annamarried George Turner in 1791. He was the son of Charles Turner, who lived northeast of Ivy Depot and who died in 1789. Ann and George Turner emigrated to Kentucky and settled in Pendelton County. In 1819, they removed to Marion County, Missouri, making the trip in a keel-boat propelled by hand. They had ten children in all, five of them named as follows: Rev. Chas. Turner, born in Kentucky in 1792 and married Phoebe Griffith, second, Susannah Lear. He died in 1863. Gabriel Turner, William and John, all of Marion County, Mo., and Margaret Turner of Texas. Frances- married, 27 Apr 1791, Wade Via, son of Micajah Via. See under Daniel on preceding page. Joelunmarried. A noted surveyor of Albemarle County. Noted for his feat of swimming the James River at night to bring aid to an injured friend.

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86 87

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THIRD GENERATION GABRIEL MAUPIN (6) Son of Daniel (3), grandson of Gabriel (1 ). Gabriel Maupin was born at Williamsburg at the home of his grandfather, Gabriel Maupin, the emigrant, in the year 1720, the year of his grandfather's death. He emigrated from Hanover to Albemarle County with his father, Daniel Maupin, and settled near Free Union in 1747. He was undoubtedly married at this time. Rev. Edgar Woods, in his History of Albemarle, confuses him with his Uncle Gabriel and speaks of him as a brother of Daniel Maupin, Senior. He died on his farm near Free Union, or Nixville, in 1794, aged 74 years. His will is recorded in the office of the clerk of Albemarle under the date of 1794. He married Ann Ballard, daughter of Thomas Ballard, who obtained a patent for 320 acres of land near Piney Mountain in 1738. Thomas Ballard died in 1781. He was a grandson of Col. Thos. Ballard, Burgess from James City in 1666, member of the council in 1673, Speaker of the House of Burgesses in 1673 and Vestryman of Bruton Parish. The children of Gabriel and Ann Maupin were: * Daniel-

married Jane Via, daughter of Micajah Via and ____ Burnett. Micajah Via was the son of William Via. The emigrant, Wm. Via, was the grandfather according to Dr. Socrates Maupin, hence Micajah Via must have been a nephew of Margaret Via Maupin. There is some little doubt as to the emigrant Via's name. He is commonly spoken of as "William", but Dr. Maupin uses the name "William" but once and then only with a question mark. In the Register of St. Peter's Parish (which once included Hanover the home of the Vias) are the following entries:"Judith, Dau. of Amer Via baptiz. the 11 Aprill. Margaret, Dauter of Amer Via baptiz 3 Aug. 1701. Mary, daut. of Amer Via Baptiz. 17 Febry 1703/4" Inasmuch as Margaret Via, wife of Daniel Maupin, was born in 1701, it seems that she and the above named Margaret might be one and the same person. (17) Davidmarried Sarah Spencer, daughter of John Spencer. (18) Thomas- married Ann Spencer, sister of Sarah Spencer (above). (18a)Matthew- married Lucy Ballard.

Gabriel-

married 26 Aug 1791, Mary or Marah Mullins, daughter of John Mullins. The latter was a son of Matthew Mullins and Mary Maupin (12). Gabriel Maupin had several children. *Johnmarried, 7 Dec 1788, Betsy Mills, daughter of Henry Mills. They had ten children. *Blandmarried, 23 Dec 1794, Sarah Brown, daughter of Robert (Irish) Brown. They removed to Tennessee. They had ten children. Judith- married David Apperson, who was killed in the Revolution. Her second husband was John Burch. They had three children. A granddaughter, Jane Burch, married Carr Maupin, son of John Maupin and Frances Dabney. Susanmarried Cyrus Jones. They had three children. Margaret- born June 12th 1763. She was one of the eldest children of Gabriel Maupin. On May 5th 1785, she married John Rush and they were the parents of eight children. John Rush was born June 26th 1764, probably in Albemarle. David Rush, a son of Margaret, married Susanna Miller, a sister of Samuel Miller (See Miller family under Bolivar Maupin (79). Wm. Marion Rush of Marion County, Missouri was a son of David and Susanna Rush. Annamarried George Turner in 1791. He was the son of Charles Turner, who lived northeast of Ivy Depot and who died in 1789. Ann and George Turner emigrated to Kentucky and settled in Pendelton County. In 1819, they removed to Marion County, Missouri, making the trip in a keel-boat propelled by hand. They had ten children in all, five of them named as follows: Rev. Chas. Turner, born in Kentucky in 1792 and married Phoebe Griffith, second, Susannah Lear. He died in 1863. Gabriel Turner, William and John, all of Marion County, Mo., and Margaret Turner of Texas. Frances- married, 27 Apr 1791, Wade Via, son of Micajah Via. See under Daniel on preceding page. Joelunmarried. A noted surveyor of Albemarle County. Noted for his feat of swimming the James River at night to bring aid to an injured friend.

86 87


THE RUSH FAMILY OF ALBEMARLE

FOURTH GENERATION

Benjamin Rush (1745-1813), a signer of the Declaration of Independence, had a cousin, Thomas Rush (1700-1770) who lived in Virginia. This Thomas Rush had a son, Peter Rush (17661824), who married Mary Mullins (1777-1859), daughter of Gabriel Mullins and Rachael Ballard [see Mary Maupin (12)]. Peter Rush and Mary Mullins had children as follows: a - Elizabeth, married John Thrasher. b - Malinda, married Joseph Thrasher. It seems probable that John Rush (1764), who married Margaret Maupin, daughter of Gabriel Maupin (6), was a son of Thomas Rush and a brother of Peter Rush. This seems the more likely since the families were so closely associated together in Albemarle County, Virginia; Pendleton County, Kentucky and in Marion County, Missouri.

DANIEL MAUPIN Son of Gabriel Maupin (6). grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ).

*************** Thomas Ballard, father-in-law of Gabriel Maupin, died In 1781. His will is recorded May 9th 1782 in Will Book 2 of Albemarle County. Extracts are given as follows:

Thomas X Ballard of Albemarle County - Daughter, Mary, five pounds sterling -**Sons, Thomas Ballard and Bland Ballard, all this my land, they suffering my daughter-in-law, Mourning Ballard, to live on, use and occupy that part of it whereon she now lives during her life **** the land to be equally divided between them so that Bland enjoy the part whereon he now lives **** the use of a negro Delphia unto my daughter, Frances Ballard, and after her decease I give and bequeath the negro, Delphia to her heirs***** Daughter, Susanna Pettis during her life all my lands in Louisa County, and after her death I give unto her and to said Susanna Pettis' oldest son then living ***** Remainder of my estate to be equally divided among five children, Thomas, Bland, ANNA MAUPINE, Frances Ballard and Susanna Pettis. Sons Thomas and Bland Executors. Dated Thirtieth day of June 1779. Thomas Ballard was, according to Rev. Edgar Woods' History of Albemarle, one of the first settlers In the county, especially of that section near Piney Mountain.

88

Daniel Maupin son of Gabriel Maupin and Ann Ballard. Born in Albemarle Co., VA; married Jane Via of Hanover Co., VA, daughter of Micajah Via. Dr. Socrates Maupin lists 10 children for them. We have names of four. 1. Anne Maupin born about 1785; married 19 Jan 1803 to Larkin Durrett. 2. Joel Maupin born about 1787; married 28 Jun 1811 to Esther Colvin. 3. Susan Jane "Jenny" Maupin born about 1789; married 19 Jul 1811 to John Timberlake. 4. Micajah Maupin born about 1791; married June 1816 to Elizabeth Bottom. Larkin Durrett, who married Anne Maupin, was quite a bit older than she. His father, Joel Durrett, as well as Larkin, came to Green County, Kentucky about 1809. Daniel and Jane were in the 1810 census of Albemarle Co., Virginia and must have come to Green Co., KY, soon thereafter. The marriage bond for Joel and Esther Colvin was signed by Daniel Maupin as well as the bond for John Timberlake and Jenny Maupin. Have not been able to find the marriage bond for Micajah.

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FIFTH GENERATION TO PRESENT GENERATION. Anne Maupin, dau. of Daniel Maupin and Jane Via, b. about 1785; m. 19 Jan 1803 to Larkin Durrett, son of Joel Durrett and Sarah Chewning. Their dau. Jane V. Durrett, m. 6 Dec 1820, Green Co. KY to Alfred C. Murray. Their son Jefferson Allen Murray b. c. 1822, m. 26 May 1842, Green Co. KY to Eliza Ruark. Their dau. Catherine Jane Murray, b. 28 Feb 1843; m. 31 Aug 1865 at Ft. Leavenworth, KS to Frederick Wilhelm Hemme, b. 30 Aug 1841, Insel, Prussia, d. 16 Feb 1922, Altoona, KS. Their son, Warner Rudolph Hemme, b. 9 Feb 1873, d. 26 Jun 1928; m. Ida May Lovell, b. 8 Oct 1877, Michigan Valley, KS, d. 17 Jul 1957, buried in San Pedro, CA. Their dau. Hazel May Hemme, b. 9 Mar 1898, Michigan Valley, KS, d. 22 Jun 1980; buried in Riverside, CA; m. 1st, 8 Jun 1917 Max New who d. 12 Oct 1918. Their dau. Maxine Eva, b. 14 Mar 1918 m. Einar R. Miller, 3 ch. Einar R. Jr, b. 1944, Carol Lynn, b. 1954 and Donald Wayne, b. 1967. Hazel May m. 2nd 5 Jul 1923, Newton, KS to Benjamin Cecil Blankenship, Sr., b. 8 Jul 1891, Okla., d. 25 Oct 1975, Calif. Their children: a. Benjamin Cecil, b. 29 Mar 1925, Madison, KS. b. Warner Rudolph, b. 12 Jul 1926 in KS. c. Eulalia Mae, b. 4 Sep 1927 in Madison, KS; m. 28 May 1948 to Floyd Edward Blau. Their children:

89

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THE RUSH FAMILY OF ALBEMARLE

FOURTH GENERATION

Benjamin Rush (1745-1813), a signer of the Declaration of Independence, had a cousin, Thomas Rush (1700-1770) who lived in Virginia. This Thomas Rush had a son, Peter Rush (17661824), who married Mary Mullins (1777-1859), daughter of Gabriel Mullins and Rachael Ballard [see Mary Maupin (12)]. Peter Rush and Mary Mullins had children as follows: a - Elizabeth, married John Thrasher. b - Malinda, married Joseph Thrasher. It seems probable that John Rush (1764), who married Margaret Maupin, daughter of Gabriel Maupin (6), was a son of Thomas Rush and a brother of Peter Rush. This seems the more likely since the families were so closely associated together in Albemarle County, Virginia; Pendleton County, Kentucky and in Marion County, Missouri.

DANIEL MAUPIN Son of Gabriel Maupin (6). grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ).

*************** Thomas Ballard, father-in-law of Gabriel Maupin, died In 1781. His will is recorded May 9th 1782 in Will Book 2 of Albemarle County. Extracts are given as follows:

Thomas X Ballard of Albemarle County - Daughter, Mary, five pounds sterling - **Sons, Thomas Ballard and Bland Ballard, all this my land, they suffering my daughter-in-law, Mourning Ballard, to live on, use and occupy that part of it whereon she now lives during her life **** the land to be equally divided between them so that Bland enjoy the part whereon he now lives **** the use of a negro Delphia unto my daughter, Frances Ballard, and after her decease I give and bequeath the negro, Delphia to her heirs***** Daughter, Susanna Pettis during her life all my lands in Louisa County, and after her death I give unto her and to said Susanna Pettis' oldest son then living ***** Remainder of my estate to be equally divided among five children, Thomas, Bland, ANNA MAUPINÂŁ, Frances Ballard and Susanna Pettis. Sons Thomas and Bland Executors. Dated Thirtieth day of June 1779. Thomas Ballard was, according to Rev. Edgar Woods' History of Albemarle, one of the first settlers in the county, especially of that section near Piney Mountain.

88

Daniel Maupin son of Gabriel Maupin and Ann Ballard. Born in Albemarle Co., VA; married Jane Via of Hanover Co., VA, daughter of Micajah Via. Dr. Socrates Maupin lists 10 children for them. We have names of four. 1. Anne Maupin born about 1785; married 19 Jan 1803 to Larkin Durrett. 2. Joel Maupin born about 1787; married 28 Jun 1811 to Esther Colvin. 3. Susan Jane "Jenny" Maupin born about 1789; married 19 Jul 1811 to John Timberlake. 4. Micajah Maupin born about 1791; married June 1816 to Elizabeth Bottom. Larkin Durrett, who married Anne Maupin, was quite a bit older than she. His father, Joel Durrett, as well as Larkin, came to Green County, Kentucky about 1809. Daniel and Jane were in the 1810 census of Albemarle Co., Virginia and must have come to Green Co., KY, soon thereafter. The marriage bond for Joel and Esther Colvin was signed by Daniel Maupin as well as the bond for John Timberlake and Jenny Maupin. Have not been able to find the marriage bond for Micajah. FIFTH GENERATION TO PRESENT GENERATION. Anne Maupin, dau. of Daniel Maupin and Jane Via, b. about 1785; m. 19 Jan 1803 to Larkin Durrett, son of Joel Durrett and Sarah Chewning. Their dau. Jane V. Durrett, m. 6 Dec 1820, Green Co. KY to Alfred C. Murray. Their son Jefferson Allen Murray b. c. 1822, m. 26 May 1842, Green Co. KY to Eliza Ruark. Their dau. Catherine Jane Murray, b. 28 Feb 1843; m. 31 Aug 1865 at Ft. Leavenworth, KS to Frederick Wilhelm Hemme, b. 30 Aug 1841, Insel, Prussia, d. 16 Feb 1922, Altoona, KS. Their son, Warner Rudolph Hemme, b. 9 Feb 1873, d. 26 Jun 1928; m. Ida May Lovell, b. 8 Oct 1877, Michigan Valley, KS, d. 17 Jul 1957, buried in San Pedro, CA. Their dau. Hazel May Hemme, b. 9 Mar 1898, Michigan Valley, KS, d. 22 Jun 1980; buried in Riverside, CA; m. 1st, 8 Jun 1917 Max New who d. 12 Oct 1918. Their dau. Maxine Eva, b. 14 Mar 1918 m. Einar R. Miller, 3 ch. Einar R. Jr, b. 1944, Carol Lynn, b. 1954 and Donald Wayne, b. 1967. Hazel May m. 2nd 5 Jul 1923, Newton, KS to Benjamin Cecil Blankenship, Sr., b. 8 Jul 1891, Okla., d. 25 Oct 1975, Calif. Their children: a. Benjamin Cecil, b. 29 Mar 1925, Madison, KS. b. Warner Rudolph, b. 12 Jul 1926 in KS. c. Eulalia Mae, b. 4 Sep 1927 in Madison, KS; m. 28 May 1948 to Floyd Edward Blau. Their children:

89


1. 2.

Michael E., b. 30 Apr 1955, d. Dec 1955. Robert Allen, b. 27 Sep 1957, m. Kathleen Faye Marshall, their dau., Carisa Lynn Blau, b. 12 Dec 1982.

This writer wants to express sincere appreciation to Eulalia Blau for her thorough genealogical research and the generous sharing of her records. These records are copies of the actual document, Wills, deeds and other material of genealogical interest from all of Virginia and Kentucky. She has much information on the Ballard family which is so intermarried with the Maupin family. It is all organized in booklets. d. Marvin LeRoy, b. 8 Aug 1934. e. Idamae Jean, b. 10 Oct 1937. f. William Lovell, b. 19 Sep 1939. Joel Maupin, second known child of Daniel Maupin and Jane Via, b. about 1787. He lived near Bowling Green and married 28 Jun 1811 to Esther Colvin, daughter of Henderson Colvin. Their children: 1. Mary Jane Maupin - married Samuel Johnson of Bowling Green, KY. 2. James Henderson Maupin - married 18 Nov 1836 to Nancy Wilson, lived in Minnesota and had a son, James Maupin. *3. Joel Daniel Maupin - born in Bowling Green, KY, in 1814 and died in Missouri, 9 Nov 1869. Married 9 Jun 1836 to Mrs. Amelia Carter, the widow of Elihu Carter. Her malden name was Jenkins. Amelia was born 15 Mar 1817. Their children: a. Joel Maupin - b. 1837; m. Margaret Wilson and had a son, Daniel Maupin. * b. Elihu Maupin - b. 1839, m. Elizabeth Forbes. c. Mary F. Maupin- b. 1841, m. Perry Jackson of Shelby Co., MO. d. James C. Maupin -b. 1843, killed at the battle of Kirksville, while serving with Porter's Confederate troops. e. Elizabeth Maupin - b. 1846; m. J. W. Saunders in 1870. * f. Simeon Maupin - b. 1849; m. Armilda Cooper and had a son, Ferdinand. g. Sarah Maupin - married Perry Jackson (her brotherin-law). h. John Maupin - died in Denver, Colorado in 1896. i. Walter Maupin - married Mary Harding. j. Daniel Maupin - died young. k. William Maupin - married Ollie Barr.

90

Besides the three children of Joel and Esther Colvin Maupin, they issued at least one other son, who was the father of J. W. Maupin of Oklahoma and Marion Maupin of Fredonia, Kansas. FIFTH GENERATION TO PRESENT DESCENDANTS OF JOEL DANIEL MAUPIN. (b)ELIHU MAUPIN, the second of the 11 children of Joel Daniel and Amelia, b. 20 Aug 1838 in Kentucky; m. 3 Jul 1861 to Elizabeth Forbes, b. 15 Apr 1845, d. 2 Nov 1940 in California. Elihu d. 9 Feb 1911 in Woodward Co. OK. Their children: *a. James Walter Maupin, b. 27 Nov 1863. b. John Logan, b. 12 Mar 1867. *c. William David, b. 9 Feb 1873. d. Lydia Frances, b. 15 Oct 1878. e. Oscar Stanley f. Daniel Harvey *(b)James Walter Maupin, son of Elihu Maupin and Elizabeth Forbes, b. 27 Nov 1863 in Putnam Co. MO, d. 21 Feb 1936, same county; m. Annie Hardy, b. 15 Apr 1865. Their children: a. Bessie E. b. 4 Feb 1891, d. 30 Dec 1930. b. Elizabeth, m. Lea Chase. Lydia Ethel, b. 21 Jan 1893 in Wichita, KS, m. 7 Aug c. 1912 to John Grundy Dugan, b. 15 Jul 1894, d. 13 Mar 1967 in Ontario, CA. Their daughter, Sylvia Faye, b. 29 Oct 1921 at Ft. Supply, OK, m. 30 Jul 1940 to Roger Sagouspe, b. 28 Aug 1914 in Imperial County, CA. Their children: 1. Larry Gene, b. 15 Feb 1942, Pomona, CA; m. 5 Sep 1970 to Jackierae Ann Wycoff. 2. Marguerite Ann, b. 29 Mar 1954 in Upland, CA; m. 31 May 1975 to Mark Thomasseau. 3. Barry Lynn, b. 26 Jun 1956. ******************** *(c)William David Maupin, son of Elihu Maupin and Elizabeth Forbes, b. 9 Feb 1873 in Butler Co. KS, d. 27 Aug 1912 in Woodward Co. OK; m. 9 Feb 1898 to Effie Amelie Miller, b. 1 Jan 1876, d. 5 Mar 1974 in Woodward Co. OK. Their 5 children were Claudia, Isabell, Eddie Lorraine, Elsie and Thelma Ruth. Eddie Lorraine Maupin, b. 15 Mar 1903, d. 17 May 1992 in Oklahoma; m. 28 Sep 1929 to Frances M. Stimmel, b. 1 Aug 1906 in Woodward Co. OK. Their 3 children were Wayne Douglas, Stimmel Lorraine, and Billy Jean.

91


1. 2.

Michael E., b. 30 Apr 1955, d. Dec 1955. Robert Allen, b. 27 Sep 1957, m. Kathleen Faye Marshall, their dau., Carisa Lynn Blau, b. 12 Dec 1982.

This writer wants to express sincere appreciation to Eulalia Blau for her thorough genealogical research and the generous sharing of her records. These records are copies of the actual document, Wills, deeds and other material of genealogical interest from all of Virginia and Kentucky. She has much information on the Ballard family which Is so intermarried with the Maupin family. It is all organized in booklets. d. Marvin LeRoy, b. 8 Aug 1934. e. Idamae Jean, b. 10 Oct 1937. f. William Lovell, b. 19 Sep 1939. Joel Maupin, second known child of Daniel Maupin and Jane Via, b. about 1787. He lived near Bowling Green and married 28 Jun 1811 to Esther Colvin, daughter of Henderson Colvin. Their children: 1. Mary Jane Maupin - married Samuel Johnson of Bowling Green, KY. 2. James Henderson Maupin - married 18 Nov 1836 to Nancy Wilson, lived in Minnesota and had a son, James Maupin. *3. Joel Daniel Maupin - born in Bowling Green, KY, in 1814 and died in Missouri, 9 Nov 1869. Married 9 Jun 1836 to Mrs. Amelia Carter, the widow of Elihu Carter. Her maiden name was Jenkins. Amelia was born 15 Mar 1817. Their children: a. Joel Maupin - b. 1837; m. Margaret Wilson and had a son, Daniel Maupin. * b. Elihu Maupin - b. 1839, m. Elizabeth Forbes. c. Mary F. Maupin- b. 1841, m. Perry Jackson of Shelby Co., MO. d. James c. Maupin -b. 1843, killed at the battle of Kirksville, while serving with Porter's Confederate troops. e. Elizabeth Maupin - b. 1846; m. J. W. Saunders in 1870. * f. Simeon Maupin - b. 1849; m. Armilda Cooper and had a son, Ferdinand. g. Sarah Maupin - married Perry Jackson (her brotherin-law). h. John Maupin - died in Denver, Colorado in 1896. i. Walter Maupin - married Mary Harding. j. Daniel Maupin - died young. k. William Maupin - married Ollie Barr.

90

Besides the three children of Joel and Esther Colvin Maupin, they issued at least one other son, who was the father of J. W. Maupin of Oklahoma and Marion Maupin of Fredonia, Kansas.

FIFTH GENERATION TO PRESENT DESCENDANTS OF JOEL DANIEL MAUPIN. (b)ELIHU MAUPIN, the second of the 11 children of Joel Daniel and Amelia, b. 20 Aug 1838 in Kentucky; m. 3 Jul 1861 to Elizabeth Forbes, b. 15 Apr 1845, d. 2 Nov 1940 in California. Elihu d. 9 Feb 1911 in Woodward Co. OK. Their children: *a. James Walter Maupin, b. 27 Nov 1863. b. John Logan, b. 12 Mar 1867. *c. William David, b. 9 Feb 1873. d. Lydia Frances, b. 15 Oct 1878. e. Oscar Stanley f. Daniel Harvey *(b)James Walter Maupin, son of Elihu Maupin and Elizabeth Forbes, b. 27 Nov 1863 in Putnam Co. MO, d. 21 Feb 1936, same county; m. Annie Hardy, b. 15 Apr 1865. Their children: a. Bessie E. b. 4 Feb 1891, d. 30 Dec 1930. b. Elizabeth, m. Lea Chase. Lydia Ethel, b. 21 Jan 1893 in Wichita, KS, m. 7 Aug c. 1912 to John Grundy Dugan, b. 15 Jul1894, d. 13 Mar 1967 in Ontario, CA. Their daughter, Sylvia Faye, b. 29 Oct 1921 at Ft. Supply, OK, m. 30 Jul 1940 to Roger Sagouspe, b. 28 Aug 1914 In Imperial County, CA. Their children: 1. Larry Gene, b. 15 Feb 1942, Pomona, CA; m. 5 Sep 1970 to Jackierae Ann Wycoff. 2. Marguerite Ann, b. 29 Mar 1954 in Upland, CA; m. 31 May 1975 to Mark Thomasseau. 3. Barry Lynn, b. 26 Jun 1956. ******************** *(c)William David Maupin, son of Elihu Maupin and Elizabeth Forbes, b. 9 Feb 1873 in Butler Co. KS, d. 27 Aug 1912 in Woodward Co. OK; m. 9 Feb 1898 to Effie Amelie Miller, b. 1 Jan 1876, d. 5 Mar 1974 in Woodward Co. OK. Their 5 children were Claudia, Isabell, Eddie Lorraine, Elsie and Thelma Ruth. Eddie Lorraine Maupin, b. 15 Mar 1903, d. 17 May 1992 in Oklahoma; m. 28 Sep 1929 to Frances M. Stimmel, b. 1 Aug 1906 in Woodward Co. OK. Their 3 children were Wayne Douglas, Stimmel Lorraine, and Billy Jean. 91


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b. 9 Sep 1930; m. 20 May 1950 in Woodward Co., OK, to Doris ~'t~lYrLJii_g_bfiJI. They have 3 daughters: Penny Nell Maupin, m. Billy Meadows; 3 dau. Sue Ann Maupin, m. Charles Hogue, 3 ch. Shelly Lynn Maupin, m. Patrick A. Wood.

(4) Micajah Maupin, fourth known child of Daniel and Jane Via Maupin, b. ca. 1790; m. June 1816 in Green Co. KY, to Elizabeth Bottom, b. 1796, daughter of Robert Bottom and Mary 0. Latimore. In 1830 census eleven children are listed. Information on I y on these: I. William Thomas, b. ca. 1816; m. 24 Nov 1849 in Taylor Co. KY to Nancy L. Fawcett. II. Merritt, b. 10 Sep 1817; m. 29 Dec 1836 to Lucinda Fawcett. III. Samuel Bottom (1819-1877) m. 3 Feb 1841 to Elizabeth Fawcett. IV. Joel, b. 24 Apr 1832; m. 11 Oct 1853 to Sarah F. Chandler. V. Mary Jane, m. Merit Frank Arnold and moved to Hart Co. KY where in 1860 census 7 children are listed with an "Elizabeth" listed as 64 yrs of age. This could be Mary Jane's mother, Elizabeth Bottom, which would make her birth date about 1796

******************** *(f)Simeon Maupin, son of Joel Daniel and Amelia Carter Maupin, was b. 25 Dec 1849, d. 17 Mar 1928; m. 22 Dec 1878 to Ar:milc:t~ QooQ~. b. 22 Apr 1843, d. 27 Mar 1928. Both died of pneumonia and are buried in Union Cemetery south of Clarence, MO. Their children: 1. Ferdie Maupin, b. 31 Oct 1881, d. 8 Apr 1966, buried in Mt. Washington Cemetery, Independence, MO; m. 21 Feb 1904 to Myrtle Lee Wi Ison, b. 4 Dec 1876, d. 28 Mar 1970. Their children: 1. Ina May Maupin, b. 24 Jan 1905. Sarah Oneita Maupin, b. 20 Jul 1909, d. 12 Apr 1940. 2. 3. Ethel Alice Maupin, b. 8 Mar 1912.

Detailed information on the above children follows: I. William Thomas Maupin, son of Micajah and Elizabeth Bottom Maupin, b. ca 1816; m. 25 Nov 1849 in Taylor Co. KY, to Nancy T. Fawcett, b. 1827, daughter of Robert and Fanny Chandler Fawcett. Their children all born in Taylor Co. KY. Merritt Marcus Maupin, b. 1850. 1. 2. Richard S. b. 1852; m. 13 Jan 1876 to Mattie Ryan. 3. Frances, b. 1853. 4. Nancy T., b. 6 Apr 1855. 5. James W., b. 1 Dec 1856. 6. John S., b. 1859. 7. Lucinda, b. 1861; m. 1878 to C. Gadberry. 8. Mattie, b. 1862. 9. Millie, b. 1866. 10. Wi II iam R. b. 1868.

******************** (3) Susan Jane Maupin, called "Jenny", daughter of Daniel and Jane Via Maupin; m. 1-9 Jul 1811 in Green Co. KY to John Timberlake, b. ca. 1790. They had one son Daniel MauQirl_ Timberlake, b. Aug 1818, d. 10 Dec 1871 in Mexico, MO; m. 10 Dec 1840 to Elizabeth Russell, b. 23 Oct 1821 in Kentucky, d. 12 Jul 1894 in Illinois. They had eleven children of which Harriet Jane Timberlake, b. 2 Jan 1842 at Campbellsville, KY and d. 10 May 1927; m. 8 Mar 1865 at Carthage, IL to Charles Dickerson, b. 10 Aug 1839 and d. 8 May 1893. Their son Lewis M. Dickerson, b. 28 Jun 1870, d. 17 Feb 1942 at Carthage, IL; m. 1 Nov 1899 to Minnie SturnQ, b. 19 Aug 1879, d. 13 Aug 1964. Their daughter Lora Marie Dickerson, b. 25 Jul 1900, d. 14 Jun 1977; m. 6 Aug 1922 to Philip Gordon Kirkpatrick, b. 21 Nov 1900, d. 10 Jan 1980 in Peoria, IL. Their daughter, Donna Ruth Kir:kQ_atrick, b. 8 Feb 1924; m. 14 Oct 1945 to James Cecil Church. Note: Joseph Timberlake, father of John Timberlake, who married Susan "Jenny" Maupin was born 1752 and died 1841, married 11 Dec 1784 to Ann Douglas, was a Revolutionary War soldier, a member of General Washington's guard. His grave site near Hodgenville, KY, has a large marker placed in 1968 by the Daughters of the American Revolution. ********************

II

II. Merritt Maupin, b. 10 Sep 1817, d. 3 Jan 1882, son of Micajah and Elizabeth Bottom Maupin; m. 29 Dec 1836 to Lucinda Fawcett, daughter of Robert and Fanny Chandler Fawcett. Their children: 1. Elizabeth F., b. ca. 1839. 2. William T. (Bill), b. 1842, d. 27 Dec 1911; m. 4 May 1868 to Martina Rice. 3. John M., b. 1845, d. 29 Jul 1921; m. 1st, 25 Sep 1866 to Mary J. Rice and 2nd, 29 Sep 1874 to Sarah Victoria Abel. 4. Nancy, b. 1846; m. 1st, Alexander Lindsey and 2nd, John Whitney, 3rd, Mr. Cheef. Nancy and Mr. Lindsey had 3 daughters and 2 sons. 5. Joel T., b. 1848.

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}1_(!y_ne DQ!!gJas Maupin_, b. 9 Sep 1930: m. 20 May 1950 in Woodward Co., OK, to Doris Evej_yn_I::U_ill1ill_. They have 3 daughters: Penny Nell Maupin, m. Billy Meadows; 3 dau. Sue Ann Maupin, m. Charles Hogue, 3 ch. Shelly Lynn Maupin, m. Patrick A. Wood.

******************** *(f)Simeon Maupin, son of Joel Daniel and Amelia Carter Maupin, was b. 25 Dec 1849, d. 17 Mar 1928; m. 22 Dec 1878 to Arrn.ll_da Coo~. b. 22 Apr 1843, d. 27 Mar 1928. Both died of pneumonia and are buried in Union Cemetery south of Clarence, MO. Their children: 1. Ferdie Maupin, b. 31 Oct 1881, d. 8 Apr 1966, buried in Mt. Washington Cemetery, Independence, MO; m. 21 Feb 1904 to Myrtle Lee Wilson, b. 4 Dec 1876, d. 28 Mar 1970. Their children: 1. Ina May Maupin, b. 24 Jan 1905. 2. Sarah Oneita Maupin, b. 20 Jul 1909, d. 12 Apr 1940. Ethel AI ice Maupin, b. 8 Mar 1912. 3.

******************** (3) Susan Jane Maupin, called "Jenny", daughter of Daniel and Jane Via Maupin; m. 1-9 Jul 181~ in Green Co. KY to John Timberlake, b. ca. 1790. They had one son Daniel Mau.Pln Timberlake, b. Aug 1818, d. 10 Dec 1871 in Mexico, MO; m. 10 Dec 1840 to Elizabeth Russell, b. 23 Oct 1821 in Kentucky, d. 12 Jul 1894 in Illinois. They had eleven children of which Harriet Jane Timberlake, b. 2 Jan 1842 at Campbellsville, KY and d. 10 May 1927; m. 8 Mar 1865 at Carthage, IL to Charles Dickerson, b. 10 Aug 1839 and d. 8 May 1893. Their son Lewis M. Dickerson, b. 28 Jun 1870, d. 17 Feb 1942 at Carthage, IL; m. 1 Nov 1899 to Minnie Stump, b. 19 Aug 1879, d. 13 Aug 1964. Their daughter Lora Marie Dickerson, b. 25 Jul 1900, d. 14 Jun 1977; m. 6 Aug 1922 to Philip Gordon Kirkpatrick, b. 21 Nov 1900, d. 10 Jan 1980 in Peoria, IL. Their daughter, Donna Ruth Kirkpatrick, b. 8 Feb 1924; m. 14 Oct 1945 to James Cecil Church. Note: Joseph Timberlake, father of John Timberlake, who married Susan "Jenny" Maupin was born 1752 and died 1841, married 11 Dec 1784 to Ann Douglas, was a Revolutionary War soldier, a member of General Washington's guard. His grave site near Hodgenville, KY, has a large marker placed in 1968 by the Daughters of the American Revolution.

********************

(4) Mica]ah Maupin, fourth known child of Daniel and Jane Via Maupin, b. ca. 1790; m. June 1816 in Green Co. KY, to Elizabeth Bottom, b. 1796, daughter of Robert Bottom and Mary 0. Latimore. In 1830 census eleven children are listed. Information only on these: I. William Thomas, b. ca. 1816; m. 24 Nov 1849 in Taylor Co. KY to Nancy L. Fawcett. II. Merritt, b. 10 Sep 1817; m. 29 Dec 1836 to Lucinda Fawcett. III. Samuel Bottom (1819-1877) m. 3 Feb 1841 to Elizabeth Fawcett. IV. Joel, b. 24 Apr 1832; m. 11 Oct 1853 to Sarah F. Chandler. V. Mary Jane, m. Merit Frank Arnold and moved to Hart Co. KY where in 1860 census 7 children are listed with an "Elizabeth" listed as 64 yrs of age. This could be Mary Jane's mother, Elizabeth Bottom, which would make her birth date about 1796

'

Detailed information on the above children follows: I. William Thomas Maupin, son of Micajah and Elizabeth Bottom Maupin, b. ca 1816; m. 25 Nov 1849 in Taylor Co. KY, to Nancy T. Fawcett, b. 1827, daughter of Robert and Fanny Chandler Fawcett. Their children all born in Taylor Co. KY. 1. Merritt Marcus Maupin, b. 1850. Richard S. b. 1852; m. 13 Jan 1876 to Mattie Ryan. 2. 3. Frances, b. 1853. 4. Nancy T., b. 6 Apr 1855. 5. James W., b. 1 Dec 1856. John S., b. 1859. 6. Lucinda, b. 1861; m. 1878 to C. Gadberry. 7. 8. Mattie, b. 1862. 9. Millie, b. 1866. 10. William R. b. 1868. II. Merritt Maupin, b. 10 Sep 1817, d. 3 Jan 1882, son of Micajah and Elizabeth Bottom Maupin; m. 29 Dec 1836 to Lucinda Fawcett, daughter of Robert and Fanny Chandler Fawcett. Their children: 1. Elizabeth F., b. ca. 1839. 2. William T. (Bill), b. 1842, d. 27 Dec 1911; m. 4 May 1868 to Martina Rice. John M., b. 1845, d. 29 Jul 1921; m. 1st, 25 Sep 1866 to 3. Mary J. Rice and 2nd, 29 Sep 1874 to Sarah Victoria Abel. 4. Nancy, b. 1846; m. 1st, Alexander Lindsey and 2nd, John Whitney, 3rd, Mr. Cheef. Nancy and Mr. Lindsey had 3 daughters and 2 sons. 5. Joel T., b. 1848.

92 93

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Pascal Kelley, b. June 1850, d. 12 May 1924; m. 1 Jan 1884 to Mrs. Jeanne Fisher. Calvin Lafayette, b. 4 Feb 1852 in Taylor Co. KY, d. 26 Nov. 1927; m. in 1873 to Elizabeth Fisher. Taylor, b. 1854; m. Addie ___ Owen B., b. 24 Feb 1856, d. 29 Sep 1923; m. 26 Nov 1885 to Artimicia Miner.

******** *1.

Calvin Lafayette Maupin, m. 1st to Elizabeth Fisher, b. 17 Feb 1858, d. 19 Oct 1900 in Taylor Co. KY, Their children: a. Edward c., b. 1876. Luther B., b 27 Jan 1878; m. 8 Jun 1900 to Pearl b. Roberts. c. Otho c., b. 21 Mar 1882, d. 1897. d. Trafton Monti, b. 7 Nov 1884 in Taylor Co. KY, d. 6 Mar 1940 in Adair Co. KY; m. 11 Apr 1921 to Martha Ann Keltner, b. 14 Apr 1890. Their children: 1. Mary Frances Maupin, b. 17 Jun 1922; m. 22 Aug 1942 to Marion P. Nordine, m. 2nd to Morgan Pepper. 2. James Clifford, b. 22 Jan 1925; m. Margaret Jean Lacy. 3. Martha Irene, b. 22 Mar 1929; m. David Louis Caldwell. 4. Elizabeth Ann, b. 3 Aug 1931; m. Harry Lee Dohoney. e. Gertie T. Maupin, b. 6 Oct 1888; m. 22 Nov 1912 to Arvin Conover. f. Orner P. Maupin, b. 5 Feb 1890; m. 24 Feb 1923 to Delpha Peterson. g. Robert Clifford Maupin, b. 1 Oct 1893; m. 9 Sep 1913 to Paralee Helm.

Calvin Lafayette Maupin, m. 2nd to Emma Fields, b. 18 Jan 1878, d. 27 Nov 1937 in Louisville, KY, 3 children: 1. Walker Lafayette, b. 14 Dec 1903; m. Louise Warren. 2. Bertha Ella, b. 4 Oct 1907; m. 9 Nov 1931 to John Schiedell. 3. . Joel Lee, b. 14 Jun 1914; m. 23 Sep 1934 to Florence Coleman. This completes descendants of Merritt (II), son of Micajah and Elizabeth Bottom Maupin.

********************

III. Samuel Bottom Maupin (1819-1877), son of Micajah and Elizabeth Bottom Maupin, m. 4 Feb 1841, to Elizabeth Fawcett, daughter of Robert and Fanny Chandler Fawcett. Their children: 1. Mary F., b. 1842, d. 1853. 2. Robert M., b. 1843. Killed in Civil War. 3. John T., b. 1844. 4. Louisa Elizabeth, b. 28 Feb 1846, Green Co. KY, d. 14 Jut 1912; m. 14 Feb 1865 to Joseph M. Allen, b. 14 Apr 1843, d. 10 Sep 1923. Their son, Robert B. Allen, b. 28 Jun 1883, d. 4 May 1947; m. 20 Dec 1903 to Daisy Benningfield, b. 30 Apr 1880, d. 18 Jun 1925. Their son Talbott R. Allen, b. 8 Aug 1909, d. 12 Dec 1988; m. 1 Jun 1930 to Jeanette Stark. Talbott Allen was a fine genealogist and helped many, especially with Kentucky records. 5. William Jefferson Maupin, b. 3 Dec 1849, d. 5 Mar 1908; m. 1878 to Malinda Cooper. Their son, Samuel Bottom Maupin, b. 13 Jun 1885 in Lebanon, KY, d. 5 Jan 1964 in Henry Co. I L; m. 13 Nov 1916 to Gertrude A. Neuhalfen, b. 15 Nov 1890, d. 9 Dec 1977 in Peoria, IL. Their daughter Helen Marie Maupin, b. 19 Apr 1920, d. 2 Jul 1991; m. 22 Aug 1940 to LeRoy L. Nauman, b. 6 Feb 1920. Their son, Richard R. Nauman, b. 13 Mar 1941; m. 3 Jut 1965 to Genevieve Brennan. 6. Lucinda J. Maupin, b. 8 Sep 1853 in Taylor Co. KY, d. 29 Jun 1901; m. 1st to James Webb; had 3 children-James W., John c., and Annie Webb. Lucinda m. 2nd to John Rodgers and had 6 children--David, Grover, Lucian, Benjamin, Mayme and Vernon. 7. Joseph Daniel Maupin (Jodaniel), b. 11 Mar 1854, d. 1934 in Kentucky; m. 11 Oct 1882 in Taylor Co. KY to Laura Catherine Parrott. Their daughter, Laura Myrtle Maupin, b. 23 May 1883; m. 3 Sep 1905 to Joseph Hayden. She m. 2nd to George A. Rend. Children of Laura & Joseph Hayden. a. Laura Genevieve Hayden, b. 26 Aug 1908. b. J. Edward, b. 7 Sep 1912. c. Evelyn D., b. 9 Jut 1913. d. Joseph Robert, b. 22 Aug 1918 e. Virginia Fern, b. 14 Jun 1921 in Stafford, KS; m. Alfred w. Stude. 8. Eliza Ann Maupin, b. 1858; m. 8 Feb 1876 to J. Strange, moved to Arkansas.

********************

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Pascal Kelley, b. June 1850, d. 12 May 1924; m. 1 Jan 1884 to Mrs. Jeanne Fisher. Calvin Lafayette, b. 4 Feb 1852 in Taylor Co. KY, d. 26 Nov. 1927; m. in 1873 to Elizabeth Fisher. Taylor, b. 1854; m. Addie ___ , Owen B., b. 24 Feb 1856, d. 29 Sep 1923; m. 26 Nov 1885 to Artimicia Miner.

******** *7. Calvin Lafayette Maupin, m. 1st to Elizabeth Fisher, b. 17 Feb 1858, d. 19 Oct 1900 in Taylor Co. KY, Their children: a. Edward C., b. 1876. b. Luther B., b 27 Jan 1878; m. 8 Jun 1900 to Pearl Roberts. c. Otho C., b. 21 Mar 1882, d. 1897. d. Trafton Monti, b. 7 Nov 1884 in Taylor Co. KY, d. 6 Mar 1940 in Adair Co. KY; m. 11 Apr 1921 to Martha Ann Keltner, b. 14 Apr 1890. Their children: 1. Mary Frances Maupin, b. 17 Jun 1922; m. 22 Aug 1942 to Marion P. Nordine, m. 2nd to Morgan Pepper. 2. James Clifford, b. 22 Jan 1925; m. Margaret Jean Lacy. 3. Martha Irene, b. 22 Mar 1929; m. David Louis Caldwell. 4. Elizabeth Ann, b. 3 Aug 1931; m. Harry Lee Dohoney. e. Gertie T. Maupin, b. 6 Oct 1888; m. 22 Nov 1912 to Arvin Conover. f. Orner P. Maupin, b. 5 Feb 1890; m. 24 Feb 1923 to Delpha Peterson. g. Robert Clifford Maupin, b. 1 Oct 1893; m. 9 Sep 1913 to Paralee Helm. Calvin Lafayette Maupin, m. 2nd to Emma Fields, b. 18 Jan 1878, d. 27 Nov 1937 in Louisville, KY, 3 children: 1. Walker Lafayette, b. 14 Dec 1903; m. Louise Warren. 2. Bertha Ella, b. 4 Oct 1907; m. 9 Nov 1931 to John Schiedell. 3. Joel Lee, b. 14 J u n 1914; m. 23 Sep 1934 to F Iorence Coleman. This completes descendants of Merritt (II), son of Micajah and Elizabeth Bottom Maupin.

III. Samuel Bottom Maupin (1819-1877), son of Micajah and Elizabeth Bottom Maupin, m. 4 Feb 1841, to Elizabeth Fawcett, daughter of Robert and Fanny Chandler Fawcett. Their children: 1. Mary F., b. 1842, d. 1853. 2. Robert M., b. 1843. Killed in Civil War. 3. John T., b. 1844. Louisa Elizabeth, b. 28 Feb 1846, Green Co. KY, d. 14 4. Jut 1912; m. 14 Feb 1865 to Joseph M. Allen, b. 14 Apr 1843, d. 10 Sep 1923. Their son, Robert B. Allen, b. 28 Jun 1883, d. 4 May 1947; m. 20 Dec 1903 to Daisy Benningfield, b. 30 Apr 1880, d. 18 Jun 1925. Their son Talbott R. Allen, b. 8 Aug 1909, d. 12 Dec 1988; m. 1 Jun 1930 to Jeanette Stark. Talbott Allen was a fine genealogist and helped many, especially with Kentucky records. 5. William Jefferson Maupin, b. 3 Dec 1849, d. 5 Mar 1908; m. 1878 to Malinda Cooper. Their son, Samuel Bottom Maupin, b. 13 Jun 1885 in Lebanon, KY, d. 5 Jan 1964 in Henry Co. IL; m. 13 Nov 1916 to Gertrude A. Neuh~lfen, b. 15 Nov 1890, d. 9 Dec 1977 in Peoria, IL. Their daughter Helen Marie Maupin, b. 19 Apr 1920, d. 2 Jul 1991; m. 22 Aug 1940 to LeRoy L. Nauman, b. 6 Feb 1920. Their son, Richard R. Nauman, b. 13 Mar 1941; m. 3 Jut 1965 to Genevieve Brennan. 6. Lucinda J. Maupin, b. 8 Sep 1853 in Taylor Co. KY, d. 29 Jun 1901; m. 1st to James Webb; had 3 children-James W., John C., and Annie Webb. Lucinda m. 2nd to John Rodgers and had 6 children--David, Grover, Lucian, Benjamin, Mayme and Vernon. 7. Joseph Daniel Maupin (Jodaniel), b. 11 Mar 1854, d. 1934 in Kentucky; m. 11 Oct 1882 in Taylor Co. KY to Laura Catherine Parrott. Their daughter, Laura Myrtle Maupin, b. 23 May 1883; m. 3 Sep 1905 to Joseph Hayden. She m. 2nd to George A. Rend. Children of Laura & Joseph Hayden. a. Laura Genevieve Hayden, b. 26 Aug 1908. b. J. Edward, b. 7 Sep 1912. c. Evelyn D., b. 9 Jut 1913. d. Joseph Robert, b. 22 Aug 1918 Virginia Fern, b. 14 Jun 1921 in Stafford, KS; m. e. Alfred W. Stude. 8. Eliza Ann Maupin, b. 1858; m. 8 Feb 1876 to J. Strange, moved to Arkansas.

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IV. Joel Maupin, son of Micajah and Elizabeth Bottom Maupin, was b. 24 Apr 1832; m. 11 Oct 1853 to Sarah Frances Chandler, b. 29 Oct 1832, d. 21 Mar 1862. All children of Joel and Sarah Chandler born in Taylor Co. KY. 1. William Noel Maupin, b. 1 Nov 1855 in Taylor Co. KY, d. 19 Apr 1941 in Pike Co. MO; m. Virginia Elizabeth Magruder, b. 15 Aug 1860 in Lincoln Co. MO, d. 2 Dec 1932 in Pike Co. MO. Their children: a. Ethel Marie, b. 23 Oct 1884 in Middletown, MO. b. Charles Emmett, b. 25 Apr 1887 in Middletown, MO, d. 19 Apr 1938; m. Lizzie Glasford. c. Emma A., b. 25 May 1889 in Lincoln Co. MO; m. 3 May 1925 to Ralph Meyer. d. Carey Judson, b. 27 Aug 1894. e. William Arthur, b. 25 Jul 1904. 2. Mary Elizabeth Maupin, b. 5 Nov 1856. 3. James Emmett Maupin, b. 19 Jan 1860, d. 1941; m. 12 Nov 1885 to Ella Belle Evans, b. 23 Jul 1864, daughter of W. A. Evans. Their children: A. William Edgar Maupin, b. 24 Aug 1886 in Bowling Green, KY, d. 31 Aug 1972 in Fulton, MO; m. 19 May 1909 in Glasgow, MO to Tina Belle Callahan, b. 14 Aug 1886, d. 2 Nov 1963, burial in Memorial Gardens Cemetery in Fulton, MO. Their children: 1. Henry Alfred Maupin, b. 29 Jun 1910; m. Mabie Wainscott, lives in Des Moines, IA. 2. Genevieve, b. 22 Aug 1911; m. Kenneth Wickell. 3. Elizabeth, b. 5 Jul 1913; m. Emmett Owen. 4. William Clayton Maupin, b. 7 Jan 1916 in Fulton, MO; m. 28 May 1936 to Mildred Hetherington. Their children: a. Doyal Thomas Maupin, b. 12 Oct 1938. b. Phyllis J., b. 27 Dec 1942; m. 31 Aug 1962 to LeRoy McCubbin. c. Patricia Jo, b. 14 Jun 1949; m. 28 Jun 1969 to Stanley R. Shaffer. All children born in Fulton, MO. 5. Ira Leigh Maupin, b. 11 Oct 1917; m. Melissa Brumley. 6. Leo C., b. 26 Sep 1923; m. Frances DeMars. B. C. D. E.

Robert Leigh Maupin, b. 22 Jul 1888, near Troy, MO, d. 21 Apr 1958. Joel Emmett Maupin, b. 4 Apr 1890. Jessie Inez Maupin, b. 31 Aug 1891. Floyd Alfred Maupin, b. 18 Oct 1892; m. 20 Dec 1919 to Winifred Anderson in Callaway Co. MO. Their Children:

96

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T

2. 3. 4.

F. G. H. 4.

Floyd McCall Maupin, b. 10 Apr 1921; m. 8 Feb 1948 in Mexico, MO, to Helen Black, b. 21 Oct 1924 in Fulton, MO. Their children: a. Marilyn Kaye, b. 30 Sep 1956. b. Michael McCall, d. at 2 days old. c. Mary Susan, b. 30 Aug 1960. Walter Anderson Maupin, b. 4 Mar 1923, in Oklahoma; m. 26 Sep 1964 to Elizabeth Pang. Bobby Ray, b. 2 Jan 1928 in Oklahoma; m. 5 Mar 1955 to Minnie Singletary. Jimmy Greene, b. 22 Nov 1930 in Oklahoma; m. 1 Aug 1954 to Leota Walls.

Cecil C. Maupin, b. 22 Feb 1894. Silas Eugene Maupin, b. 22 Apr 1896. Obie Dewey Maupin, b. 26 Mar 1898.

Sarah Frances Maupin, 4th child of Joel Maupin and Sarah Frances Chandler, b. 26 Feb 1862; m. 27 Jan 1881, in Kentucky to Lafayette Miskell.

After Sarah Frances Chandler Maupin died, Joel married 1 Oct 1863 to Samantha Minta Rogers, b. 19 Sep 1842. Their children:. a. Joel Edgar Maupin, b. 5 Aug 1865. b. Martha Ellen, b. 25 Aug 1866; m. Mark Lively. c. Ida Gay, b. 11 Mar 1868. d. Arthur, b. Oct 1870. e. Leigh, b. 8 Aug 1872, d. 12 Jan 1935. He was a Doctor and committed suicide in Hodgeville, KY.

******************** FOURTH GENERATION DAVID MAUPIN (17) Son of Gabriel (6), grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). David Maupin was born in Albemarle County, VA, near Free Union, about 1766 or 1768 and died in the same county in 1821. Will filed 1 Oct 1821, W.B. 7, pg 141. He married 13 Oct 1785 to Sarah Spencer, daughter of John and Rosanna Spencer, and she was a sister of Ann Spencer, who married Thomas Maupin (18). A history of the Spencer family is given under this number. The children of David Maupin were: Pleasant -married Lucinda Wood, 5 Dec 1807. He died in 1866. Children were: a. David W., b. 9 Feb 1808, d. 22 Mar 1862; m. 5 Apr 1832 to Virginia Mills. Served in Southern army. Children

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IV. Joel Maupin, son of Micajah and Elizabeth Bottom Maupin, was b. 24 Apr 1832; m. 11 Oct 1853 to Sarah Frances Chandler, b. 29 Oct 1832, d. 21 Mar 1862. All children of Joel and Sarah Chandler born in Taylor Co. KY. 1. William Noel Maupin, b. 1 Nov 1855 in Taylor Co. KY, d. 19 Apr 1941 in Pike Co. MO; m. Virginia Elizabeth Magruder, b. 15 Aug 1860 in Lincoln Co. MO, d. 2 Dec 1932 in Pike Co. MO. Their children: a. Ethel Marie, b. 23 Oct 1884 in Middletown, MO. b. Charles Emmett, b. 25 Apr 1887 in Middletown, MO, d. 19 Apr 1938; m. Lizzie Glasford. c. Emma A., b. 25 May 1889 in Lincoln Co. MO; m. 3 May 1925 to Ralph Meyer. d. Carey Judson, b. 27 Aug 1894. e. William Arthur, b. 25 Jul 1904. 2. Mary Elizabeth Maupin, b. 5 Nov 1856. 3. James Emmett Maupin, b. 19 Jan 1860, d. 1941; m. 12 Nov 1885 to Ella Belle Evans, b. 23 Jul 1864, daughter of W. A. Evans. Their children: A. William Edgar Maupin, b. 24 Aug 1886 in Bowling Green, KY, d. 31 Aug 1972 in Fulton, MO; m. 19 May 1909 in Glasgow, MO to Tina Belle Callahan, b. 14 Aug 1886, d. 2 Nov 1963, burial in Memorial Gardens Cemetery in Fulton, MO. Their children: 1. Henry Alfred Maupin, b. 29 Jun 1910; m. Mable Wainscott, lives in Des Moines, IA. 2. Genevieve, b. 22 Aug 1911; m. Kenneth Wickell. 3. Elizabeth, b. 5 Jul 1913; m. Emmett Owen. 4. William Clayton Maupin, b. 7 Jan 1916 in Fulton, MO; m. 28 May 1936 to Mildred Hetherington. Their children: a. Doyal Thomas Maupin, b. 12 Oct 1938. b. Phyllis J., b. 27 Dec 1942; m. 31 Aug 1962 to LeRoy McCubbin. c. Patricia Jo, b. 14 Jun 1949; m. 28 Jun 1969 to Stanley R. Shaffer. All children born in Fulton, MO. 5. Ira Leigh Maupin, b. 11 Oct 1917; m. Melissa Brumley. 6. Leo C., b. 26 Sep 1923; m. Frances DeMars. B. C. D. E.

Robert Leigh Maupin, b. 22 Jut 1888, near Troy, MO, d. 21 Apr 1958. Joel Emmett Maupin, b. 4 Apr 1890. Jessie Inez Maupin, b. 31 Aug 1891. Floyd Alfred Maupin, b. 18 Oct 1892; m. 20 Dec 1919 to Winifred Anderson in Callaway Co. MO. Their Children:

96

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2. 3. 4.

F. G. H. 4.

Floyd McCall Maupin, b. 10 Apr 1921; m. 8 Feb 1948 in Mexico, MO, to Helen Black, b. 21 Oct 1924 in Fulton, MO. Their children: a. Marilyn Kaye, b. 30 Sep 1956. b. Michael McCall, d. at 2 days old. c. Mary Susan, b. 30 Aug 1960. Walter Anderson Maupin, b. 4 Mar 1923, in Oklahoma; m. 26 Sep 1964 to Elizabeth Pang. Bobby Ray, b. 2 Jan 1928 in Oklahoma; m. 5 Mar 1955 to Minnie Singletary. Jimmy Greene, b. 22 Nov 1930 in Oklahoma; m. 1 Aug 1954 to Leota Walls.

Cecil C. Maupin, b. 22 Feb 1894. Silas Eugene Maupin, b. 22 Apr 1896. Obie Dewey Maupin, b. 26 Mar 1898.

Sarah Frances Maupin, 4th child of Joel Maupin and Sarah Frances Chandler, b. 26 Feb 1862; m. 27 Jan 1881, in Kentucky to Lafayette Miskell.

After Sarah Frances Chandler Maupin died, Joel married 1 Oct 1863 to Samantha Minta Rogers, b. 19 Sep 1842. Their children:. a. Joel Edgar Maupin, b. 5 Aug 1865. b. Martha Ellen, b. 25 Aug 1866; m. Mark Lively. c. Ida Gay, b. 11 Mar 1868. d. Arthur, b. Oct 1870. e. Leigh, b. 8 Aug 1872, d. 12 Jan 1935. He was a Doctor and committed suicide in Hodgeville, KY.

******************** FOURTH GENERATION DAVID MAUPIN (17) Son of Gabriel (6), grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). David Maupin was born in Albemarle County, VA, near Free Union, about 1766 or 1768 and died in the same county in 1821. Will filed 1 Oct 1821, W.B. 7, pg 141. He married 13 Oct 1785 to Sarah Spencer, daughter of John and Rosanna Spencer, and she was a sister of Ann Spencer, who married Thomas Maupin (18). A history of the Spencer family is given under this number. The children of David Maupin were: Pleasant -married Lucinda Wood, 5 Dec 1807. He died in 1866. Children were: a. David W., b. 9 Feb 1808, d. 22 Mar 1862; m. 5 Apr 1832 to Virginia Mills. Served in Southern army. Children

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Note: The birth dates obtained from Bible record, also recorded in that Bible a death date for Wallon Maupin, 22 Mar 1881. We found in the marriage records for Albemarle County, VA-Wayland W. Maupin married 7 Apr 1853 to Lucy Davis. David- born 16 Dec 1788, son of David and Sarah Spencer, died 10 May 1846. Married, 3 Feb 1812 to Jerusha Snow, b. 2 Nov 1791, daughter of Richard Snow. Jerusha died 7 Mar 1849. Their children were: a. Richard Snow Maupin, M.D., b. 1816-d. 1887; married Miss McDowell. David, married 7 May 1839 Frances Cobb. A certain b. Richard Cobb Maupin married a daughter of James Harris and Mary McCullough. He was, in all probability, a son of this David Maupin. c. Ernaline. Rice- born 1795-died 15 Dec 1863; married 2 Dec 1820 to Mary Carr, daughter of Meekins Carr. Their children: a. Fendol b. Nancy, married 30 Apr 1848 to William Tilman. c. Julia Ann, b. 1830; married 2 Apr 1849 to Caleb Abel of Moore's Creek. They had a daughter, Polly Abel. d. Rice W., born 1829. e. Gabriel Wade, served in the Confederate army. He, or a cousin of the same name, had a son, John Milton Maupin, who emigrated to Howard Co. MO. A daughter of this later, Elizabeth, was the wife of John B. Maupin of Howard Co. See Matthew (18a). f. Angeline, born 1836, married James M. Maddox. g. Jane Shannon. h: James Ross married Emma Sutphen. i. Mildred Ellen married Napoleon Crawford Maupin.

*

Gabriel -married Lucy Huckstep; second, Lucy Mallory. He died in 1858. His Will is in Will Book 25, p. 361, Albemarle Co. VA. Their children: a. James Hardin, b. 1838, was a Confederate soldier. b. Gabriel 0., b. 1841, served in the Confederate army. c. Ellen, b. 1844. d. Lucy, b. 1846, married James R. Maupin.

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were--Benjamin F., Alexander, Mary C., Zachariah, Frances, George W., Lucy J., and James E. Mary, b. 13 Dec 1810; m. 13 Mar 1833 to John A. Via. Pleasant W., b. 23 Nov 1815; married three times. One of his wives was Sarah Catterton to whom he was married 3 Aug 1836 in Albemarle Co. VA. William W. b. 8 Sep 1820.

Note: The birth dates obtained from Bible record, also recorded in that Bible a death date for Wallon Maupin, 22 Mar 1881. We found in the marriage records for Albemarle County, VA-Wayland W. Maupin married 7 Apr 1853 to Lucy Davis.

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David- born 16 Dec 1788, son of David and Sarah Spencer, died 10 May 1846. Married, 3 Feb 1812 to Jerusha Snow, b. 2 Nov 1791, daughter of Richard Snow. Jerusha died 7 Mar 1849. Their children were: a. Richard Snow Maupin, M.D., b. 1816-d. 1887; married Miss McDowell. David, married 7 May 1839 Frances Cobb. A certain b. Richard Cobb Maupin married a daughter of James Harris and Mary McCullough. He was, in all probability, a son of this David Maupin. c. Ernaline. Rice - born 1795-died 15 Dec 1863; married 2 Dec 1820 to Mary Carr, daughter of Meekins Carr. Their children: a. Fendol b. Nancy, married 30 Apr 1848 to William Tilman. c. Julia Ann, b. 1830; married 2 Apr 1849 to Caleb Abel of Moore's Creek. They had a daughter, Polly Abel. d. Rice W., born 1829. e. Gabriel Wade, served in the Confederate army. He, or a cousin of the same name, had a son, John Milton Maupin, who emigrated to Howard Co. MO. A daughter of this later, Elizabeth, was the wife of John B. Maupin of Howard Co. See Matthew (18a). f. Angeline, born 1836, married James M. Maddox. g. Jane Shannon. James Ross married Emma Sutphen. i. Mildred Ellen married Napoleon Crawford Maupin.

*

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Gabriel -married Lucy Huckstep; second, Lucy Mallory. He died in 1858. His Will is in Will Book 25, p. 361, Albemarle Co. VA. Their children: a. James Hardin, b. 1838, was a Confederate soldier. b. Gabriel 0., b. 1841, served in the Confederate army. c. Ellen, b. 1844• d. Lucy, b. 1846, married James R. Maupin.

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Thomas B. - born 1801. Married, 5 Dec 1825 to Susan D. Gibson. Their children: a. Sarah E. married 24 Dec 1867 to Henry T. Davis. b. Nancy Frances, married Wm. T. Harris. c. John D. married Elizabeth Smith. d. Gabriel Nicholas, served in Southern army. Married 14 Feb 1867 to Lizzie Harris. e. Mary Ann married 13 Dec 1866 to J. Nathl Maupin. f. Susane Mildred, unmarried. g. Bernard P., married 3 Nov 1866 to Susan A. Maupin. * h. Henry Chapman married, 29 Feb 1876 to Mary Lucy Burruss. i. Lucy E. married, 5 Dec 1872 to B. L. Via. j. Thomas R. married 1 Jut 1866 to Sallie E. Maupin.

*

*Nicholas - married 30 Mar 1835 to Lucinda Ballard. Their children were: * a. Napoleon Crawford Maupin * b. Laura Ella, b. 19 Jan 1839; married 16 Feb 1865 in Caldwell Co. MO to William Birney. c. Henry Clay and his twind. Virginia Ann e. David Rice f. George Andrew g. Thomas Ernest Susanna- married 1 Feb 1813 in Orange Co. VA to John Dunn. Their children were: a. James Dunn, married 10 Jut 1834 to Betsy Gentry. She was a sister of Martha, wife of Joel Maupin (42). b. Sally Dunn, wife of Robt. Garrison. c. Nancy Dunn, married 20 Dec 1836 to Thomas Via.

Rosanna -

Eldest daughter, married her cousin, John Maupin

(41).

Sally (Sarah) - married 1 Nov 1819 to Elijah Craig. Their children were: a. David Craig, married his cousin, Mary Gibson. See below. b. Spencer Craig c. Elijah Craig of Hannibal, MO, father of W. B. Craig, minister. d. Mildred Craig.

"

Polly - married 5 Sep 1825 to Henry Gibson. They settled in Monroe County, MO. Children: a. Mary, b. 3 Jut 1840, d. 18 Oct 1924 near Anabel, MO. She married 28 Sep 1865 at Plattsburg, MO to David M. Craig. She had nine children. b. Henry Craig of Cairo, MO. ******** other grandchildren of Gabriel Maupin (6) The following Maupins were grandchildren of Gabriel Maupin (6) and his wife, Ann Ballard. They are the children of Daniel Maupin and Jane Via; Matthew Maupin and Lucy Ballard; Gabriel Maupin and Mary Mullins or John Maupin and Betsy Mills: Jane Maupin, married Archibald Turk, 14 Oct 1815. David W. Maupin, married Virginia Ann Mills, 27 Mar 1832. Mary Maupin, married John A. Via, 13 Mar 1833. Gabriel 0. Maupin, on Confederate muster rolls. Thomas R. Maupin, on Confederate muster rolls. Horace Maupin on Confederate muster rolls. Carson Maupin, killed at Gettysburg. John D. Maupin, married Narcissa Davis, 3 Mar 1836. Served with Imboden's Cavalry (both born 1814).

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Sixth Generation Forward From David (17) Pleasant White Maupin, son of Pleasant and Lucinda Wood Maupin, was born 23 Nov 1815, d. 21 Nov 1891. He was married 3 times, (1) Sarah Chatterton in 1837, (2) M. J. Batton in 1852, (3) Elisa Ann Wood in 1866. There were 5 children: * 1. Edward Pleasant Maupin, b. 14 Jan 1870, d. 3 Mar 1948; m. 14 Feb 1889, to Susan Catherine James, b. 25 Apr 1872, d. 11 Feb 1900. 2. David Maupin, m. Susan Sandridge. 3. George A. Maupin, m. Nannie Garrison. 4. Joel R. Maupin, m. Lilly Maupin. 5. Susan Maupin, m. (1) Edward Munday, (2) Jerry Coleman.

*Edward Pleasant Maupin and Susan Catherine James had 3 sons and 2 daughters. I. Levi Pleasant Maupin (1893-1971); m. 2 Jun 1917, to Alberta Sandridge (1896-1971 ). Their children:

a. Elizabeth - married 17 Sep 1828 to Clifton Maupin (44).

/)1

Levi Pleasant Maupin, Jr., b. 25 Oct 1924; m. 9 Oct 1949, to Mary Louise Hodges, b. 22 Jut 1926. Their children: 1 01

j


Thomas B.- born 1801. Married, 5 Dec 1825 to Susan D. Gibson. Their children: a. Sarah E. married 24 Dec 1867 to Henry T. Davis. b. Nancy Frances, married Wm. T. Harris. * c. John D. married Elizabeth Smith. d. Gabriel Nicholas, served in Southern army. Married 14 Feb 1867 to Lizzie Harris. e. Mary Ann married 13 Dec 1866 to J. Nat hi Maupin. f. Susane Mildred, unmarried. g. Bernard P., married 3 Nov 1866 to Susan A. Maupin. * h. Henry Chapman married, 29 Feb 1876 to Mary Lucy Burruss. i. Lucy E. married, 5 Dec 1872 to B. L. Via. j. Thomas R. married 1 Jut 1866 to Sallie E. Maupin. *Nicholas - married 30 Mar 1835 to Lucinda Ballard. Their children were: * a. Napoleon Crawford Maupin * b. Laura Ella, b. 19 Jan 1839; married 16 Feb 1865 in Caldwell Co. MO to William Birney. c. Henry Clay and his twind. Virginia Ann e. David Rice f. George Andrew g. Thomas Ernest Susanna- married 1 Feb 1813 in Orange Co. VA to John Dunn. Their children were: a. James Dunn, married 10 Jul 1834 to Betsy Gentry. She was a sister of Martha, wife of Joel Maupin (42). b. Sally Dunn, wife of Robt. Garrison. c. Nancy Dunn, married 20 Dec 1836 to Thomas Via.

Rosanna -

Eldest daughter, married her cousin, John Maupin

(41).

Sally (Sarah) - married 1 Nov 1819 to Elijah Craig. Their children were: a. David Craig, married his cousin, Mary Gibson. See below. b. Spencer Craig c. Elijah Craig of Hannibal, MO, father of W. B. Craig, minister. d. Mildred Craig.

Polly - married 5 Sep 1825 to Henry Gibson. They settled in Monroe County, MO. Children: a. Mary, b. 3 Jul 1840, d. 18 Oct 1924 near Anabel, MO. She married 28 Sep 1865 at Plattsburg, MO to David M. Craig. She had nine children. b. Henry Craig of Cairo, MO. ******** other grandchildren of Gabriel Maupin (6) The following Maupins were grandchildren of Gabriel Maupin (6) and his wife, Ann Ballard. They are the children of Daniel Maupin and Jane Via; Matthew Maupin and Lucy Ballard; Gabriel Maupin and Mary Mullins or John Maupin and Betsy Mills: Jane Maupin, married Archibald Turk, 14 Oct 1815. David W. Maupin, married Virginia Ann Mills, 27 Mar 1832. Mary Maupin, married John A. Via, 13 Mar 1833. Gabriel 0. Maupin, on Confederate muster rolls. Thomas R. Maupin, on Confederate muster rolls. Horace Maupin on Confederate muster rolls. Carson Maupin, killed at Gettysburg. John D. Maupin, married Narcissa Davis, 3 Mar 1836. Served with Imboden's Cavalry (both born 1814).

100

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I Sixth Generation Forward From David (17) Pleasant White Maupin, son of Pleasant and Lucinda Wood Maupin, was born 23 Nov 1815, d. 21 Nov 1891. He was married 3 times, (1) Sarah Chatterton in 1837, (2) M. J. Batton in 1852, (3) Elisa Ann Wood in 1866. There were 5 children: * 1. Edward Pleasant Maupin, b. 14 Jan 1870, d. 3 Mar 1948; m. 14 Feb 1889, to Susan Catherine James, b. 25 Apr 1872, d. 11 Feb 1900. 2. David Maupin, m. Susan Sandridge. 3. George A. Maupin, m. Nannie Garrison. 4. Joel R. Maupin, m. Lilly Maupin. 5. Susan Maupin, m. (1) Edward Munday, (2) Jerry Coleman.

*Edward Pleasant Maupin and Susan Catherine James had 3 sons and 2 daughters. I. Levi Pleasant Maupin (1893-1971); m. 2 Jun 1917, to Alberta Sandridge (1896-1971 ). Their children:

a. Elizabeth -married 17 Sep 1828 to Clifton Maupin (44).

!.-

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Levi Pleasant Maupin, Jr., b. 25 Oct 1924; m. 9 Oct 1949, to Mary Louise Hodges, b. 22 Jul 1926. Their children: 1 01

J


1.

2. 3. 4.

Susanne P. Maupin, b. 25 Jul 1952; m. Charles A. Gard, b. 14 Apr 1947--one son, Thomas Gard, b. 1985. Melanie Jo Maupin, b. 8 Jun 1956. Jennie Lind Maupin, b. 15 May 1957. Teresa Louise Maupin, b. 6 Nov 1958; m. 1982 to James F. Rayman, b. 28 Sep 1953-- 2 children--Ashleigh Lind, b. 20 Dec 1986 and Samantha R., b. 14 Nov 1990.

Note: Levi Pleasant Maupin, Sr. and Alberta Sandridge were married in a double ceremony with his brother Melvin Napoleon Maupin and Irene Vollmer. III. IV. V.

l·11

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Annie L. Maupin, third child of Edward P. Maupin and Susan James, b. 1896; m. Reed Davis. Ernest H., b. 1898; m. Jennie Via. Catherine (Katy), m. 1st Walter Via; 2nd Charlie Sandridge.

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Mary McCoy Maupin, second child of Levi Pleasant Maupin and Alberta Sandridge, b. 1 Mar 1928; m. James Mason Belew, b. 6 Sep 1925. Their children: 1. Jerry Mason Belew, b. 15 Aug 1950. 2. Judith P. Belew, b. 24 Sep 1952; m. Dennis Hogberg, b. 26 May 1947. Their 2 children Michael Dennis Hogberg, b. 20 Jun 1984 and Shanna P. Hogberg, b. 9 May 1987. 3. Daniel L. Belew, b. 17 Sep 1954; m. Rebecca J. Engle, b. 26 Oct 1955. Their 2 children Brandon Loving Belew, b. 26 Feb 1985 and Bonnie Jean Belew, b. 6 Sep 1987.

Pleasant White Maupin, son of Pleasant and Lucinda Wood Maupin, m. 3rd to Elisa A. Wood, b. 12 Aug 1834, d. 23 Jun 1891. Their son George Allen Maupin, b. 26 Apr 1873, d. 21 Sep 1958; m. Nannie C. Garrison, b. 8 Jan 1871, d. 27 Jun 1958. Their son, Arthur Thomas Maupin, b. 14 Sep 1912, d. 15 Apr 1975; m. 18 Sep 1931 to Lillian Gertrude Maupin, daughter of Addison and Beulah Pritchard Maupin, b. 19 Apr 1914, d. 15 Apr 1975. Their son, Gaa Thomas Maupin, b. 30 Oct 1946; m. 15 Aug 1970 to Constance Carol White, b. 20 Nov 1951. Their children, Matthew Robert Maupin, b. 17 Aug 1971 and Laura Lillian Maupin, b. 10 Jun 1975.

Jean Page Maupin, third child of Levi Pleasant Maupin and Alberta Sandridge, b. 6 Oct 1930; m. William Mitchell Patterson, b. 22 Jun 1926. Their children: 1. William Mitchell Patterson, Jr., b. 15 Apr 1959; m. Donna Marie Roberts, b. 3 Jun 1959. 2. John Page Patterson, b. 10 Mar 1961; m. Theresa Lynn Herring, b. 21 Apr 1960. Their children: Tyler Books Patterson, b. 29 Apr 1981 and Tiffany Page Patterson, b. 19 Apr 1985.

The parents of Gary Maupin, Arthur Thomas Maupin and Lillian Gertrude Maupin, were introduced at church in Washington, D.C. because they had the same last name! Arthur's lineage goes back to Gabriel and Ann Ballard, Lillian's to William and Mildred White, both sons of Daniel and Margaret Via Maupin. The Maupin family owes a debt of gratitude to Gary Maupin of Fairfax, VA for his contribution to our family history. Gary sponsored a young man to research in France whose work produced a lot of answers. His excellent report is covered in earlier pages. Gary then went with his family to France and he shared his pictures and experiences with family members in the Colonial Williamsburg, VA, meeting, Nov 1 & 2, 1991. . . , A/

Melvin Napoleon Maupin, second son of Edward P. and Susan C. James Maupin, b. 1894; m. 1917 to Irene A. Vollmer, 1890-1968. Their children: a. June J. Maupin, b. 1918; m. W. Herbert Dixon, b. 1914. They had 2 sons--W. Herbert Dixon, Jr., b. 1942 and Richard Maupin Dixon, b. 1945. Eleanor D. Maupin, m. John Rueter; daughter b. Ann, b. 1946. c. Nancy I. Maupin, b. 1926; m. Bernard Kurland, b. 1919--3 daughters--Jean, 1947; Janet, 1950 and Judi, 1953. 102

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Gabriel Wade Maupin, son of Rice and Mary 1 born in Albemarle Co. VA, 8 Jul 1832, died th Married 24 Nov 1868 to Malinda Maddox, b. 8 A 1890, the daughter of John H and Sarah Car children: 1. Henry Randolph Maupin, b. 8 Oct 18 m. 7 Oct 1896 to Emma Jane Maupin, 17 Sep 1955, daughter of G. 0. and I children:

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Susanne P. Maupin, b. 25 Jul 1952; m. Charles A. Gard, b. 14 Apr 1947--one son, Thomas Gard, b. 1985. Melanie Jo Maupin, b. 8 Jun 1956. Jennie Lind Maupin, b. 15 May 1957. Teresa Louise Maupin, b. 6 Nov 1958; m. 1982 to James F. Rayman, b. 28 Sep 1953-- 2 children--Ashleigh Lind, b. 20 Dec 1986 and Samantha R., b. 14 Nov 1990.

b.

Mary McCoy Maupin, second child of Levi Pleasant Maupin and Alberta Sandridge, b. 1 Mar 1928; m. James Mason Belew, b. 6 Sep 1925. Their children: 1. Jerry Mason Belew, b. 15 Aug 1950. 2. Judith P. Belew, b. 24 Sep 1952; m. Dennis Hogberg, b. 26 May 1947. Their 2 childrenMichael Dennis Hogberg, b. 20 Jun 1984 and Shanna P. Hogberg, b. 9 May 1987. 3. Daniel L. Belew, b. 17 Sep 1954; m. Rebecca J. Engle, b. 26 Oct 1955. Their 2 children Brandon Loving Belew, b. 26 Feb 1985 and Bonnie Jean Belew, b. 6 Sep 1987.

c.

Jean Page Maupin, third child of Levi Pleasant Maupin and Alberta Sandridge, b. 6 Oct 1930; m. William Mitchell Patterson, b. 22 Jun 1926. Their children: 1. William Mitchell Patterson, Jr., b. 15 Apr 1959; m.Donna Marie Roberts, b. 3 Jun 1959. 2. John Page Patterson, b. 10 Mar 1961; m. Theresa Lynn Herring, b. 21 Apr 1960. Their children: Tyler Books Patterson, b. 29 Apr 1981 and Tiffany Page Patterson, b. 19 Apr 1985.

Melvin Napoleon Maupin, second son of Edward P. and Susan C. James Maupin, b. 1894; m. 1917 to Irene A. Vollmer, 1890-1968. Their children: a. June J. Maupin, b. 1918; m. W. Herbert Dixon, b. 1914. They had 2 sons--W. Herbert Dixon, Jr., b. 1942 and Richard Maupin Dixon, b. 1945. b. Eleanor D. Maupin, m. John Rueter; daughter Ann, b. 1946. Nancy I. Maupin, b. 1926; m. Bernard Kurland, c. b. 1919--3 daughters--Jean, 1947; Janet, 1950 and Judi, 1953.

Note: Levi Pleasant Maupin, Sr. and Alberta Sandridge were married in a double ceremony with his brother Melvin Napoleon Maupin and Irene Vollmer. III. IV. V.

Annie L. Maupin, third child of Edward P. Maupin and Susan James, b. 1896; m. Reed Davis. Ernest H., b. 1898; m. Jennie Via. Catherine (Katy), m. 1st Walter Via; 2nd Charlie Sandridge.

Pleasant White Maupin, son of Pleasant and Lucinda Wood Maupin, m. 3rd to Elisa A. Wood, b. 12 Aug 1834, d. 23 Jun 1891. Their son George Allen Maupin, b. 26 Apr 1873, d. 21 Sep 1958; m. Nannie c. Garrison, b. 8 Jan 1871, d. 27 Jun 1958. Their son, Arthur Thomas Maupin, b. 14 Sep 1912, d. 15 Apr 1975; m. 18 Sep 1931 to Lillian Gertrude Maupin, daughter of Addison and Beulah Pritchard Maupin, b. 19 Apr 1914, d. 15 Apr 1975. Their son, Gary Thomas Maupin, b. 30 Oct 1946; m. 15 Aug 1970 to Constance Carol White, b. 20 Nov 1951. Their children, Matthew Robert Maupin, b. 17 Aug 1971 and Laura Lillian Maupin, b. 10 Jun 1975. The parents of Gary Maupin, Arthur Thomas Maupin and Lillian Gertrude Maupin, were introduced at church in Washington, D.C. because they had the same last name! Arthur's lineage goes back to Gabriel and Ann Ballard, Lillian's to William and Mildred White, both sons of Daniel and Margaret Via Maupin. The Maupin family owes a debt of gratitude to Gary Maupin of Fairfax, VA for his contribution to our family history. Gary sponsored a young man to research in France whose work produced a lot of answers. His excellent report is covered in earlier pages. Gary then went with his family to France and he shared his pictures and experiences with family members in the Colonial Williamsburg, VA, meeting, Nov 1 & 2, 1991. , ,;~

******************** Sixth Generation from Rice Maupin, son of Dav Gabriel Wade Maupin, son of Rice and Mary 1 born in Albemarle Co. VA, 8 Jul 1832, died th Married 24 Nov 1868 to Malinda Maddox, b. 8 A 1890, the daughter of John H and Sarah Car children: 1. Henry Randolph Maupin, b. 8 Oct 18 m. 7 Oct 1896 to Emma Jane Maupin, 17 Sep 1955, daughter of G. 0. and I children:

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Leona Gabriella, b. 7 Dec 1898; m. 30 Nov 1921 to Jennings Page Dollins, b. 31 Mar 1898--one child, Jennings Page Dollins, Jr., b. 16 Jan 1923; m. Ruth Evans.

William Franklin Maupin, 1871-1953, unmarried. Gabriel Emmette Maupin, b. 26 May 1876; m. Carrie Edrlg_ge Jones. Their daughter, Gladys Juliette M_~YQl_fJ, b. 21 May 1920 in Albemarle Co. VA; m. 17 Jun 1944 to Evans Mundy Leake. One child, Anne ~eth Leake, b. 23 May 1946; m. 17 Jun 1967 to ~s Sheild McCandlish, Jr.; one child, Charles Sheild McCandlish III, b. 4 May 1969 in Knoxvflte~ TN: ********************

Sixth Generation Forward from Thomas B. under David (17) John D. Maupin, son of Thomas B. and Susan Gibson Maupin; m. Elizabeth Smith. Their children were: Thomas D., John W., Bernard B., Henry F., Sally s., Smith G., Lizzie, Ovander Pittman, and Joseph G. Bernard B. Maupin . ' married Lula Deane and had 3 children; Newton, ~. and Susn Elizabeth. J. Irving Maupin married 5 Oct 1921 to Rosalie Alice Bruffey and had 6 children. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Alvin, b. 20 Nov 1922, d. 9 Jul 1989. Wendell w., b. 22 Oct 1924. ~., b. 27 Dec 1925. Erma E., b. 9 Jun 1928. Janis I, b. 12 Jun 1930. Giles B., b. 14 May 1932.

Hollis W. Maupin married Catherine Louise Thompson, daughter of Henry Thompson, b. 8 Sep 1875, d. 9 May 1952 and Fannie Puckett, b. 8 Jut 1897, d. 27 Feb 1977. Hollis and Catherine had Steve, b. 15 May 1948; Garry w., b. 18 Jun 1949; Kurt J. b. 22 Sep 1958 and ~., b. 24 Aug 1960. Ovander Pittman Maupin, son of John D. and Elizabeth Smith Maupin; m. Annie Frances Dunn. Ovander died 7 Apr 1939 and Annie died 23 Feb 1988. Their children: 1. Alma Bernice Maupin, b. 17 Oct 1907, d. Nov 1929. 2. Garnett P. Maupin, b. 4 Apr 1909. Ora~, b. 23 Sep 1910. 3. 4. Waddell Henry Maupin, b. 23 Jun 1913; one son Douglas Henry Maupin.

104

Ora A. Maupin, lives in Charlottesville, VA, where she served that city's residents as commissioner of Revenue beginning in 1952. Responsible for city and state business as well as income and other tax matters. She served until her retirement in the 1980s. Since her retirement, Ora Maupin has given her time and talent as a volunteer in the Historical library, the hospital, and various organizations besides her church work.

****** Henry Chapman Maupin, Sr. (Chap), son of Thomas B. Maupin and Susan 0. Gibson, b. 26 Mar 1845 at Free Union, Albemarle Co., VA, d. 6 Mar 1927 at Free Union, VA. Married 29 Feb 1876 to Mary Lucy Burruss, b. 12 Jun 1854 at Free Union, VA, daughter of Capt. Robert D. Burruss and Frances Isabella Blackwell. Mary died 13 May 1924. She and Henry are buried in the Wesley Chapel Methodist Church cemetery at Free Union. Their children: 1. Fannies. Maupin, b. 18 Dec 1876, d. 22 Oct 1943; m. 27 Sep 1905 to John L. Bruce, 2 daughters. 2. Robert T. Maupin, b. 24 Jan 1879, d. 25 Oct 1918; m. 27 Sep 1906 to Alice Holsing, 2 sons. 3. William B. Maupin, b. 12 May 1881, d. 13 Feb 1953; m. 22 Dec 1909 to Sallie Mary Dunn, 2 sons, 3 daughters. 4. Sallie M. Maupin, b. 25 Jun 1883, d. 11 Jul 1885. 5. Henry Chapman MauQ.!n, Jr., b. 17 Jun 1886. 6. Lucy M. Maupin, b. 7 Oct 1888, d. 2 Dec 1968; m. 29 Oct 1913 to William N. Dudley, 1 son, 3 daughters. 7. Nellie E. Maupin, b. 3 Jul 1890, d. 22 Jan 1974; m. 8 Jun 1929 to James S. Watkins, no children. 8. Effie Eliza Maupin, b. 25 Mar 1892, d. 8 Nov 1961, never married. 9. Charlie I. Maupin, b. 18 Jun 1894, d. 31 Dec 1954; m. 28 Jun 1927 to Ellen Little, no children.

*

*Henry Chapman Maupin, Jr. (Henry), son of Henry Chapman Maupin (Chap), and Mary Lucy Burrus, b. 17 Jun 1886 at Free Union, Albemarle Co. VA, died 27 Apr 1959 at Arlington, VA; m. 2 Aug 1916 to Eva Christian Davis, b. 26 Jun 1891 at Earlysville, Albemarle Co. VA, daughter of John Tucker Davis and Lelia Cecelia Walton. Eva died 3 Mar 1987 at Arlington, VA. Eva and Henry are buried in the Nat'l Memorial Park Cemetery at Falls Church, VA. Their children all born in Charlottesville, VA, and grew up in Arlington Co. VA. 1. Elizabeth Gertrude Maupin m. 28 Sep 1940 to James Henry Wallace, one son, James Henry Wallace, Jr. 2. Mary Lelier Maupin, m. (1) 6 Dec 1941 to s. Joseph Marek--one daughter--Marilyn Marek. m. (2) 20 Jul to Sidney Frank Mason. 1

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2. 3.

Leona Gabriella, b. 7 Dec 1898; m. 30 Nov 1921 to Jennings Page Dollins, b. 31 Mar 1898--one child, Jennings Page Dollins, Jr., b. 16 Jan 1923; m. Ruth Evans.

William Franklin Maupin, 1871-1953, unmarried. Gabriel Emmette Maupin, b. 26 May 1876; m. Carrie Edridge Jones. Their daughter, Gladys Juliette M~ldQLI1, b. 21 May 1920 in Albemarle Co. VA; m. 17 Jun 1944 to Evans Mundy Leake. One child, Anne Elizabeth Leake, b. 23 May 1946; m. 17 Jun 1967 to Charles Sheild McCandlish, Jr.; one child, .Charles Sheild McCandlish, III, b. 4 May 1969 in Knoxville, TN. ********************

Sixth Generation Forward from Thomas B. under David (17) John D. Maupin, son of Thomas B. and Susan Gibson Maupin; m. Elizabeth Smith. Their children were: Thomas D., John W., Bernard B., Henry F., Sally S., Smith G., Lizzie, Ovander Pittman, and Joseph G. Bernard B. Maupin, married Luta Deane and had 3 children; Newton, J. Irving, and Susn Elizabeth. J. Irving Maupin married 5 Oct 1921 to Rosalie Alice Bruffey and had 6 children. 1. Alvin, b. 20 Nov 1922, d. 9 Jut 1989. Wendell w., b. 22 Oct 1924. 2. Hollis W., b. 27 Dec 1925. 3. Erma E., b. 9 Jun 1928. 4. Janis I, b. 12 Jun 1930. 5. Giles B., b. 14 May 1932. 6. Hollis W. Maupin married Catherine Louise Thompson, daughter of Henry Thompson, b. 8 Sep 1875, d. 9 May 1952 and Fannie Puckett, b. 8 Jut 1897, d. 27 Feb 1977. Hollis and Catherine had Steve, b. 15 May 1948; Garry W., b. 18 Jun 1949; Kurt J. b. 22 Sep 1958 and Cheryl A., b. 24 Aug 1960. Ovander Pittman Maupin, son of John D. and Elizabeth Smith Maupin; m. Annie Frances Dunn. Ovander died 7 Apr 1939 and Annie died 23 Feb 1988. Their children: 1. Alma Bernice Maupin, b. 17 Oct 1907, d. Nov 1929. Garnett P. Maupin, b. 4 Apr 1909. 2. Ora A. Maupin, b. 23 Sep 1910. 3. Waddell Henry Maupin, b. 23 Jun 1913; one son Douglas 4. Henry Maupin.

Ora A. Maupin, lives in Charlottesville, VA, where she served that city's residents as commissioner of Revenue beginning in 1952. Responsible for city and state business as well as income and other tax matters. She served until her retirement in the 1980s. Since her retirement, Ora Maupin has given her time and talent as a volunteer in the Historical library, the hospital, and various organizations besides her church work.

****** Henry Chapman Maupin, Sr. (Chap), son of Thomas B. Maupin and Susan 0. Gibson, b. 26 Mar 1845 at Free Union, Albemarle Co., VA, d. 6 Mar 1927 at Free Union, VA. Married 29 Feb 1876 to Mary Lucy Burruss, b. 12 Jun 1854 at Free Union, VA, daughter of Capt. Robert D. Burruss and Frances Isabella Blackwell. Mary died 13 May 1924. She and Henry are buried in the Wesley Chapel Methodist Church cemetery at Free Union. Their children: 1. FannieS. Maupin, b. 18 Dec 1876, d. 22 Oct 1943; m. 27 Sep 1905 to John L. Bruce, 2 daughters. 2. Robert T. Maupin, b. 24 Jan 1879, d. 25 Oct 1918; m. 27 Sep 1906 to Alice Holsing, 2 sons. 3. William B. Maupin, b. 12 May 1881, d. 13 Feb 1953; m. 22 Dec 1909 to Sallie Mary Dunn, 2 sons, 3 daughters. 4. Sallie M. Maupin, b. 25 Jun 1883, d. 11 Jut 1885. Henry Chapman Maupin, Jr., b. 17 Jun 1886. 5. 6. Lucy M. Maupin, b. 7 Oct 1888, d. 2 Dec 1968; m. 29 Oct 1913 to William N. Dudley, 1 son, 3 daughters. 7. Nellie E. Maupin, b. 3 Jut 1890, d. 22 Jan 1974; m. 8 Jun 1929 to James S. Watkins, no children. 8. Effie Eliza Maupin, b. 25 Mar 1892, d. 8 Nov 1961, never married. 9. Charlie I. Maupin, b. 18 Jun 1894, d. 31 Dec 1954; m. 28 Jun 1927 to Ellen Little, no children.

*

*Henry Chapman Maupin, Jr. (Henry), son of Henry Chapman Maupin (Chap), and Mary Lucy Burrus, b. 17 Jun 1886 at Free Union, Albemarle Co. VA, died 27 Apr 1959 at Arlington, VA; m. 2 Aug 1916 to Eva Christian Davis, b. 26 Jun 1891 at Earlysville, Albemarle Co. VA, daughter of John Tucker Davis and Lelia Cecelia Walton. Eva died 3 Mar 1987 at Arlington,. VA. Eva and Henry are buried in the Nat'l Memorial Park Cemetery at Falls Church, VA. Their children all born in Charlottesville, VA, and grew up in Arlington Co. VA. 1. Elizabeth Gertrude Maupin m. 28 Sep 1940 to James Henry Wallace, one son, James Henry Wallace, Jr. 2. Mary Lelier Maupin, m. (1) 6 Dec 1941 to s. Joseph Marek--one daughter--Marilyn Marek. m. (2) 20 Jut to Sidney Frank Mason.

104 105


3.

Charlotte Davis Maupin, b. 18 Oct 1924, m. 21 Sep 1946 to John Thomas Manning,b. 12 Apr 1922, 2 children-Janis Marie Manning, b. 12 Mar 1953 and John Thomas Manning, Jr., b. 2 Jul 1956, m. 27 Dec 1980 to Susan Henley, one son Matthew Tyler Manning, b. 4 May 1985.

1.

Lynn Courtney Kirkman, b. 30 Jul 1948; married 2 Oct 1971 to Robert F rancl s Mackie, Jr. Children: a. Robert Frances Mackie II, b. 6 Jun 1975. b. James Austin Mackie, b. 26 Nov 1980. 2. Brent Robert Kirkman, b. 16 May 1953 in Joplin, MO, graduated from Emory University, Atlanta, GAin 1977. Received degree of Dr. of Philosophy in Biochemistry and Cellular Molecular Biology from University of Miami in 1987. He is presently engaged in cancer research at University of Miami.

Fifth Generation Forward from Nicholas, son of David (17). Nicholas Maupin, son of David and Sarah Spencer Maupin, b. in Albemarle Co. VA, in 1800, d. in Breckenridge, MO, 15 Dec 1863; m. Lucinda Ballard in Virginia, 30 Mar 1835. They went to Missouri after 1840 and settled near St. Joseph, MO. They had 7 children listed under his name. Napoleon Crawford Maupin, married his cousin, Mildred I. Ellen Maupin, daughter of Rice and Mary A. Carr Maupin, in Breckenridge, MO. Napoleon and Mildred remained in Missouri after their marriage for about six years. He was a prosperous merchant there, engaged in hotel, mercantile and drug ownerships. Three of their six children were born In Missouri before leaving there due to a disastrous fire which destroyed most of their possessions. They returned to Albemarle Co., VA where their last three children were born. Their children: 1. Asa William Maupin, b. 10 Dec 1873 in MO; m. May 1894 to Pearl M. Ward. 2. Baynard Shannon Maupin, b. 22 Jun 1875 In MO; m. 3 Jun 1908 to Ethel M. Wingfield. 3. Claude Victor Maupin, b. 29 Oct 1878 in MO, d. 2 Oct 1957; m. 10 Jun 1903 to Leta Mae Carter, b. 26 Jun 1883, d. 19 Sep 1949 in Charlottesville, VA. Leta is a member of the Carter family of Virginia--4 children: a. Mavis Estelle, b. 5 May 1904, d. 2 Oct 1957; m. 5 Apr 1929 to Henry E. Allen--1 child, Leta Wade Allen Creech, b. 23 Mar 1944. b. Lois Adele, b. 9 Sep 1906; m. Russell Walker. c. Claude Nelson, b. 29 Mar 1908, d. 18 Feb 1979; m. 12 Oct 1935 to Virginia Smyre in Bruton Parish Church, Williamsburg, VA. Claude Nelson was a graduate of William and Mary College. d. Eleanor Virginia, b. 23 Jul 1920, attended Mary Baldwin College at Staunton, VA, University of N. Carolina and graduated from University of Chicago, 1941. Married 1 Sep 1940 to Robert Edwin Kirkman. Dr. Kirkman is an eye, nose and throat specialist. Their children: 106

4.

Napoleon Cloren Maupin, b. 5 Oct 1879 in Albemarle Co. VA; married 3 Aug 1904 in Washington, D.C. to Lottie Parker Young of Charlottesvi lie. Their children: a. Alease V. Maupin, b. 24 Aug 1905, d. an Infant. b. Harvey Alden Maupin, b. 8 May 1907; m. 8 Aug 1936 to Mary Gagianis. Their children: 1. Janet Alden, b. 1943, d. 1944. 2. Stephen Young, b. 5 Jan 1946; m. 24 Jul 1971 to Judith Collen Jones, 2 Children: a. Heather Angeli a Maupin, b. 19 Feb 1973. b. Michael Stephen Maupin, b. 25 Feb 1982. 3. Angelia Maupin, b. 11 Dec 1948; m. 1980 to Dr. Stephen R. Quint. Live in Chapel Hill, NC, where he is a faculty member at University of NC. 3 Children: a. Robin Josephine, b. 20 Jan 1983. b. Janet Marie, b. 2 May 1985. c. Peter Andrew, b. 3 Mar 1989. c. Eloise Tilman Maupin, b. 20 Apr 1910; m. 3 Jan 1931 to Michael Joseph Copps, Jr. He died 24 Dec 1973. This writer is especially grateful for the years of sup port and friendship of this special person Eloise "Tillie" Maupin Copps.

5. 6.

Nora Beulah--no record. Alonzo Roscoe Maupin, last child of Napoleon Crawford and Mildred Ellen Maupin, b. 18 May 1884, d. 25 Feb 1955; m. 8 Dec 1908 to Elsie Mae Johns, b. 17 Sep 1888. Elsie Mae lived in her home in Charlottesville until age 95 then moved 107


3.

1.

Lynn Courtney Kirkman, b. 30 Jul 1948; married 2 Oct 1971 to Robert Francis Mackie, Jr. Children: a. Robert Frances Mackie II, b. 6 Jun 1975. b. James Austin Mackie, b. 26 Nov 1980. 2. Brent Robert Kirkman, b. 16 May 1953 in Joplin, MO, graduated from Emory University, Atlanta, GA in 1977. Received degree of Dr. of Philosophy in Biochemistry and Cellular Molecular Biology from University of Miami in 1987. He is presently engaged in cancer research at University of Miami.

Charlotte Davis Maupin, b. 18 OCt 1924, m. 21 Sep 1946 to John Thomas Mannlng,b. 12 Apr 1922, 2 children-Janis Marie Manning, b. 12 Mar 1953 and John Thomas Manning, Jr., b. 2 Jul 1956, m. 27 Dec 1980 to Susan Henley, one son Matthew Tyler Manning, b. 4 May 1985.

Fifth Generation Forward from Nicholas, son of David (17). Nicholas Maupin, son of David and Sarah Spencer Maupin, b. in Albemarle Co. VA, in 1800, d. in Breckenridge, MO, 15 Dec 1863; m. Lucinda Ballard in Virginia, 30 Mar 1835. They went to Missouri after 1840 and settled near St. ,Joseph, MO. They had 7 children listed under his name. Napoleon Crawford Maupin, married his cousin, Mildred I. Ellen Maupin, daughter of Rice and Mary A. Carr Maupin, in Breckenridge, MO. Napoleon and Mildred remained in Missouri after their marriage for about six years. He was a prosperous merchant there, engaged In hotel, mercantile and drug ownerships. Three of their six children were born in Missouri before leaving there due to a disastrous fire which destroyed most of their possessions. They returned to Albemarle Co., VA where their last three children were born. Their children: 1. Asa William Maupin, b. 10 Dec 1873 in MO; m. May 1894 to Pearl M. Ward. Baynard Shannon Maupin, b. 22 Jun 1875 In MO; 2. m. 3 Jun 1908 to Ethel M. Wingfield. 3. Claude Victor Maupin, b. 29 OCt 1878 in MO, d. 2 Oct 1957; m. 10 Jun 1903 to Leta Mae Carter, b. 26 Jun 1883, d. 19 Sep 1949 In Charlottesville, VA. Leta Is a member of the Carter family of Virginia--4 children: a. Mavis Estelle, b. 5 May 1904, d. 2 Oct 1957; m. 5 Apr 1929 to Henry E. Allen--1 child, Leta Wade Allen Creech, b. 23 Mar 1944. b. Lois Adele, b. 9 Sep 1906; m. Russell Walker. c. Claude Nelson, b. 29 Mar 1908, d. 18 Feb 1979; m. 12 Oct 1935 to Virginia Smyre In Bruton Parish Church, Williamsburg, VA. Claude Nelson was a graduate of William and Mary College. d. Eleanor Virginia, b. 23 Jul 1920, attended Mary Baldwin College at Staunton, VA, University of N. Carolina and graduated from University of Chicago, 1941. Married 1 Sep 1940 to Robert Edwin Kirkman. Dr. Kirkman is an eye, nose and throat specialist. Their children: 106

4.

Napoleon Cloren Maupin, b. 5 OCt 1879 in AI bemarle Co. VA; married 3 Aug 1904 in Washington, D.C. to Lottie Parker Young of Charlottesville. Their children: a. Alease V. Maupin, b. 24 Aug 1905, d. an infant. b. Harvey Alden Maupin, b. 8 May 1907; m. 8 Aug 1936 to Mary Gagianis. Their children: 1. Janet Alden, b. 1943, d. 1944. 2. Stephen Young, b. 5 Jan 1946; m. 24 Jul 1971 to Judith Collen Jones, 2 Children: a. Heather Angelia Maupin, b. 19 Feb 1973. b. Michael Stephen Maupin, b. 25 Feb 1982. 3. Angelia Maupin, b. 11 Dec 1948; m. 1980 to Dr. Stephen R. Quint. Live in Chapel Hill, NC, where he is a faculty member at University of NC. 3 Children: a. Robin Josephine, b. 20 Jan 1983. b. Janet Marie, b. 2 May 1985. c. Peter Andrew, b. 3 Mar 1989. c. Eloise Tilman Maupin, b. 20 Apr 1910; m. 3 Jan 1931 to Michael Joseph Copps, Jr. He died 24 Dec 1973. This writer is especially grateful for the years of support and friendship of this special person Eloise "Tillie" Maupin Copps.

5. 6.

Nora Beulah--no record. Alonzo Roscoe Maupin, last child of Napoleon Crawford and Mildred Ellen Maupin, b. 18 May 1884, d. 25 Feb 1955; m. 8 Dec 1908 to Elsie Mae Johns, b. 17 Sep 1888. Elsie Mae lived In her home in Charlottesville until age 95 then moved 107


in with her daughter, Luella Theimer in Charlotte, NC. Their children: A. Ardella Parker Maupin, b. 10 Sep 1909, d. 26 Jul 1983; m. 20 Jul 1927, to Wilton A. Griffith, b. 10 Nov 1905, d. 4 Jan 1975. Their children: 1. Patricia Mae Griffith, b. 1935; m. 1960 to Dennis Boyd Rinker. Their Children: a. Bonnie Kay Rinker, b. 1967. b. Donna Lynn Rinker, b. 1971. 2. David Wilton Griffith, b. 1944; m. 1966 to Carolyn Peterson. Their Children: a. Laura Katherine Griffith, b. 1968. b. Lisa Christine Griffith, b. 1968. c. David Stuart Griffith, b. 1971. B. Herman Rea Maupin, b. 2 Aug 1911, d. 20 Dec 1972; m. 7 Jan 1935 to Virginia Hoge. C. Luella Lockwood Maupin, b. 3 Oct 1913; m. 22 Jun 1936 to Lawrence L. Theimer. One son: a. Jerry Lamont Theimer, b. 1947; m. 1st 1967 to Linda Dianne Robertson--one daughter--Jenifer Lynn Theimer, b. 1970--m. 2nd, 1976 to Pamela Joan Smith, b. 1952, 2 sons, Jerry Lamont, Jr, 1977 and Michael Lawrence Theimer, b. 1978. D. Robert Crawford Maupin, b. 26 Feb 1916, d. 22 Jun 1981, m. 25 Aug 1936 Alberta G. Thurston. 1. Gary Ann Maupin b. 25 Apr 1937, m. 2 Jun 1966, Bruce E. Goodale. 2. Gail Crawford Maupin, b. 27 Apr 1938 m. 7 Dec 1957 William J. Jones. Issue: a. Deborah Gail, b. 18 Mar 1961 b. Kimberly Ann, b. 31 Mar 1964. c. Paula Lynne, b. 6 Feb 1967. 3. Sandra Lee Maupin, b. 20 Dec 1941, m. 27 Jul 1963, Louis C. "Tuck" Landry III. II.

Laura Ellen Maupin, 2nd child of Nicholas and Lucinda Ballard Maupin; m. 2 Jan 1873 to William L. Birney, M.D. in Caldwell Co. MO. Dr. Birney was also clerk of Circuit Court in Clinton Co. MO. He practiced law In Plattsburg, M0--2 daughters--Nora and Ada.

I have no additional information on last 5 children of Nicholas and Lucinda Ballard Maupin; namely, Henry Clay, Virginia Anne, David Rice, George Andrew and Thomas Ernest. ******************** 108

FOURTH GENERATION THOMAS MAUPIN (18} Son of Gabriel (6), grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). Thomas Maupin was born in Albemarle County, Virginia, near Free Union, or Nixville, in 1770 and died on his farm in that locality 23 Jan 1828. Will filed in Albemarle Co. 7 Jan 1828, Will Book 9, pg. 226. He married 10 Jun 1784 to Ann Spencer, daughter of John Spencer and Rosanna Graves. Ann Spencer was born in 177 _and died at her home near Moormans in 1848. Her will recorded in Albemarle Co. 26 Aug 1848. Their children were: (41) John R. -

married his cousin, Rosanna Maupin, daughter of David. (42) Joel Rice- married Martha Gentry, daughter of Christopher Gentry. (43) Thomas G.- married Nancy 9路 Harris, daughter of Jarratt Harris. (44) Clifton married Elizabeth Maupin, daughter of David (17).

(44A) Arthur Rosanna Susanna Mary L. *Martha Nancy R. -

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married Mary V. Harris, daughter of Jarratt Harris. married 3 Mar 1828 to Isaac Wood. married Daniel Via, great Grandson of the emigrant, William Via. married 28 Nov 1833 to John Clark, son of Thomas Clark. married William Turner Wood. They Jived on the home plantation of Thomas Maupin after his death. married 14 Dec 1818 to William Via.

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THE RICE - GRAVES - SPENCER FAMILIES John Spencer of Albemarle is the father of Ann, Sarah and Mary Graves Spencer, (all of whom married Maupins). Dr. Socrates Maupin thought it likely that his ancestor's name was Richard a grandson or a great grandson of the Nicholas Spencer of the Virginia Council since Nicholas was a common Christian name of the descendants of the Maupin - Spencer marriages. At any rate, the said Richard Spencer settled in Hanover and had three sons, namely Sharp, who settled in Prince Edward County, Abraham (or Abel) who settled in an adjoining county, and John, who made his home in Albemarle. ,I

109

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in with her daughter, Luella Theimer in Charlotte, NC. Their children: A. Ardella Parker Maupin, b. 10 Sep 1909, d. 26 Jul 1983; m. 20 Jul 1927, to Wilton A. Griffith, b. 10 Nov 1905, d. 4 Jan 1975. Their children: 1. Patricia Mae Griffith, b. 1935; m. 1960 to Dennis Boyd Rinker. Their Children: a. Bonnie Kay Rinker, b. 1967. b. Donna Lynn Rinker, b. 1971. 2. David Wilton Griffith, b. 1944; m. 1966 to Carolyn Peterson. Their Children: a. Laura Katherine Griffith, b. 1968. b. Lisa Christine Griffith, b. 1968. c. David Stuart Griffith, b. 1971. B. Herman Rea Maupin, b. 2 Aug 1911, d. 20 Dec 1972; m. 7 Jan 1935 to Virginia Hoge. C. Luella Lockwood Maupin, b. 3 Oct 1913; m. 22 Jun 1936 to Lawrence L. Theimer. One son: a. Jerry Lamont Theimer, b. 1947; m. 1st 1967 to Linda Dianne Robertson--one daughter--Jenifer Lynn Theimer, b. 1970--m. 2nd, 1976 to Pamela Joan Smith, b. 1952, 2 sons, Jerry Lamont, Jr, 1977 and Michael LawrenceTheimer, b. 1978. D. Robert Crawford Maupin, b. 26 Feb 1916, d. 22 Jun 1981, m. 25 Aug 1936 Alberta G. Thurston. 1. Gary Ann Maupin b. 25 Apr 1937, m. 2 Jun 1966, Bruce E. Goodale. 2. Gail Crawford Maupin, b. 27 Apr 1938 m. 7 Dec 1957 William J. Jones. Issue: a. Deborah Gail, b. 18 Mar 1961 b. Kimberly Ann, b. 31 Mar 1964. c. Paula Lynne, b. 6 Feb 1967. 3. Sandra Lee Maupin, b. 20 Dec 1941, m. 27 Jul 1963, Louis C. "Tuck" Landry III. II.

Laura Ellen Maupin, 2nd child of Nicholas and Lucinda Ballard Maupin; m. 2 Jan 1873 to William L. Birney, M.D. in Caldwell Co. MO. Dr. Birney was also clerk of Circuit Court in Clinton Co. MO. He practiced law in Plattsburg, M0--2 daughters--Nora and Ada.

I have no additional information on last 5 children of Nicholas and Lucinda Ballard Maupin; namely, Henry Clay, Virginia Anne, David Rice, George Andrew and Thomas Ernest. ******************** 108

FOURTH GENERATION THOMAS MAUPIN (18) Son of Gabriel (6), grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). Thomas Maupin was born in Albemarle County, Virginia, near Free Union, or Nixville, in 1770 and died on his farm in that locality 23 Jan 1828. Will filed in Albemarle Co. 7 Jan 1828, Will Book 9, pg. 226. He married 10 Jun 1784 to Ann Spencer, daughter of John Spencer and Rosanna Graves. Ann Spencer was born in 177 _and died at her home near Moormans in 1848. Her will recorded in Albemarle Co. 26 Aug 1848. Their children were: (41) John R. -

married his cousin, Rosanna Maupin, daughter of David. (42) Joel Rice- married Martha Gentry, daughter of Christopher Gentry. (43) Thomas G.- married Nancy 9路 Harris, daughter of Jarratt Harris. (44) Clifton married Elizabeth Maupin, daughter of David ( 17 ). (44A) Arthur - married Mary V. Harris, daughter of Jarratt Harris. Rosanna married 3 Mar 1828 to Isaac Wood. Susanna married Daniel Via, great Grandson of the emigrant, William Via. Mary L. married 28 Nov 1833 to John Clark, son of Thomas Clark. *Marthamarried William Turner Wood. They lived on the home plantation of Thomas Maupin after his death. Nancy R. married 14 Dec 1818 to William Via. ******************** THE RICE - GRAVES - SPENCER FAMILIES John Spencer of Albemarle is the father of Ann, Sarah and Mary Graves Spencer, (all of whom married Maupins). Dr. Socrates Maupin thought it likely that his ancestor's name was Richard a grandson or a great grandson of the Nicholas Spencer of the Virginia Council since Nicholas was a common Christian name of the descendants of the Maupin - Spencer marriages. At any rate, the said Richard Spencer settled in Hanover and had three sons, namely Sharp, who settled in Prince Edward County, Abraham (or Abel) who settled in an adjoining county, and John, who made his home in Albemarle. 109


According to the record of Dr. Maupin, John Spencer was born in 1732. It has been a tradition in the family that both he and a son were killed in the Revolution. The son, Thomas, was killed at Guilford Court House. The lieutenant John Spencer may not have been the John Spencer of Albemarle since there was a Spencer living in that county after the Revolution and his death occurred there in 1789. In a petition from Albemarle for the emission of paper money, dated Anno Dom. 1788, we find the names of John Spencer Sr., Thomas Maupin (his son-in-law), Gabriel Maupin, father of Thomas Maupin, John Spencer Jr., Gideon Spencer, Zachariah Maupin, Daniel Maupin Sr., Daniel Maupin Jr., and Cornelius Maupin. (From William and Mary Quarterly Review, July 1922.) All of these men lived in the same locality west of Charlottesville. The wife of John Spencer was Rosanna Graves and their children were: John Sharp Abraham Thomas - killed at Guilford Court House. Elizabeth-married a Scotch surgeon, Dr. Melvin, who, while serving in the British army, was taken prisoner with Burgoyne at Saratoga and confined In the prison barracks near Charlottesville. Sarah wife of David Maupin (17) Ann wife of Thomas Maupin (18) Mary Graves-wife of Chapman White Maupin (34) Rosanna- wife of Thos. Naylor. Their children: a. Susanna, married Mat Walton. Had a son, Chapman. Sally, m. Jordan Davidson of Kentucky. Children: b. Nancy, James, Abner, John, Sarah, Mary Jane, Martha, and Samuel, all of Lawrence, KS c. Mildred, married R. Fowler, and second, J. Turner of Garrard Co. Kentucky. Their children were not known. d. Rosanna, married Jesse Davidson of Garrard County, KY. Children were: Louisa, Leander, Lou Ann, Elizabeth, Sarilda, Mary Jane, and William Abner Davidson. Susan wife of William Sandidge, who was a grandson of John Graves. Rosanna Graves Spencer died in 1831 at the age of 97. Her father, Thomas Graves, was originally from King and Queen County, it is believed, but later appeared in Spotsylvania about the year 1725, a deed of land being made to him in that year. (Deed Book A). His home was on the border between Hanover and Spotsylvania and he owned a mill there. This home was

eventually owned by his son-in-law, Col. William Pettus. Early in the history of Albemarle, Thomas Graves took up large tracts of land in the county. It is not known if he ever lived there but many of his children were residents of the county and may have occupied his lands. Graves died in 1768. 路 His family is noted for its longevity and his father, it is said, lived to a great age. His daughter, Rosanna Spencer, was 97 at her death and his granddaughter, Mary Graves Maupin was 96 years old at the time of her death. The will of Thomas Graves (Will Book D, page 318) is dated Oct. 17, 1767, and in it he bequeaths the land where he lived and a third of the revenue from his mill to his wife, Ann Graves. In Deed Book H, date 1772, there is a record of a gift of a negro slave from Ann Rice Graves to her granddaughter, Barbara Pettus, and four years later she makes record of another gift of a slave to her granddaughter, Susanna Spencer of Albemarle. Ann Rice Graves died in 1782 and her son, Rice, administered her will. Both Thomas Graves and his wife, Ann, had been previously married. Her first husband had been a Clark of King and Queen County. The name of the first wife of Graves is not known. By his first wife he had sons: John Thomas ___ Susan -

lived in North Carolina. lived in Kentucky wife of a Smith of Meechums River, Albemarle County. wife of Col. Wm. Pettus of Meechums River. He was executor of his father-in-law's will and finally bought the Graves homestead. He died in 1798 and his will is dated that year and recorded Sept. 4th 1798. His children were: a. William, who married Lucy Walters. Overton Hart Pettus b. c. James Pettus d. Joseph Pettus e. Barbary Arnold f. Nancy, wife of William Graves of Louisa. Susanna, wife of Davenport. g. h. Louisa Rosanna -married John Spencer of AI bemarle. David married a Tilley and lived four miles west of Charlottesville. Susanna, mother of COl. Joseph Martin of Henry County seems to have been a daughter of this David Graves. The father of Ann Rice, who married Thomas Graves, was Thomas Rice, and Englishman of Welsh extraction, who came to Virginia during the last quarter of the 11th century. He seems to have settled first in New Kent COunty. Apr. 29th 1693, he was granted lands in Kingston Parish, Gloucester county (Patent Book 8, page 261). In Vol. 17, page 132 of the Patent Book is a record


According to the record of Dr. Maupin, John Spencer was born in 1732. It has been a tradition in the family that both he and a son were killed in the Revolution. The son, Thomas, was killed at Guilford Court House. The lieutenant John Spencer may not have been the John Spencer of Albemarle since there was a Spencer living in that county after the Revolution and his death occurred there in 1789. In a petition from Albemarle for the emission of paper money, dated Anno Dom. 1788, we find the names of John Spencer Sr., Thomas Maupin (his son-in-law), Gabriel Maupin, father of Thomas Maupin, John Spencer Jr., Gideon Spencer, Zachariah Maupin, Daniel Maupin Sr., Daniel Maupin Jr., and Cornelius Maupin. (From William and Mary Quarterly Review, July 1922.) All of these men lived in the same locality west of Charlottesville. The wife of John Spencer was Rosanna Graves and their children were: John Sharp Abraham Thomas - killed at Guilford Court House. Elizabeth-married a Scotch surgeon, Dr. Melvin, who, while serving in the British army, was taken prisoner with Burgoyne at Saratoga and confined in the prison barracks near Charlottesville. Sarah wife of David Maupin (17) Ann wife of Thomas Maupin (18) Mary Graves-wife of Chapman White Maupin (34) Rosanna- wife of Thos. Naylor. Their children: a. Susanna, married Mat Walton. Had a son, Chapman. b. Sally, m. Jordan Davidson of Kentucky. Children: Nancy, James, Abner, John, Sarah, Mary Jane, Martha, and Samuel, all of Lawrence, KS c. Mildred, married R. Fowler, and second, J. Turner of Garrard Co. Kentucky. Their children were not known. d. Rosanna, married Jesse Davidson of Garrard County, KY. Children were: Louisa, Leander, Lou Ann, Elizabeth, Sarilda, Mary Jane, and William Abner Davidson. Susan wife of William Sandidge, who was a grandson of John Graves.

eventually owned by his son-in-law, Col. William Pettus. Early in the history of Albemarle, Thomas Graves took up large tracts of land in the county. It is not known if he ever lived there but many of his children were residents of the county and may have occupied his lands. Graves died in 1768. 路 His family is noted for its longevity and his father, it is said, lived to a great age. His daughter, Rosanna Spencer, was 97 at her death and his granddaughter, Mary Graves Maupin was 96 years old at the time of her death. The will of Thomas Graves (Will Book D, page 318) is dated Oct. 17, 1767, and in it he bequeaths the land where he lived and a third of the revenue from his mill to his wife, Ann Graves. In Deed Book H, date 1772, there is a record of a gift of a negro slave from Ann Rice Graves to her granddaughter, Barbara Pettus, and four years later she makes record of another gift of a slave to her granddaughter, Susanna Spencer of Albemarle. Ann Rice Graves died in 1782 and her son, Rice, administered her will. Both Thomas Graves and his wife, Ann, had been previously married. Her first husband had been a Clark of King and Queen County. The name of the first wife of Graves is not known. By his first wife he had sons: John Thomas ___ Susan -

Rosanna Graves Spencer died in 1831 at the age of 97. Her father, Thomas Graves, was originally from King and Queen County, it is believed, but later appeared in Spotsylvania about the year 1725, a deed of land being made to him in that year. (Deed Book A). His home was on the border between Hanover and Spotsylvania and he owned a mill there. This home was

lived in North Carolina. lived in Kentucky wife of a Smith of Meechums River, Albemarle County. wife of Col. Wm. Pettus of Meechums River. He was executor of his father-in-law's will and finally bought the Graves homestead. He died in 1798 and his will is dated that year and recorded Sept. 4th 1798. His children were: a. William, who married Lucy Walters. b. Overton Hart Pettus c. James Pettus d. Joseph Pettus e. Barbary Arnold f. Nancy, wife of William Graves of Louisa. g. Susanna, wife of Davenport. h. Louisa Rosanna -married John Spencer of AI bemarle. David married a Tilley and lived four miles west of Charlottesville. Susanna, mother of Col. Joseph Martin of Henry County seems to have been a daughter of this David Graves. The father of Ann Rice, who married Thomas Graves, was Thomas Rice, and Englishman of Welsh extraction, who came to Virginia during the last quarter of the 17th century. He seems to have settled first in New Kent County. Apr. 29th 1693, he was granted lands in Kingston Parish, Gloucester County (Patent Book 8, page 261 ). In Vol. 17, page 132 of the Patent Book is a record

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of a deed to Thos. Rice for 1200 acres of land in Hanover. He seems to have spent his last days in Virginia on this plantation. Sometime subsequent to 1704, he left Virginia to return to England where he had been left a considerable legacy. He never returned to the colony and it was reported that he died at sea. He left a large family of three daughters and nine sons, and they were reduced to destitute circumstances after the loss of their father. The family moved about thirty miles up country and here they married and reared large families in Hanover and nearby counties. Loss of records during the Revolution and the Ci vi I War has made it hard to trace the several fami I ies descended from Thos. Rice. His children, as best we can learn at this date, were: James born 1686 Thomas- born 1688 Edward - born 1690. He was probably the father of Mary, who married James Garland of Hanover, who died in Albemarle in 1812. Williammarried Sarah . Their children: a. Richard b. John, married Mary Finney. he was born 1779, died 1838. Children were: Mary, Ursula and William. Benajah c. d. Hannah e. Ann, wife of John Graves. f. Sarah, wife of Edward Graves. Ann married Clark; second, Thomas Graves. Children given on previous page. Hezekiah- married Mary Bullock? Nathaniel Michael? Two other sons and two other daughters.

Maupin, his cousin and daughter of David (17). They were married 12 Nov 1812 in Albemarle County. Their children: Thomas R. b. 1818, probably the oldest child. John Nicholas - married Mary Ann Thompson on 8 Mar 1842. He served in the Confederate Army throughout the war. Their children were: a. Nathaniel J. b. Sarah, wife of _ _ Marshall. c. Susan Ann Sarah Ann married 3 Mar 1828, to Skidmore Wood, a Southern soldier. Rosanna married 3 Mar 1828 to Isaac Wood.

JOEL RICE MAUPIN (42) Son of Thomas ( 18), grandson of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1). Joel R. Maupin was born near Free Union in Albemarle County, Virginia, 5 May 1795. He served in the War of 1812 from 29 Aug 1814 to 22 Feb 1815 in Capt. John Rothwell's company of the 7th Virginia Militia, under Col. Gray. On 18 Dec 1827, he married Martha Gentry, daughter of Christopher Gentry and Sarah A. Dunn of Albemarle County. Martha Gentry was born 15 Mar 1800 and died 2 Aug 1880. See Gentry Family history following.

John R. Maupin was born in Albemarle County in 1795 and died in the same county, date not known. His wife was Rosanna

Joel Maupin and his wife emigrated from Virginia to Marion County, Missouri in 1829, travelling overland to St. Louis and from thence to Hannibal by flatboat. he settled on a farm four miles west of Hannibal and became one of the important wheat growers of that section. At the time of his death, he owned a considerable acreage in Marion and Shelby Counties. He died on 12 Aug 1876 and was buried in the family burial plot just west of his old home. The children of Joel and Martha Gentry Maupin were: (78)Christopher John-married Margaret Maupin, daughter of Thomas (43). (79)Americus Bolivar-married Salina Miller, daughter of Samuel Miller. Joel Addisonmarried Rebecca Field, 28 Jan 1857. He was born in Marion Co., 15 Feb 1833, and died in that county in 191_. His children: a. Ella, m. Tom Head. Had one son, Ray Head. * b. Charles, m. Mollie Donnely. Children: 1. Ernest, died single. 2. Lena Maupin 3. Virginia, m. Joe Schneider. 4. James, m. ____ . His daughters, Romaine and Romelle.

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These meager records of the Rice family were collected by Dr. Socrates Maupin from his grandmother, Rosanna Graves Spencer, daughter of Ann Rice Graves and granddaughter of Thos. Rice of Hanover.

******************** FIFTH GENERATION JOHN R. MAUPIN (41) Son of Thomas (18), grandson of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3, of Gabriel ( 1).


of a deed to Thos. Rice for 1200 acres of land in Hanover. He seems to have spent his last days in Virginia on this plantation. Sometime subsequent to 1704, he left Virginia to return to England where he had been left a considerable legacy. He never returned to the colony and it was reported that he died at sea. He left a large family of three daughters and nine sons, and they were reduced to destitute circumstances after the loss of their father. The family moved about thirty miles up country and here they married and reared large families in Hanover and nearby counties. Loss of records during the Revolution and the Civil War has made it hard to trace the several families descended from Thos. Rice. His children, as best we can learn at this date, were: Jamesborn 1686 Thomas- born 1688 Edward - born 1690. He was probably the father of Mary, who married James Garland of Hanover, who died in Albemarle in 1812. William- married Sarah . Their children: a. Richard b. John, married Mary Finney. he was born 1779, died 1838. Children were: Mary, Ursula and William. c. Benajah d. Hannah e. Ann, wife of John Graves. f. Sarah, wife of Edward Graves. Ann married Clark; second, Thomas Graves. Children given on previous page. Hezekiah- married Mary Bullock? Nathaniel Michael? Two other sons and two other daughters.

Maupin, his cousin and daughter of David (17). They were married 12 Nov 1812 in Albemarle County. Their children: Thomas R. b. 1818, probably the oldest child. John Nicholas - married Mary Ann Thompson on 8 Mar 1842. He served in the Confederate Army throughout the war. Their children were: a. Nathaniel J. b. Sarah, wife of _ _ Marshall. c. Susan Ann Sarah Ann married 3 Mar 1828, to Skidmore Wood, a Southern soldier. Rosanna married 3 Mar 1828 to Isaac Wood. JOEL RICE MAUPIN (42) Son of Thomas (18), grandson of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), of Gab riel ( 1 ). Joel R. Maupin was born near Free Union in Albemarle County, Virginia, 5 May 1795. He served in the War of 1812 from 29 Aug 1814 to 22 Feb 1815 in Capt. John Rothwell's company of the 7th Virginia Militia, under Col. Gray. On 18 Dec 1827, he married Martha Gentry, daughter of Christopher Gentry and Sarah A. Dunn of Albemarle County. Martha Gentry was born 15 Mar 1800 and died 2 Aug 1880. See Gentry Family history following.

John R. Maupin was born in Albemarle County in 1795 and died in the same county, date not known. His wife was Rosanna

Joel Maupin and his wife emigrated from Virginia to Marion County, Missouri in 1829, travelling overland to St. Louis and from thence to Hannibal by flatboat. he settled on a farm four miles west of Hannibal and became one of the important wheat growers of that section. At the time of his death, he owned a considerable acreage in Marion and Shelby Counties. He died on 12 Aug 1876 and was buried in the family burial plot just west of his old home. The children of Joel and Martha Gentry Maupin were: (78)Christopher John-married Margaret Maupin, daughter of Thomas (43). (79)Americus Bolivar-married Salina Miller, daughter of Samuel Miller. Joel Addisonmarried Rebecca Field, 28 Jan 1857. He was born in Marion Co., 15 Feb 1833, and died in that county in 191_. His children: a. Ella, m. Tom Head. Had one son, Ray Head. * b. Charles, m. Mollie Donnely. Children: 1. Ernest, died single. 2. Lena Maupin 3. Virginia, m. Joe Schneider. 4. James, m. __ . His daughters, Romaine and Romelle.

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These meager records of the Rice family were collected by Dr. Socrates Maupin from his grandmother, Rosanna Graves Spencer, daughter of Ann Rice Graves and granddaughter of Thos. Rice of Hanover.

******************** FIFTH GENERATION JOHN R. MAUPIN (41) Son of Thomas (18), grandson of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3, of Gabriel (1 ).


b. in Marion County, 11 Oct 1837, and d. in that county in 1912. He married 1 May 1860 to Theresa Turner. They had one son, Rice Maupin. He died in Palmyra in 19_. leaving two daughters, one of whom, Deta, lived in Cheyenne, WY. b. 23 Mar 1845; m. Capt. Joseph Higbee. Her Marthachildren were Addison, Martha, Elizabeth, William and Gene Higbee. The latter was a partner in the firm of Higbee and Hockaday at Columbia and died in that city in 1923. The Higbees made their home at Schell City, MO, for many years. Mary Frances- m. Thomas Maupin (81 ). b. 22 Aug 1842 and d. 4 Feb 1924. He m. William P.Susan Miller, daughter of Samuel Miller and sister of Salina Miller, who married his brother, Bolivar. Their marriage was 16 Jan 1866. She died in 1899. Their children were: a. Etta Maupin, who lived on a part of the old farm of Joel Maupin. b. Ada, wife of Chas. Miller. They had one son, William and lived on the old homestead of Joel Maupin. Geo. Washington-Born 6 Aug 1843; d. 23 Apr 1859.

David Graves -

******************** The following letter was written by Ann Spencer Maupin to her son, Joel Rice Maupin in 1834. Thomas Maupin, her husband, had probably been dead some months at this time.

we could spare was sold off a little before Christmas, such as the horses, cows, hogs, and some household stuff, with the crops we made last year in order to pay the balance of such debts as the estate owes. You write that you have it in contemplation to pay us a visit some time or another. It would give me great pleasure to see you and Martha with the children at my house once more and if you cannot all come I hope you and your wife will try to make arrangements to do so before it be very long.

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I suppose you heard that your sister Polly was married. She married John Clark, son of Thos. Clark. He is overseer this year for Col. John Jones in this neighborhood. Mr. Clark and Polly are both well and so are all your brothers and sisters in this part of the country. They all want to see you very much and wish to be remembered to you.

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Martha and the children, I received the locks of hair with the three children's names. Christopher John Thomas' hair is very much like your own and so is Americus Bolivar's, but Joel -Addison's approaches nearer the color of Martha's. It is a beautiful auburn color and the last one's hair is very long for its age. The three locks are still tacked on their names in the letter and I intend to take very good care of them as I cannot see them. I can look at the locks of hair and know the color of all their heads.

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I hope you will write soon. I am always glad to get a letter from you. You can direct your letters to Moorman's River postoffice, which is kept at Edmund Brown's just below me. It is handier to get letters here than at Charlottesville. I add no more but my very best wishes for your prosperity in time and in Eternity.

Dear Son: I received your letter dated Nov 3rd 1833, which gave me and the rest of your friends a great deal of pleasure to hear from you and that you and your family are all well. I was also very glad to hear how well you are making out in the world. Your crop was fine and better than we can possibly make in this old county. My health has not been good for several years but it has been as good or better for about eight months last than for a considerable time. I am making out in the world as well as usual. We have made plenty to live on heretofore and I am in hopes that I shall continue to do so. I shall not make a crop this year. I have hired out Brice for $55.00 and Mary lives with me to wait on me. Turner Wood has rented my plantation and he and Patsey live in the house with me and are very kind to me. Everything that 114

Your mother Ann Maupin Albermarle Co. VA 6th Feby 1834

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Mr. Joel R. Maupin Hannibal P.O. Marion County, Missouri

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~~r~~:路~ Oavi d Graves - b. in Marion County, 11 Oct 1837, and d. in that county in 1912. He married 1 May 1860 to Theresa Turner. They had one son, Rice Maupin. He died in Palmyra in 19_. leaving two daughters, one of whom, Deta, lived in Cheyenne, WY. b. 23 Mar 1845; m. Capt. Joseph Higbee. Her Marthachildren were Addison, Martha, Elizabeth, William and Gene Higbee. The latter was a partner in the firm of Higbee and Hockaday at Columbia and died in that city in 1923. The Higbees made their home at Schell City, MO, for many years. Mary F ranees- m. Thomas Maupin (81 ). b. 22 Aug 1842 and d. 4 Feb 1924. He m. William P.Susan Miller, daughter of Samuel Miller and sister of Salina Miller, who married his brother, Bolivar. Their marriage was 16 Jan 1866. She died in 1899. Their children were: a. Etta Maupin, who lived on a part of the old farm of Joel Maupin. b. Ada, wife of Chas. Miller. They had one son, William and lived on the old homestead of Joel Maupin. Geo. washington-Born 6 Aug 1843; d. 23 Apr 1859.

******************** The following letter was written by Ann Spencer Maupin to her son, Joel Rice Maupin in 1834. Thomas Maupin, her husband, had probably been dead some months at this time.

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we could spare was sold off a little before Christmas, such as the horses, cows, hogs, and some household stuff, with the crops we made last year in order to pay the balance of such debts as the estate owes.

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You write that you have it in contemplation to pay us a visit some time or another. It would give me great pleasure to see you and Martha with the children at my house once more and if you cannot all come I hope you and your wife will try to make arrangements to do so before it be very long.

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I suppose you heard that your sister Polly was married. She married John Clark, son of Thos. Clark. He is overseer this year for Col. John Jones in this neighborhood. Mr. Clark and Polly are both well and so are all your brothers and sisters in this part of the country. They all want to see you very much and wish to be remembered to you.

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Martha and the children, I received the locks of hair with the three children's names. Christopher John Thomas' hair is very much like your own and so is Americus Bolivar's, but Joel Addison's approaches nearer the color of Martha's. It is a beautiful auburn color and the last one's hair is very long for its age. The three locks are still tacked on their names in the letter and I intend to take very good care of them as I cannot see them. I can look at the locks of hair and know the color of all their heads. I hope you will write soon. I am always glad to get a letter from you. You can direct your letters to Moorman's River postoffice, which is kept at Edmund Brown's just below me. It is handier to get letters here than at Charlottesville. I add no more but my very best wishes for your prosperity in time and in Eternity.

Dear Son: I received your letter dated Nov 3rd 1833, which gave me and the rest of your friends a great deal of pleasure to hear from you and that you and your family are all well. I was also very glad to hear how well you are making out in the world. Your crop was fine and better than we can possibly make in this old county. My health has not been good for several years but it has been as good or better for about eight months last than for a considerable time. I am making out in the world as well as usual. We have made plenty to live on heretofore and I am in hopes that I shall continue to do so. I shall not make a crop this year. I have hired out Brice for $55.00 and Mary lives with me to wait on me. Turner Wood has rented my plantation and he and Patsey live in the house with me and are very kind to me. Everything that 114

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Mr. Joel R. Maupin Hannibal P.O. Marion County, Missouri

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A MISSOURI PIONEER

land that in early days was worthless swamp is considered now as the best in the state.

Joel Maupin In Marion County In 1829, Joel Rice Maupin, with his wife and small son, joined the hundreds of other Virginians who were making their way westward to build their homes in the virgin wilderness of Missouri. Travelling by wagon, he made his way over the old wagon trail to Kentucky. Crossing the Ohio River at Shawneetown, he made his way to St. Louis and thence to Hannibal by flatboat. Some of the train made the trip from St. Louis to Hannibal by land. Hannibal was a village of some forty inhabitants at the time and Port Scipio, on the Bay, was rival that threatened to become the metropolis of the newly settled country. Maupin located four miles west of Hannibal and began to improve a farm, which later became one of the best in the county. Traces of the old well he dug, while still living in his covered wagon, were still to be seen a hundred years later. All traces of his first rude log cabin have long since disappeared and his later home was destroyed by fire in 1907. The year following his arrival in Marion was long remembered as the year of the great snow. The author had much of his information from his grandfather, who had often heard his father tell of the early days in Missouri. The snow of 1830 came early in the year, about Nov 1st, and it covered the ground and drifted to the depth of twelve feet. The snow remained on the ground all winter and travel was practically impossible. The roads were little more than trails and these the snow filled and blocked as to defy passage. One can imagine the hardships of the newcomers who had little time to prepare shelter for themselves or their animals. To make matters worse, the summer following was a poor one for crops, the corn being almost an entire failure. It is said that the corn was actually frost bitten in August. Seed corn sold on the levee at Hannibal as it was unloaded from the boats at four dollars a bushel, a high price for those days. It seems likely that this corn crop failure caused Joe Maupin to turn his attention to wheat and caused that crop to later become the ranking crop of the county. In 1832, the spring was backward, sleets, freezes and high water causing much trouble. The Mississippi was out all over the bottoms most of the time. Today, it is hard to realize what the Mississippi river bottoms were like over a hundred years ago. Now great fields of wheat, corn and clover grow where, in the days of our forefathers, the slough grass flourished or water stood the year around. Protected by levees, much of the

Besides their crop and weather troubles, the settlers had another problem about that time. There was a constant threat of Indian trouble from the north and across the river. The Sacs, Fox and Winnebagos had united under Black Hawk and were on the warpath in Iowa and Illinois and no one knew when they might make a raid down the river to their old home near Hannibal. Gen. Gentry, a kinsman of Martha Gentry Maupin, wife of Joel Maupin, was in command of the troops sent to protect the settlers from the Indian raids. He spent some time at the Maupin's home while he was in the county. He was later to lose his life fighting Indians in Florida where he led the Missouri troops. In 1833, the Hannibal and Centerville road was laid out. It passed close to the home of Joel Maupin and he was now in closer touch with the markets. This road was the most travelled road in North Missouri and is followed rather closely today by U.S. Highway 36. The year of 1833 was also rather long remembered in the country as a year the stars fell and as a cholera year. This dire plague swept over Marion County with terrible results. Its worst hold was at Palmyra but settlers died all over the county and at Hannibal. It is said that one fifth of the settlers died but this is probably an exaggeration, tho the figures are probably correct for Palmyra. In the country, it is probable that not one tenth of the people perished. In 1835, another attack of the plague struck the county but it was not so serious altho the people were terror stricken. This same year was also known as the "cold year". In February, occurred the memorable "Cold Friday" which was one of the coldest days ever known in northeast Missouri. The temperature fell to fifty below zero and much stock was frozen. In the middle of May there came a severe freeze, stripping the trees of foliage and killing many of them. Of course all crops were ruined and the settlers hurried to plant again. Sept. 15th there came another hard freeze which ruined the late crops and the whole season was lost to the despairing farmers. Early in his life on his Missouri farm, Joel Maupin realized the importance of wheat as a crop for Marion County. The soil was adapted to its growth and the river made a splendid highway to the markets. Consequently he began to grow it on a large scale, constantly increasing his acreage until he was the largest grower in this section. When the Civil War broke out and interrupted agriculture in Marion, Maupin owned over a thousand acres of land and sixty slaves. Little by little his

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A MISSOURI PIONEER Joel Maupin In Marion County

n 1829, Joel Rice Maupin, with his wife and small son, joined the hundreds of other Virginians who were making their way westward to build their homes in the virgin wilderness of Missouri. Travelling by wagon, he made his way over the old wagon trail to Kentucky. Crossing the Ohio River at Shawneetown, he made his way to St. Louis and thence to Hannibal by flatboat. Some of the train made the trip from St. Louis to Hannibal by land.

Hannibal was a village of some forty inhabitants at the time and Port Scipio, on the Bay, was rival that threatened to become the metropolis of the newly settled country. Maupin located four miles west of Hannibal and began to improve a farm, which later became one of the best in the county. Traces of the old well he dug, while still Jiving in his covered wagon, were still to be seen a hundred years later. All traces of his first rude Jog cabin have long since disappeared and his later home was destroyed by fire in 1907.

The year following his arrival in Marion was long remembered as the year of the great snow. The author had much of his ;nformation from his grandfather, who had often heard his father tell of the early days in Missouri. The snow of 1830 came early in the year, about Nov 1st, and it covered the ground and drifted to the depth of twelve feet. The snow remained on the ground all winter and travel was practically impossible. The roads were little more than trails and these the snow filled and blocked as to defy passage. One can imagine the hardships of the newcomers who had little time to prepare shelter for themselves or their animals. To make matters worse, the summer following was a poor one for crops, the corn being almost an ~ntire failure. It is said that the corn was actually frost bitten ;n August. Seed corn sold on the levee at Hannibal as it was ;nloaded from the boats at four dollars a bushel, a high price for those days. It seems likely that this corn crop failure ;aused Joe Maupin to turn his attention to wheat and caused that crop to later become the ranking crop of the county.

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1832, the spring was backward, sleets, freezes and high ,..,ater causing much trouble. The Mississippi was out all over :he bottoms most of the time. Today, it is hard to realize what :he Mississippi river bottoms were like over a hundred years lgo. Now great fields of wheat, corn and clover grow where, in :he days of our forefathers, the slough grass flourished or 'later stood the year around. Protected by levees, much of the

land that in early days was worthless swamp is considered now as the best in the state. Besides their crop and weather troubles, the settlers had another problem about that time. There was a constant threat of Indian trouble from the north and across the river. The Sacs, Fox and Winnebagos had united under Black Hawk and were on the warpath in Iowa and Illinois and no one knew when they might make a raid down the river to their old home near Hannibal. Gen. Gentry, a kinsman of Martha Gentry Maupin, wife of Joel Maupin, was in command of the troops sent to protect the settlers from the Indian raids. He spent some time at the Maupin's home while he was in the county. He was later to lose his life fighting Indians in Florida where he led the Missouri troops. In 1833, the Hannibal and Centerville road was laid out. It passed close to the home of Joel Maupin and he was now in closer touch with the markets. This road was the most travelled road in North Missouri and is followed rather closely today by U.S. Highway 36. The year of 1833 was also rather long remembered in the country as a year the stars fell and as a cholera year. This dire plague swept over Marion County with terrible results. Its worst hold was at Palmyra but settlers died all over the county and at Hannibal. It is said that one fifth of the settlers died but this is probably an exaggeration, tho the figures are probably correct for Palmyra. In the country, it is probable that not one tenth of the people perished. In 1835, another attack of the plague struck the county but it was not so serious altho the people were terror stricken. This same year was also known as the "cold year". In February, occurred the memorable "Cold Friday" which was one of the coldest days ever known in northeast Missouri. The temperature fell to fifty below zero and much stock was frozen. In the middle of May there came a severe freeze, stripping the trees of foliage and killing many of them. Of course all crops were ruined and the settlers hurried to plant again. Sept. 15th there came another hard freeze which ruined the late crops and the whole season was lost to the despairing farmers. Early in his life on his Missouri farm, Joel Maupin realized the importance of wheat as a crop for Marion County. The soil was adapted to its growth and the river made a splendid highway to the markets. Consequently he began to grow it on a large scale, constantly increasing his acreage until he was the largest grower in this section. When the Civil War broke out and interrupted agriculture in Marion, Maupin owned over a thousand acres of land and sixty slaves. Little by little his

116 117

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property was mulched from him on account of his sympathy for the South. At the end of the struggle he had little left but the bare land. He was a staunch Democrat and took part in all of the hard partisan struggles which preceded the war. His last effort was made to defeat Joshua Gentry, his wife's kinsman, for state senator. He could never forgive Gentry for taking sides with the north against their native state, Virginia. Gentry ran on an anti-abolitionist ticket and many Democrats were afraid to cast their votes, yet in the home precinct of Maupin, Gentry was beaten 129 to 1, which showed the power and influence of the old pioneer in his home neighborhood. He lived to see the Democrats allowed to vote in 1870 but he took no active part in politics after the war. He died 12 Aug 1876 and was buried in a little cemetery on the corner of his homestead, a few rods from where, he had pitched his camp on his arrival from far away Albemarle a half century before. Part of his grave was hewn in solid rock and many of his old slaves returned to dig it and see "Marse Joel" for the last time. Such was slavery and it is an illuminating incident in the annals of the hundreds of Virginians and Kentuckians who made the West. On his Monument of marble are inscribed the following words: JOEL MAUPIN OF Albemarle Born May 5th 1795 Died Aug 12th 1876

THE GENTRY FAMILY Among the British soldiers sent to Virginia to quell Bacon's Rebellion were two brothers, Nicholas and Samuel Gentry. They were discharged from service in 1685 and in the land book Register of the next year, we find a patent of land to Samuel Gentry in New Kent County. The Parish Vestry Book of St. Peters in New Kent and the St. Pauls Vestry Book in Hanover contain many records of the descendants of these two brothers. Nicholas Gentry had, among other children, a son James, and a son Nicholas Jr. The former, born in Hanover in 1710, had a son, George born in the same county about 1735. George Gentry moved to Albemarle County and settled near Free Union, where he became one of the most prosperous planters. His wife's name was Elizabeth and she was of Indian descent, legend says from Pocahontas. Gentry was a man of considerable wealth when he died in 1810. One of his sons Christopher, born in Hanover in 1773, married Sarah J. Dunn. Martha, daughter of Christopher and Sarah Dunn Gentry, married Joel Rice Maupin (42), 18 Dec 1827. Another daughter, Betsy, married James Dunn, grandson of David Maupin (17). Returning to Nicholas Gentry Jr., son of the first Nicholas Gentry, we find many of his descendants intermarried with the Maupin family. Nicholas Jr., died in 1779 leaving a large family. His son, David (1724-1812), had a daughter, Winifred, who married William Martin of Albemarle (See Harris Family). Their daughter, Mary Martin, married Garland Maupin (60), and another daughter, Elizabeth, married Eiias Simms. See James Maupin (87). Another son of Nicholas Gentry Jr., was Martin Gentry (17471827). He married Mary Timberlake and their daughter, Betsy, married Daniel Maupin (27) and another daughter, Patsy, became the wife of "Saddler" Daniel Maupin (19), cousin of Daniel (27). Richard Gentry, son of David Gentry, previously mentioned, married Jane Harris, daughter of Christopher Harris. See Harris History. Gen. Richard Gentry of Missouri was their son. Another son, David, born 1787, married Susan Maupin, daughter of Daniel (27), and Betsy Gentry, his wife. The above data was complied from "The Gentry Family in America" by the late Richard Gentry of Kansas City, and from the unpublished notes of Dr. Socrates Maupin of the University of Virginia. 119

118


property was mulched from him on account of his sympathy for the South. At the end of the struggle he had little left but the bare land. He was a staunch Democrat and took part in all of the hard partisan struggles which preceded the war. His last effort was made to defeat Joshua Gentry, his wife's kinsman, for state senator. He could never forgive Gentry for taking sides with the north against their native state, Virginia. Gentry ran on an anti-abolitionist ticket and many Democrats were afraid to cast their votes, yet in the home precinct of Maupin, Gentry was beaten 129 to 1, which showed the power and influence of the old pioneer in his home neighborhood. He lived to see the Democrats allowed to vote in 1870 but he took no active part in politics after the war. He died 12 Aug 1876 and was buried in a little cemetery on the corner of his homestead, a few rods from where, he had pitched his camp on his arrival from far away Albemarle a half century before. Part of his grave was hewn in solid rock and many of his old slaves returned to dig it and see "Marse Joel" for the last time. Such was slavery and it is an illuminating incident in the annals of the hundreds of Virginians and Kentuckians who made the West. On his Monument of marble are inscribed the following words: JOEL MAUPIN OF Albemarle Born May 5th 1795 Died Aug 12th 1876

THE GENTRY FAMILY Among the British soldiers sent to Virginia to quell Bacon's Rebellion were two brothers, Nicholas and Samuel Gentry. They were discharged from service in 1685 and in the land book Register of the next year, we find a patent of land to Samuel Gentry in New Kent County. The Parish Vestry Book of St. Peters in New Kent and the St. Pauls Vestry Book in Hanover contain many records of the descendants of these two brothers. Nicholas Gentry had, among other children, a son James, and a son Nicholas Jr. The former, born in Hanover in 1710, had a son, George born in the same county about 1735. George Gentry moved to Albemarle County and settled near Free Union, where he became one of the most prosperous planters. His wife's name was Elizabeth and she was of Indian descent, legend says from Pocahontas. Gentry was a man of considerable wealth when he died in 1810. One of his sons Christopher, born in Hanover in 1773, married Sarah J. Dunn. Martha, daughter of Christopher and Sarah Dunn Gentry, married Joel Rice Maupin (42), 18 Dec 1827. Another daughter, Betsy, married James Dunn, grandson of David Maupin (17). Returning to Nicholas Gentry Jr., son of the first Nicholas Gentry, we find many of his descendants intermarried with the Maupin family. Nicholas Jr., died in 1779 leaving a large family. His son, David (1724-1812), had a daughter, Winifred, who married William Martin of Albemarle (See Harris Family). Their daughter, Mary. Martin, married Garland Maupin (60), and another daughter, Elizabeth, married Eiias Simms. See James Maupin (87). Another son of Nicholas Gentry Jr., was Martin Gentry (17471827). He married Mary Timberlake and their daughter, Betsy, married Daniel Maupin (27) and another daughter, Patsy, became the wife of "Saddler" Daniel Maupin (19), cousin of Daniel (27). Richard Gentry, son of David Gentry, previously mentioned, married Jane Harris, daughter of Christopher Harris. See Harris History. Gen. Richard Gentry of Missouri was their son. Another son, David, born 1787, married Susan Maupin, daughter of Daniel (27), and Betsy Gentry, his wife. The above data was complied from "The Gentry Family in America" by the late Richard Gentry of Kansas City, and from the unpublished notes of Dr. Socrates Maupin of the University of Virginia. 119

118


f.

SIXTH GENERATION CHRISTOPHER JOHN THOMAS MAUPIN (78) Son of Joel Rice (42), grandson of Thomas (18), of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 ). John Maupin was born in Albemarle County, VA, 13 Nov 1828, and died in Shelby County, MO, 17 Jul 1878. He was buried at Spencers Chapel. He was but a few months over a year old when his father made the trip from Albemarle to Marion County, MO. The trip was made overland with oxen by way of Kentucky, crossing the Ohio at Shawneetown and thence to St. Louis. John Maupin settled in Shelby County soon after the county was formed. His home was on Crooked Creek in Jefferson Township. A few years later he crossed the plains in the California gold rush. After many exciting adventures and narrow escapes, he returned to Shelby and built a home a few miles from his first habitation. He married his cousin, Margaret, daughter of Thomas Maupin (43). She was the first teacher of the old Stalcup School, which stood on the dividing line between the timber and the prairie not far from the first cabin of John Maupin. The school was the first in West Shelby and it was built about 1845 or 1847. It was the kindergarten, high school and university of many of the Maupin family in those pioneer days in North Missouri. The love affair of the two cousins was bitterly opposed by the families on account of their kinship. This opposition was the cause of the abandonment of the first cabin on Crooked Creek and the trip to California. However the Missouri sweetheart proved a stronger attraction than the California gold and they were married in Sept. 1858 a few months after the return of John Maupin to Missouri. The children of John and Margaret Maupin were: I dress

Frederick-

m. James Chambers. Their children: a. Shelby, m. Kate Yost. b. Margaret, m. Harrison LivermoreofShelbina, MO. c. Mildred, m. Harry Wailes, Shelbina, MO. married Fannie Henniger. Their children: a. Art Maupin, m. Mayme Clay. Several Children. b. Maud Maupin, m. Henry Clay. Two children. They were killed in a railroad accident at Lentner ( 192- ). c. Jennie Maupin, m. Adam Lucas. Children were: Maupin, Lynn and Margaret Lucas. d. John Maupin, m. Florence Churchill. Children were: Merle and Billy Gene Maupin. e. Paul Maupin, m. Lucille Wingate; second 120

Mildred Nona

Mable Maupin, married Aubrey Williamson. Have a son, Eugene Williamson. unmarried. married Dr. J. A. Furnish of the Furnish Hospital, Shelbina, MO. They have a daughter, Virginia, Dr. Furnish was a grandson of Thomas Maupin (43).

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AMERICUS BOLIVAR MAUPIN (79). Son of Joel Rice (42), grandson of Thomas (18), of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3) of Gabriel (1 ). Bolivar Maupin, known as Boll Maupin, was born in Marion County, MO, 4 Feb 1831, and died in Shelby County, MO, 22 Feb 1905. He and his wife are buried in the cemetery at Oak Ridge Church, not far from their old home. Maupin was one of the early settlers of West Shelby, settling on Crooked Creek in Jefferson Township in 1850. The site of his home was in the southeast corner of Section 2, township 56, range 12. He married Salina Miller, daughter of Samuel Miller of Marion County, MO, born 26 Aug 1832 and died in Shelby County, 24 Oct 1907. Maupin was one of the prominent citizens of the county and was always an important figure in political affairs. He was a delegate to many of the Democratic conventions and a warm friend of Senator Joel Stone and Champ Clark. The children of Bolivar and Salina Maupin were: Christopher John - b. 28 Dec 1852; d. 29 Sep 1929. Thomas m. 5 Dec 1871 Kate Conrad, daughter of Jacob Conrad and Regina Weir. Their children: a. Lena, m. J. J. Sanders. Children: 1. Floyd, m. Lois Collins. 2. Hazel, m. Eugene Moore. b. Annie, m. Rev. Richard Webdell. They have one son, Everett. Mary Frances b. 6 Dec 1856; m. Judge Jas. Chinn, son of Elijah Chinn, an early Shelby settler. Children were: a. Lucy, m. Virgil Kidwell. Children were: 1. Cassie, wife of Floyd Thomas. 2. James, m. Blanch Smith. b. George Chinn, m. Bertha Hirrlinger. Children were: 1. Beryl, m. Lotus Hunolt. 2. Orville, m. Mary _ _ 3. Jack, m. Frances Shepard.

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f.

SIXTH GENERATION CHRISTOPHER JOHN THOMAS MAUPIN (78) Son of Joel Rice (42), grandson of Thomas (18), of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 ). John Maupin was born in Albemarle County, VA, 13 Nov 1828, and died in Shelby County, MO, 17 Jul 1878. He was buried at Spencers Chapel. He was but a few months over a year old when his father made the trip from Albemarle to Marion County, MO. The trip was made overland with oxen by way of Kentucky, crossing the Ohio at Shawneetown and thence to St. Louis. John Maupin settled in Shelby County soon after the county was formed. His home was on Crooked Creek in Jefferson Township. A few years later he crossed the plains in the California gold rush. After many exciting adventures and narrow escapes, he returned to Shelby and built a home a few miles from his first habitation. He married his cousin, Margaret, daughter of Thomas Maupin (43). She was the first teacher of the old Stalcup School, which stood on the dividing line between the timber and the prairie not far from the first cabin of John Maupin. The school was the first in West Shelby and it was built about 1845 or 1847. It was the kindergarten, high school and university of many of the Maupin family in those pioneer days in North Missouri. The love affair of the two cousins was bitterly opposed by the families on account of their kinship. This opposition was the cause of the abandonment of the first cabin on Crooked Creek and the trip to California. However the Missouri sweetheart proved a stronger attraction than the California gold and they were married in Sept. 1858 a few months after the return of John Maupin to Missouri. The children of John and Margaret Maupin were: I dress

Frederick-

m. James Chambers. Their children: a. Shelby, m. Kate Yost. b. Margaret, m. Harrison Livermore of Shelbina, MO. c. Mildred, m. Harry Wailes, Shelbina, MO. married Fannie Henniger. Their children: a. Art Maupin, m. Mayme Clay. Several Children. b. Maud Maupin, m. Henry Clay. Two children. They were killed in a railroad accident at Lentner ( 192- ). c. Jennie Maupin, m. Adam Lucas. Children were: Maupin, Lynn and Margaret Lucas. d. John Maupin, m. Florence Churchill. Children were: Merle and Billy Gene Maupin. e. Paul Maupin, m. Lucille Wingate; second 120

Mildred Nona

Mable Maupin, married Aubrey Williamson. Have a son, Eugene Williamson. unmarried. married Dr. J. A. Furnish of the Furnish Hospital, Shelbina, MO. They have a daughter, Virginia, Dr. Furnish was a grandson of Thomas Maupin (43).

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I IIIII

AMERICUS BOLIVAR MAUPIN (79). Son of Joel Rice (42), grandson of Thomas (18), of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3) of Gabriel (1 ).

I I !

Bolivar Maupin, known as Boll Maupin, was born in Marion County, MO, 4 Feb 1831, and died in Shelby County, MO, 22 Feb 1905. He and his wife are buried in the cemetery at Oak Ridge Church, not far from their old home. Maupin was one of the early settlers of West Shelby, settling on Crooked Creek in Jefferson Township in 1850. The site of his home was in the southeast corner of Section 2, township 56, range 12. He married Salina Miller, daughter of Samuel Miller of Marion County, MO, born 26 Aug 1832 and died in Shelby County, 24 Oct 1907. Maupin was one of the prominent citizens of the county and was always an important figure in political affairs. He was a delegate to many of the Democratic conventions and a warm friend of Senator Joel Stone and Champ Clark. The children of Bolivar and Salina Maupin were: Christopher John -b. 28 Dec 1852; d. 29 Sep 1929. Thomas m. 5 Dec 1871 Kate Conrad, daughter of Jacob Conrad and Regina Weir. Their children: a. Lena, m. J. J. Sanders. Children: 1. Floyd, m. Lois Collins. 2. Hazel, m. Eugene Moore. b. Annie, m. Rev. Richard Webdell. They have one son, Everett. Mary Frances b. 6 Dec 1856; m. Judge Jas. Chinn, son of Elijah Chinn, an early Shelby settler. Children were: a. Lucy, m. Virgil Kidwell. Children were: 1. Cassie, wife of Floyd Thomas. 2. James, m. Blanch Smith. b. George Chinn, m. Bertha Hi rrl inger. Children were: 1. Beryl, m. Lotus Hunolt. 2. Orville, m. Mary _ _â&#x20AC;˘ 3. Jack, m. Frances Shepard. 121

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Ill c. James William

Virginia Graves -

Samuel Rice

Bolivar, m. Lily Clay. Had a daughter, Marie. born 26 Dec 1858; died 1950; m. Fannie Maupin, daughter of Charles Maupin (84). Children were: a. Cora, died young. b. William B., m. Elsye Baker; second, Imo Speyerer. He served in the World War on Destroyer Flotilla. Children were: 1. Weeks Maupin, m. __ Threldkeld. 2. Cora EI i zabeth 3. Phyllis. Born 14 Jun 1862; m. Squire Barton. They had two daughters Amanda, wife of Joseph King and Ethel, wife of Jas. Leftridge. She died 1919, leaving three children, Adolphus, Virginia and Laverne Leftridge. Born 4 Nov 1864; m. 21 Dec 1884, Rosa Schmeirer, daughter of Michael John Schmeirer and Mary Weir. Rosa Schmeirer was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, 19 Aug 1855 and was carried as a child to Pennsylvania where the family settled in Venango County, near Barkeysville. Mary Weir Schmeirer died there 9 Feb 1857 and her husband died in 1862. They are buried in the old Winebrennarian Cemetery near Barkeysville, PA.

Samuel R. and Rosa Maupin had one son, Eugene, born 25 Dec 1888 on the farm southeast of Clarence, a part of which farm was land taken up from the United States government by his great grandfather Joel Rice Maupin (42). He attended Missouri University, 1909, 1910 Farm House 1913. Associate Editor, Journal of Agriculture, St. Louis, 1918-1920. Volunteered First Officer's Training Camp, World War, attached to Company A, Third Replacement Center and returned to farm to assist Food Production campaign; Editor Bevier Appeal, 1925; Founder Independent at Clarence in 1925; Consolidated with Clarence Courier in 1928; Supervisor Farm Credit Administration, 1933-1938; Publicity Director State Auditor's Office, 1939-1944; m. at Shelbina, 12 Apr 1911, Frances Woods Maupin, daughter of Nathaniel Maupin (88). She was born 13 Mar 1890, and has been prominent in work of several National Patriotic Societies, D.A.R.; Daughter of 1812; U.D.C.; Colonial Dames; First Families of Virginia and Huguenot Society of Founders of Manakinetown. She was Missouri State President of Colonial Dames of XVII Century. Their children: a. Frances Madeline, b. 25 Aug 1912, m. 15 May 1932 122

b.

Enoch

Noel Weisenborn of Macon. He d. 2 Apr 1969. Two daughters: 1. Nona Juanita b. 31 Dec. 1932, m. 5 Mar 1954 Jack H. Cunningham; children: a. Madelynn Ann, b. 21 Dec 1954 b. James Noel, b. 5 Dec 1956 c. John Alan, b. 21 August 1958; m. 20 Mar 1981, Nancy R. Bindbeutel, 3 sons: Cody Alan, b. 10 May 1986, James Todd and Casey Ryan, twins, b. 3 Sep 1987. 2. Elizabeth Tyson (Betty), b. 1 Nov 1934; m. 12 Oct 1957, Russell J. Fleming, one son: Russell Tyson, b. 19 Jun 1958 Jean Margaret, b. 9 Apr 1915. Graduate of William Woods College; m. 20 Jan 1951 to J. Timbrook. No children. Died 16 Sep 1987. -

Sarah Martha-

b. 10 Aug 1867; d. 2 Oct 1951; m. Minnie Taylor, daughter of David Taylor and granddaughter of Abraham Vandiver, one of the first five settlers in Shelby County. Their son: a. Georgie Taylor, m. Paulyne Mitchell. he was born 18 Jan 1898. They have one daughter, Georgianna, b. 21 Jan 1922. born 13 Jan 1875; m. W. K. Dungan. Children are: a. Lena, m. Merton Moore. b. Clifford c. Elsie.

Geo. Washington- died young.

******************** FIFTH GENERATION THOMAS G. MAUPIN (43) Son of Thomas (18), grandson of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 ). Thomas G. Maupin was born in Albemarle County, VA, in 1788 and died 17 Jan 1878 in Paris, Monroe County, MO. He and his wife are buried in the old cemetery at Spencer's Chapel, near Granville, MO. Maupin served in the War of 1812 as a member of Capt. Estes' company of Virginia Militia. He married, 18 Apr 1815, Nancy 0. Harris, daughter of Jarratt Harris of AI bemarle. He was the son of Thomas Harris and Susan Dabney, the latter being the daughter of John Dabney, who commanded Dabney's Legion at the siege of Yorktown. Thomas Harris was blind and was the eldest son of James and Mary 123

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il l~l l c.

James William

-

Virginia Graves-

Samuel Rice

-

Bolivar, m. Lily Clay. Had a daughter, Marie. born 26 Dec 1858; died 1950; m. Fannie Maupin, daughter of Charles Maupin (84). Children were: a. Cora, died young. b. William B., m. Elsye Baker; second, Imo Speyerer. He served in the World War on Destroyer Flotilla. Children were: 1. Weeks Maupin, m. __ Threldkeld. 2. Cora Elizabeth 3. Phyllis. Born 14 Jun 1862; m. Squire Barton. They had two daughters Amanda, wife of Joseph King and Ethel, wife of Jas. Leftridge. She died 1919, leaving three children, Adolphus, Virginia and Laverne Leftridge. Born 4 Nov 1864; m. 21 Dec 1884, Rosa Schmeirer, daughter of Michael John Schmeirer and Mary Weir. Rosa Schmeirer was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, 19 Aug 1855 and was carried as a child to Pennsylvania where the family settled in Venango County, near Barkeysville. Mary Weir Schmeirer died there 9 Feb 1857 and her husband died in 1862. They are buried in the old Winebrennarian Cemetery near Barkeysville, PA.

Samuel R. and Rosa Maupin had one son, Eugene, born 25 Dec 1888 on the farm southeast of Clarence, a part of which farm was land taken up from the United States government by his great grandfather Joel Rice Maupin (42). He attended Missouri University, 1909, 1910 Farm House 1913. Associate Editor, Journal of Agriculture, St. Louis, 1918-1920. Volunteered First Officer's Training Camp, World War, attached to Company A, Third Replacement Center and returned to farm to assist Food Production campaign; Editor Bevier Appeal, 1925; Founder Independent at Clarence in 1925; Consolidated with Clarence Courier in 1928; Supervisor Farm Credit Administration, 1933-1938; Publicity Director State Auditor's Office, 1939-1944; m. at Shelbina, 12 Apr 1911, Frances Woods Maupin, daughter of Nathaniel Maupin (88). She was born 13 Mar 1890, and has been prominent in work of several National Patriotic Societies, D.A.R.; Daughter of 1812; U.D.C.; Colonial Dames; First Families of Virginia and Huguenot Society of Founders of Manakinetown. She was Missouri State President of Colonial Dames of XVII Century. Their children: a. F ranees Madeline, b. 25 Aug 1912, m. 15 May 1932 122

b.

Enoch

Noel Weisenborn of Macon. He d. 2 Apr 1969. Two daughters: 1. Nona Juanita b. 31 Dec. 1932, m. 5 Mar 1954 Jack H. Cunningham; children: a. Madelynn Ann, b. 21 Dec 1954 b. James Noel, b. 5 Dec 1956 c. John Alan, b. 21 August 1958; m. 20 Mar 1981, Nancy R. Bindbeutel, 3 sons: Cody Alan, b. 10 May 1986, James Todd and Casey Ryan, twins, b. 3 Sep 1987. Elizabeth Tyson (Betty), b. 1 Nov 1934; m. 12 Oct 2. 1957, Russell J. Fleming, one son: Russell Tyson, b. 19 Jun 1958 Jean Margaret, b. 9 Apr 1915. Graduate of William Woods College; m. 20 Jan 1951 to J. Timbrook. No children. Died 16 Sep 1987. -

Sarah Martha-

b. 10 Aug 1867; d. 2 Oct 1951; m. Minnie Taylor, daughter of David Taylor and granddaughter of Abraham Vandiver, one of the first five settlers in Shelby County. Their son: a. Georgie Taylor, m. Paulyne Mitchell. he was born 18 Jan 1898. They have one daughter, Georgianna, b. 21 Jan 1922. born 13 Jan 1875; m. W. K. Dungan. Children are: a. Lena, m. Merton Moore. b. Clifford c. Elsie.

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Geo. Washington- died young.

******************** FIFTH GENERATION THOMAS G. MAUPIN (43) Son of Thomas (18), grandson of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 ). Thomas G. Maupin was born in Albemarle County, VA, in 1788 and died 17 Jan 1878 in Paris, Monroe County, MO. He and his wife are buried in the old cemetery at Spencer's Chapel, near Granville, MO. Maupin served in the War of 1812 as a member of Capt. Estes' company of Virginia Militia. He married, 18 Apr 1815, Nancy 0. Harris, daughter of Jarratt Harris of AI bemarle. He was the son of Thomas Harris and Susan Dabney, the latter being the daughter of John Dabney, who commanded Dabney's Legion at the siege of Yorktown. Thomas Harris was blind and was the eldest son of James and Mary 123

11111111'1111


Harris and a grandson of Maj. Robt. Harris. See Harris Family under Margaret (26). Nancy Harris was the sister of the wife of Arthur Maupin (44a), brother of Thomas (43). She was born in Albemarle 11 Oct 1792, and died in Monroe County, 1 Feb 1867. Thomas Maupin emigrated to Missouri in 1832 and first settled in Johnson County, MO, but later removed to Monroe County where he bought and entered lands near the present site of Spencer's Chapel Methodist Church. He and his wife were among the organizers of the church and it is said that Thomas Maupin gave it its name after his mother, Ann Spencer. Many Maupins are buried in this old churchyard and the descendants of at least three of Daniel Maupin's children are buried here. The children of Thomas Maupin are: (80) William H.- married Elizabeth, daughter of Clifton Maupin (69). (81) Thomas - married Mary Frances, daughter of Joel Maupin (42). Margaretmarried Christopher John Thomas Maupin (78). Virginia Annie- married Gen. Sharp. Susan married Henry Ryan. Pyrenia married Rev. E. K. Miller, Methodist minister and son of Samuel Miller (See Miller Family under Bolivar Maupin (79). Hardenie - married ____ Sparks. Hannah b. 18 Jan 1832; d. 7 Feb 1881. Mildred d. 20 Dec 1865. Nancy married John Furnish. b. 27 Oct 1825; d. 9 Jan 1869.

Mollie

Rice Graves -

SIXTH GENERATION WILLIAM HARRIS MAUPIN (80). Son of Thomas (43), grandson of Thomas (18), of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). William Maupin, according to his son, was born in Albemarle County 20 May 1816. He died in Monroe County, MO, 27 Oct 1889. He and his wife are buried at the Spencers Chapel Cemetery. They were among the first members of the church. The wife of William Maupin was Elizabeth, daughter of Clifton Garland Maupin (69). She was born in Monroe County, 3 Oct 1831, and died in the same county 19 Dec 1878. Their children were: Thomas Clifton- b. in Monroe County, 11 Nov 1852; m. Eliza Ann Jacoby, 14 Feb 1871. She was born 4 Oct 1852; d. 17 Feb 1922. Their home was near Middle Grove in Monroe County. Their children were:

Elbert, b. 27 Nov 1871; m. Ida Brown In t~ Home at Centralia, MO. b. Graves, b. 9 Jan 1874; m. Willie Newton In 1894. Their daughter, Helen Lee, wu b. II Nov 1904. Home was in Moberly, MO. c. Guy, b. 1 Aug 1877; m. 25 Dec 1909 to MM Lee. Their children were: Thomas Clifton, Jr., b. 23 May 1914, and Robert Guy, b. 16 Apr 1919. d. William, b. 20 Aug 1884; m. Clara Box in 1914. No children. e. Frances, wife of Harry Harris, b. 7 Aug 1888 and m. 24 Jul 1909. married Robert Estill of Kansas City. Their children were: a. Ben b. William c. Robert d. Judith e. Elizabeth born in Monroe County, MO, 21 Aug 1857. He was School Commissioner of Shelby County for four years and Probate Judge of that county for over thirty-five years. He married Emma Chapman of Monroe County on 26 Dec 1880. Their children were: a. Elizabeth Woods Maupin, married D. Buckman. b. Minnie Maupin, m. Arthur Lundin. c. Charles Byron Maupin, served in Marine Corps during the World War. Lived in California. d. Paul Maupin; m. 13 Apr 1916 to Myrtle Stalcup. e. Martha Maupin, m. Dan Whitmore of Webster Groves. f. Emma Ricie Maupin. g. Temple Graves Maupin h. Robert Maupin born in Monroe county, 4 Mar 1860; m. Carrie Morrison. Children: a. Capt. Howard Maupin, Surgeon with American forces in World War I. Married Ora Tursman of Chicago; second, â&#x20AC;˘ b. James Maupin, served in World War; m. Georgia Goe. One daughter, Mary Irene. c. Warren Maupin, married Violet Thomas. Served in World War. d. Mildred Maupin, died young. born 21 Sep 1856; m. Isaac Stalcup, daughters, Minnie and Annie Leonard. a.

William A. -

Talitha

124 125


Harris and a grandson of Maj. Robt. Harris. See Harris Family under Margaret (26). Nancy Harris was the sister of the wife of Arthur Maupin (44a), brother of Thomas (43). She was born in Albemarle 11 Oct 1792, and died in Monroe County, 1 Feb 1867. Thomas Maupin emigrated to Missouri in 1832 and first settled in Johnson County, MO, but later removed to Monroe County where he bought and entered lands near the present site of Spencer's Chapel Methodist Church. He and his wife were among the organizers of the church and it is said that Thomas Maupin gave it its name after his mother, Ann Spencer. Many Maupins are buried in this old churchyard and the descendants of at least three of Daniel Maupin's children are buried here. The children of Thomas Maupin are: (80) William H.- married Elizabeth, daughter of Clifton Maupin (69). (81) Thomas - married Mary Frances, daughter of Joel Maupin (42). Margaretmarried Christopher John Thomas Maupin (78). Virginia Annie- married Gen. Sharp. Susan married Henry Ryan. Pyrenia married Rev. E. K. Miller, Methodist minister and son of Samuel Miller (See Miller Family under Bolivar Maupin (79). married ____ Sparks. Hardenie b. 18 Jan 1832; d. 7 Feb 1881. Hannah d. 20 Dec 1865. Mildred married John Furnish. b. 27 Oct 1825; d. 9 Jan Nancy 1869.

a.

Mollie

-

Rice Graves -

SIXTH GENERATION WILLIAM HARRIS MAUPIN (80). Son of Thomas (43), grandson of Thomas (18), of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). William Maupin, according to his son, was born in Albemarle County 20 May 1816. He died in Monroe County, MO, 27 Oct 1889. He and his wife are buried at the Spencers Chapel Cemetery. They were among the first members of the church. The wife of William Maupin was Elizabeth, daughter of Clifton Garland Maupin (69). She was born in Monroe County, 3 Oct 1831, and died in the same county 19 Dec 1878. Their children were: Thomas Clifton- b. in Monroe County, 11 Nov 1852; m. Eliza Ann Jacoby, 14 Feb 1871. She was born 4 Oct 1852; d. 17 Feb 1922. Their home was near Middle Grove in Monroe County. Their children were: 124

William A. -

Talitha

-

Elbert, b. 27 Nov 1871; m. Ida Brown in 1896. Home at Centralia, MO. b. Graves, b. 9 Jan 1874; m. Willie Newton in 1894. Their daughter, Helen Lee, was b. 26 Nov 1904. Home was in Moberly, MO. c. Guy, b. 1 Aug 1877; m. 25 Dec 1909 to Mae Lee. Their children were: Thomas Clifton, Jr., b. 23 May 1914, and Robert Guy, b. 16 Apr 1919. d. William, b. 20 Aug 1884; m. Clara Box in 1914. No children. e. Frances, wife of Harry Harris, b. 7 Aug 1888 and m. 24 Jul 1909. married Robert Estill of Kansas City. Their children were: a. Ben b. William c. Robert d. Judith e. Elizabeth born in Monroe County, MO, 21 Aug 1857. He was School Commissioner of Shelby County for four years and Probate Judge of that county for over thirty-five years. He married Emma Chapman of Monroe County on 26 Dec 1880. Their children were: a. Elizabeth Woods Maupin, married D. Buckman. b. Minnie Maupin, m. Arthur Lundin. c. Charles Byron Maupin, served in Marine Corps during the World War. Lived in California. d. Paul Maupin; m. 13 Apr 1916 to Myrtle Stalcup. e. Martha Maupin, m. Dan Whitmore of Webster Groves. f. Emma Ricie Maupin. g. Temple Graves Maupin h. Robert Maupin born in Monroe county, 4 Mar 1860; m. Carrie Morrison. Children: a. Capt. Howard Maupin, Surgeon with American forces in World War I. Married Ora Tursman of Chicago; second, -~:--b. James Maupin, served in World War; m. Georgia Goe. One daughter, Mary Irene. c. Warren Maupin, married Violet Thomas. Served in World War. d. Mildred Maupin, died young. born 21 Sep 1856; m. Isaac Stalcup, daughters, Minnie and Annie Leonard. 125


Robert Minnie Joseph

m. Letha Bates. Their children are Mildred and Corienne. He was of medical profession and with Kelley Inst. m. Elbert King. No children. Home at Shelbina, MO. m. Ora Muldrow. Have daughter, Bernice Maupin.

********************

THOMAS MAUPIN (81) Son of Thomas (43), grandson of Thomas (18), of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1). Thomas Maupin was born in Monroe County, MO, 14 Jan 1826, and died in the same county, 21 Mar 1905. His wife was Mary Frances, daughter of Joel Maupin (42). She was born 22 Jan 1840, in Marion County and died at her home in north Monroe County, near Oak Ridge Church, 21 Feb 1901. They were married 29 Jan 1857. Their home was on the Shelby-Monroe line and Thomas Maupin had considerable acreage here. He was a stockman of some reputation and imported many fine Jacks from Kentucky and did much to give Shelby and Monroe their high standing in the production of fine mules. His children were: Marion Monroe- b. 13 Jun 1858; d. 1926; m. Emma Francis, 23 Feb 1881. He lived on the old home farm of his father's. Their children were: a. Myrtle, m. Edward Smock. Issue: 1. Monroe

2. b. c.

d.

Nannie, m. Ben Stewart; d. Feb 1967. Eugene Thomas, m. Maud Stewart; d. in 1917, leaving one son, Marion Stewart Maupin, b. 2 Nov 1912, d. 19 Jan 1984; m. 5 Mar 1932, to Margaret Dickson. She preceded him in death as did a daughter, Margaret. Marion Stewart was a farmer. He was a Judge in Monroe Co. MO, for 12 years and 2 terms as Mayor of Shelbina, MO. His son Richard, b. 13 May 1939; m. 18 Dec 1960 to Nancy Cain of Paris, MO. Richard continues to farm the 120 acres that have been in the Maupin family since 1834. The Spencer Chapel cemetery is at the corner of the farm. Many Maupins are buried there. A list of all buried in the Spencer Chapel Cemetery is on record at the Shelbina, MO, Library. Richard and Nancy Cain Maupin have 2 children, Stacy and James Eric. Varian, m. Winnie, dau. of Frank Wright. They have a daughter, Jeane Margery. 126

FIFTH GENERATION CLIFTON MAUPIN (44) Son of Thomas (18), grandson of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), Gabriel (1 ). Clifton Maupin was born in Albemarle County, VA, about 1800 and his wife was Elizabeth Maupin, b. 1810, his cousin, daughter of David Maupin (17). They married 17 Sep 1828 in Albemarle County. Will Book 28, pg 228. Their children were: Cynthia Sarah Ann Adeline John RiceClifton PriceDavid Marian J. -

married H. B. Blackwell b. 1833 b. 1834 b. 1836, Lieutenant in the Confederate army. enlisted in the Confederate army at an early age. Killed on the Stone Wall at Gettysburg during Pickett's Charge 3 Jul 1863. wife of J. Ward.

ARTHUR MAUPIN (44a) Son of Thomas (18), grandson of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). Arthur T. Maupin (written Athanasius by Dr. Socrates Maupin) was born in Albemarle County, VA, in 1812 and died 27 Apr 1880 at the age of 68 according to the inscription on his monument in the old Harris Cemetery near his old home in Montgomery County, MO. He emigrated from Albemarle County to Montgomery County, Missouri about 1840. Settled on Little Loutre River in the northwest part of the county. His wife was Mary V. Harris, daughter of Jarratt Harris of Albemarle, and sister of his brother, Thomas' wife. She was born in Albemarle in 1815 and died in Montgomery County, MO, 7 Dec 1872. She also is buried in the Harris Cemetery. The children of Arthur and Mary Maupin were: Fanny

Born in Albemarle County, married Alfred Walker and they live on a farm northwest of her father's homestead. Children: a. Arthur, b. 15 Feb 1864, d. 14 Feb 1894; m. Mattie Hudson. They lived in Texas. No issue. b. Minnie, m. Lee Oliver. Home was west of Montgomery City. Their son, Stanley, m. Rose Grebe. Had several children. 127


Robert Minnie Joseph

m. Letha Bates. Their children are Mildred and Corienne. He was of medical profession and with Kelley Inst. m. Elbert King. No children. Home at Shelbina, MO. m. Ora Muldrow. Have daughter, Bernice Maupin.

********************

THOMAS MAUPIN (81) Son of Thomas (43), grandson of Thomas (18), of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). Thomas Maupin was born in Monroe County, MO, 14 Jan 1826, and died in the same county, 21 Mar 1905. His wife was Mary Frances, daughter of Joel Maupin (42). She was born 22 Jan 1840, in Marion County and died at her home in north Monroe County, near Oak Ridge Church, 21 Feb 1901. They were married 29 Jan 1857. Their home was on the Shelby-Monroe line and Thomas Maupin had considerable acreage here. He was a stockman of some reputation and imported many fine Jacks from Kentucky and did much to give Shelby and Monroe their high standing in the production of fine mules. His children were: Marion Monroe- b. 13 Jun 1858; d. 1926; m. Emma Francis, 23 Feb 1881. He lived on the old home farm of his father's. Their children were: a. Myrtle, m. Edward Smock. Issue: 1. Monroe

2. b. c.

Nannie, m. Ben Stewart; d. Feb 1967. Eugene Thomas, m. Maud Stewart; d. in 1917, leaving one son, Marion Stewart Maupin, b. 2 Nov 1912, d. 19 Jan 1984; m. 5 Mar 1932, to Margaret Dickson. She preceded him in death as did a daughter, Margaret. Marion Stewart was a farmer. He was a Judge in Monroe Co. MO, for 12 years and 2 terms as Mayor of Shelbina, MO. His son Richard, b. 13 May 1939; m. 18 Dec 1960 to Nancy Cain of Paris, MO. Richard continues to farm the 120 acres that have been in the Maupin family since 1834. The Spencer Chapel cemetery is at the corner of the farm. Many Maupins are buried there. A list of all buried in the Spencer Chapel Cemetery is on record at the Shelbina, MO, Library. Richard and Nancy Cain Maupin have 2 children, Stacy and James Eric. d. Varian, m. Winnie, dau. of Frank Wright. They have a daughter, Jeane Margery. 126

FIFTH GENERATION CLIFTON MAUPIN (44) Son of Thomas (18), grandson of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), Gabriel (1 ). Clifton Maupin was born in Albemarle County, VA, about 1800 and his wife was Elizabeth Maupin, b. 1810, his cousin, daughter of David Maupin (17). They married 17 Sep 1828 in Albemarle County. Will Book 28, pg 228. Their children were: Cynthia Sarah Ann Adeline John RiceClifton PriceDavid Marian J. -

married H. B. Blackwell b. 1833 b. 1834 b. 1836, Lieutenant in the Confederate army. enlisted in the Confederate army at an early age. Killed on the Stone Wall at Gettysburg during Pickett's Charge 3 Jul 1863. wife of J. Ward.

ARTHUR MAUPIN (44a) Son of Thomas (18), grandson of Gabriel (6), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). Arthur T. Maupin (written Athanasius by Dr. Socrates Maupin) was born in Albemarle County, VA, in 1812 and died 27 Apr 1880 at the age of 68 according to the inscription on his monument in the old Harris Cemetery near his old home in Montgomery County, MO. He emigrated from Albemarle County to Montgomery County, Missouri about 1840. Settled on Little Loutre River in the northwest part of the county. His wife was Mary V. Harris, daughter of Jarratt Harris of Albemarle, and sister of his brother, Thomas' wife. She was born in Albemarle in 1815 and died in Montgomery County, MO, 7 Dec 1872. She also is buried in the Harris Cemetery. The children of Arthur and Mary Maupin were: Fanny

Born in Albemarle County, married Alfred Walker and they live on a farm northwest of her father's homestead. Children: a. Arthur, b. 15 Feb 1864, d. 14 Feb 1894; m. Mattie Hudson. They lived in Texas. No issue. b. Minnie, m. Lee Oliver. Home was west of Montgomery City. Their son, Stanley, m. Rose Grebe. Had several children. 127


Della, m. Corvin Graves. Home was in Montgomery City. 1. Joseph, has one child. 2. Mary Virginia, married. No children. d. Frank, died 16 Jul 1881. e. Payne, b. 2 Mar 1878, d. 9 Dec 1889. Killed by a runaway horse near Wellsville, MO. f. Ida, married Amos Calvert. Home at Bronough, MO. No children. born 28 Oct 1837, d. 16 Apr 1906. She was born in Albemarle County. She married James Henry Oliver, son of John Oliver and Margaret Miller of Clark County, KY. Children: a. James, lived in Colorado. b. Elbert M., m. Clarintha Boone, descendant of Daniel Boone. Home was west of Montgomery City. Children were as follows: 1. Letha, m. Bud Walker. 3 Children. 2. Easter, m. Hughes Powell. 3. Clay J., m. Myrtle Hart, 2 children. 4. Julia, m. Walter Terry, I child. c. Sarah Frances, b. 8 May 1867, d. 5 Apr 1931; m. Joshua Dickey. Lived west of Montgomery City. Both are buried at Wellsville, MO cemetery. Their children: 1. Stella, m. Verner Rogers, 4 children. 2. Mamie, m. Henry Hickerson, 1 child. 3. Elmer, m. Hazel Updyke, no children. 4. Pearl, m. Manley Dixon, 1 child. 5. Harris, m. Vera Rogers, 1 child. 6. Clara, m. Edward __, 1 child. d. Arthur, adopted by his Uncle, Varnum Davis, who married Sallie Oliver, sister of James Oliver. Arthur Oliver married and was a florist at Brownwood, TX. Died 21 Feb 1936. His children: 1. Zelia 2. Mary Virginia 3. Estella e. Maggie, m. Henry Dungan. Home near Wellsville. Children: 1. Arthur 2. Arlene, twin of Arthur, m. Walter Woodson. 3. Kenneth, married __ , 1 child. 4. Monta f. Mary, m. Wm. Bishop. Home in Montgomery City, MO, children: 1. Leola 2. Wilfred c.

Camilla

128

3. Harry 4. Alma 5. Floy 6. Floyd, twin of Floy. 7. Mary Virginia 8. Wendell 9. \Alice g. Ovid E., died 31 Mar 1865. h. Camilla, b. 4 Mar 1874, d. 4 May 1874. Jarott Thomas- born 15 Apr 1847, d. Apr 1887; m. Mary Elizabeth Scholl. They lived on a farm west of Montgomery City, MO. Both buried in Liberty Cemetery. Children: a. Hughes, b. 26 Sep 1872. Married Alice Yates. Children were: 1. J. T. died in infancy. 2. Glen Yates Maupin, married Eula Carr. Have a son, Gene. 3. Melba Elizabeth, married_. She had one son. b. Harris, m. Jessie Britt. Their children were: 1. Thomas, died in infancy. 2. Laverta, m. Harry Smith. 3. Reece Hughes 4. Harris Jr. Arthur Jr. born in Montgomery County, MO; married 路Jennie Harrison. Children: a. Leslie Maupin, lives in Texas, 4 children. b. Early Tilman, lives in Abernathy Texas, 2 children. c. Hattie, m. Joseph Earhart, Home in Lubbock, Texas. d. Stella, married and lives in Yuma, AZ.

*

*

******** *a. Hughes Maupin, b. 26 Sep 1872, d. 21 Dec 1950, south of Auxvasse, MO. Married Alice Yates, b. 29 Aug 1877, d. 27 Jun 1957 in Auxvasse, MO. Their children: 1. J. T. died in infancy. 2. Glen Yates, b. 28 Oct 1905, d. 12 Aug 1979; m. 14 May 1934 to Eula F. Carr. Glen owned and operated funeral homes in Fulton and Auxvasse, MO. Two children: a. Gene Carr Maupin, b. 20 Dec 1935 in Fulton, MO. b. Thomas Lynn Maupin, b. 28 Jan 1943 in Fulton. 129


Della, m. Corvin Graves. Home was in Montgomery City. 1. Joseph, has one child. 2. Mary Virginia, married. No children. d. Frank, died 16 Jut 1881. e. Payne, b. 2 Mar 1878, d. 9 Dec 1889. Killed by a runaway horse near Wellsville, MO. f. Ida, married Amos Calvert. Home at Bronough, MO. No children. born 28 Oct 1837, d. 16 Apr 1906. She was born in Albemarle County. She married James Henry Oliver, son of John Oliver and Margaret Miller of Clark County, KY. Children: a. James, I i ved in Colorado. b. Elbert M., m. Clarintha Boone, descendant of Daniel Boone. Home was west of Montgomery City. Children were as follows: 1. Letha, m. Bud Walker. 3 Children. 2. Easter, m. Hughes Powell. 3. Clay J., m. Myrtle Hart, 2 children. 4. Julia, m. Walter Terry, I child. c. Sarah Frances, b. 8 May 1867, d. 5 Apr 1931; m. Joshua Dickey. Lived west of Montgomery City. Both are buried at Wellsville, MO cemetery. Their children: 1. Stella, m. Verner Rogers, 4 children. 2. Mamie, m. Henry Hickerson, 1 child. 3. Elmer, m. Hazel Updyke, no children. 4. Pearl, m. Manley Dixon, 1 child. 5. Harris, m. Vera Rogers, 1 child. 6. Clara, m. Edward __, 1 child. d. Arthur, adopted by his Uncle, Varnum Davis, who married Sallie Oliver, sister of James Oliver. Arthur Oliver married and was a florist at Brownwood, TX. Died 21 Feb 1936. His children: 1. Zelia 2. Mary Virginia 3. Estella e. Maggie, m. Henry Dungan. Home near Wellsville. Children: 1. Arthur 2. Arlene, twin of Arthur, m. Walter Woodson. 3. Kenneth, married __ , 1 child. 4. Monta f. Mary, m. Wm. Bishop. Home in Montgomery City, MO, children: 1. Leola 2. Wilfred

c.

Camilla

128

3. Harry 4. Alma 5. Floy 6. Floyd, twin of Floy. 7. Mary Virginia 8. Wendell 9. ~~Alice g. Ovid E., died 31 Mar 1865. h. Camilla, b. 4 Mar 1874, d. 4 May 1874. Jarott Thomas- born 15 Apr 1847, d. Apr 1887; m. Mary Elizabeth Scholl. They lived on a farm west of Montgomery City, MO. Both buried in Liberty Cemetery. Children: a. Hughes, b. 26 Sep 1872. Married Alice Yates. Children were: 1. J. T. died in infancy. 2. Glen Yates Maupin, married Eula Carr. Have a son, Gene. 3. Melba Elizabeth, married_. She had one son. b. Harris, m. Jessie Britt. Their children were: 1. Thomas, died in infancy. 2. Laverta, m. Harry Smith. 3. Reece Hughes 4. Harris Jr. Arthur Jr. born in Montgomery County, MO; married 路Jennie Harrison. Children: a. Leslie Maupin, lives in Texas, 4 children. b. Early Tilman, lives in Abernathy Texas, 2 children. c. Hattie, m. Joseph Earhart, Home in Lubbock, Texas. d. Stella, married and lives in Yuma, AZ.

*

*

******** *a. Hughes Maupin, b. 26 Sep 1872, d. 21 Dec 1950, south of Auxvasse, MO. Married Alice Yates, b. 29 Aug 1877, d. 27 Jun 1957 in Auxvasse, MO. Their children: 1. J. T. died in infancy. 2. Glen Yates, b. 28 Oct 1905, d. 12 Aug 1979; m. 14 May 1934 to Eula F. Carr. Glen owned and operated funeral homes in Fulton and Auxvasse, MO. Two children: a. Gene Carr Maupin, b. 20 Dec 1935 in Fulton, MO. b. Thomas Lynn Maupin, b. 28 Jan 1943 in Fulton. 129


*b.Harris Maupin, b. 19 Feb 1877, in Montgomery Co. MO, d. 25 Sep 1972, in Mexico, MO. Married 8 Feb 1903, to Jessie Floreda Britt. She was born 14 Sep 1879. Their children: 1. LaVerta Glenn Maupin, b. 4 Nov 1904, d. 1976. 2. Thomas B. Maupin, died young. 3. Harris Maupin, Jr., b. 15 Apr 1910; m. 11 Feb 1943, to Carlene G. Woodson, b. 17 Jut 1916, d. 31 Oct 1988. Buried in Auxvasse Cemetery, Montgomery Co. MO. Their children: a. Harris Lynn Maupin, b. 16 May 1944. b. Cheryl Irene Maupin, b. 4 Jan 1947. 4. Reece Hughes Maupin, b. 11 Aug 1916, in Montgomery Co MO; m. 10 Feb 1940, to Irene Dorothy Woodson, b. 20 Jan 1918, in Callaway Co. MO. Irene was a sister to Carlene Woodson Maupin, wife of her husband's brother, Harris Jr. Their children: a. David Hughes Maupin, b. 1 May 1943 in St. Louis, MO. b. Deetrice Glenn Maupin, b. 24 May 1947 in Mexico, MO. Fifth Generation From Thomas (18), Wm. Wood Jr. and forward. Martha (Patsy) Maupin, daughter of Thomas (18) and Annie Spencer; m. 17 Dec 1827 to William Turner Wood. Their children; John M., Lucy Ann, Clifton R.*. Their son, John M. Wood, b. Albemarle Co. VA, on 4 Dec 1856, d. 4 Aug 1904; m. in Albemarle Co. VA on 4 Dec 1856 to Julia M. Estes. Their son, John_Bobe_r_.t WQQ_g, b. Albemarle Co. VA, on 11 Dec 1864, d. Albemarle Co., 8 Sep 1949; m. 26 Dec 1889 to Elizabeth Davis Ford. Their son, Robert Sidney Wood, b. Charlottesville, VA, on 27 Oct 1904, d. Albemarle Co. VA, on 13 Aug 1972; m. in Albemarle Co. on 1 Sep 1925, to Edna May Hall. Their son, _Wj_IJj~_m__J;~rLW.9.9d, M.D., b. Charlottesville, VA, on 1 Aug 1928; m. in AI bemarle Co., 28 Aug 1948, to Marie Lucas Robertson, b. Cambridge, MD, 22 Aug 1930. Their son, William Earl Woo_iL Jr, b. Charlottesville, VA, 1 Nov 1952. ********************

130

FOURTH GENERATION MATTHEW MAUPIN (18a) Son of Gabriel (6), grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). Matthew Maupin married Lucy Ballard, his cousin and daughter of Bland Ballard. The latter was the son of John Ballard of Albemarle. They had five children but the names of only three are known, namely: Gabriel Bland Bennett

married Margaret Loyd. b. 4 Jut 1788, d in 1840; lived in Bath County, KY, but who was in Bourbon County, KY in April 1829 when he was a witness to the will of John Black of that county. Bennett Maupin married 3 Oct 1808, to Mary Burch, who, it is thought, was of the family of Judith Maupin Apperson, who married secondly, John Burch. The three known children of Bennett Maupin were: a. Dardel, b. 1812 in Bath Co. KY. b. Alexander, killed by a negro during the Civil War. c. John Burch, b. 4 Sep 1810, d. 21 Oct 1891. He married 28 Nov 1832, Peace Smiley, b. 28 Feb 1817, d. 21 Oct 1892. Children: 1. Alexander C. (1837-1903), married 6 May 1861, Laura Bush of Bradford Co. PA. They moved to Howard Co. MO. Their son was John B. Maupin, b. 23 Aug 1867 and married Elizabeth Maupin, daughter of John Milton Maupin (see David Maupin (17). Their children: I. Rice of Glasgow, MO. II. John B. III. Edward IV. Minnie v. Mary 2. Nelson Henry, b. 1839, m. Julia Johnson. 3. Edward Scott, b. 7 Apr 1844, m. Rebecca Beeler. 4. Martha, b. 1847, m. Pressley Cloyd in Howard Co. MO. 5. Sarah, b. 1849, m. Josiah Morris. 6. James Roger, b. 19 Jun 1852, d. 10 Aug 1885; m. Alice Staples. He was a Baptist minister and a former president of Southwest Baptist College, Bolivar, MO. They had four children:

*

131

,I! 'I:iIi 1

!'

illij


FOURTH GENERATION *b.Harris Maupin, b. 19 Feb 1877, in Montgomery Co. MO, d. 25 Sep 1972, in Mexico, MO. Married 8 Feb 190j, to Jessie Floreda Britt. She was born 14 Sep 1879. Their children: 1. LaVerta Glenn Maupin, b. 4 Nov 1904, d. 1976. 2. Thomas B. Maupin, died young. 3. Harris Maupin. Jr., b. 15 Apr 1910; m. 11 Feb 1943, to Carlene G. Woodson, b. 17 Jul 1916, d. 31 Oct 1988. Buried in Auxvasse Cemetery, Montgomery Co. MO. Their children: a. Harris Lynn Maupin, b. 16 May 1944. b. Cheryl Irene Maupin, b. 4 Jan 1947. 4. Reece Hughes Maupin, b. 11 Aug 1916, in Montgomery Co MO; m. 10 Feb 1940, to Irene Dorothy Woodson, b. 20 Jan 1918, in Callaway Co. MO. Irene was a sister to carlene Woodson Maupin, wife of her husband's brother, Harris Jr. Their children: a. David Hughes Maupin, b. 1 May 1943 in St. Louis, MO. b. Deetrice Glenn Maupin, b. 24 May 1947 in Mexico, MO. Fifth Generation From Thomas (18), Wm. Wood Jr. and forward. Martha (Patsy) Maupin, daughter of Thomas (18) and Annie Spencer; m. 17 Dec 1827 to William Turner Wood. Their children; John M., Lucy Ann, Clifton R.*. Their son, John M. Wood, b. Albemarle Co. VA, on 4 Dec 1856, d. 4 Aug 1904; m. in Albemarle Co. VA on 4 Dec 1856 to Julia M. Estes. Their son, John 8obe.r:.t_WQQ_g, b. Albemarle Co. VA, on 11 Dec 1864, d. AI bemarl e Co., 8 Sep 1949; m. 26 Dec 1889 to Elizabeth Davis Ford. Their son, Robert Sidney Wood, b. Charlottesville, VA, on 27 Oct 1904, d. Albemarle Co. VA, on 13 Aug 1972; m. in Albemarle co. on 1 Sep 1925, to Edna May Hall. Their son, 'dJJE!!m._l;~_rLWQQQ.____M.D ..â&#x20AC;˘ b. Charlottesville, VA, on 1 Aug 1928; m. in Albemarle Co., 28 Aug 1948, to Marie Lucas Robertson, b. Cambridge, MD, 22 Aug 1930. Their son, ~Jllia!TI Earl Wood, Jr, b. Charlottesville, VA, 1 Nov

1952. ********************

130

MATTHEW MAUPIN (18a) Son of Gabriel (6), grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). Matthew Maupin married Lucy Ballard, his cousin and daughter of Bland Ballard. The latter was the son of John Ballard of Albemarle. They had five children but the names of only three are known, namely: Gabriel Bland Bennett

married Margaret Loyd. b. 4 Jul 1788, d in 1840; lived in Bath County, KY, but who was in Bourbon County, KY in April 1829 when he was a witness to the will of John Black of that county. Bennett Maupin married 3 Oct 1808, to Mary Burch, who, it is thought, was of the family of Judith Maupin Apperson, who married secondly, John Burch. The three known children of Bennett Maupin were: a. Daniel, b. 1812 in Bath Co. KY. b. Alexander, killed by a negro during the Civil War. c. John Burch, b. 4 Sep 1810, d. 21 Oct 1891. He married 28 Nov 1832, Peace Smiley, b. 28 Feb 1817, d. 21 Oct 1892. Children: 1. Alexander C. (1837-1903), married 6 May 1861, Laura Bush of Bradford Co. PA. They moved to Howard Co. MO. Their son was John B. Maupin, b. 23 Aug 1867 and married Elizabeth Maupin, daughter of John Milton Maupin (see David Maupin (17). Their children: I. Rice of Glasgow, MO. II. John B. III. Edward IV. Minnie V. Mary 2. Nelson Henry, b. 1839, m. Julia Johnson. * 3. Edward Scott, b. 7 Apr 1844, m. Rebecca Beeler. 4. Martha, b. 1847, m. Pressley Cloyd in Howard Co. MO. 5. Sarah, b. 1849, m. Josiah Morris. 6. James Roger, b. 19 Jun 1852, d. 10 Aug 1885; m. Alice Staples. He was a Baptist minister and a former president of Southwest Baptist College, Bolivar, MO. They had four children:

131

!I

IIIII:


I. Arthur, deceased, buried at Bolivar, MO, with his parents. II. Edgar S. of Vicksburg, Mississippi. III. Oval A., of Chicago, b. 1884, d. 9 Aug 1965. IV. Everett M., of Osceola, MO, d. in Kansas City.

*EDWARD SCOTT MAUPIN, son of John Burch Maupin and Peace Smiley, b. 7 Apr 1844, in Marion Co. MO, in the town of Vesta. He enlisted in the Confederate Army in 1862 and served until 1865 with the rank of Pvt. He served in Company F., 4th MO Calvary. He later became a milt wright. Married Rebecca C. Beeler, who was b. 12 May 1849. The 1870 census shows them living at Lancaster, Schuyler County, MO, in the Independence township. They tater moved to Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas. They had 4 children: A. George B., b. 23 Nov 1869, d. 2 Apr 1959. B. Addie c. Albert D. Edward Theodore

b.

3.

Lottie Mae Maupin, b. 16 Nov 1938; m. 16 Nov 1956 to Jimmy Lee Hallman, b. 20 Oct 1936; 2 children. a. Michael Kevin Hallman, b. 8 Sep 1957; m. to Elaine Miller, b. 21 Oct 1963. b. Michelle Hallman, b. 20 Mar 1960.

C. Lena Catherine Maupin, b. 26 Aug 1900, d. 23 Jun 1954; m. John A. Case, one child. 1. George Alphred Case, b. 20 Apr 1924; m. 23 Jun 1947 to Barbara Ruth Kennan, b. 23 Dec 1927, 2 children. a. John Ray Case, b. 20 Apr 1949; m. to Mari I y n Kaye Biggs, b. 17 Oct 1952, no children.

*

b.

*A. George Birch, b. 23 Nov 1869 in Missouri; m. 23 Mar 1892 to Terah Frances McCoy, b. 8 Feb 1875 and d. 20 Sep 1948. George Birch died on 2 Apr 1959. They had 9 children. A. Mabel Eileen Maupin, b. 25 Feb 1893, d. 28 Nov 1919; m. 26 Feb 1915 to Ed Thompson, d. 29 Nov 1920; 2 children: 1. Adrian Thompson, b. 23 Sep 1916, d. 18 May 1960. 2. George Thompson, b. 20 Aug 1918, d. 9 Mar 1967. B. Edward Teague Maupin, b. 24 Nov 1897, d. 4 Aug 1962; m. July 1921 to Eva Charlotte Hardin, b. 19 Dec 1900, d. 22 Mar 1967, 3 children. 1. Sarah Frances Maupin, b. 16 Dec 1924, m. 11 Jut 1942 to Cloyd Eugene Madison, b. 16 Aug 1916, 1 child. a. Edward Eugene Madison, b. 7 Aug 1946; m. 10 Aug 1968 to Rita Haye Carwile, b. 20 Jan 1948. 2.

Mildred Ann Maupin, b. 10 Apr 1929; m. 22 Dec 1945 to Victor Hoffer Frantz, b. 30 Nov 1918, 2 children: a. Victoria Ann Frantz, b. 26 Jun 1952; married, 2 children. a. Heather Dawn Goodwin, b. 30 Oct 1973. b. Holly Dara Goodwin, b. 10 Apr 1977. Victoria married 2nd, 28 Sep 1991 to David Jon Holton.

Raymond David Frantz, b. 10 Apr 1958; m. 2 Sep 1978 to Lisa Fredeman, b. 24 Sep 1958, 2 children: 1. Erin Ashley Frantz, b. 18 Mar 1985. 2. Christopher David Frantz, b. 13 Jut 1988.

Dennis Lee Case, b. 22 Jun 1951; m. 4 Jun 1972 to Janice Lynn Matthew, b. 4 Aug 1954, had 5 children. 1. Matthew Justin Case, b. 21 Aug 1975. 2. Christopher Alphred Joseph Case, b. 15 Jan 1979. 3. Catherine Laura Lee Case, b. 27 Jun 1981. 4. Daniel Jonathan David Case, b. 18 Jun 1986. 5. Timothy James Andrew Case, b. 23 Sep 1988.

D. Walter B. Maupin, b. 18 Aug 1903, d. 28 May 1983; m. 1927 to Maggie Florine Brown, 2 children. 1. James Leonard Maupin, M.D., b. 23 Sep 1927; m. Norma Griffith, 3 children. a. James Leonard Maupin, Jr, b. 29 Apr 1954, d. 6 May 1954. b. James Leonard Maupin III, b. 3 Aug 1960. c. Joel Norman Maupin, b. 25 Feb 1963. James m. 2nd 6 Nov 1974 to Jolene Byers, b. 20 Jan 1950, 1 child. a. Christina Jo Maupin, b. 29 Dec 1984. 2.

Catherine Florine Maupin, b. 27 Apr 1929; m. 24 Jun 1949 to Charles Riley, Jr., d. 18 Sep 1986, 4 children. a. Terah Catherine Riley, b. 30 Nov 1950; m. Richard Denton Magoun, 2 children. 1. Angela Lynn Magoun, b. 7 Dec 1978. 2. Amy Catherine Magoun, b. 19 Jun 1981.

b.

Cheryl Lynn Riley, b. 21 Sep 1955; m. Curtis Allen Thompson, 2 children.

132 133


I. Arthur, deceased, buried at Bolivar, MO, with his parents. II. Edgar S. of Vicksburg, Mississippi. III. Oval A., of Chicago, b. 1884, d. 9 Aug 1965. IV. Everett M., of Osceola, MO, d. in Kansas City.

*EDWARD SCOTT MAUPIN, son of John Burch Maupin and Peace Smiley, b. 7 Apr 1844, in Marion Co. MO, in the town of Vesta. He enlisted in the Confederate Army in 1862 and served until 1865 with the rank of Pvt. He served in Company F., 4th MO Calvary. He later became a mill wright. Married Rebecca C. Beeler, who was b. 12 May 1849. The 1870 census shows them living at Lancaster, Schuyler County, MO, in the Independence township. They later moved to Pine Bluff, Jefferson County, Arkansas. They had 4 children: * A. George B., b. 23 Nov 1869, d. 2 Apr 1959. B. Addie C. Albert D. Edward Theodore

b.

3.

Lottie Mae Maupin, b. 16 Nov 1938; m. 16 Nov 1956 to Jimmy Lee Hallman, b. 20 Oct 1936; 2 children. a. Michael Kevin Hallman, b. 8 Sep 1957; m. to Elaine Miller, b. 21 Oct 1963. b. Michelle Hallman, b. 20 Mar 1960.

C. Lena Catherine Maupin, b. 26 Aug 1900, d. 23 Jun 1954; m. John A. Case, one child. 1. George Alphred Case, b. 20 Apr 1924; m. 23 Jun 1947 to Barbara Ruth Kennan, b. 23 Dec 1927, 2 children. a. John Ray Case, b. 20 Apr 1949; m. to Marilyn Kaye Biggs, b. 17 Oct 1952, no children. b.

*A. George Birch, b. 23 Nov 1869 in Missouri; m. 23 Mar 1892 to Terah Frances McCoy, b. 8 Feb 1875 and d. 20 Sep 1948. George Birch died on 2 Apr 1959. They had 9 children. A. Mabel Eileen Maupin, b. 25 Feb 1893, d. 28 Nov 1919; m. 26 Feb 1915 to Ed Thompson, d. 29 Nov 1920; 2 children: 1. Adrian Thompson, b. 23 Sep 1916, d. 18 May 1960. 2. George Thompson, b. 20 Aug 1918, d. 9 Mar 1967. B. Edward Teague Maupin, b. 24 Nov 1897, d. 4 Aug 1962; m. July 1921 to Eva Charlotte Hardin, b. 19 Dec 1900, d. 22 Mar 1967, 3 children. 1. Sarah Frances Maupin, b. 16 Dec 1924, m. 11 Jul 1942 to Cloyd Eugene Madison, b. 16 Aug 1916, 1 child. a. Edward Eugene Madison, b. 7 Aug 1946; m. 10 Aug 1968 to Rita Haye Carwile, b. 20 Jan 1948. 2.

Mildred Ann Maupin, b. 10 Apr 1929; m. 22 Dec 1945 to Victor Hoffer Frantz, b. 30 Nov 1918, 2 children: a. Victoria Ann Frantz, b. 26 Jun 1952; married, 2 children. a. Heather Dawn Goodwin, b. 30 Oct 1973. b. Holly Dara Goodwin, b. 10 Apr 1977. Victoria married 2nd, 28 Sep 1991 to David Jon Holton.

Raymond David Frantz, b. 10 Apr 1958; m. 2 Sep 1978 to Lisa Fredeman, b. 24 Sep 1958, 2 children: 1. Erin Ashley Frantz, b. 18 Mar 1985. 2. Christopher David Frantz, b. 13 Jul 1988.

Dennis Lee Case, b. 22 Jun 1951; m. 4 Jun 1972 to Janice Lynn Matthew, b. 4 Aug 1954, had 5 children. 1. Matthew Justin Case, b. 21 Aug 1975. 2. Christopher Alphred Joseph Case, b. 15 Jan 1979. 3. Catherine Laura Lee Case, b. 27 Jun 1981. 4. Daniel Jonathan David Case, b. 18 Jun 1986. 5. Timothy James Andrew Case, b. 23 Sep 1988.

D. Walter B. Maupin, b. 18 Aug 1903, d. 28 May 1983; m. 1927 to Maggie Florine Brown, 2 children. 1. James Leonard Maupin, M.D., b. 23 Sep 1927; m. Norma Griffith, 3 children. a. James Leonard Maupin, Jr, b. 29 Apr 1954, d. 6 May 1954. b. James Leonard Maupin III, b. 3 Aug 1960. c. Joel Norman Maupin, b. 25 Feb 1963. James m. 2nd 6 Nov 1974 to Jolene Byers, b. 20 Jan 1950, 1 child. a. Christina Jo Maupin, b. 29 Dec 1984. 2.

Catherine Florine Maupin, b. 27 Apr 1929; m. 24 Jun 1949 to Charles Riley, Jr., d. 18 Sep 1986, 4 children. a. Terah Catherine Riley, b. 30 Nov 1950; m. Richard Denton Magoun, 2 children. 1. Angela Lynn Magoun, b. 7 Dec 1978. 2. Amy Catherine Magoun, b. 19 Jun 1981.

b.

Cheryl Lynn Riley, b. 21 Sep 1955; m. Curtis Allen Thompson, 2 children.

132 133


1. 2. c.

d.

Margaret Anna Thompson, b. 25 Jul 1985. Vriginia Laine Thompson, b. 7 Jun 1987.

Donna LuAnn Riley, b. 27 Oct 1963; m. Jack David Kenward, 1 child. 1. Amber Kay Kenward, b. 5 Aug 1985. Kimberly Kay Riley, b. 20 Sep 1965; m. Dean Allan Worthen, Sr. 1. Dean Allan Worthen, Jr., b. 17 Jut 1983.

Walter B. Maupin, m. 2nd to Mary Lou Dean Manes, b. 10 Nov 1917, d. 12 Aug 1989, 2 children. 1. Walter Robert Maupin, b. 10 Mar 1944; m. 23 Dec 1985 to Judith Lynn Young, b. 22 Apr 1956. 2. William Carl Maupin, b. 17 Nov 1946; m. Janie Stocks, born 6 May 1943, 1 child. a. Jerry Dean Maupin, b. 13 May 1966. William Carl m. 2nd 17 Aug 1974 to Theresa Sue Hubbard, b. 27 Dec 1953, 1 child. a. Cody Ryan Maupin, b. 5 Oct 1977. E. Sudie Mae Maupin, b. 18 Nov 1905, d. 25 Oct 1983; m. 5 May 1926 toT. W. Champion, d. 12 Jun 1984, no children. F. Onita Hazel Maupin, b. 14 Nov 1908, d. 18 Mar 1980; m. 15 Apr 1931 to Earl Spangler, d. 4 Feb 1980, no children. G. Harvey Neal Maupin, b. 25 May 1911; m. 23 Jan 1932 to Mary Jo Herring, d. 11 Jan 1967, 2 children. 1. Jo Neal Maupin, b. 7 Nov 1932; m. 5 Sep 1954 to Audrey Diane Maus, b. 11 Dec 1932, 2 Children. a. Michael Scott Maupin, b. 18 Nov 1957. b. Mark Alan Maupin, b. 27 Mar 1961. 1. Stephanie Chanteile Maupin, b. 18 Jan 1979. 2.

Ray Gene Maupin, b. 17 Jan 1937; m. 26 Dec 1957 to John Malcolm Hall, b. 29 Jan 1935, 3 children. a. Melanie Gene Hall, b. 1 Feb 1959; m. 22 Aug 1981 to Michael Joseph Mooney, b. 16 Dec 1958, 3 children. 1. Mark John Mooney, b. 15 Jan 1985. 2. Lauren Elizabeth Mooney, b. 2 Mar 1987. 3. Kevin Patrick Mooney, b. 17 May 1990.

b. c.

John Maupin Hall, deceased. Terah Jo Hall, b. 7 Mar 1964; m. 18 Jun 1988 to Brian David Maddox, b. 6 Jun 1965.

134

H. Elsie Burch Maupin, b. 3 Jan 1914; m. 24 Mar 1937 to Lewis Hill, no children.

I. Frances Theodosia Maupin, b. 10 Nov 1916; m. 27 Aug 1933 to Earnest Hall, d. 14 Oct 1973, 1 child. 1. Sharon Frances Hall, b. 19 Nov 1937; m. Jack Mazanti, 3 children. a. Lisa Jo Mazanti, b. 5 May 1957. Michael Hall Mazanti, b. 9 Aug 1959. b. Cynthia Louise Mazanti, b. 29 Aug 1960; married, c. 1 child. 1. Jacob Holland Taylor, b. 17 Jul 1989. ******************** Fifth Generation forward. John Maupin, son of Gabriel (6) and Ann Ballard Maupin, m. 27 Eugene Dec 1788, to Betsy Mills, daughter of Henry Mills. Maupin's research show ten children for John but no names were then known. From research done by Bill Albertson, it is believed the family to be as follows: 1. Male-no name 2. Female-no name. * 3. Austin. 4. Elizabeth, m. 26 Mar 1821 to Aaron Taylor. Their marriage bond executed in Rockridge Co. VA, giving Elizabeth Maupin as daughter of John Maupin, dec'd. 5. Ann * 6. Henry 7. Maria L. 8. female 9. John 10. Gabriel *Austin Maupin - On the 1850 census of Obion Co. TN, Austin Maupin is listed as 54 years old, b. in Virginia, which would give his birth year as 1796. He married Price Annie McNeil of Hickman Co. TN. They had a son. James H. Maupin, b. 15 Jan 1830, d. 1 Dec 1915 at Neelyville, MO; m. Agnes, b. 1834 in Franklin Co. KY. Their daughter $U.$afl_.l:l_!__MaupJf1I b. 1 Dec 1877, d. 24 Nov 1948; m. Jessie Lh._QmE!~--Q~vi~. b. 23 Aug 1872, d. March 1935. Their daughter, $!JJ?ie_J~搂si~__Q_avj_~. b. 27 Jun 1919; m. a "Rush". This Jessie w. Rush of Bowling Green, KY. information sent by -----路--------路----*Henry Maupin, m. Phoebe---, came to Obion Co. TN, on horse back from another as yet undetermined Tennessee locale about 1830. According to 1850 records their children are:

135


1. 2.

Margaret Anna Thompson, b. 25 Jul 1985. Vriginia Laine Thompson, b. 7 Jun 1987.

c.

Donna LuAnn Riley, b. 27 Oct 1963; m. Jack David Kenward, 1 child. 1. Amber Kay Kenward, b. 5 Aug 1985.

d.

Kimberly Kay Riley, b. 20 Sep 1965; m. Dean Allan Worthen, Sr. 1. Dean Allan Worthen, Jr., b. 17 Jul 1983.

Walter B. Maupin, m. 2nd to Mary Lou Dean Manes, b. 10 Nov 1917, d. 12 Aug 1989, 2 children. 1. Walter Robert Maupin, b. 10 Mar 1944; m. 23 Dec 1985 to Judith Lynn Young, b. 22 Apr 1956. 2. William Carl Maupin, b. 17 Nov 1946; m. Janie Stocks, born 6 May 1943, 1 child. a. Jerry Dean Maupin, b. 13 May 1966. William Carl m. 2nd 17 Aug 1974 to Theresa Sue Hubbard, b. 27 Dec 1953, 1 child. a. Cody Ryan Maupin, b. 5 Oct 1977. E. Sudie Mae Maupin, b. 18 Nov 1905, d. 25 Oct 1983; m. 5 May 1926 toT. W. Champion, d. 12 Jun 1984, no children. F. Onita Hazel Maupin, b. 14 Nov 1908, d. 18 Mar 1980; m. 15 Apr 1931 to Earl Spangler, d. 4 Feb 1980, no children. G. Harvey Neal Maupin, b. 25 May 1911; m. 23 Jan 1932 to Mary Jo Herring, d. 11 Jan 1967, 2 children. 1. Jo Neal Maupin, b. 7 Nov 1932; m. 5 Sep 1954 to Audrey Diane Maus, b. 11 Dec 1932, 2 Children. a. Michael Scott Maupin, b. 18 Nov 1957. b. Mark Alan Maupin, b. 27 Mar 1961. 1. Stephanie Chanteile Maupin, b. 18 Jan 1979. 2.

Ray Gene Maupin, b. 17 Jan 1937; m. 26 Dec 1957 to John Malcolm Hall, b. 29 Jan 1935, 3 children. a. Melanie Gene Hall, b. 1 Feb 1959; m. 22 Aug 1981 to Michael Joseph Mooney, b. 16 Dec 1958, 3 children. 1. Mark John Mooney, b. 15 Jan 1985. 2. Lauren Elizabeth Mooney, b. 2 Mar 1987. 3. Kevin Patrick Mooney, b. 17 May 1990.

b. c.

John Maupin Hall, deceased. Terah Jo Hall, b. 7 Mar 1964; m. 18 Jun 1988 to Brian David Maddox, b. 6 Jun 1965.

134

H. Elsie Burch Maupin, b. 3 Jan 1914; m. 24 Mar 1937 to Lewis Hill, no children. I. Frances Theodosia Maupin, b. 10 Nov 1916; m. 27 Aug 1933 to Earnest Hall, d. 14 Oct 1973, 1 child. 1. Sharon Frances Hall, b. 19 Nov 1937; m. Jack Mazanti, 3 children. a. Lisa Jo Mazanti, b. 5 May 1957. b. Michael Hall Mazanti, b. 9 Aug 1959. c. Cynthia Louise Mazanti, b. 29 Aug 1960; married, 1 child. 1. Jacob Holland Taylor, b. 17 Jul 1989. ******************** Fifth Generation forward. John Maupin, son of Gabriel (6) and Ann Ballard Maupin, m. 27 Dec 1788, to Betsy Mills, daughter of Henry Mills. Eugene Maupin's research show ten children for John but no names were then known. From research done by Bill Albertson, it is believed the family to be as follows: 1. Male-no name 2. Female-no name. * 3. Austin. 4. Elizabeth, m. 26 Mar 1821 to Aaron Taylor. Their marriage bond executed in Rockridge Co. VA, giving Elizabeth Maupin as daughter of John Maupin, dec'd. 5. Ann * 6. Henry 1. Maria L. 8. female 9. John 10. Gabriel *Austin Maupin - On the 1850 census of Obion Co. TN, Austin Maupin is listed as 54 years old, b. in Virginia, which would give his birth year as 1796. He married Price Annie McNeil of Hickman Co. TN. They had a son. James H. Maupin, b. 15 Jan 1830, d. 1 Dec 1915 at Neelyville, MO; m. Agnes, b. 1834 in Franklin Co. KY. Their daughter $_usar:L..f:h._Maupj_r.h b. 1 Dec 1877, d. 24 Nov 1948; m. Jessie Lh_Qmf!ยง__Q!!yi~, b. 23 Aug 1872, d. March 1935. Their daughter, $!.1.ยง1~...4~ยงSie___Q_avjยง, b. 27 Jun 1919; m. a "Rush". This information sent by .).~s~_ie_w_._ __8u$_b_ of Bowling Green, KY. *Henry Maupin, m. Phoebe---, came to Obion Co. TN, on horse back from another as yet undetermined Tennessee locale about 1830. According to 1850 records their children are:

135


*a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h.

John Atkinson, b. 1836. Martha, b. 1838 Gabriel, b. 1842 Ann, b. 1842 Nancy, b. 1844 Henry, b. 1846 Austin, b. 1846 Caroline, b. 1850

*John Atkinson Maupin, b. 1836, d. 1916; m. 9 Sep 1858 to Martha Jane Hudspeth, b. 18 Aug 1841, d. 1929. They went to Texas in 1866, accompanied by Martha's family. They settled in the Kingston Community of East Texas where they Jived until about 1891. Their children were: Bob, William A. *James H., Sith B., Ella, Geneva, Reta, Mattie and Annie. *James Hudspeth Maupin, b. 3 May 1872, d. 10 Sep 1932; m. Millie F. Ward, b. 25 Dec 1872, d. 10 Nov 1951. Their children: Roger Quincy, Lawson Tate, *James Ward, and Lucille. *James Ward Maupin, b. 20 Jan 1904, d. 3 Sep 1949; m. 27 Dec 1926 in Texas to Mary A. Smith-Foord, b. 27 Feb 1904, d. 19 Sep 1951. They had 2 children: James Ward, Jr. who died shortly after birth and Fred Hudspeth Maupin, b. 15 Mar 1933; m. 14 Oct 1951, to Wilma Lynette McCoy, 4 children; James Ward, b. 1954, Michael D., b. 1956, Kevin Lee, b. 1957, and Vicki Lynn, b. 1958. ******************** Fourth Generation from Gabriel (6). Blan (Bland) Maupin, son of Gabriel (6) and Ann Ballard Maupin, b. 1770, d. 7 Jan 1829; m. 23 Dec 1794 to Sarah Brown, b. 1775, d. 1852, daughter of Robert Brown. They moved from Albemarle Co. VA to Bedford Co. TN in 1811. Dr. Socrates Maupin recorded they had 10 children--no names. The following are known descendants. 1. Robert B. Maupin, b. 17 Apr 1800, Albemarle Co. VA, d. 20 Aug 1867, buried Maupin Cemetery, Bedford Co. TN; m. Nancy Wood Caruther. Their children: Blan, b. 1831, Sarah, b. 1833, Robert, b. 1835, Nancy, b. 1837, Sidney, 1840, Martha, b. 1842, Elizabeth, b. 1844, Eliza, b. 1846, and Frances b. 1848. 2. Sarah Maupin, m. William G. Wood. 3. Sidney Maupin, b. Dec 1805 in Albemarle Co. VA, d. 7 Mar 1862, Coffee Co. TN; m. 1824 to David H. Williams, Bedford Co. TN, Their son, William Blan Maupin Williams, 4 Jan 1826,

136

d. 30 Dec 1891; m. 1848 to Elizabeth Catherine Cribbs, b. 23 Oct 1828, d. 31 Aug 1898. Their son Blan Maupin Williams, b. 7 Jut 1857, d. 6 Mar 1906; m. 23 Aug 1877 to Mary Frances McCuistion, b. 27 May 1860, d. 4 Mar 1932. Their son Harvell Porter Williams, b. 13 Sep 1896, d. 1 Jun 1976; m. 16 Nov 1919 to Emma M. Jones, b. 28 Aug 1897, d. 29 Jun 1974 at Norris, TN. Their daughter Frances Elnora Williams, b. 14 Oct 1923; m. 21 May 1948, to John William Morgan. 4. Gabriel Maupin, son of Blan and Sarah Brown Maupin, b. 7 Sep 1810, in Albemarle Co. VA, m. 1 Sep 1844, to Sallie Hickerson, b. 2 Jan 1820, daughter of Joseph and Nancy Russeau Hickerson. Nancy d. 22 Jut 1884. Their children born in Bedford Co. TN. a. Nancy, b. 5 Sep 1846, m. Joseph Justice. b. Blan, b. 22 Nov 1847, d. 7 Sep 1884. c. Sarah Ann, b. 10 Mar 1849. d. Joseph N., b. 21 Aug 1851. e. Gabriel, b. 12 Sep 1853, d. 15 Apr 1879. f. Thomas H. b. 18 Dec 1855. g. Marietta, b. 23 Dec 1858. h. Thornton P. b. 23 Dec 1861. This information is from "History of Bedford Co. TN of 1886, pg 1161. According to this history Gabriel is the only living child of Blan and Sarah Brown Maupin in 1886. 5. Lucinda Maupin, daughter of Blan and Sarah Brown Maupin, b. 14 Dec 1814 in Albemarle Co. VA, d. 4 Mar 1862; m. 21 Oct 1834, in Bedford Co. TN, to Patrick Westmoreland Williams, b. 11 Apr 1811, d. 10 Oct 1895; of their 8 children we have information on two. a. Mary Jane Williams, b. 9 Jul 1839, d. 28 Oct 1886; m. 1 Jun 1865 to W. E. Brumfield. Mrs. Nida Wheeler of Nashville, TN, is a descendant of this line. b. Susan Lucinda Williams, b. 15 Mar 1843, Bedford Co. TN, d. 3 May 1917,Coffee Co., TN; m. 12 Dec 1865 to Clayton Cheshire. Their son Ernest Madison Cheshire, b. 16 Oct 1870, d. 26 Nov 1933; m. 20 Nov 1895 to .ยงarah M. Dillingham in Bedford Co. TN. Their son Madison Cheshire, b. 5 Aug 1896, d. 15 Aug ...., ...., Nashville, TN; m. 18 May 1919, to Virgie Sain. Their daughter Anna Marie Cheshire, b. 21 Feb 1920; m. 29 Dec 1939, at Chattanooga, TN to George L. Huggins. Names of other 5 children of Blan and Sarah Brown Maupin not known to this writer. ******************** 137 Ill"'


*a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h.

"

John Atkinson, b. 1836. Martha, b. 1838 Gabriel, b. 1842 Ann, b. 1842 Nancy, b. 1844 Henry, b. 1846 Austin, b. 1846 Caroline, b. 1850

*John Atkinson Maupin, b. 1836, d. 1916; m. 9 Sep 1858 to Martha Jane Hudspeth, b. 18 Aug 1841, d. 1929. They went to Texas in 1866, accompanied by Martha's family. They settled in the Kingston Community of East Texas where they lived until about 1891. Their children were: Bob, William A. *James H., Sith B., Ella, Geneva, Reta, Mattie and Annie. *James Hudspeth Maupin, b. 3 May 1872, d. 10 Sep 1932; m. Millie F. Ward, b. 25 Dec 1872, d. 10 Nov 1951. Their children: Roger Quincy, Lawson Tate, *James Ward, and Lucille. *James Ward Maupin, b. 20 Jan 1904, d. 3 Sep 1949; m. 27 Dec 1926 in Texas to Mary A. Smith-Foord, b. 27 Feb 1904, d. 19 Sep 1951. They had 2 children: James Ward, Jr. who died shortly after birth and Fred Hudspeth Maupin, b. 15 Mar 1933; m.140ct 1951, to Wilma Lynette McCoy, 4 children; James Ward, b. 1954, Michael D., b. 1956, Kevin Lee, b. 1957, and Vicki Lynn, b. 1958. ******************** Fourth Generation from Gabriel (6). Blan (Bland) Maupin, son of Gabriel (6) and Ann Ballard Maupin, b. 1770, d. 7 Jan 1829; m. 23 Dec 1794 to Sarah Brown, b. 1775, d. 1852, daughter of Robert Brown. They moved from Albemarle Co. VA to Bedford Co. TN in 1811. Dr. Socrates Maupin recorded they had 10 children--no names. The following are known descendants. 1. Robert B. Maupin, b. 17 Apr 1800, Albemarle Co. VA, d. 20 Aug 1867, buried Maupin Cemetery, Bedford Co. TN; m. Nancy Wood Caruther. Their children: Blan, b. 1831, Sarah, b. 1833, Robert, b. 1835, Nancy, b. 1837, Sidney, 1840, Martha, b. 1842, Elizabeth, b. 1844, Eliza, b. 1846, and Frances b. 1848. 2. Sarah Maupin, m. William G. Wood. 3. Sidney Maupin, b. Dec 1805 in Albemarle Co. VA, d. 7 Mar 1862, Coffee Co. TN; m. 1824 to David H. Williams, Bedford Co. TN, Their son, William Blan Maupin Williams, 4 Jan 1826,

d. 30 Dec 1891; m. 1848 to Elizabeth Catherine Cribbs, b. 23 Oct 1828, d. 31 Aug 1898. Their son Blan Maupin Williams, b. 7 Jul 1857, d. 6 Mar 1906; m. 23 Aug 1877 to Mary Frances McCuistion, b. 27 May 1860, d. 4 Mar 1932. Their son Harvell Porter Williams, b. 13 Sep 1896, d. 1 Jun 1976; m. 16 Nov 1919 to Emma M. Jones, b. 28 Aug 1897, d. 29 Jun 1974 at Norris, TN. Their daughter Frances Elnora Williams, b. 14 Oct 1923; m. 21 May 1948, to John William Morgan. 4. Gabriel Maupin, son of Blan and Sarah Brown Maupin, b. 7 Sep 1810, in Albemarle Co. VA, m. 1 Sep 1844, to Sallie Hickerson, b. 2 Jan 1820, daughter of Joseph and Nancy Russeau Hickerson. Nancy d. 22 Jul 1884. Their children born in Bedford Co. TN. a. Nancy, b. 5 Sep 1846, m. Joseph Justice. b. Blan, b. 22 Nov 1847, d. 7 Sep 1884. Sarah Ann, b. 10 Mar 1849. c. d. Joseph N., b. 21 Aug 1851. e. Gabriel, b. 12 Sep 1853, d. 15 Apr 1879. f. Thomas H. b. 18 Dec 1855. Marietta, b. 23 Dec 1858. g. Thornton P. b. 23 Dec 1861. h. This information is from "History of Bedford Co. TN of 1886, pg 1161. According to this history Gabriel is the only living child of Blan and Sarah Brown Maupin in 1886. 5. Lucinda Maupin, daughter of Blan and Sarah Brown Maupin, b. 14 Dec 1814 in Albemarle Co. VA, d. 4 Mar 1862; m. 21 Oct 1834, in Bedford Co. TN, to Patrick Westmoreland Williams, b. 11 Apr 1811, d. 10 Oct 1895; of their 8 children we have information on two. a. Mary Jane Williams, b. 9 Jul 1839, d. 28 Oct 1886; m. 1 Jun 1865 to W. E. Brumfield. Mrs. Nida Wheeler of Nashville, TN, is a descendant of this line. b. Susan Lucinda Williams, b. 15 Mar 1843, Bedford Co. TN, d. 3 May 1917,Coffee Co., TN; m. 12 Dec 1865 to Clayton Cheshire. Their son Ernest Madison Cheshire, b. 16 Oct 1870, d. 26 Nov 1933; m. 20 Nov 1895 to Sarah M. Dillingham in Bedford Co. TN. Their son Henry Madison Cheshire, b. 5 Aug 1896, d. 15 Aug 1963, Nashville, TN; m. 18 May 1919, to Virgie Sain. Their daughter Anna Marie Cheshire, b. 21 Feb 1920; m. 29 Dec 1939, at Chattanooga, TN to George L. Huggins. Names of other 5 children of Blan and Sarah Brown Maupin not known to this writer. ********************

136

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THIRD GENERATION JOHN MAUPIN (7) Son of Daniel (3), grandson of Gabriel ( 1) This son of Daniel Maupin and Margaret Via was born in Hanover County, VA, in 1725 and died in Albemarle County, VA, in 1806, aged 81 years. He was one of the executors of his father's will and lived on the old Maupin land grants near Whitehall. At the time of the Indian massacres in Augusta County in 1758, he joined a company of Albemarle militia which was enrolled to protect the frontier. Two of his brothers were members of the same company and later this company saw service in the Revolution as part of the Virginia State troops. The wife of John Maupin was Frances Dabney of Hanover and they were probably married in that county before the removal of the Maupins to Albemarle in 1747. Frances Dabney was the daughter of Cornelius Dabney (French, d'Aubigne) and Sarah Jennings. See Dabney History following. After the death of Cornelius Dabney, his widow made her home with John Maupin, living to a great age. She was buried in the yard of his homestead and her grave could still be located in the days of Dr. S. Maupin. It cannot be identified at this time. The children of John and Frances Maupin were as follows: Sarah married William Jarman. See Zachariah (10). He was the son of Thomas Jarman and lived near Mechum's Depot. He ow ned a mi II near the present site of Mechums. Their children were: a- James, married Sarah, daughter of Benjamin Brown. b -Thomas, who bought land at the summit of the ridge afterwards known as Jarman's Gap. He died Aug. 1868 and his wife was Nancy Key. c - Mary, wife of William Woods Jr, son of William Woods and Susannah Wallace. d -John, married Betsy Broaddus, daughter of Edward Broaddus.Their children were: 1. Edward, who married Judith Waddy Maupin, daughter of John Maupin (30). 2. Dabney, who married Frances, daughter of Daniel Maupin (19). e - Frances, b. 5 Dec 1781, d. 8 Feb 1856, m. Jas. Bell Ballard, b. 4 Nov 1778, d. 14 Nov 1858, son of John Ballard and Mary Powers. f - Pleasant, m. Elizabeth, dau. of the same John Ballard. g -William, m. Peggy Wallace, daughter of Michael Wallace and Jane Bratton. 140

Michael Wallace and Jane Bratton. h -Sally, wife of William Ballard, son of John Ballard. i - Catherine, wife of Wm Wiant. k -Tandy. (19) Daniel married Sally Jarman; second, Patsy Gentry; third, Mrs. Hannah (Jameson) Harris. (20) Cornelius -married Mourning Harris; second, Nancy Tomlin; third, Mary Paul, and fourth, Mary Ellis. (21) William married Jane Jameson. (22) Thomas married Judith Cobbs; second, Margaret, daughter of William Maupin (9). * John married Sally Crosthwait. Had ten children. (23) Gabriel married Susannah Bailey. (24) Jennings - married Sarah Miller. Dabney unmarried. Died before his father. * Robert married Mary McGehee, sister of Frances McGehee, who lived in Charlottesville until 1817 when he bought a farm lying between Ivy and Mechum's Depot, owned by Thomas and Dabney Shelton. He died in 1846. The father of these two McGehees is not known. Children of Robert and Mary McGehee Maupin: *a - Edward H. *b- Carr c - Robert d - Carri na, married Nathan Luck. e- Hardina f - Arnnie (25) Carr married Jane Burch, dau. of a son of John Burch and Judith Maupin [see Gabriel Maupin (6)]. (26) Margaret - married, 14 Apr 1783, John Harris, son of Christopher Harris and Agnes McCord. Frances- married, 15 Aug 1783, William Shelton of Mechum's Depot. She was his second wife, the first being Lucy Harris. Shelton's father, Wm Shelton, Sr. came to Albemarle from King and Queen County, settling on Byrd Creek. His wife's name was Patience, though he was twice married. He died in 1799. Wm Shelton, Jr. died In 1815. His children by Frances Maupin were: a - Dabney of Augusta County. b- Thomas of Augusta. He and Dabney sold their share in their father's estate to Francis McGehee, see above. c - Sarah, probably died unmarried. d -Agnes, no record of her marriage. e - Lucy, married Elliott Brown. f - Weatherston, married Elizabeth Harrison. They moved to Mason County, Kentucky. 141


THIRD GENERATION JOHN MAUPIN (7) Son of Daniel (3), grandson of Gabriel (1) This son of Daniel Maupin and Margaret Via was born in Hanover County, VA, in 1725 and died in Albemarle County, VA, in 1806, aged 81 years. He was one of the executors of his father's w iII and lived on the old Maupin land grants near Whitehall. At the time of the Indian massacres in Augusta County in 1758, he joined a company of Albemarle militia which was enrolled to protect the frontier. Two of his brothers were members of the same company and later this company saw service in the Revolution as part of the Virginia State troops. The wife of John Maupin was Frances Dabney of Hanover and they were probably married in that county before the removal of the Maupins to Albemarle in 1747. Frances Dabney was the daughter of Cornelius Dabney (French, d'Aubigne) and Sarah Jennings. See Dabney History following. After the death of Cornelius Dabney, his widow made her home with John Maupin, living to a great age. She was buried in the yard of his homestead and her grave could still be located in the days of Dr. S. Maupin. It cannot be identified at this time. The children of John and Frances Maupin were as follows: Sarah married William Jarman. See Zachariah (10). He was the son of Thomas Jarman and lived near Mechum's Depot. He ow ned a mi II near the present site of Mechums. Their children were: a- James, married Sarah, daughter of Benjamin Brown. b -Thomas, who bought land at the summit of the ridge afterwards known as Jarman's Gap. He died Aug. 1868 and his wife was Nancy Key. c - Mary, wife of William Woods Jr, son of William Woods and Susannah Wallace. d -John, married Betsy Broaddus, daughter of Edward Broaddus.Their children were: 1. Edward, who married Judith Waddy Maupin, daughter of John Maupin (30). 2. Dabney, who married Frances, daughter of Daniel Maupin (19). e - Frances, b. 5 Dec 1781, d. 8 Feb 1856, m. Jas. Bell Ballard, b. 4 Nov 1778, d. 14 Nov 1858, son of John Ballard and Mary Powers. f - Pleasant, m. Elizabeth, dau. of the same John Ballard. g -William, m. Peggy Wallace, daughter of Michael Wallace and Jane Bratton. 140

Michael Wallace and Jane Bratton. h -Sally, wife of William Ballard, son of John Ballard. i - Catherine, wife of Wm Wiant. k -Tandy. (19) Daniel married Sally Jarman; second, Patsy Gentry; third, Mrs. Hannah (Jameson) Harris. (20) Cornelius -married Mourning Harris; second, Nancy Tomlin; third, Mary Paul, and fourth, Mary Ellis. (21) William married Jane Jameson. (22) Thomas married Judith Cobbs; second, Margaret, daughter of William Maupin (9). * John married Sally Crosthwait. Had ten children. (23) Gabriel married Susannah Bailey. (24) Jennings - married Sarah Miller. Dabney unmarried. Died before his father. * Robert married Mary McGehee, sister of Frances McGehee, who lived in Charlottesville until 1817 when he bought a farm lying between Ivy and Mechum's Depot, owned by Thomas and Dabney Shelton. He died In 1846. The father of these two McGehees is not known. Children of Robert and Mary McGehee Maupin: *a - Edward H. *b - Carr c - Robert d - Carrina, married Nathan Luck. e- Hardlna f - Arnnie (25) Carr married Jane Burch, dau. of a son of John Burch and Judith Maupin [see Gabriel Maupin (6)]. (26) Margaret - married, 14 Apr 1783, John Harris, son of Christopher Harris and Agnes McCord. Frances - married, 15 Aug 1783, William Shelton of Mechum's Depot. She was his second wife, the first being Lucy Harris. Shelton's father, Wm Shelton, Sr. came to AI bemarle from King and Queen County, settling on Byrd Creek. His wife's name was Patience, though he was twice married. He died in 1799. Wm Shelton, Jr. died in 1815. His children by Frances Maupin were: a - Dabney of Augusta County. b- Thomas of Augusta. He and Dabney sold their share in their father's estate to Francis McGehee, see above. c - Sarah, probably died unmarried. d -Agnes, no record of her marriage. e - Lucy, married Elliott Brown. f - Weatherston, married Elizabeth Harrison. They moved to Mason county, Kentucky. 141


WILL OF JOHN MAUPIN In the name of God, Amen. I, John Maupin of Albemarle County and State of Virginia, being through the Mercy of God, Sound of mind and Memory and understanding, do hereby make and appoint and order this my Last Will and testament - in manner and form following - my Soul I humbly bequeath to God who gave it to me. My body I commit to the earth from which it was taken to be decently buried at the Discretion of my sons, hereafter mentioned As to my Worldly Estate my will is and I positively order that all my Just Debts be first paid. My will is my estate be not appraised and then after the payments of my Debts and funeral Expenses, I give the same to my children in the following manner-First, I give to my daughter Sarah Jarman, to her and her heirs and assignees forever Forty pounds with Lawful Interest thereon from the day of marriage till the forty pounds may be received. Secondly, I give to my daughter Fanny Shelton, to her and her heirs and assignees forever forty pounds with Interest thereon from the day of marriage till the forty pounds is received. Thirdly, I give to my daughter Margret Harris, to her and her heirs forever forty pounds with interest thereon from the day of Marriage till the forty pounds is received, which my daughter Margret Harris has received one Negro Girl named Rose at Sixty five pounds which the said Margret Harris Has had in possession from October eighteen hundred and one, that is to be deducted from the above legacy.

In Witness whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and fixed my Seal this twenty-fourth day of August one Thousand eight hundred and Six. Signed Sealed Published and Delivered for the Last Will and testament of the above named. John Maupin ( Seal ) In presence of us his Mathew X Maupin mark Amos Maupin Thomas Shelton At a Court held for Albemarle County the 6th day of October

1806 --

This Instrument of writing purporting to be the last will and testament of John Maupin, Deceased was produced in Court and proved by the oaths of Mathew Maupin, Amos Maupin and Thomas Shelton, witnessed thereto and ordered to be recorded. And on the motion of Daniel Maupin, Robert Maupin and Jennings Maupin, executors named in the within will Certificate Is granted them for obtaining a probate In due form of Law on their Giving bond and Security which they did and qualified accordingly. Teste John Nicholas

Fourthly, all the rest of my Estate after paying the above mentioned legacy is to be Sold with the money equally divided among my twelve children, and my Grand Daughter Patsey Dabney Maupin, Daniel Maupin's Daughter. I give to my Grandaughter Fanny Dabney Maupin, Jenning's Daughter -one Bay mare four years old, to her and her heirs forever. Names of my Several Children, to wit: Daniel Maupin, Cornelius Maupin, William Maupin, John Maupin, Thomas Maupin, Gabriel Maupin, Robert Maupin, Jennings Maupin, Carr Maupin, Sarah Jarman, Fanny Shelton, Margret Harris and Lastly, I do hereby Constitute and appoint my three sons, Daniel Maupin, Robert Maupin and Jennings Maupin Executors of this my Last Will and Testament hereby revoking all other or former wills and Testaments by me heretofore made.

142 143

cA

C


WILL OF JOHN MAUPIN In the name of God, Amen. I, John Maupin of Albemarle County and State of Virginia, being through the Mercy of God, Sound of mind and Memory and understanding, do hereby make and appoint and order this my Last Will and testament - in manner and form following - my Soul I humbly bequeath to God who gave it to me. My body I commit to the earth from which it was taken to be decently buried at the Discretion of my sons, hereafter mentioned As to my Worldly Estate my will is and I positively order that all my Just Debts be first paid. My will is my estate be not appraised and then after the payments of my Debts and funeral Expenses, I give the same to my children in the following manner-First, I give to my daughter Sarah Jarman, to her and her heirs and assignees forever Forty pounds with Lawful Interest thereon from the day of marriage till the forty pounds may be received. Secondly, I give to my daughter Fanny Shelton, to her and her heirs and assignees forever forty pounds with Interest thereon from the day of marriage till the forty pounds is received. Thirdly, I give to my daughter Margret Harris, to her and her heirs forever forty pounds with interest thereon from the day of Marriage till the forty pounds is received, which my daughter Margret Harris has received one Negro Girl named Rose at Sixty five pounds which the said Margret Harris Has had in possession from October eighteen hundred and one, that Is to be deducted from the above legacy.

In Witness whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and fixed my Seal this twenty-fourth day of August one Thousand eight hundred and Six. Signed Sealed Published and Delivered for the Last Will and testament of the above named. John Maupin ( Seal ) In presence of us his Mathew X Maupin mark Amos Maupin Thomas Shelton At a Court held for Albemarle County the 6th day of October 1806 --

This Instrument of writing purporting to be the last will and testament of John Maupin, Deceased was produced In Court and proved by the oaths of Mathew Maupin, Amos Maupin and Thomas Shelton, witnessed thereto and ordered to be recorded. And on the motion of Daniel Maupin, Robert Maupin and Jennings Maupin, executors named in the within will Certificate Is granted them for obtaining a probate In due form of Law on their Giving bond and Security which they did and qualified accordingly. Teste John Nicholas C A C

Fourthly, all the rest of my Estate after paying the above mentioned legacy is to be Sold with the money equally divided among my twelve children, and my Grand Daughter Patsey Dabney Maupin, Daniel Maupin's Daughter. I give to my Grandaughter Fanny Dabney Maupin, Jenning's Daughter -one Bay mare four years old, to her and her heirs forever. Names of my Several Children, to wit: Daniel Maupin, Cornelius Maupin, William Maupin, John Maupin, Thomas Maupin, Gabriel Maupin, Robert Maupin, Jennings Maupin, Carr Maupin, Sarah Jarman, Fanny Shelton, Margret Harris and Lastly, I do hereby Constitute and appoint my three sons, Daniel Maupin, Robert Maupin and Jennings Maupin Executors of this my Last Will and Testament hereby revoking all other or former wills and Testaments by me heretofore made.

142

143


Third Generation

THIRD GENERATION

THE DABNEY FAMILY

THE DABNEY FAMILY

The original name from which the American Dabney Is derived has three final endings, namely, Aublglnl, a town In France seated on the River Neere. This had the title of a duchy as belonging to the Duke of Richmond In right of the Duchess of Aubiglni from whom Richmond was descended. The second ending was that of D'Aublgney as given it by the English, Duke George Gordon Lennox, at the time when the duchy was conferred by Louis XIV on Louis Renal de Penceencourt of England in favor of her son, Charles Lennox, Duke of Richmond, 1684.

The children of Cornelius Dabney and Sarah Jennings were:

The third ending was given by the French as Aubigne and it Is generally known there by that appellation. In America, it resolved itself into Dabney. Theodore Agrlppa D'Aublgne, a French Calvinist, was a follower of Henri IV and died In Geneva In 1639. His son, Constant, was the father of the notorious Madame de Maintenon and was an eminent author of that period. In fact, the literary talent of the family has been noted through several generations and one of the best of the modern painters of France was of the D'Aubigne family. Cornelius D'Aubigne, or Dabney, descendant of Theodore Agrippa D'Aubigne, came to America early In the 18th century. In 1721, he married his second wife, Sarah Jennings, In Hanover County. She had accompanied the Dabneys to America as a companion to the first wife of Dabney. She was the daughter of Charles Jennings, whose brother, William Jennings, of Acton Place, London, was very wealthy. Sarah Dabney was his sole heir. Numerous efforts have been made by her descendants to recover the estate but without avail. Cornelius Dabney was allowed a certain sum of money by the Colonial Council for acting as Interpreter to the Indians. He died in 1764 leaving a will which was probated in Hanover County In 1765. His wife survived him many years and made her home with her daughter, Frances, wife of John Maupin (7). She was buried in the yard of his home.

Cornelius -

married Lucy Winston. He was born in 1756 and died in 1821. He served in the American army in the Revolution. William married Philadelphia Gwathney. John (1724-1821 ). Born in Hanover County, VA. He commanded Dabney's Legion at Yorktown at the time of the surrender of Cornwallis. He married, first, Anna Harris; second, Margaret Smith. The children by Anna Harris were: a - Sarah, married Thomas Waller. b -Mary, married Thomas Minor. c - William, married _________ Quarles. d -John, married Anna Harris. e - Anna, married Henry Terrill. f - Elizabeth, married Bernard Brown. son, Bernard, married Miriam, daughter of Daniel Maupin (19). g - Susan, married Thomas Harris, son of James and Mary Harris of Albemarle. Thomas Harris was blind. Their children were: 1. William Harris, married Kate, daughter of Daniel Maupin (19). 2. Jarratt Harris, married ____ Children: A. Nancy, married Thomas Maupin {43). B. Mary Virginia, married Arthur Maupin (44a). C. Larkin Harris of Monroe County, MO. 3. Betty Harris, married Bernard Maupin. h - Lucy Dabney, married Thomas McReynolds. i - Rebecca, married Thomas Warner. j - Cornelius, married Jane Harris. k -Nancy, married John Hunter. Mary first wife of Christopher Harris. Her descendants also intermarried with the Maupin family. See Harris Family. Elizabeth-married Daniel Maupin (8). Frances -married John Maupin (7). Ann married David Thompson. Sarah married Matthew Brown. married William Johnson. Cornelius Dabney was 90 years old when he died hence he must have been born about 1674.

144 145


,. Third Generation

THIRD GENERATION

THE DABNEY FAMILY

THE DABNEY FAMILY

The original name from which the American Dabney Is derived has three final endings, namely, Aubigini, a town in France seated on the River Neere. This had the title of a duchy as belonging to the Duke of Richmond In right of the Duchess of Aubigini from whom Richmond was descended. The second ending was that of D'Aubigney as given it by the English, Duke George Gordon Lennox, at the time when the duchy was conferred by Louis XIV on Louis Renal de Penceencourt of England in favor of her son, Charles Lennox, Duke of Richmond, 1684.

The children of Cornelius Dabney and Sarah Jennings were:

The third ending was given by the French as Aubigne and it Is generally known there by that appellation. In America, it resolved itself into Dabney. Theodore Agrippa D'Aubigne, a French Calvinist, was a follower of Henri IV and died In Geneva in 1639. His son, Constant, was the father of the notorious Madame de Maintenon and was an eminent author of that period. In fact, the literary talent of the family has been noted through several generations and one of the best of the modern pal nters of France was of the D'Aubigne family. Cornelius D'Aubigne, or Dabney, descendant of Theodore Agrippa D'Aubigne, came to America early In the 18th century. In 1721, he married his second wife, Sarah Jennings, in Hanover County. She had accompanied the Dabneys to America as a companion to the first wife of Dabney. She was the daughter of Charles Jennings, whose brother, William Jennings, of Acton Place, London, was very wealthy. Sarah Dabney was his sole heir. Numerous efforts have been made by her descendants to recover the estate but without avail. Cornelius Dabney was allowed a certain sum of money by the Colonial Council for acting as interpreter to the Indians. He died in 1764 leaving a will which was probated in Hanover County in 1765. His wife survived him many years and made her home with her daughter, Frances, wife of John Maupin (7). She was buried in the yard of his home.

Cornelius -

married Lucy Winston. He was born in 1756 and died in 1821. He served in the American army in the Revolution. William married Phi lade! phi a Gwathney. John (1724-1821 ). Born in Hanover County, VA. He commanded Dabney's Legion at Yorktown at the time of the surrender of Cornwallis. He married, first, Anna Harris; second, Margaret Smith. The chi I d ren by Anna Harris were: a - Sarah, married Thomas Waller. b - Mary, married Thomas Minor. c - William, married ----~- ___ Quarles. d -John, married Anna Harris. e - Anna, married Henry Terrill. f - Elizabeth, married Bernard Brown. son, Bernard, married Miriam, daughter of Daniel Maupin (19). g - Susan, married Thomas Harris, son of James and Mary Harris of Albemarle. Thomas Harris was blind. Their children were: 1. Wi II iam Harris, married Kate, daughter of Daniel Maupin (19). 2. Jarratt Harris, married Children: A. Nancy, married Thomas Maupin (43). B. Mary Virginia, married Arthur Maupin (44a). C. Larkin Harris of Monroe County, MO. 3. Betty Harris, married Bernard Maupin. h -Lucy Dabney, married Thomas McReynolds. i - Rebecca, married Thomas Warner. j - Cornelius, married Jane Harris. k -Nancy, married John Hunter. Mary first wife of Christopher Harris. Her descendants also intermarried with the Maupin family. See Harris Family. Elizabeth-married Daniel Maupin (8). Frances- married John Maupin (7). Ann married David Thompson. Sarah married Matthew Brown. married William Johnson. Cornelius Dabney was 90 years old when he died hence he must have been born about 1674.

144 145

m

~I


FOURTH GENERATION

(47) Nimrod-

DANIEL MAUPIN (19) Son of John (7), grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ).

1

1~56,

Daniel Maupin was born in Albemarle County, 16 Sep and died in that county in 1838. Will filed in Albemarle Cof 23 Dec 1837, Will Book 13, pg. 57. He was one of the executor'ls of his grandfather's will, which was probated in 1788. In 1834 he and his wife, Hannah, deeded the ground for the Mt. Moriah Methodist Church. The Methodist church which had preceded this one had gone by the name of Maupin's Meeting House and was probably the first Methodist church in Albemarle !County. Daniel Maupin was a saddler as well as a farmer atd made saddles for the American army both in the Revolution and in the War of 1812. The Pension Office records say that Daniel Maupin enlisted at the beginning of the Revolution and serv d until October 1781. In that year, he was a private in the co~any of Capt. Isaac Davis under Col. Reuben Lindsey. He drew a pension from Oct. 1, 1832 until Sept. 4, 1837, when it as last paid. His grandson, Frank Maupin, late of Clarence, MO, had in his possession the powderhorn carried by Daniel Maupi in the Revolution.

(48) LilournFrances

Mary

Elizabeth -

His first wife was Sally Jarman, m. 14 Jan 1781, sej under Zacheriah Maupin (10). His second wife was Patsy Gentry, aughter of Martin Gentry and Mary Timberlake. (See Gentn History under Joel Maupin (42). Patsy Gentry was borrl 22 May 1772. The third wife of Daniel Maupin was Mrs. Hannah! Harris, nee Jameson, wife of William Harris. The children of Daniel and Sally Jarman were: Miriam

*

married, 18 Jan 1802 to Barnard Brown. He died in 1828 leaving the following children Smith, James, Bernard, Allen, Sidney, Sarah, Bettie, Pyrenia, who married Tilman Maupif. (51), Thompson, Frances, Susan and George. ernard Brown was a descendant of a sister of Margaret Via, probably a great grandson.

Patsy

The children of Mrs. Hannah Harris were: (49) Merritt married Mary Maupin, daughter of William Maupin (21 ). John W. b. 1819. Unmarried. Sarah T. b. 1822; married Dr. Peary and they emigrated to Missouri.

married William Harris, son of Thomas Harris and Susan Dabney.

********************

The children of Patsy Gentry were: (45) Joel

married Susan Maupin, see Cornelius Maupin (20). married Elizabeth Kent; second, Patsy Tilman. married 12 Nov 1818 to Dabney Jarman, son of John Jarman and Betsy Broaddus. John Jarman was a son of Sarah Maupin and a grandson of John Maupin (7). Children of Frances Jarman were: a. William, m. Catherine Lindsey, daughter of Fanny Maupin and Col. Henry Lindsey. Fanny Maupin was the daughter of Jennings Maupin (24). b. John, married Mary Fry. c. Matthew, married Miss Fretwell. d. Mary, married William Keblinger. e. James f. Elizabeth, married Burlington Fretwell. married John Hayden of Fluvanna Co., children were: William, John (killed in the Civil War), James, Elizabeth, Fannie and Margaret. married, 19 Dec 1827, to Thomas W. Harris. Her children were: a. James Harris b. Sally, b. 1842, m. 11 Dec 1866 to Rice Wood, b. 1834, of the family of Gabriel (6). c. Bettie, m. John H. Maupin, son of James D. (46). d. William, married Virginia Maupin, daughter of Tilman (51). e. Oswin, m. 22 Dec 1858 to Mary Maupin, daughter of Tilman (51). f. George, married 10 Jan 1855 to Sarah Elizabeth Foster.

-

married Mary Maupin; second Mrs. Moss MO. (46) James Dabney-married Dorinda Kennerly.

~f Paris,

146 147


rI FOURTH GENERATION DANIEL MAUPIN (19) Son of John (7), grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). Daniel Maupin was born in Albemarle County, 16 Sep 1756, and died in that county in 1838. Will filed in Albemarle Co. 23 Dec 1837, Will Book 13, pg. 57. He was one of the executor's of his grandfather's will, which was probated in 1788. In 1834, he and his wife, Hannah, deeded the ground for the Mt. Moriah Methodist Church. The Methodist church which had preceded this one had gone by the name of Maupin's Meeting House and was probably the first Methodist church in Albemarle County. Daniel Maupin was a saddler as well as a farmer and made saddles for the American army both in the Revolution and in the War of 1812. The Pension Office records say that Daniel Maupin enlisted at the beginning of the Revolution and served until October 1781. In that year, he was a private in the company of Capt. Isaac Davis under Col. Reuben Lindsey. He drew a pension from Oct. 1, 1832 until Sept. 4, 1837, when it was last paid. His grandson, Frank Maupin, late of Clarence, MO., had in his possession the powderhorn carried by Daniel Maupin in the Revolution.

(47) Nimrod(48) LilournFrances

Mary

Elizabeth -

His first wife was Sally Jarman, m. 14 Jan 1781, see under Zacheriah Maupin (10). His second wife was Patsy Gentry, daughter of Martin Gentry and Mary Timberlake. (See Gentry History under Joel Maupin (42). Patsy Gentry was born 22 May 1772. The third wife of Daniel Maupin was Mrs. Hannah Harris, nee Jameson, wife of William Harris. The children of Daniel and Sally Jarman were: Miriam

married, 18 Jan 1802 to Barnard Brown. He died in 1828 leaving the following children: Smith, James, Bernard, Allen, Sidney, Sarah, Bettie, Pyrenia, who married Tilman Maupin (51), Thompson, Frances, Susan and George. Bernard Brown was a descendant of a sister of Margaret Via, probably a great grandson.

Patsy

The children of Mrs. Hannah Harris were: (49) Merrittmarried Mary Maupin, daughter of William Maupin (21 ). John W. b. 1819. Unmarried. Sarah T. b. 1822; married Dr. Peary and they emigrated to Missouri.

married William Harris, son of Thomas Harris and Susan Dabney.

The children of Patsy Gentry were: (45) Joel

*

married Susan Maupin, see Cornelius Maupin (20). married Elizabeth Kent; second, Patsy Tilman. married 12 Nov 1818 to Dabney Jarman, son of John Jarman and Betsy Broaddus. John Jarman was a son of Sarah Maupin and a grandson of John Maupin (7). Children of Frances Jarman were: a. William, m. Catherine Lindsey, daughter of Fanny Maupin and Col. Henry Lindsey. Fanny Maupin was the daughter of Jennings Maupin (24). b. John, married Mary Fry. c. Matthew, married Miss Fretwell. d. Mary, married William Keblinger. e. James f. Elizabeth, married Burlington Fretwell. married John Hayden of Fluvanna Co., children were: William, John (killed in the Civil War), James, Elizabeth, Fannie and Margaret. married, 19 Dec 1827, to Thomas W. Harris. Her children were: a. James Harris b. Sally, b. 1842, m. 11 Dec 1866 to Rice Wood, b. 1834, of the family of Gabriel (6). c. Bettie, m. John H. Maupin, son of James D. (46). d. Wi IIi am, married Virginia Maupin, daughter of Tilman (51). e. Oswin, m. 22 Dec 1858 to Mary Maupin, daughter of Tilman (51). f. George, married 10 Jan 1855 to Sarah Elizabeth Foster.

********************

-

married Mary Maupin; second Mrs. Moss of Paris, MO. (46) James Dabney-married Dorinda Kennerly.

146 147


CONTINUING TO THE PRESENT GENERATIONS OF: GEORGE HARRIS, son of Elizabeth Maupin and Thomas W. Harris, grandson of Daniel Maupin (19), was born 1831, m. 10 Jan 1855 to Sarah Elizabeth Foster, b. 15 Feb 1839. We have record of 2 sons: j-lilton Ashby and Robert Stuart. 1. Hilton Ashby Harris, b. 31 Mar 1862; m. 19 Oct 1887 to Inda Phillips Marshall, b. 15 Dec 1862. Their son Ernest Peyton Harris, b. 23 Jan 1893; m. 25 Feb 1920 to Katherine Pearl 'dlLhoit, b. 15 May 1893. Their daughter Inda Gay Harris, b. 4 Apr 1922; m. 15 Sep 1943 to A. Robert Kuhlthau; 3 childrenRobe rt_E~_ytothJ3j chard H-'-L_and __1_ll"l d ~__GC!Y, 2.

Robert Stuart Harris, b. 26 Oct 1864 in Charlottesville, VA, d. 23 Aug. 1949; m. 16 Oct 1889 to Annie Lee_i?illiam, b. 20 Apr 1870, d. 27 Aug 1948. Their son Charles Foster Harris, b. 17 Aug 1905; m. 13 Sep 1946 to Ressie Maree Kincheloe, b. 29 Oct 1918. Their daughter, Mlllยง---'=aur:_g__Harri~, b. 2 Jan 1950 in Charlottesville, VA; m. 10 Jan 1970 to David Jackson Crickenberger.

Information concerning the family of Daniel Maupin was obtained from: W. H. Miller's History and Genealogies Dr. Socrates Maupin's Manuscript Notes on the Maupin Family. Lee K. Maupin, son of James D. Maupin (46). United States Pension Office Records. History of Monroe County, Missouri 1884. Gentry Family in America.

********************

marriage took place in Albemarle Co. VA, on 18 Dec. 1817. After the death of his first wife, Joel Maupin married a Mrs. Sally Moss in Paris, MO. She was born 1791 and died 2 Apr 1869. He had five daughters by his first wife, namely: Martha Mary

Susan

Jane

[)OIJ_p,

Jacinth a

Joel Maupin was born in Albemarle County, VA and died in Paris, Monroe County, MO. He was an early settler in Paris, in fact, one of the very first and he was Judge and Sheriff of the county for many years, being succeeded by his son-in-law, Daniel Dulaney. He settled in the county in 1834, some years before it was made into a county. His first wife was Mary, daughter of John Maupin (30), known as John "Red Head". This

married Daniel Maupin Dulaney in 1841. grandson of Daniel Maupin (27).

He was the

Like many other Maupins, the descendants of Joel Maupin (45) can also trace their Maupin line through Joel's wife, Mary Maupin, daughter of John Maupin (30).

FIFTH GENERATION JOEL MAUPIN (45) Son e>f Daniel (19), grandson of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 )โ€ข

married, 19 Nov 1835, Peter Thomas of Sullivan County. married, 29 Aug 1839, Dr. George Moss, son of her father's second wife. They had seven children, among them George, Robert and Joel M. Moss. married, 2 Aug 1844, Andrew Caplinger of Paris and had 4 daughters and 3 sons. She lived to be 100 years old. Married, 13 Aug 1850, Robert Towler of Marion County. She had 4 children. 1. Robert, never married. 2. Edward F., had several children. 3. Mary M, one daughter, Vera. 4. Annie Elizabeth Towler, b. 6 Mar 1857, d. 28 Mar 1928; m. 27 Nov 1884 to John W. Lafon, b. 8 Aug 1858, d. 12 May 1941. Their daughter EL~D_ges .Q_o_r:Lrln~_l,.f!.fQn, b. 30 Sep 1893; m. 23 Nov 1916 to _Lewis_QL~_rel'}ce__ _g_~r_QU, b. 28 Dec 1887, d. 16 Mar 1973 in Macon, MO. Their daughter, liLC!_ Ruth GCJ..rr:g_U, b. 2 Nov 1923 in Clarence, MO; m. 2 Sep 1948 to Ben Charles Doup. Their children; Carroll R~tb.Doup, Benjamin Lewis _Doup, & Hi ram Lafon

********** JAMES DABNEY MAUPIN (46) Son of Daniel (19), grandson of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1).

James D. Maupin was born in Albemarle 23 Jan 1801 and died in Shelby County, MO, 7 Apr 1888. He is buried at Spencer's Chapel, southwest of Shelbina, MO. He came with a large body of emigrants from Augusta County, VA, settling on Otter Creek in Shelby County where he owned a large farm. The year of

148 149


CONTINUING TO THE PRESENT GENERATIONS OF: GEORGE HARRIS, son of Elizabeth Maupin and Thomas W. Harris, grandson of Daniel Maupin (19), was born 1831, m. 10 Jan 1855 to Sarah Elizabeth Foster, b. 15 Feb 1839. We have record of 2 sons: Hilton Ashby and Robert Stuart. 1. Hilton Ashby Harris, b. 31 Mar 1862; m. 19 Oct 1887 to Inda Phillips Marshall, b. 15 Dec 1862. Their son Ernest Peyton Harris, b. 23 Jan 1893; m. 25 Feb 1920 to Katherine Pearl Wilhoit, b. 15 May 1893. Their daughter Inda Gay Harris, b. 4 Apr 1922; m. 15 Sep 1943 to A. Robert Kuhlthau; 3 childrenRobert Peyton, Richard H.. and Linda Gay.

marriage took place in Albemarle Co. VA, on 18 Dec. 1817. After the death of his first wife, Joel Maupin married a Mrs. Sally Moss in Paris, MO. She was born 1791 and died 2 Apr 1869. He had five daughters by his first wife, namely: Martha Mary

Susan

Jane 2. Robert Stuart Harris, b. 26 Oct 1864 in Charlottesville, VA, d. 23 Aug. 1949; m. 16 Oct 1889 to Annie Lee Gilliam, b. 20 Apr 1870, d. 27 Aug 1948. Their son Charles Foster Harris, b. 17 Aug 1905; m. 13 Sep 1946 to Ressie Maree Kincheloe, b. 29 Oct 1918. Their daughter, ~nni~_ Laura Harris, b. 2 Jan 1950 in Charlottesville, VA; m. 10 Jan 1970 to David Jackson Crickenberger. Information concerning the family of Daniel Maupin was obtained from: W. H. Miller's History and Genealogies Dr. Socrates Maupin's Manuscript Notes on the Maupin Family. Lee K. Maupin, son of James D. Maupin (46). United States Pension Office Records. History of Monroe County, Missouri 1884. Gentry Family in America.

Jacintha

married, 19 Nov 1835, Peter Thomas of Sullivan County. married, 29 Aug 1839, Dr. George Moss, son of her father's second wife. They had seven children, among them George, Robert and Joel M. Moss. married, 2 Aug 1844, Andrew Caplinger of Paris and had 4 daughters and 3 sons. She lived to be 100 years old. Married, 13 Aug 1850, Robert Towler of Marion County. She had 4 children. 1. Robert, never married. 2. Edward F., had several children. 3. Mary M, one daughter, Vera. 4. Annie Elizabeth Towler, b. 6 Mar 1857, d. 28 Mar 1928; m. 27 Nov 1884 to John W. Lafon, b. 8 Aug 1858, d. 12 May 1941. Their daughter Frances Cori nr:LE! LafQ.Q, b. 30 Sep 1893; m. 23 Nov 1916 to Lewis Clarence Carroll, b. 28 Dec 1887, d. 16 Mar 1973. in Macon, MO. Their daughter, Lila Ruth G.~r:rqll, b. 2 Nov 1923 in Clarence, MO; m. 2 Sep 1948 to Ben Charles Doup. Their children; Carroll Rutl:l._Doup, Benjamin Lewis Doup, & Hiram Lafon QQI-.I_Q. married Daniel Maupin Dulaney in 1841. He was the grandson of Daniel Maupin (27).

Like many other Maupins, the descendants of Joel Maupin (45) can also trace their Maupin line through Joel's wife, Mary Maupin, daughter of John Maupin (30).

******************** FIFTH GENERATION

**********

JOEL MAUPIN (45) Son of Daniel (19), grandson of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1).

JAMES DABNEY MAUPIN (46) Son of Daniel (19), grandson of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 ).

Joel Maupin was born in Albemarle County, VA and died in Paris, Monroe County, MO. He was an early settler in Paris, in fact, one of the very first and he was Judge and Sheriff of the county for many years, being succeeded by his son-in-law, Daniel Dulaney. He settled in the county in 1834, some years before it was made into a county. His first wife was Mary, daughter of John Maupin (30), known as John "Red Head". This

James D. Maupin was born in Albemarle 23 Jan 1801 and died in Shelby County, MO, 7 Apr 1888. He is buried at Spencer's Chapel, southwest of Shelbina, MO. He came with a large body of emigrants from Augusta County, VA, settling on Otter Creek in Shelby County where he owned a large farm. The year of

148

149


I this emigration was 1851. His wife was Dorinda Kennerly, b. 11 May 1810, d. 1868; they married 26 Dec 1827, in Augusta County, VA. Their children were: married Elijah Sparks. They had a son, Thomas Milton Sparks of Shelbina, MO. married Lee Kennerly. Children: Thomas and Mary c. Mary. married Peter M. Hanger. No children. Harriet K. b. 31 Jul 1836; m. 16 Aug 1887 to Betsy John Henry Harris, granddaughter of Daniel (19). He served throughout the war in the Confederate army. Later he settled at Maud, MO, where he owned a drug store. He is buried in Spencer Chapel Cemetery. born 1840, d. 30 Jun 1885; buried in Spencer Sarah Ann Chapel Cemetery. married Nat Threldkeld. Had sons, Frank and Tabitha E. William. Benjamin Franklin married Mollie Carver, no children. (82) Lee Kennerly married Mollie Sparks Lizzie A.

Virginia Frances

SIXTH GENERATION LEE KENNERLY MAUPIN (82) Son of James Dabney (46), grandson of Daniel (19), of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 ). Lee K. Maupin was born in Augusta County, VA, 2 May 1850; d. 9 Jul 1930. In 1851 he came with his parents to Northeast Missouri. They settled on Otter Creek in South Jefferson Township in Shelby County. Lee K. Maupin lived on the old farm of his father, James Dabney Maupin, after the death of the latter. From the Shelbina Democrat - May 1924 "Lee K. Maupin of this city was 74 years of age last week and recalled that he and two others were the only ones left of a party of 51, who emigrated, from near Staunton, Virginia in 1851 to this section of the country. The company of 51 included some slaves and the trip was made by wagon train. The other two survivors of the trip are his sister, Mrs. N. W. Threldkeld of near Shelbina and a brother, Frank Maupin of Clarence, Mo."

The wife of LeeK. Maupin was Mollie Sparks. She was born 25 Dec 1857; died 1964. Married 3 Mar 1887. Their children were: 150

Ruby Lee Harry Sparks Willie Ben Lizzie Bob John Henry

Born 1890; m. Fletcher Wood. She died In 1918 leaving a daughter Winifred Maupin Woods. Born 1888; m. Maud Powell. Lived at Miami, OK. Born 1893; m. Richard Taylor-3 children. Born 1900; m. Homer Wallace. Born 1896; m. Melclna Wood. They have a son, Aubrey Jean and a daughter, Ruby Maupin. They lived on the old homestead of James Dabney Maupin. John Henry, d. 1964.

********** FIFTH GENERATION NIMROD MAUPIN (47) Son of Daniel (19), grandson of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1). Nimrod Maupin was born 3 Jan 1811, in Albemarle County, VA, died 14 Apr 1872, in Callaway County, MO; m. 19 Dec 1832, to Susan Elizabeth Maupin, daughter of Bernard Maupin (son of Cornelius (20) and Betsy Harris). She was born 13 Jun 1815, in Albemarle Co. VA, a twin of Silas Bernard Maupin. She died 5 Aug 1869, in Callaway County, MO. Both she and her husband are buried in Harris Cemetery near Shamrock in Callaway County, MO. Their children were as follows: (83)LIIburn Dabney Married Sarah Elizabeth Moore of Holliday, MO. Martha Ann born 13 Nov 1834; m. Druary Allen Maupin. Children were: Lenora and Mattie. James Martin m. Ellen Groves, b. 12 Sep 1836 and d. at Madison, MO. His children: a. Bertha Grove, b. 25 Jul 1874. b. Ulah Temple, b. 18 Oct 1876. Sarah Jarman born 2 Jul 1838; m. Jesse Everhart of Callaway County. Moved to Texas where she died. Children were: Meritt and Emmett Everhart. Smith born 19 Dec 1839; d. 10 Mar 1845. Lucella M. born 25 Dec 1841; d. 23 Mar 1846. Berryman J. died young. Jacintha A. born 26 Jan 1845; died in Los Angeles in 1930. She married 23 Dec 1875, to R. W. Hatton. They had a daughter, Eleanor, who married J. 0. Withers in Macon, MO. Robert N. born 23 Dec 1848, and died at Fairfax, MO, 14 Feb 1924. He married Mrs. Emma Lackey, 20 Sep 1893. They had one son, Rex Maupin, b. 20 Jan 1896. 151


I this emigration was 1851. His wife was Dorinda Kennerly, b. 11 May 1810, d. 1868; they married 26 Dec 1827, in Augusta County, VA. Their children were: married Elijah Sparks. They had a son, Thomas Milton Sparks of Shelbina, MO. married Lee Kennerly. Children: Thomas and Mary c. Mary. married Peter M. Hanger. No children. Harriet K. b. 31 Jul 1836; m. 16 Aug 1887 to Betsy John Henry Harris, granddaughter of Daniel (19). He served throughout the war in the Confederate army. Later he settled at Maud, MO, where he owned a drug store. He is buried in Spencer Chapel Cemetery. born 1840, d. 30 Jun 1885; buried in Spencer Sarah Ann Chapel Cemetery. married Nat Threldkeld. Had sons, Frank and Tabitha E. William. Benjamin Franklin married Mollie Carver, no children. (82) Lee Kennerly married Mollie Sparks Lizzie A.

Virginia Frances

SIXTH GENERATION LEE KENNERLY MAUPIN (82) Son of James Dabney (46), grandson of Daniel (19), of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). LeeK. Maupin was born in Augusta County, VA, 2 May 1850; d. 9 Jul 1930. In 1851 he came with his parents to Northeast Missouri. They settled on Otter Creek in South Jefferson Township in Shelby County. Lee K. Maupin lived on the old farm of his father, James Dabney Maupin, after the death of the latter. From the Shelbina Democrat - May 1924 "Lee K. Maupin of this city was 74 years of age last week and recalled that he and two others were the only ones left of a party of 51, who emigrated, from near Staunton, Virginia in 1851 to this section of the country. The company of 51 included some slaves and the trip was made by wagon train. The other two survivors of the trip are his sister, Mrs. N. W. Threldkeld of near Shelbina and a brother, Frank Maupin of Clarence, Mo."

The wife of Lee K. Maupin was Mollie Sparks. She was born 25 Dec 1857; died 1964. Married 3 Mar 1887. Their children were: 150

Ruby Lee Harry Sparks Willie Ben Lizzie Bob John Henry

Born 1890; m. Fletcher Wood. She died In 1918 leaving a daughter Winifred Maupin Woods. Born 1888; m. Maud Powell. Lived at Miami, OK. Born 1893; m. Richard Taylor-3 children. Born 1900; m. Homer Wallace. Born 1896; m. Melcina Wood. They have a son, Aubrey Jean and a daughter, Ruby Maupin. They lived on the old homestead of James Dabney Maupin. John Henry, d. 1964.

********** FIFTH GENERATION NIMROD MAUPIN (47) Son of Daniel (19), grandson of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 ). Nimrod Maupin was born 3 Jan 1811, in Albemarle County, VA, died 14 Apr 1872, in Callaway County, MO; m. 19 Dec 1832, to Susan Elizabeth Maupin, daughter of Bernard Maupin (son of Cornelius (20) 路and Betsy Harris). She was born 13 Jun 1815, In Albemarle Co. VA, a twin of Silas Bernard Maupin. She died 5 Aug 1869, In Callaway County, MO. Both she and her husband are buried in Harris Cemetery near Shamrock in Callaway County, MO. Their children were as follows: (83)Lilburn Dabney Married Sarah Elizabeth Moore of Holliday, MO. Martha Ann born 13 Nov 1834; m. Druary Allen Maupin. Children were: Lenora and Mattie. James Martin m. Ellen Groves, b. 12 Sep 1836 and d. at Madison, MO. His children: a. Bertha Grove, b. 25 Jul 1874. b. Ulah Temple, b. 18 Oct 1876. Sarah Jarman born 2 Jul 1838; m. Jesse Everhart of Callaway County. Moved to Texas where she died. Children were: Meritt and Emmett Everhart. Smith born 19 Dec 1839; d. 10 Mar 1845. Lucella M. born 25 Dec 1841; d. 23 Mar 1846. Berryman J. died young. Jacintha A. born 26 Jan 1845; died in Los Angeles in 1930. She married 23 Dec 1875, to R. W. Hatton. They had a daughter, Eleanor, who married J. o. Withers in Macon, MO. Robert N. born 23 Dec 1848, and died at Fairfax, MO, 14 Feb 1924. He married Mrs. Emma Lackey, 20 Sep 1893. They had one son, Rex Maupin, b. 20 Jan 1896. 151


Emma Susan

(83a) Silas Edwin

born 4 Mar 1851; died 19 Apr 1924. She m. Merriwether L. Harris, 1 Mar 1871. He died 21 Feb 1887. Their children: a. Linn R. Harris, b. 24 Jan 1872 b. H. P. Harris, b. 23 Jun 1873 c. Zennah L Harris., b. 15 Jan 1875 d. Ethel L. Harris, b. 5 Jun 1876 e. Ira L. Harris, b. 18 Sep 1877 f. Lavitah K. Harris, b. 19 Jan 1879 g. Effie Pearl Harris, died young. h. Etta Pearl Harris, b. 20 Feb 1882 i. Aubrey R. Harris, b. 4 Nov 1883 j. Susan M. Harris, b. 29 Aug 1887; died 17 Sep 1907. k. ~---~-born 25 Sep 1846; died at Rockport, MO., 2 Mar 1926; m. Mollie Rhoads of Saline Co. MO. ********** SIXTH GENERATION

LILBURN DABNEY MAUPIN (83) Son of Nimrod (47), grandson of Daniel (19), of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 ). Lilburn Maupin was born 8 Sep 1833, near Holiday, in Monroe County, MO; died 3 Jun 1905, at Renick, MO. He and his wife are buried at Holiday. He was the eldest child of Nimrod Maupin and was born soon after the arrival of his parents in Monroe County, which at that date was just being settled and was the frontier in Northeast Missouri. His wife was Elizabeth Moore, daughter of Austin Moore of Monroe County. The children of Lilburn D. Maupin were as follows: born in 1860. Lived near Sedalia, MO and later in California. Had a daughter, Mary Elizabeth. Susan Kathryn married John Hamilton and died at Huntsville, MO, in 1920. They had no children. married M. H. Morris, Sedalia, MO. Nannie W. born 8 Oct 1865, near Madison, MO; married Lulu *Robert E. E. Grant of Renick, MO. Their children were: a. Lucille, wife of 0. F. Gurthet of Tulsa, OK. b. Goldena R., wife of T. L. Smart of Pattonsburg, MO. c. Robert G., formerly with Savings Bank, Pattonsburg. d. Curtman, lives at Pattonsburg, MO. He had one daughter, Shirley Ann Maupin. e. Ellen K., attending Christian College, 1924.

Austin Nimrod

152

"

Joseph E. Minnie Lillie Dollie

unmarried, lived at Sedalia, MO. married T. A. Mitchell, Lamonte, MO. married A. B. Armstrong, Wartrace, TX. married Dr. Walter Austin, Huntsville, MO.

*Note: A fine biography and picture of Robert E. Maupin in "History of Northwest Missouri:, pgs 1159-60. SILAS EDWIN MAUPIN (83a) Son of Nimrod (47), grandson of Daniel 919), of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 ). Silas Edwin Maupin was born 25 Sep 1846, and died at Rockport, MO, 2 Mar 1926. He was a member of Company A, 9th Missouri Infantry, C.S.A., and surrendered 26 May 1865 at Alexandria, LA. He was paroled 7 Jun 1865. His wife was Mollie Rhoads of Saline County, MO, and their marriage their took place 19 Mar 1879. The children of Silas Edwin Maupin were: Lloyd L. Nellie C. Osa M. Orlin B. Lillie A. Edwin C. Robert. P. Joseph C. Leta B. Forrest E. Mary 0. Lura L.

born born born born born born born born born born born born

31 20 1 3 24 1 17 3 30 11 27 7

Dec 1870 Oct 1881 Jul 1884 Nov 1885 Mar 1887 Mar 1889 Feb 1891 Apr 1893 Jul 1896 Oct 1897 May 1900 Jul 1904

NOTE: Information concerning the family of Nimrod Maupin (47) and his children's families was furnished by Austin N. Maupin of Chula Vista, CA. He was formerly of Missouri and lived at Sedalia for some years prior to going to California. His daughter, Mary Elizabeth, graduated at the Sedalia High School in 1915. She later attended Park College and Missouri University and after graduation she taught English in Bushong High School, Kansas, for two years. She was instructor in Eng I ish at the Teachers College, Emporia Kansas, 1921-1922, resigning to attend Columbia University at New York City, where she received her A.M. degree. After her work at Columbia, she was instructor in English classes at Skidmore College, N.Y., at State Teachers College at Warrensburg, MO and at Park College, Parksville, MO. ********************

153


Emma Susan

born 4 Mar 1851; died 19 Apr 1924. She m. Merriwether L. Harris, 1 Mar 1871. He died 21 Feb 1887. Their children: a. Linn R. Harris, b. 24 Jan 1872 b. H. P. Harris, b. 23 Jun 1873 c. Zennah L Harris., b. 15 Jan 1875 d. Ethel L. Harris, b. 5 Jun 1876 e. Ira L. Harris, b. 18 Sep 1877 f. Lavitah K. Harris, b. 19 Jan 1879 g. Effie Pearl Harris, died young. h. Etta Pearl Harris, b. 20 Feb 1882 i. Aubrey R. Harris, b. 4 Nov 1883 j. Susan M. Harris, b. 29 Aug 1887; died 17 Sep 1907.

k.

(83a) Silas Edwin

-

born 25 Sep 1846; died at Rockport, MO., 2 Mar 1926; m. Mollie Rhoads of Saline Co. MO. ********** SIXTH GENERATION

LILBURN DABNEY MAUPIN (83) Son of Nimrod (47), grandson of Daniel (19), of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 ). Lilburn Maupin was born 8 Sep 1833, near Holiday, in Monroe County, MO; died 3 Jun 1905, at Renick, MO. He and his wife are buried at Holiday. He was the eldest child of Nimrod Maupin and was born soon after the arrival of his parents in Monroe County, which at that date was just being settled and was the frontier in Northeast Missouri. His wife was Elizabeth Moore, daughter of Austin Moore of Monroe County. The children of Lilburn D. Maupin were as follows: born in 1860. Lived near Sedalia, MO and later in California. Had a daughter, Mary Elizabeth. Susan Kathryn married John Hamilton and died at Huntsville, MO, in 1920. They had no children. married M. H. Morris, Sedalia, MO. Nannie W. born 8 Oct 1865, near Madison, MO; married Lulu *Robert E. E. Grant of Renick, MO. Their children were: a. Lucille, wife of 0. F. Gurthet of Tulsa, OK. b. Goldena R., wife of T. L. Smart of Pattonsburg, MO. c. Robert G., formerly with Savings Bank, Pattonsburg. d. Curtman, lives at Pattonsburg, MO. He had one daughter, Shirley Ann Maupin. e. Ellen K., attending Christian College, 1924.

Joseph E. Minnie Lillie Dollie

unmarried, lived at Sedalia, MO. married T. A. Mitchell, Lamonte, MO. married A. B. Armstrong, Wartrace, TX. married Dr. Walter Austin, Huntsville, MO.

*Note: A fine biography and picture of Robert E. Maupin in "History of Northwest Missouri:, pgs 1159-60. SILAS EDWIN MAUPIN (83a) Son of Nimrod (47), grandson of Daniel 919), of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 ). Silas Edwin Maupin was born 25 Sep 1846, and died at Rockport, MO, 2 Mar 1926. He was a member of Company A, 9th Missouri Infantry, C.S.A., and surrendered 26 May 1865 at Alexandria, LA. He was paroled 7 Jun 1865. His wife was Mollie Rhoads of Saline County, MO, and their marriage their took place 19 Mar 1879. The children of Silas Edwin Maupin were: Lloyd L. Nellie c. Osa M. Orlin B. Lillie A. Edwin C. Robert. P. Joseph C. Leta B. Forrest E. Mary 0. Lura L.

born born born born born born born born born born born born

31 20 1 3 24 1 17 3 30 11 27 7

Dec 1870 Oct 1881 Jul 1884 Nov 1885 Mar 1887 Mar 1889 Feb 1891 Apr 1893 Jul 1896 Oct 1897 May 1900 Jut 1904

NOTE: Information concerning the family of Nimrod Maupin (47) and his children's families was furnished by Austin N. Maupin of Chula Vista, CA. He was formerly of Missouri and lived at Sedalia for some years prior to going to California.

Austin Nimrod

152

His daughter, Mary Elizabeth, graduated at the Sedalia High School in 1915. She later attended Park College and Missouri University and after graduation she taught English in Bushong High School, Kansas, for two years. She was instructor in English at the Teachers College, Emporia Kansas, 1921-1922, resigning to attend Columbia University at New York City, where she received her A.M. degree. After her work at Columbia, she was instructor in English classes at Skidmore College, N.Y., at State Teachers College at Warrensburg, MO and at Park College, Parksville, MO. ********************

153


b. c. d. e. f.

FIFTH GENERATION LILBURN G. MAUPIN (48) Son of Daniel (19), grandson of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1)

Lilburn G. Maupin was born in Albemarle Co. VA, about 1813 and died 19 Oct 1868, in Missouri, to which state he had emigrated along with his brother, Nimrod. His first wife was Elizabeth Kent and after her death he married, 17 Dec 1838, to Patsy Tilman, b. 10 Jul 1813, d. 28 Apr 1898. He had by his first wife Elizabeth: Sarah P.

William Daniel

Merritt Emma Jane Bettie Lulu Virginia

born 1847 SIXTH GENERATION

WILLIAM DANIEL MAUPIN Son of Merrit (49), grandson of Daniel (19), of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ).

b. 1837

The children of the second wife, Patsy (Martha) were: Willia Ann b. 1839, m. Sam Lowe of Maryland. Henry Harrison b. 1841. He lived in Monroe Co. MO, not far from Granville. He served in the Confederate army. Old Monroe County records give his name as owning land in the western part of Monroe. born 1843 Adeliza born 1845. His home was in Western Monroe. He Paul Daniel finally went to California. Preston born 1848 Martha Elizabeth Lilburn Gentry He, or his father, together with his wife, were the first members of the Methodist Church near Granville. Fanny Moss

******************** MERRITT MAUPIN (49) Son of Daniel (19), grandson of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel

William Daniel Maupin, b. 1847-d. 1927, son of Merritt (49); m. 9 Nov 1881, to Ella Frances Childress, b. 1857-d. 1897. It was first marriage recorded at Mt. Moriah Church, in Charlottesville, Albemarle Co. VA. Their children were Mary Ella, Verdie, Cornelia, Agnes, and William Daniel, Jr. 1. Mary Ella, 1882-1955, m. Miletus Jarman Bowen, 1874-1940, and had 9 children. a. Lee, married Mary Jones, 1 son Lenor. b. Earle, never married. c. William, never married. d. Katherine, married Robert Lyon, 1 son James. Frances, married Paul Wright, 4 children; Paul, Mary, e. Robert, & James. f. Cornelia, married Richard Smith, Jr., 1 son Richard III. g. Page, married Wilbur Sanders, no children. h. Agnes, married Wm. R. Johnson, 3 children 1. William Ray Johnson, m. Julie Bishop, had Laura. 2. Susan Page Johnson, m. John Blackman. 3. Robert Bowen Johnson i. Virginia, m. Ellis Cline, 3 Children; Mary, Ginny Lee, and Paul.

( 1).

Merritt Maupin son of "Saddler" Daniel Maupin was born 1814 in Albemarle County and lived there all of his life. His farm was a part of the old Maupin land grant and is still in his family. He married 16 Dec 1839, to Mary Maupin, daughter of William Maupin (21) and Jane Jameson, his wife. The children of Merritt and Mary Maupin were: Cornelia J.

born 1843; m. 6 Jul 1864, to William B. Railey, son of Lilburn Railey and Lucy Burks. Their children were: a. Linwood

154

2. William Daniel, Jr. m. Grace Ellison Clark in Dec 1924. They had 2 sons: a. William Daniel Maupin, III (called Dan by everyone) m. Bettie Carol Chapman, no children. b. James Merritt Maupin, m. Diane Mighels, 3 Children: James Merritt, Jr., Daniel Francis, and Jennie Lynn. After James and Diane divorced he m. Sara Mullooly of Weston, W. VA and had a son Joseph Michael. James Merritt Maupin, d. 1 Nov 1987. "Dan" and Bettie live next to their two nephews James Merritt, Jr. and Daniel, on the "Maupin's Apple Orchard Farm". Quoting from one of Dan's letters. "We think that we

155


b. c. d. e. f.

FIFTH GENERATION LILBURN G. MAUPIN (48) Son of Daniel (19), grandson of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1)

Lilburn G. Maupin was born in Albemarle Co. VA, about 1813 and died 19 Oct 1868, in Missouri, to which state he had emigrated along with his brother, Nimrod. His first wife was Elizabeth Kent and after her death he married, 17 Dec 1838, to Patsy Tilman, b. 10 Jut 1813, d. 28 Apr 1898. He had by his first wife Elizabeth: Sarah P.

William Daniel

Merritt Emma Jane Bettie Lulu Virginia

born 1847 SIXTH GENERATION

WILLIAM DANIEL MAUPIN Son of Merrit (49), grandson of Daniel (19), of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ).

b. 1837

The children of the second wife, Patsy (Martha) were: Willia Ann b. 1839, m. Sam Lowe of Maryland. Henry Harrison b. 1841. He lived in Monroe Co. MO, not far from Granville. He served in the Confederate army. Old Monroe County records give his name as owning land in the western part of Monroe. born 1843 Adeliza born 1845. His home was in Western Monroe. He Paul Daniel finally went to California. Preston born 1848 Martha Elizabeth Lilburn Gentry He, or his father, together with his wife, were the first members of the Methodist Church near Granville. Fanny Moss

******************** MERRITT MAUPIN (49) Son of Daniel (19), grandson of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel

William Daniel Maupin, b. 1847-d. 1927, son of Merritt (49); m. 9 Nov 1881, to Ella Frances Childress, b. 1857-d. 1897. It was first marriage recorded at Mt. Moriah Church, in Charlottesville, Albemarle Co. VA. Their children were Mary Ella, Verdie, Cornelia, Agnes, and William Daniel, Jr. 1. Mary Ella, 1882-1955, m. Miletus Jarman Bowen, 1874-1940, and had 9 children. a. Lee, married Mary Jones, 1 son Lenor. b. Earle, never married. c. William, never married. d. Katherine, married Robert Lyon, 1 son James. Frances, married Paul Wright, 4 children; Paul, Mary, e. Robert, & James. f. Cornelia, married Richard Smith, Jr., 1 son Richard III. g. Page, married Wilbur Sanders, no children. h. Agnes, married Wm. R. Johnson, 3 children 1. William Ray Johnson, m. Julie Bishop, had Laura. 2. Susan Page Johnson, m. John Blackman. 3. Robert Bowen Johnson i. Virginia, m. Ellis Cline, 3 Children; Mary, Ginny Lee, and Paul.

(1).

Merritt Maupin son of "Saddler" Daniel Maupin was born 1814 in Albemarle County and lived there all of his life. His farm was a part of the old Maupin land grant and is still in his family. He married 16 Dec 1839, to Mary Maupin, daughter of William Maupin (21) and Jane Jameson, his wife. The children of Merritt and Mary Maupin were: Cornelia J.

born 1843; m. 6 Jul 1864, to William B. Railey, son of Lilburn Railey and Lucy Burks. Their children were: a. Linwood

154

2. William Daniel, Jr. m. Grace Ellison Clark in Dec 1924. They had 2 sons: a. William Daniel Maupin, III (called Dan by everyone) m. Bettie Carol Chapman, no children. b. James Merritt Maupin, m. Diane Mighels, 3 Children: James Merritt, Jr., Daniel Francis, and Jennie Lynn. After James and Diane divorced hem. Sara Mullooly of Weston, W. VA and had a son Joseph Michael. James Merritt Maupin, d. 1 Nov 1987. "Dan" and Bettie live next to their two nephews James Merritt, Jr. and Daniel, on the "Maupin's Apple Orchard Farm". Quoting from one of Dan's letters. "We think that we

155


live where Daniel and Margaret, our ancestors, lived. A lot of old records were lost in a fire in Louisa County Court House, also during the Revolution. We know of the continual connection of the family and Mr. Moriah Church. There are some graves in the garden about 50 ft N.E. of the old house site. My brother's house was the second one on the same site the first being destroyed by fire. Foundation shows the old timbers. This could possibly be Daniel's home site. Merritt Maupin, my gr grandfather was the first person buried at Mt. Moriah cemetery. I have the land grant from King of England to Charles Moorman dated 1738. This is another indication that this was Daniel's home. This grant has been passed down generation to generation" (end of quote). ******************** FOURTH GENERATION CORNELIUS MAUPIN (20) Son of John (7), grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). Cornelius Maupin was born in Albemarle County VA, 3 Feb 1758 and died there 19 Dec 1840. He was a soldier in the American army during the Revolution, enlisting in August 1778, as a private in the company of Col. Robert Harris. In 1781, he reenlisted as a private in the company of Capt. Henry Burk, under Major Nicholas Lewis of Albemarle. He took part in the siege of Yorktown and his name Is on the pension list for his Revolutionary service under Pension file #7041. He was married four times. His first wife was Mourning Harris, daughter of James and Mary Harris of Albemarle. The latter was a daughter of Col. Robert Harris and Mourning Glenn (See Harris history). The second wife of Cornelius Maupin was Nancy Tomlin; the third, Mary Paul, and the fourth, Mary Ellis. His children by Mourning Harris were: Malinda *Bernard

b. 5 Aug 1781, d. 1 Sep 1810; m, 22 May 1805 to John Ellis. b. 1 Jun 1782, d. 11 Feb 1861; m. 13 Dec 1806 to Betsy Harris. Their children: *a. Amanda, b. 1809, d. 12 Mar 1893; m. 22 Mar 1830 to David Clarke. *b. Silas Bernard, b. 13 Jun 1815; m. 1st, 5 Dec 1835 to Mary Jane Norris, m. 2nd, 24 Apr 1864 to Sarah James. c. Susan Elizabeth, twin of Silas, b. 13 Jun 1815; m. Nimrod Maupin (47). d. Charles D., b. in AI bemarle, 13 Oct 1819 and died in Montgomery Co. MO, 5 Nov 1895. He

156

married 20 Oct 1848, to Virginia D. Harris, b. 4 Jun 1820 in Albemarle Co. VA, daughter of William Harris. Virginia d. 23 Jan 1892. They are both buried in Bethel Cemetery, close to Wellsville, Montgomery Co. MO. Children: 1. William Maupin, b. 2 Feb 1852, d. 2 Sep 1911; m. Julie F. Harrison, both buried at Bethel Cemetery along with their children. A. Harry L. Maupin, born 31 Dec 1887, d. 30 Sep 1909. B. Mary Davis Maupin, 1880-1916. 2. Oswin H. Maupin, 1857-1924; m. Mary Elizabeth Minter, 1870-1918. 2 children died in infancy. 3. Dorthula H. Maupin, 1849-1897; m. George Walker. Their children: A. Ira W. Walker 1877-1897 B. Doren G. Walker 1879-1902 C. Emmett Walker D. Martha E. Walker, married Will Walker. (50) Charles Wesley married Mary Harrison *Rebecca married William Jameson Issue of second wife of Cornelius Maupin, Nancy Tomlin: *Nancy T.

married 13 Dec 1820, to David Wiant. Mrs. Wiant furnished the data for much of the history of Cornelius Maupin (20).

Child of the third wife, Mary Paul, was: *Cornelius Dabney or (Dabney Cornelius) married Rebecca Johnson, Children: a. James Thomas, m. Sarah Oder. They had William J., Stuart Ashby and other children. b. Jane, b. 1840. Cornelius Maupin married fourth on 28 Jun 1829 to Mary Ellis. No children. Continuing the Descendants of Cornelius (20). Bernard Maupin, son of Cornelius and Mourning Harris Maupin, b. 1 Jun 1783 in Albemarle Co. VA, d. 11 Feb 1861, in Montgomery Co. MO. He is buried there on the farm of his son Charles and his wife Virginia Harris. There is a large tombstone at his grave giving his dates. Bernard m. 13 Dec 1806 to Betsy Harris, daughter of Thomas Harris and Susan Dabney Harris. He had come with his two sons, Charles and Silas Bernard with their

157


live where Daniel and Margaret, our ancestors, lived. A lot of old records were lost in a fire In Louisa County COurt House, also during the Revolution. We know of the continual connection of the family and Mr. Moriah Church. There are some graves in the garden about 50ft N.E. of the old house site. My brother's house was the second one on the same site the first being destroyed by fire. Foundation shows the old timbers. This could possibly be Daniel's home site. Merritt Maupin, my gr grandfather was the first person buried at Mt. Moriah cemetery. I have the land grant from King of England to Charles Moorman dated 1738. This is another indication that this was Daniel's home. This grant has been passed down generation to generation" (end of quote). ******************** FOURTH GENERATION CORNELIUS MAUPIN (20) Son of John (7), grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). Cornelius Maupin was born in Albemarle County VA, 3 Feb 1758 and died there 19 Dec 1840. He was a soldier in the American army during the Revolution, enlisting in August 1778, as a private in the company of Col. Robert Harris. In 1781, he reenlisted as a private in the company of Capt. Henry Burk, under Major Nicholas Lewis of Albemarle. He took part in the siege of Yorktown and his name is on the pension list for his Revolutionary service under Pension file 17041. He was married four times. His first wife was Mourning Harris, daughter of James and Mary Harris of Albemarle. The latter was a daughter of Col. Robert Harris and Mourning Glenn (See Harris history). The second wife of Cornelius Maupin was Nancy Tomlin; the third, Mary Paul, and the fourth, Mary Ellis. His children by Mourning Harris were: Malinda *Bernard

b. 5 Aug 1781, d. 1 Sep 1810; m, 22 May 1805 to John Ellis. b. 1 Jun 1782, d. 11 Feb 1861; m. 13 Dec 1806 to Betsy Harris. Their children: *a. Amanda, b. 1809, d. 12 Mar 1893; m. 22 Mar 1830 to David Clarke. *b. Silas Bernard, b. 13 Jun 1815; m. 1st, 5 Dec 1835 to Mary Jane Norris, m. 2nd, 24 Apr 1864 to Sarah James. c. Susan Elizabeth, twin of Silas, b. 13 Jun 1815; m. Nimrod Maupin (47). d. Charles D., b. in AI bemarle, 13 Oct 1819 and died in Montgomery Co. MO, 5 Nov 1895. He

156

married 20 Oct 1848, to Virginia D. Harris, b. 4 Juh 1820 in Albemarle Co. VA, daughter of William Harris. Virginia d. 23 Jan 1892. They are both buried in Bethel Cemetery, close to Wellsville, Montgomery Co. MO. Children: 1. William Maupin, b. 2 Feb 1852, d. 2 Sep 1911; m. Julie F. Harrison, both buried at Bethel Cemetery along with their children. A. Harry L. Maupin, born 31 Dec 1887, d. 30 Sep 1909. B. Mary Davis Maupin, 1880-1916. 2. Oswin H. Maupin, 1857-1924; m. Mary Elizabeth Minter, 1870-1918. 2 children died in infancy. 3. Dorthula H. Maupin, 1849-1897; m. George Walker. Their children: A. Ira W. Walker 1877-1897 B. Doren G. Walker 1879-1902 C. Emmett Walker D. Martha E. Walker, married Wi II Walker. (60) Charles Wesley married Mary Harrison *Rebecca married William Jameson lasue of second wife of Cornelius Maupin, Nancy Tomlin: *Nancy T.

married 13 Dec 1820, to David Wiant. Mrs. Wiant furnished the data for much of the history of Cornelius Maupin (20).

Child of the third wife, Mary Paul, was: *Cornelius Dabney or (Dabney Cornelius) married Rebecca Johnson, Children: a. James Thomas, m. Sarah Oder. They had William J., Stuart Ashby and other children. b. Jane, b. 1840. Cornelius Maupin married fourth on 28 Jun 1829 to Mary Ellis. No children. Continuing the Descendants of Cornelius (20). Bernard Maupin, son of Cornelius and Mourning Harris Maupin,

b. 1 Jun 1783 in Albemarle Co. VA, d. 11 Feb 1861, in Montgomery Co. MO. He is buried there on the farm of his son Charles and his wife Virginia Harris. There is a large tombstone at his grave giving his dates. Bernard m. 13 Dec 1806 to Betsy Harris, daughter of Thomas Harris and Susan Dabney Harris. He had come with his two sons, Charles and Silas Bernard with their

157


fami I ies to Montgomery Co. MO in 1852. Betsy was deceased by 1860 because in the 1860 Montgomery Co. MO census, Bernard is recorded as living with son Charles, being 77 years of age along with Virginia's father, William Harris, 78 years of age. Descendants of Bernard and Betsy Harris Maupin: 1. Amanda Dabney Maupin, b. 1809, d. 12 Mar 1893; m. 22 Mar 1830 to David H. Clarke, who d. 18 Feb 1885. Their chi I d ren: a. Virginia Ann Susan Clarke, b. 30 Sep 1835, d. 29 Sep 1884; m. 22 Dec 1859 to Felix C. Moore, son of Charles & Ann Carter Moore. Grandson of Edward and Mildred Lewis Moore, gr grandson of Col. Charles Lewis and Mary Randolph. Their issue with dates from a certified copy of the Moore Bible. a1. Sallie Kate Moore, b. 6 Oct 1860, d. 23 Feb 1895; m. Rufus King. a2. Charles William Edward Moore, b. 25 Mar 1866; m. Nannie Shackelford. a3. Howard Felix Moore, b. 21 Jun 1873; m. Acton Nelson Shackelford. a4. Amanda Li IIi an Moore, b. 19 Mar 1875; m. Rufus King, her sister Kate's widower. a5. Mary Grace Moore, b. 26 Jan 1877.

*

a3.

Howard Felix Moore, m. Acton Nelson Shackelford. Their Children: 1. Phyllis Shackelford Moore, m. (1) Henry Lamar, (2) Bernard John Gallagher. Their issue, Bernard John Gallagher, Jr. who m. Emma Wi I helmi na Eschauzier, their daughter was Sarah Joan. 2. Rear Admiral Howard Shackelford Moore, m. Patricia Timby. Their children: a. Valeria Moore; m. Lee Manning. Their chi I d ren, AI icia and Scott b. Nancy Wingfield Moore; m. Paul Baglien, their son, Cory Shackelford Moore Baglien. Phyllis, m. 3rd, Brig. Gen. Frank Dorn.

One of the many rewarding aspects of genealogy and family history are the wonderful people we meet with the trips and experiences that go with it. Such as it was for me with Phyllis. In Apr 1977, I received a letter from a Mrs Phyllis Dorn in Washington, D.C. She had a copy of my D.A.R. papers that read I was a descendant of Bernard Maupin, son of Cornelius. She explained she was from that I i ne and wanted to do a book on our family but could not find Bernard's family other than Amanda. We talked by phone and I was

158

invited to visit her on my next trip to Washington, D.C., which was in a few weeks. This I did especially since she told me she had inherited and had in their home a Gilbert Stuart portrait of our common ancestor, John Maupin, father of Cornelius. They had lived for 28 years at 2517 Massachusetts Ave, N.W., Washington, D.C. That is "Embassy Row". Their home, filled with antiques, was so warm and friendly, and I was overjoyed to see the picture. No doubt it is a Gi I bert Stuart. We know as an artist, especial! y in the beginning, Stuart traveled the countryside painting. It had a small burn blemish, she said was from during the Civil War. Phyllis and Gen. Dorn spent half their time in California. We continued to write and again the next April, 1978, I visited in her home again. Later in 1978 when my letters were not answered, I supposed they were in California. In Feb 1979 a letter came from Gen. Dorn, telling me Phyllis had died in late 1978 and 3 weeks after her death, her son was killed and he himself had just returned from the hospital for cancer surgery. Gen. Dorn was a writer as well as Phyllis, who was novelist, painter, and pianist of note. In his last letter Gen. Dorn, said he was moving to California as soon as he was well enough. Which brings me back to the Gilbert Stuart portrait of our ancestor. What became of it? When he wrote about the problems of estate settlement, I asked about the picture as tactfully as possible, but did not receive an answer. I have a "picture of the picture" - it shows a gentleman with white hair, brown eyes, nice shirt, a fine looking face and I believe her when she said it was our John. I would I ike for it to be found and would like any help or ideas from other interested descendants to accomplish the task. 2.

Silas Bernard Maupin, b. 13 Jun 1815, in Albemarle Co. VA, d. 1 Apr 1873, at Mooresville, Livingston Co. MO; m. 1st on 5 Dec 1835 in Virginia to Mary Jane Norris. They came to Montgomery Co. MO in 1852. Their children: a. Bernard Thomas Maupin, b. 5 Aug 1838, d. 1 Sep 1911; m. Rozella Mannen, b. 14 Jun 1839, d. 1 Jun 1924. They had 8 children, one known is Ira Thomas Maupin who married Mollie Odessa Nelson. Their son, Ira Twist Maupin, b. 3 May 1906, Mar 1955. His son Ira "Tim" Maupin, b. 6 Jun 1937; m. 27 Jul 1963 to Judy Ann Bauerle, b. 27 Oct 1941. Their children: 1. Susan Anne Maupin, b. 13 May 1964 2. Jacqueline Anne Maupin, b. 6 Jul 1968 3. Michael Timothy Maupin, b. 25 Mar 1971.

d:

159

1 I

I


families to Montgomery Co. MO in 1852. Betsy was deceased by 1860 because in the 1860 Montgomery Co. MO census, Bernard is recorded as living with son Charles, being 77 years of age along with Virginia's father, William Harris, 78 years of age. Descendants of Bernard and Betsy Harris Maupin: 1. Amanda Dabney Maupin, b. 1809, d. 12 Mar 1893; m. 22 Mar 1830 to David H. Clarke, who d. 18 Feb 1885. Their children: a. Virginia Ann Susan Clarke, b. 30 Sep 1835, d. 29 Sep 1884; m. 22 Dec 1859 to Felix C. Moore, son of Charles & Ann Carter Moore. Grandson of Edward and Mildred Lewis Moore, gr grandson of Col. Charles Lewis and Mary Randolph. Their issue with dates from a certified copy of the Moore Bible. a1. Sallie Kate Moore, b. 6 Oct 1860, d. 23 Feb 1895; m. Rufus King. a2. Charles William Edward Moore, b. 25 Mar 1866; m. Nannie Shackelford. a3. Howard Felix Moore, b. 21 Jun 1873; m. Acton Nelson Shackelford. a4. Amanda Lillian Moore, b. 19 Mar 1875; m. Rufus King, her sister Kate's widower. a5. Mary Grace Moore, b. 26 Jan 1877.

*

a3.

Howard Felix Moore, m. Acton Nelson Shackelford. Their Children: 1. Phyllis Shackelford Moore, m. ( 1) Henry Lamar, (2) Bernard John Gallagher. Their issue, Bernard John Gallagher, Jr. who m. Emma Wilhelmina Eschauzier, their daughter was Sarah Joan. 2. Rear Admiral Howard Shackelford Moore, m. Patricia Timby. Their children: a. Valeria Moore; m. Lee Manning. Their children, Alicia and Scott b. Nancy Wingfield Moore; m. Paul Baglien, their son, Cory Shackelford Moore Baglien. Phyllis, m. 3rd, Brig. Gen. Frank Dorn.

One of the many rewarding aspects of genealogy and family history are the wonderful people we meet with the trips and experiences that go with it. Such as it was for me with Phyllis. In Apr 1977, I received a letter from a Mrs Phyllis Dorn in Washington, D.C. She had a copy of my D.A.R. papers that read I was a descendant of Bernard Maupin, son of Cornelius. She explained she was from that line and wanted to do a book on our family but could not find Bernard's family other than Amanda. We talked by phone and I was

158

invited to visit her on my next trip to Washington, D.C., which was in a few weeks. This I did especially since she told me she had inherited and had in their home a Gilbert Stuart portrait of our common ancestor, John Maupin, father of Cornelius. They had lived for 28 years at 2517 Massachusetts Ave, N.W., Washington, D.C. That is "Embassy Row". Their home, filled with antiques, was so warm and friendly, and I was overjoyed to see the picture. No doubt it is a Gilbert Stuart. We know as an artist, especially in the beginning, Stuart traveled the countryside painting. It had a small burn blemish, she said was from during the Civil War. Phyllis and Gen. Dorn spent half their time in California. We continued to write and again the next April, 1978, I visited in her home again. Later in 1978 when my letters were not answered, I supposed they were in California. In Feb 1979 a letter came from Gen. Dorn, telling me Phyllis had died in late 1978 and 3 weeks after her death, her son was killed and he himself had just returned from the hospital for cancer surgery. Gen. Dorn was a writer as well as Phyllis, who was novelist, painter, and pianist of note. In his last letter Gen. Dorn, said he was moving to California as soon as he was well enough. Which brings me back to the Gilbert Stuart portrait of our ancestor. What became of it? When he wrote about the problems of estate settlement, I asked about the picture as tactfully as possible, but did not receive an answer. I have a "picture of the picture" - it shows a gentleman with white hair, brown eyes, nice shirt, a fine looking face and I believe her when she said it was our John. I would like for it to be found and would like any help or ideas from other interested descendants to accomplish the task. 2.

Silas Bernard Maupin, b. 13 Jun 1815, in Albemarle Co. VA, d. 1 Apr 1873, at Mooresville, Livingston Co. MO; m. 1st on 5 Dec 1835 in Virginia to Mary Jane Norris. They came to Montgomery Co. MO in 1852. Their children: a. Bernard Thomas Maupin, b. 5 Aug 1838, d. 1 Sep 1911; m. Rozella Mannen, b. 14 Jun 1839, d. 1 Jun 1924. They had 8 children, one known is Ira Thomas Maupin who married Mollie Odessa Nelson. Their son, Ira Twist Maupin, b. 3 May 1906, d: Mar 1955. His son Ira "Tim" Maupin, b. 6 Jun 1937; m. 27 Jul 1963 to Judy Ann Bauerle, b. 27 Oct 1941. Their children: 1. Susan Anne Maupin, b. 13 May 1964 2. Jacqueline Anne Maupin, b. 6 Jul 1968 3. Michael Timothy Maupin, b. 25 Mar 1971.

159


b.

c. d.

William Dabney Maupin, son of Bernard Thomas and Rozella Maupin, b. 6 Jun 1840; m. Dec 1870 to Nancy A. Cochran of St. Charles Co. MO. One daughter, Effie. John W. Maupin, b. 1844 James Maupin, b. 1847

Silas Bernard Maupin, m. 2nd 24 Apr 1864, to Sarah James, daughter of Charles and Mary James. Sarah was born 21 Feb 1832 in Glostershire, England, and came to America with her parents in 1852 to the St. Charles, MO area. She died 28 Jul 1916 at the home of her daughter, Mary Maupin Blackshaw in Wellsville, Montgomery Co. MO and is buried in the Wellsville cemetery. As Silas Bernard Maupin is my grandfather, I would like to add some personal thoughts and observations. This is something I would like to have done for many of the persons on these many pages of names and dates but for several reasons am unable to do so. I encourage all who can to make your own family book and put down your feelings and beliefs so that those coming after you will know something more about you than names and dates. My father, Charles Edward, was born when his father Silas was past fifty years of age, the same for myself, being the last of eight, I was born when my father Charles was past fifty. I was six years old when he died. Life was very hard for my father and my grandmother, having two small children in those early days. So my father and I grew up not knowing our fathers. But in small ways we have remembrances. For my grandfather, Silas, it is his obituary. It tells me a lot about him so will share it here. Also in his books. I have one of Silas's Bibles, dated 1835, a book of John Wesley's sermons dated 1835 - these are good sized books. Also a small book of devotional poems mostly by Charles Wesley and Isaac Watts. Silas wrote his name in the front with the date 10 January 1864. What the date means I do not know but it meant something to him. We know as Maupins that we have a Huguenot background - a strong Protestant heritage and it has come down to us to create a loving family of brothers and sisters cared for and nurtured by our wonderful mother, Katie, and a father who loved us all. They were not able to provide us with the material things of life but the most important ingredient in our lives was there, LOVE and caring for one another.

OBITUARY - ST. LOUIS CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE - 30 APRIL 1873 MAUPIN: Died, in Mooresville, Livingston County, Missouri, April 1, 1873, Silas Bernard Maupin. Brother Maupin was born in Albemarle County, Va. June 13, 1815: Professed religion Sept. 3, 1834, while kneeling at the Alter of Prayer side by side with Bro. John W. Ellis, well known to the Missouri Conference. The writer has met often with Bro. Maupin in class meeting, and heard him relate the circumstances attending his conversion. He never doubted the work God wrought in him by his Holy Spirit. He held some official position in the Church from his con version till his death. He was licensed an exhorter in 1852, which sacred trust he kept with fidelity to the church -a work in which he seemed to delight. Brother Maupin was called upon to endure great suffering for nearly a year before his death. On the 25th day of May, 1872, he was stricken down by paralysis, from which his death resulted as above stated. Yet he never complained, was always cheerful, bore his sufferings with humble, Christian resignation. I shall never forget the happy look and sweet smile that played upon his countenance when I stood by his bedside and heard him tell with rapturous delight of that good country over younder, of which he would soon be an inhabitant. When I first approached him, he reached out his hand and said "Brother Rooker, have you come at last. I have been waiting to see you and tell you about that good country." Said he, "I have just been lying here and looking over there. It is a better country than this, there is no mistake about it." Said I, "Brother Maupin you are satisfied religion is true and not a failure.". Said he with calm composure, enjoyed only by a child of God, "I have been satisfied of that since my conversion. I have feared only this, that when I shall step into the turbid water and grapple with death, my faith might fail me." But, said he, "I have this conscious realization as death approached, my faith increases and Jesus who has been with me through all the storms of life, will not forsake me in death." He requested that the writer preach his funeral from this scripture, "Set thine house in order, for thou shalt die and not live." He leaves a loving family (wife and children) to mourn their loss, which is his eternal gain. May we all live right and die right, and meet Brother Maupin and all the redeemed of God in a land that is better than this. John S. Rooker (Richmond, Virginia papers please copy)

**********

160

161


b.

c. d.

William Dabney Maupin, son of Bernard Thomas and Rozella Maupin, b. 6 Jun 1840; m. Dec 1870 to Nancy A. Cochran of St. Charles Co. MO. One daughter, Effie. John w. Maupin, b. 1844 James Maupin, b. 1847

Silas Bernard Maupin, m. 2nd 24 Apr 1864, to Sarah James, daughter of Charles and Mary James. Sarah was born 21 Feb 1832 in Glostershire, England, and came to America with her parents in 1852 to the St. Charles, MO area. She died 28 Jul 1916 at the home of her daughter, Mary Maupin Blackshaw in Wellsville, Montgomery Co. MO and is buried in the Wellsville cemetery. As Silas Bernard Maupin is my grandfather, I would like to add some personal thoughts and observations. This is something I would like to have done for many of the persons on these many pages of names and dates but for several reasons am unable to do so. I encourage all who can to make your own family book and put down your feelings and beliefs so that those coming after you will know something more about you than names and dates. My father, Charles Edward, was born when his father Silas was past fifty years of age, the same for myself, being the last of eight, I was born when my father Charles was past fifty. I was six years old when he died. Life was very hard for my father and my grandmother, having two small children in those early days. So my father and I grew up not knowing our fathers. But in small ways we have remembrances. For my grandfather, Silas, it is his obituary. It tells me a lot about him so will share it here. Also in his books. I have one of Silas's Bibles, dated 1835, a book of John Wesley's sermons dated 1835 - these are good sized books. Also a small book of devotional poems mostly by Charles Wesley and Isaac Watts. Silas wrote his name in the front with the date 10 January 1864. What the date means I do not know but it meant something to him. We know as Maupins that we have a Huguenot background - a strong Protestant heritage and it has come down to us to create a loving family of brothers and sisters cared for and nurtured by our wonderful mother, Katie, and a father who loved us all. They were not able to provide us with the material things of life but the most important ingredient in our lives was there, LOVE and caring for one another.

OBITUARY - ST. LOUIS CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE - 30 APRIL 1873 MAUPIN: Died, in Mooresville, Livingston County, Missouri, April 1, 1873, Silas Bernard Maupin. Brother Maupin was born in Albemarle County, Va. June 13, 1815: Professed religion Sept. 3, 1834, while kneeling at the Alter of Prayer side by side with Bro. John W. Ellis, well known to the Missouri Conference. The writer has met often with Bro. Maupin in class meeting, and heard him relate the circumstances attending his conversion. He never doubted the work God wrought in him by his Holy Spirit. He held some official position in the Church from his conversion till his death. He was licensed an exhorter in 1852, which sacred trust he kept with fidelity to the church -a work in which he seemed to delight. Brother Maupin was called upon to endure great suffering for nearly a year before his death. On the 25th day of May, 1872, he was stricken down by paralysis, from which his death resulted as above stated. Yet he never complained, was always cheerful, bore his sufferings with humble, Christian resignation. I shall never forget the happy look and sweet smile that played upon his countenance when I stood by his bedside and heard him tell with rapturous delight of that good country over younder, of which he would soon be an inhabitant. When I first approached him, he reached out his hand and said "Brother Rooker, have you come at last. I have been waiting to see you and tell you about that good country." Said he, "I have just been lying here and looking over there. It is. a better country than this, there is no mistake about it." Said I, "Brother Maupin you are satisfied religion is true and not a failure.". Said he with calm composure, enjoyed only by a child of God, "I have been satisfied of that since my conversion. I have feared only this, that when I shall step into the turbid water and grapple with death, my faith might fail me." But, said he, "I have this conscious realization as death approached, my faith increases and Jesus who has been with me through all the storms of life, will not forsake me in death." He requested that the writer preach his funeral from this scripture, "Set thine house in order, for thou shalt die and not live." He leaves a loving family (wife and children) to mourn their loss, which is his eternal gain. May we all live right and die right, and meet Brother Maupin and all the redeemed of God in a land that is better than this. John s. Rooker (Richmond, Virginia papers please copy)

********** 161 160


a.

Children of Silas Bernard Maupin and Sarah James. A. CHARLES EDWARD MAUPIN, son of Silas Bernard and Sarah James Maupin was born 6 July 1865, in St. Charles, MO; d. 17 Jan 1923, in Kansas City, KS; m. 24 May 1894, to Katie Lutz, b. 10 Jan 1880, in Cincinnati, OH, d. 16 Mar 1954, in Kansas City, KS. Their children: 1.

Bertha Elizabeth Maupin, b. 26 Jul 1895, in Kansas City, KS, d. 8 Dec 1981, in San Diego, CA; m. 16 Nov 1915, to James William Smith. Two children: ~~n~yj_ey~ .ยงmii.t:l, b. 12 Dec 1917; m. 11 Oct 1957 to Benjamin Womble. He died 29 Jan 1985, and QtJ_qrj~_IJ.EL~mith, b. 1919, d. 1921. After divorce in 1928, Bertha married 7 Mar 1942, to Roy B. Smith. He d. 25 Jun 1982. Both buried in Kansas City, KS.

2.

Charles Dewey Maupin, b. 3 Feb 1898, d. 23 Oct 1965 in Kansas City, KS, burial in Mt. Muncie Cemetery, Leavenworth, KS; m. 1928 to Helen Wentzel, b. 4 Nov 1904, d. 22 Sep 1988, in Kansas City, KS. One son: a. Donald Maupin, b. 17 Mar 1934, d. 19 Sep 1989; married 15 Jun 1958 to Leanne Munday. a1. Laura Ann Maupin, b. 31 Jun 1962; m. 5 Jun 1982 to Kevin Karel. a2. Jean Ann Maupin, b. 19 Nov 1964. a3. Jacqueline Maupin, b. 196-.

3.

Leslie Silas Maupin, b. 4 Sep 1900, in Kansas, d. 26 Jan 1968, in San Diego, CA; buried in Kansas City, KS; m. in Independence, MO, 17 Mar 1917, to Daisy Marie Hawkins, b. 29 Nov 1899, d. 20 Jan 1970, in California. Their son: a. Elmer Leslie Maupin, b. 18 Sep 1920, in Missouri, d. 12 Mar 1974, in California; m. 5 Mar 1946, to Naomi Marie Schultheis in California. Their children: a. Edward Leslie Maupin; m. Beverly Shaw; had Melissa and Michelle. b. Mary Elizabeth Maupin, b. 26 Sep 1951; m. Dave Alsworth. c. Clifford Elmer Maupin, b. 25 Jun 1957; m. 27 Feb 1982, to Michelle Polivka. Their children: c1. Steven, b. 26 Nov 1986 c2. Timothy, b. 23 Mar 1989. Leslie Maupin, m. 2nd in 1926 in Kansas to Rosalie Anderson Sewell, b. 4 Sep 1902, d. 31 Jul 1956, in California, buried in Kansas City, KS. Their child:

162

Delores Jean Maupin, b. 23 Aug 1930; m. 8 May 1948 to John Vincent. Their children: a1. Sandra Vincent, b. 11 Jun 1950; m. Michael Newsom. a2. Donald Wesley Vincent, b. 19 Aug 1953; m. Sandra VanCleve. a3. Ronald Leslie Vincent, b. 19 Aug 1953; m. Rhonda Jones. a4. John Vincent, b. 11 Mar 1952; m. Sally Azalia.

After his wife, Rosalie's death in 1956, Leslie married Dorothy Anderson.

4.

Robert William Maupin, b. 11 Aug 1903, in Jackson Co. MO, d. at his home in Basehor, KS, 25 Oct 1966. Buried in Chapel Hill Cemetery, Kansas City, KS; m. in 1926 to Ruby C. Young, b. 18 Jul 1903, d. 3 Feb 1989, buried beside her husband. Two daughters: a. Eleanor Maupin, b. Oct 1930, in Kansas City, KS; married 18 May 1951, to Wesley Masterson. Their son: a1. Michael Wesley Masterson, b. 8 Dec 1953; m. Edelma______ in Aruba, South America. They had twins, b. 11 Oct 1991, Fernando Wesley and Freddy Jesus.

b.

c.

Julia Mae Maupin, b. 25 Jan 1935 in Kansas City, KS; m. 18 Sep 1953 to Charles Edward Fouts in Rochport, France. Their children: b1. Carol Renee Fouts, b. 20 Jul 1954, in Kansas City, KS; m. 2 Nov 1974, to Richard Carmitchel. Their children: a. Nicholas Brett Carmitchel, b. 19 Jan 1980. b. Chad Jordan Carmitchel, b. 3 Apr 1982. c. Anthony Craig Carmitchel, b. 1 Sep 1983. b2. Step hen Charles Fouts, b. 24 Nov 1957, Kansas City, KS; m. 20 May 1978, to Martha Frances Fore. Their children: a. Jacob Charles Fouts, b. 15 Jul 1980. b. Travis Wayne Fouts, b. 18 Jun 1982. Susan Elaine Fouts, b. 2 Nov 1958, Kansas City, KS; m. 23 Jul 1977, to Dennis J. Kelly. Their children: c1. Kyle Scott Kelly, b. 1 Aug 1978. c2. Ryan Patrick Kelly, b. 30 Oct 1979. c3. Joseph Ross Kelly, b. 8 May 1988.

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a.

Children of Silas Bernard Maupin and Sarah James. A. CHARLES EDWARD MAUPIN, son of Silas Bernard and Sarah James Maupin was born 6 July 1865, in St. Charles, MO; d. 17 .Jan 1923, in Kansas City, KS; m. 24 May 1894, to Katie Lutz, b. 10 Jan 1880, in Cincinnati, OH, d. 16 Mar 1954, in Kansas City, KS. Their children: 1.

Bertha Elizabeth Maupin, b. 26 Jul 1895, in Kansas City, KS, d. 8 Dec 1981, in San Diego, CA; m. 16 Nov 1915, to James William Smith. Two children: (3en~vLeye ยงmi:tf}, b. 12 Dec 1917; m. 11 Oct 1957 to Benjamin Womble. He died 29 Jan 1985, and Gh<:irJen_~ ยงmith, b. 1919, d. 1921. After divorce in 1928, Bertha married 7 Mar 1942, to Roy B. Smith. He d. 25 Jun 1982. Both buried in Kansas City, KS.

2.

Charles Dewey Maupin, b. 3 Feb 1898, d. 23 Oct 1965 in Kansas City, KS, burial in Mt. Muncie Cemetery, Leavenworth, KS; m. 1928 to Helen Wentzel, b. 4 Nov 1904, d. 22 Sep 1988, in Kansas City, KS. One son: a. Donald Maupin, b. 17 Mar 1934, d. 19 Sep 1989; married 15 Jun 1958 to Leanne Munday. a1. Laura Ann Maupin, b. 31 Jun 1962; m. 5 Jun 1982 to Kevin Karel. a2. Jean Ann Maupin, b. 19 Nov 1964. a3. Jacqueline Maupin, b. 196-.

3.

Leslie Silas Maupin, b. 4 Sep 1900, in Kansas, d. 26 Jan 1968, in San Diego, CA; buried in Kansas City, KS; m. in Independence, MO, 17 Mar 1917, to Daisy Marie Hawkins, b. 29 Nov 1899, d. 20 Jan 1970, in California. Their son: a. Elmer Leslie Maupin, b. 18 Sep 1920, in Missouri, d. 12 Mar 1974, in California; m. 5 Mar 1946, to Naomi Marie Schultheis in California. Their children: a. Edward Leslie Maupin; m. Beverly Shaw; had Melissa and Michelle. b. Mary Elizabeth Maupin, b. 26 Sep 1951; m. Dave Alsworth. c. Clifford Elmer Maupin, b. 25 Jun 1957; m. 27 Feb 1982, to Michelle Polivka. Their children: c1. Steven, b. 26 Nov 1986 c2. Timothy, b. 23 Mar 1989. Leslie Maupin, m. 2nd in 1926 in Kansas to Rosalie Anderson Sewell, b. 4 Sep 1902, d. 31 Jul 1956, in California, buried in Kansas City, KS. Their child:

162

Delores Jean Maupin, b. 23 Aug 1930; m. 8 May 1948 to John Vincent. Their children: a1. Sandra Vincent, b. 11 Jun 1950; m. Michael Newsom. a2. Donald Wesley Vincent, b. 19 Aug 1953; m . Sandra VanCleve. a3. Ronald Leslie Vincent, b. 19 Aug 1953; m. Rhonda Jones. a4. John Vincent, b. 11 Mar 1952; m. Sail y Azalia.

After his wife, Rosalie's death in 1956, Leslie married Dorothy Anderson.

4.

Robert William Maupin, b. 11 Aug 1903, in Jackson Co. MO, d. at his home in Basehor, KS, 25 Oct 1966. Buried in Chapel Hill Cemetery, Kansas City, KS; m. in 1926 to Ruby C. Young, b. 18 Jul 1903, d. 3 Feb 1989, buried beside her husband. Two daughters: a. Eleanor Maupin, b. Oct 1930, in Kansas City, KS; married 18 May 1951, to Wesley Masterson. Their son: a1. Michael Wesley Masterson, b. 8 Dec 1953; m. Edelma ______ in Aruba, South America. They had twins, b. 11 Oct 1991, Fernando Wesley and Freddy Jesus.

b.

c.

Julia Mae Maupin, b. 25 Jan 1935 in Kansas City, KS; m. 18 Sep 1953 to Charles Edward Fouts in Rochport, France. Their children: b1. Carol Renee Fouts, b. 20 Jul 1954, in Kansas City, KS; m. 2 Nov 197 4, to Richard Carmitchel. Their children: a. Nicholas Brett Carmitchel, b. 19 Jan 1980. b. Chad Jordan Carmitchel, b. 3 Apr 1982. c. Anthony Craig Carmitchel, b. 1 Sep 1983. b2. Stephen Charles Fouts, b. 24 Nov 1957, Kansas City, KS; m. 20 May 1978, to Martha Frances Fore. Their children: a. Jacob Chari es Fouts, b. 15 J u I 1980. b. Travis Wayne Fouts, b. 18 Jun 1982. Susan Elaine Fouts, b. 2 Nov 1958, Kansas City, KS; m. 23 Jul 1977, to Dennis J. Kelly. Their children: c1. Kyle Scott Kelly, b. 1 Aug 1978. c2. Ryan Patrick Kelly, b. 30 Oct 1979. c3. Joseph Ross Kelly, b. 8 May 1988.

163

j


5.

6.

Walter Perry Maupin, b. 12 Aug 1905 in Jackson Co. MO; d. 27 Mar 1982 in Kansas City, KS; m. 12 Jun 1928 to Opal Southard, b. 17 Jun 1905. Now lives in Denver, CO, near her son: a. Bruce Allan Maupin, b. 5 Feb 1934, in Kansas City, KS; m. 30 Aug 1958, in Topeka, KS to Margaret J. Peach. Moved to Denver, CO. Their children: a1. Steven Bruce Maupin, b. 15 Oct 1961. a2. Sarah Katherine Maupin, b. 6 Oct 1964; m. 27 May 1989 to Scott A. Powers. Their child, Katherine Elizabeth Powers, b. 21 Aug 1991. Emma May Maupin, b. 29 Jul路1909, In Jackson Co. MO; m. in Kansas City, KS, 26 May 1928, to Walter Hellwig. He died 21 Dec 1988. Their son: a. Walter Keith Hellwig, b. 18 Dec 1930, in Kansas City, KS; m. 26 May 1951, in Colorado to Jeanette Newby, b. 7 Oct 1932. Their children: a1. Michelle Ann Hellwig, b. 26 Jul 1955, in Kansas City, KS; m. 19 Apr 1975, to David Riedesel. Their children all born in Kansas City, KS. a. Amy Elaine Riedesel, b. 21 Jun 1978. b. John David Riedesel, b. 6 Apr 1981. c. Jennifer Ann Riedesel, b. 29 Apr 1983. a2. Lisa Elaine Hellwig, b. 13 Jut 1957; m. 30 Dec 1977, to James Richard Swanson. Their children: a. Allan Swanson, b. 18 Jan 1981. b. Brad William Swanson, b. 20 Jun 1983. c. Kyle Swanson, b. 23 Jun 1987.

7.

Violet Lorraine Maupin, b. 5 May 1913, in Jackson Co. MO; m. 4 May 1943, to Ralph King. He died 7 Aug 1984, in Kansas City, KS. No children.

8.

Dorothy Aline Maupin, b. 2 Aug 1917, in Kansas City, KS; m. 13 Jun 1942, in Orlando, FL, to Lorenzo D. Shaffett, b. 10 Feb 1916, in Baton Rouge, LA. Their children: a. Donna Kay Shaffett, b. 3 Feb 1947, in Kansas City, KS; m. 26 Jun 1970, to Gerard Goodale. Their children: a1. Kathlene Elizabeth Goodale, b. 1 Feb 1979. a2. Rachael Aileen Goodale, b. 27 Jun 1981 a3. Sara Elizabeth Goodale, b. 27 Jun 1981. Lawrence Edward Shaffett, b. 26 Jut 1948, in b. Kansas City, KS; m. 18 Mar 1978, In Santa Barbara, CA, to Diane Jan. No children.

164

c.

Dennis James Shaffett, b. 7 May 1954, in Kansas City, KS; m. 30 Apr 1983, to Debra Joleen Garrett, b. 3 Dec 1954. No children.

B. Mary Elizabeth Maupin, dau. of Silas Bernard and Sarah James Maupin b. 28 Mar 1871, d.11 Oct 1954, Wellsville, MO; m. 3 Dec 1902, Robert D. Blackshaw. Their son: 1. Robert W. Blackshaw, b. 26 Sep 1903, Wellsville, MO; d. 14 Mar 1987, Lansing, MI; m. 17 Jun 1928, to Sophie A. Williams, b. 31 Oct 1903, d.30 Jun 1990. Their son: a. Robert E. Blackshaw, b. 19 Nov 1934; m. 13 Mar 1961, Lansing, MI, to Presteen Trentham. Issue: a1. Diane E. Blackshaw, b. 4 Jan 1962, m. 6 Jun 1981, Phillip McVaugh. Issue: Amanda P. b. 8 Mar 1987 and Ina Patrick, b. 15 Nov 1991. a2. Robert P. Blackshaw, b. 11 Apr 1964, m. 2 Dec 1989 Tanya Bryanton; Issue: Brittany Taylor, b. 11 Sep 1990 and Robert M. b. 18 Jan 1994. a3. Julia Ann Blackshaw, b. 14 Feb 1970. FIFTH GENERATION CHARLES WESLEY MAUPIN (50) Son of Cornelius (20), grandson of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel ( 1 ). Charles W. Maupin, was born in Albemarle County, VA, and died in Jefferson County, MO in 1842. He married 16 Sep 1811, to Mary Harrison, daughter of Richard Harrison and his wife, Mary, who it is thought was the daughter of Peter Clarkson. Richard Harrison came to Albemarle from Cumberland and bought lands near Whitehall. Charles Wesley Maupin moved from Albemarle County to St. Louis County, MO in 1826, settling south and west of St. Louis. In 1834, he moved to Jefferson County, MO and located six miles northeast of Hillsboro, where he remained until his death. Of hts children we have record only of the following: *Richard John W.

born 1822; lived at Hillsboro, MO; m. 30 Jun 1845 In Jefferson Co. MO. to Catherine Johnston. He had a large family. born in Albemarle County, 30 Oct 1817. He came with his father to the Missouri frontier in 1826 and had little chance for an education. He was self taught, learning to read, write and do arithmetic by the light from the old fireplace in his father's first log home. In 1843, He married Ann Byrnes and made his home near High Ridge but later moved to St. Louis County where he remained until 1860 when he located In Jefferson County. As his sympathies were with the

165


5.

6.

Walter Perry Maupin, b. 12 Aug 1905 in Jackson Co. MO; d. 27 Mar 1982 in Kansas City, KS; m. 12 Jun 1928 to Opal Southard, b. 17 Jun 1905. Now lives in Denver, co, near her son: a. Bruce Allan Maupin, b. 5 Feb 1934, in Kansas City, KS; m. 30 Aug 1958, in Topeka, KS to Margaret J. Peach. Moved to Denver, CO. Their children: a1. Steven Bruce Maupin, b. 15 Oct 1961. a2. Sarah Katherine Maupin, b. 6 Oct 1964; m. 27 May 1989 to Scott A. Powers. Their chi I d, Katherine Elizabeth Powers, b. 21 Aug 1991. Emma May Maupin, b. 29 Jul路1909, in Jackson Co. MO; m. in Kansas City, KS, 26 May 1928, to Walter Hellwig. He died 21 Dec 1988. Their son: a. Walter Keith Hellwig, b. 18 Dec 1930, in Kansas City, KS; m. 26 May 1951, in Colorado to Jeanette Newby, b. 7 Oct 1932. Their children: a1. Michelle Ann Hellwig, b. 26 Jul 1955, in Kansas City, KS; m. 19 Apr 1975, to David Riedesel. Their children all born in Kansas City, KS. a. Amy Elaine Riedesel, b. 21 Jun 1978. b. John David Riedesel, b. 6 Apr 1981. c. Jennifer Ann Riedesel, b. 29 Apr 1983. a2. Lisa Elaine Hellwig, b. 13 Jul 1957; m. 30 Dec 1977, to James Richard Swanson. Their children: a. Allan Swanson, b. 18 Jan 1981. b. Brad William Swanson, b. 20 Jun 1983. c. Kyle Swanson, b. 23 Jun 1987.

7.

Violet Lorraine Maupin, b. 5 May 1913, in Jackson Co. MO; m. 4 May 1943, to Ralph King. He died 7 Aug 1984, in Kansas City, KS. No children.

8.

Dorothy Aline Maupin, b. 2 Aug 1917, in Kansas City, KS; m. 13 Jun 1942, in Orlando, FL, to Lorenzo D. Shaffett, b. 10 Feb 1916, in Baton Rouge, LA. Their children: a. Donna Kay Shaffett, b. 3 Feb 1947, in Kansas City, KS; m. 26 Jun 1970, to Gerard Goodale. Their children: a1. Kathlene Elizabeth Goodale, b. 1 Feb 1979. a2. Rachael Aileen Goodale, b. 27 Jun 1981 a3. Sara Elizabeth Goodale, b. 27 Jun 1981. b. Lawrence Edward Shaffett, b. 26 Jul 1948, in Kansas City, KS; m. 18 Mar 1978, in Santa Barbara, CA, to Diane Jan. No children.

164

c.

Dennis James Shaffett, b. 7 May 1954, in Kansas City, KS; m. 30 Apr 1983, to Debra Joleen Garrett, b. 3 Dec 1954. No children.

B. Mary Elizabeth Maupin, dau. of Silas Bernard and Sarah James Maupin b. 28 Mar 1871, d. 11 Oct 1954, Wellsville, MO; m. 3 Dec 1902, Robert D. Blackshaw. Their son: 1. Robert W. Blackshaw, b. 26 Sep 1903, Wellsville, MO; d. 14 Mar 1987, Lansing, MI; m. 17 Jun 1928, to Sophie A. Williams, b. 31 Oct 1903, d.30 Jun 1990. Their son: a. Robert E. Blackshaw, b. 19 Nov 1934; m. 13 Mar 1961, Lansing, MI, to Presteen Trentham. Issue: a1. Diane E. Blackshaw, b. 4 Jan 1962, m. 6 Jun 1981, Phillip McVaugh. Issue: Amanda P. b. 8 Mar 1987 and Ina Patrick, b. 15 Nov 1991. a2. Robert P. Blackshaw, b. 11 Apr 1964, m. 2 Dec 1989 Tanya Bryanton; Issue: Brittany Taylor, b. 11 Sep 1990 and Robert M. b. 18 Jan 1994. a3. Julia Ann Blackshaw, b. 14 Feb 1970. FIFTH GENERATION CHARLES WESLEY MAUPIN (50) Son of Cornelius (20), grandson of John (7), of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1). Charles W. Maupin, was born in Albemarle County, VA, and died in Jefferson County, MO in 1842. He married 16 Sep 1811, to Mary Harrison, daughter of Richard Harrison and his wife, Mary, who it is thought was the daughter of Peter Clarkson. Richard Harrison came to Albemarle from Cumberland and bought lands near Whitehall. Charles Wesley Maupin moved from Albemarle County to St. Louis County, MO in 1826, settling south and west of St. Louis. In 1834, he moved to Jefferson County, MO and located six miles northeast of Hillsboro, where he remained until his death. Of hts children we have record only of the following: *Richard John W.

born 1822; lived at Hillsboro, MO; m. 30 Jun 1845 in Jefferson Co. MO. to Catherine Johnston. He had a large family. born in Albemarle County, 30 Oct 1817. He came with his father to the Missouri frontier in 1826 and had little chance for an education. He was self taught, learning to read, write and do arithmetic by the light from the old fireplace in his father's first log home. In 1843, He married Ann Byrnes and made his home near High Ridge but later moved to St. Louis County where he remained until 1860 when he located In Jefferson County. As his sympathies were with the

165


South during the war, he took a very active part. While recruiting for the Confederate Army, he was arrested and taken prisoner for nine months when he was exchanged. He joined the Confederate Army at Vicksburg and surrendered at the fall of that city. Exchanged again, he went to Richmond and was sent to the Western army and served until the end of the war under Gen. Price, surrendering with the Missouri leader. He did not return until Aug 1866 and died on the 26th of that month with Cholera. Although he had been a man of some means, he was practically penniless after the war's ravages. His wife died in 1853. Their children were as follows: a. b.

c.

Samuel Maupin, m. Octavia ________ . They had a son, William, who lived in Harlingen, Texas. Edward B. Maupin, born in 1845 near High Ridge. In 1866, he married Ann, daughter of Isaac and Margaret Smith, an Indiana family. Edward Maupin died in 1914 at Eureka, MO, where he had made his home since 1869. His wife died in St. Louis in 1921. Their children were as follows: 1. Octavia, of St. Louis 2. Lucy Junge of St. Louis 3. Ella 4. Emma 5. Clay 6. Janetta, wife of Grue. Lived in St. Louis. 7. John T. 8. Winnifred 9. James S. 10. Grover C. 11. LillieG. William H. Maupin born at Eureka, MO, 5 Aug 1848 and died there 21 Jul 1915. He m. 22 Feb 1872 to Margaret Kidd, b. 1849; d. 1937. Their children: 1. Charles C. Maupin, b. 27 Nov 1872; died 29 Oct 1952; m. Madie E. Horn, b. 19 Feb 1878; d. 1 Aug 1958. They moved to St. Louis where he was on the Police Dept. and a Captain when he retired at age 70. A. Mary Margaret Maupin, b. 11 Oct 1904; d. 14 Oct 1973. She was a school teacher. She married Jack L. Brown. B. Elizabeth Madie Maupin, b. 14 Jun 1911; m. John L. Seifeit. No children.

166

C. Charles Fuhrman Maupin, b. 13 Apr 1913, d. 8 Sep 1975. He was married to Eileen Hyland, one child, Charles, b. 19 Jun 1933; died 28 Nov 1975; m. Margaret Minks, on son, Charles Maupin, b. 1958. 2. Ethel Joplin, of St. Louis, born 30 Mar 1875; died. 2 Aug 1944. 3. Walter Maupin of Eureka, MO, b. 20 Jan 1878; d. 16 Feb 1955. 4. Daisy Maupin, of Eureka, MO, b. 30 Oct 1883; d. 7 Nov 1968. d.

Silas P. Maupin, born at Eureka, MO. in 1850 and died there in 1906. His wife was Nettie Kidd, b. 1855; d. 1901, sister of Margaret Kidd, wife of his brother, William. Their children were: 1. Malissa, wife of _________ Frank. 2. Edward, b. 1879; d. 2 Sep 1935. 3. Margaret, married a Mr. Radecker. 4. May 5. Stella 6. Stanley married Helen _ Some of Silas Maupin children are buried in the Kidd cemetery. House Springs, Missouri.

Additional information for Charles Wesley Maupin (50) At the time Eugene Maupin was doing his research he had little information on this son of Cornelius Maupin and Mourning Harris. According to his files he had contacted a descendent of John W. in 1924 and it appears here. Additional information fr-om later research as follows from courthouse and individual records.

Charles Wesley Maupin died in Jefferson Co. MO, without a Will. His estate settlement recorded in the Courthouse is dated 21 Dec 1842 with John Hammond as administrator and lists his children as follows: Elizabeth King, John Maupin, Frances Hammond, Richard Maupin, Corilla Maupin, William Maupin, Charles R. Maupin, also Mary and Stephen Lacy, grandchildren. His wife Mary also died without a Will and her estate settlement is dated 16 May 1862, which gives a probable death date for wife Mary. Her heirs are listed as Mary E. King, John Maupin, Richard Maupin, William Maupin, Corilla Hale and Charles Maupin. Corilla Hale is the administrator. Children of Charles Wesley and Mary Maupin are as follows:

167


during the war, he took a very active part. ecruiting for the Confederate Army, he was d and taken prisoner for nine months when he changed. He joined the Confederate Army at urg and surrendered at the fall of that city. ged again, he went to Richmond and was sent Western army and served until the end of the der Gen. Price, surrendering with the Missouri He did not return until Aug 1866 and died on h of that month with Cholera. Although he had a man of some means, he was practically ss after the war's ravages. His wife died in heir children were as follows: amuel Maupin, m. Octavia ________ . They had a on, William, who lived in Harlingen, Texas. dward B. Maupin, born in 1845 near High Ridge. n 1866, he married Ann, daughter of Isaac and argaret Smith, an Indiana family. Edward aupin died in 1914 at Eureka, MO, where he ad made his home since 1869. His wife died in t. Louis in 1921. Their children were as ollows: 1. Octavia, of St. Louis 2. Lucy Junge of St. Louis 3. Ella 4. Emma 5. Clay 6. Janetta, wife of Grue. Lived in St. Louis. 7. John T. 8. Winnifred 9. James S. 10. Grover C. 11 . Li IIi e G. William H. Maupin born at Eureka, MO, 5 Aug 1848 and died there 21 Jul 1915. He m. 22 Feb 1872 to Margaret Kidd, b. 1849; d. 1937. Their children: 1. Charles C. Maupin, b. 27 Nov 1872; died 29 Oct 1952; m. Madie E. Horn, b. 19 Feb 1878; d. 1 Aug 1958. They moved to St. Louis where he was on the Police Dept. and a Captain when he retired at age 70. A. Mary Margaret Maupin, b. 11 Oct 1904; d. 14 Oct 1973. She was a school teacher. She married Jack L. Brown. B. Elizabeth Madie Maupin, b. 14 Jun 1911; m. John L. Seifeit. No children.

166

C. Charles Fuhrman Maupin, b. 13 Apr 1913, d. 8 Sep 1975. He was married to Eileen Hyland, one child, Charles, b. 19 Jun 1933; died 28 Nov 1975; m. Margaret Minks, on son, Charles Maupin, b. 1958. 2. Ethel Joplin, of St. Louis, born 30 Mar 1875; died. 2 Aug 1944. 3. Walter Maupin of Eureka, MO, b. 20 Jan 1878; d. 16 Feb 1955. 4. Daisy Maupin, of Eureka, MO, b. 30 Oct 1883; d. 7 Nov 1968. d.

Silas P. Maupin, born at Eureka, MO. in 1850 and died there in 1906. His wife was Nettie Kidd, b. 1855; d. 1901, sister of Margaret Kidd, wife of his brother, William. Their children were: 1. Malissa, wife of __________ Frank. 2. Edward, b. 1879; d. 2 Sep 1935. 3. Margaret, married a Mr. Radecker. 4. May 5. Stella 6. Stanley married Helen Some of Silas Maupin children are buried in the Kidd cemetery. House Springs, Missouri.

Additional information for Charles Wesley Maupin (50) At the time Eugene Maupin was doing his research he had little information on this son of Cornelius Maupin and Mourning Harris. According to his files he had contacted a descendent of John W. in 1924 and it appears here. Additional information from later research as follows from courthouse and individual records.

Charles Wesley Maupin died in Jefferson Co. MO, without a Will. His estate settlement recorded in the Courthouse is dated 21 Dec 1842 with John Hammond as administrator and lists his children as follows: Elizabeth King, John Maupin, Frances Hammond, Richard Maupin, Corilla Maupin, William Maupin, Charles R. Maupin, also Mary and Stephen Lacy, grandchildren. His wife Mary also died without a Wi II and her estate settlement is dated 16 May 1862, which gives a probable death date for wife Mary. Her heirs are listed as Mary E. King, John Maupin, Richard Maupin, William Maupin, Corilla Hale and Charles Maupin. Corilla Hale is the administrator. Children of Charles Wesley and Mary Maupin are as follows:

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;I~~

1. Mary Elizabeth, b. ca. 1812; m. Mr. King. 2. Sarah Jane, b. ca 1815 in Virginia; m. 22 Jan 1835 in Missouri to Charles G. Lacy. 3. John W., b. 30 Oct 1817 in Virginia; m. 3 Sep 1840 in Missouri to Ann Byrnes. 4. Frances, b. 1818 in Virginia; m. Mr. Hammond. 5. Richard J., b. Jul 1822; m. 30 Jan 1845 to Catherine E. Johnston in Missouri. 6. William, b. 1825; m. 28 Dec 1854 to Ara Ann Wilson in Missouri. 7. Corilla c., b. 1827; m. 12 Jan 1845 to Albert G. Hale. 8. Charles R., b. 1831; m. 19 Mar 1854 to Minerva Bittick. :11=5. Richard J. Maupin, b. July 1822 in Virginia; m. 30 Jan 1845 in Jefferson Co. MO. to Catherine Johnston, b. 1826 in Missouri. Their children: 1. Elizabeth Ann, b. 1847; m. 31 Jul 1869 to Henry Kelopper. 2. Jesse H. b. Apr 1850; m. 28 Sep 1884 to Clarissa Belle Ogle. 3. Charles, b. 1852/53. 4. Seymour, b. 1857/58. 5. Richard, b. 1859. 6. Laura C., b. 6 Sep 1862; m. 9 Jan 1883 in Jefferson Co. MO, to Robert H. Hunt. 7. James, b. 1864/65. 8. Andrew, b. Dec 1866; m. ca. 1890 to Amanda? Laura C. Maupin, daughter of Richard J. and Catherine Maupin, b. 6 Sep 1862, d. 3 Oct 1947 in St. Louis, MO; m. 9 Jan 1883 to Robert H. Hunt, b. 25 Mar 1854 in Indiana, d. 16 Nov 1933. Both buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, MO. Their children: 1. Archie E. Hunt, b. June 1883, d. 14 Jan 1925; m. Myrtle Keary in St. Louis, MO. Henry R. Hunt, b. Aug 1887; m. 12 Jun 1907, in St. 2. Louis, MO, to Elsie A. Herbster, b. 14 Nov 1889. Their daughter, R~_EL1.. !_J:l~_t]_t, b. 14 Jun 1908, d. 23 Apr 1988 in St. Louis, MO; m. 15 Jun 1925, to Charles F. Heidbreder. They had 2 children: Jean E., b. 9 Oct 1925 and Rae M. Heidbreder, b. 23 Oct 1927; m. 15 Feb 1947 to Orville L. Meyer. Their children: a. Clifford J. Meyer, b. 9 Mar 1948; m. 3 Jul 1976 to Bonnie Sue Ludwig. b. Leonard E. Meyer, b. 7 Sep 1949; m. 8 Sep 1979 to Susan V. HeIms.

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Rebecca Maupin, 2nd daughter of Cornelius and Mourning Harris Maupin, was b. ca 1793 in Albemarle Co. VA, d. 14 Nov 1853, in St. Charles, MO; m. 15 Sep 1814, to William L. Jameson, son of Samuel and Margaret Craig Jameson. Their children all born in Albemarle Co. VA. 1. Sarah Jane Jennings Jameson, b. 7 Jut 1820, d. 11 Jut 1876; m. 8 Jut 1851 to John Pourie. 2. Rebecca Susan Catherine Jameson, b. 17 Apr 1825, d. 13 Dec 1891; m. 12 Jun 1844, to Absalom Hoffman. 3. Mary Elizabeth Hannah Jameson, b. 3 Apr 1827; d. 4 Aug 1910; m. 8 May 1850, to William Henry Bates. 4. William Lilburn Thomas Jameson, b. 24 Nov 1828; d. 18 Mar 1914; m. Catherine A. Bates. 5. Martha Samuela Whery Jameson, b. 9 Oct 1830; d. 1 May 1911; m. 16 Dec 1857, to William Hoffman.

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Rebecca and William Jameson with their five children left Albemarle Co. VA, for Missouri about 1835. They came first to Fern Osage, then to St. Charles, MO. We know they came with other family members, Rebecca's brother Charles Wesley Maupin had come earlier to this area. It is said that Rebecca rode horseback all the way from Virginia to Missouri. These are the known descendants of Rebecca Maupin and William L. Jameson. 3. Mary Elizabeth Hannah Jameson, b. 3 Apr 1827, in Albemarle Co. VA, d. 4 Aug 1910, in St. Charles, MO; m. 8 May 1850, to William Henry Bates, b. 10 Jul 1823, in NY; d. 23 Jut 1898, in St. Charles, MO. Of their seven children we have J..q_b_f1__ Frg_n~Un J2. ~1~§. b. 19 Jut 1861, in St. Charles, MO; d. 26 Aug 1946, in Alton, IL, Burial in St. Charles, MO. Married 1 Feb 1888, to Hettie May Bitzer, b. 5 Jan 1863, in Lebanon, IL; d. 19 Feb 1940 in Kensington, CA. Of their 13 children is RL~hard_Eceernf!_l'l ~{l.te.§, b. 18 Jun 1906, in St. Charles, MO; d. 11 Nov 1979, in El Cerrito, CA; m. 3 Mar 1933, to Beryl Evelyn Flick, b. 10 Dec 1909. Their son is J. f!mL~J?QO..J!!t~-~L6~1~§. b. 25 Sep 1933, in Berkeley, CA; m. Carlotta Earlene Hollis. They live in Kensington, CA. 5. Martha Samuela Jameson, b. 9 Oct 1830; d. 16 Dec 1857, in St. Louis; m. 16 Dec 1857, at St. Charles, MO, to William Hoffman, b. 3 Jul 1828, in St. Charles, MO; d. 1 May 1876, in Cottleville, MO. Of their 8 children, ~Jlr..~_b___ L,_t,J..Ia Hoffman, b. 18 Nov 1869, in Cottleville, MO; d. 9 Feb 1961 in Upper Darby, PA; m. 28 Dec 1892 in St. Louis, MO to Andrew C. Mearkle, b. 24 Jun 1864, in Everett, PA; d. 6 Aug 1934, in Philadelphia, PA. Their daughter Alta__C....!_l1ear~..L~. b. 7 Apr 1900, in Toledo, OH; m. 10 Nov 1927, to David R. Loring in New York City. Their son David R. Loring, Jr, b. 1929.

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1 11 11

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1. Mary Elizabeth, b. ca. 1812; m. Mr. King. 2. Sarah Jane, b. ca 1815 in Virginia; m. 22 Jan 1835 in Missouri to Charles G. Lacy. 3. John W., b. 30 Oct 1817 in Virginia; m. 3 Sep 1840 in Missouri to Ann Byrnes. 4. Frances, b. 1818 in Virginia; m. Mr. Hammond. 5. Richard J., b. Jut 1822; m. 30 Jan 1845 to Catherine E. Johnston in Missouri. 6. William, b. 1825; m. 28 Dec 1854 to Ara Ann Wilson in Missouri. 1. Corilla c., b. 1827; m. 12 Jan 1845 to Albert G. Hale. 8. Charles R., b. 1831; m. 19 Mar 1854 to Minerva Bittick. #5. Richard J. Maupin, b. July 1822 in Virginia; m. 30 Jan 1845 in Jefferson Co. MO. to Catherine Johnston, b. 1826 in Missouri. Their children: 1. Elizabeth Ann, b. 1847; m. 31 Jut 1869 to Henry Kelopper. 2. Jesse H. b. Apr 1850; m. 28 Sep 1884 to Clarissa Belle Ogle. Charles, b. 1852/53. 3. 4. Seymour, b. 1857/58. 5. Richard, b. 1859. Laura c., b. 6 Sep 1862; m. 9 Jan 1883 in Jefferson Co. 6. MO, to Robert H. Hunt. 7. James, b. 1864/65. 8. Andrew, b. Dec 1866; m. ca. 1890 to Amanda ? Laura C. Maupin, daughter of Richard J. and Catherine Maupin, b. 6 Sep 1862, d. 3 Oct 1947 in St. Louis, MO; m. 9 Jan 1883 to Robert H. Hunt, b. 25 Mar 1854 in Indiana, d. 16 Nov 1933. Both buried in Bellefontaine Cemetery, St. Louis, MO. Their children: 1. Archie E. Hunt, b. June 1883, d. 14 Jan 1925; m. Myrtle Keary in St. Louis, MO. 2. Henry R. Hunt, b. Aug 1887; m. 12 Jun 1907, in St. Louis, MO, to Elsie A. Herbster, b. 14 Nov 1889. Their daughter, HC!.~J,..!_J:IY..flt, b. 14 Jun 1908, d. 23 Apr 1988 in St. Louis, MO; m. 15 Jun 1925, to Charles F. Heidbreder. They had 2 children: Jean E., b. 9 Oct 1925 and Rae M. Heidbreder, b. 23 Oct 1927; m. 15 Feb 1947 to Orville L. Meyer. Their children: a. Clifford J. Meyer, b. 9 Mar 1948; m. 3 Jut 1976 to Bonnie Sue Ludwig. b. Leonard E. Meyer, b. 7 Sep 1949; m. 8 Sep 1979 to Susan v. Helms.

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Rebecca Maupin, 2nd daughter of Cornelius and Mourning Harris Maupin, was b. ca 1793 in Albemarle Co. VA, d. 14 Nov 1853, in St. Charles, MO; m. 15 Sep 1814, to William L. Jameson, son of Samuel and Margaret Craig Jameson. Their children all born in Albemarle Co. VA. 1. Sarah Jane Jennings Jameson, b. 7 Jul 1820, d. 11 Jut 1876; m. 8 Jut 1851 to John Pourie. 2. Rebecca Susan Catherine Jameson, b. 17 Apr 1825, d. 13 Dec 1891; m. 12 Jun 1844, to Absalom Hoffman. 3. Mary Elizabeth Hannah Jameson, b. 3 Apr 1827; d. 4 Aug 1910; m. 8 May 1850, to William Henry Bates. 4. William Lilburn Thomas Jameson, b. 24 Nov 1828; d. 18 Mar 1914; m. Catherine A. Bates. 5. Martha Samuela Whery Jameson, b. 9 Oct 1830; d. 1 May 1911; m. 16 Dec 1857, to William Hoffman. Rebecca and William Jameson with their five children left Albemarle Co. VA, for Missouri about 1835. They came first to Fem Osage, then to St. Charles, MO. We know they came with other family members, Rebecca's brother Charles Wesley Maupin had come earlier to this area. It is said that Rebecca rode horseback all the way from Virginia to Missouri. These are the known descendants of Rebecca Maupin and William L. Jameson. 3. Mary Elizabeth Hannah Jameson, b. 3 Apr 1827, in Albemarle Co. VA, d. 4 Aug 1910, in St. Charles, MO; m. 8 May 1850, to William Henry Bates, b. 10 Jut 1823, in NY; d. 23 Jut 1898, in St. Charles, MO. Of their seven children we have J..q_b_ll__ Fr~n~_Un .!2_at~~. b. 19 Jut 1861, in St. Charles, MO; d. 26 Aug 1946, in Alton, IL, Burial in St. Charles, MO. Married 1 Feb 1888, to Hettie May Bitzer, b. 5 Jan 1863, in Lebanon, IL; d. 19 Feb 1940 in Kensington, CA. Of their 13 children is ffi_g_harq_ _Er_eefTI.li_ll !2~te.ยง, b. 18Jun 1906, in St. Charles, MO; d.11 Nov 1979, in El Cerrito, CA; m. 3 Mar 1933, to Beryl Evelyn Flick, b. 10 Dec 1909. Their son is ..lJ!DJ1~..ยงQrtJ3jt_~-~L!2~1~-~. b. 25 Sep 1933, in Berkeley, CA; m. Carlotta Earlene Hollis. They live in Kensington, CA. 5. Martha Samuela Jameson, b. 9 Oct 1830; d. 16 Dec 1857, in St. Louis; m. 16 Dec 1857, at St. Charles, MO, to William Hoffman, b. 3 Jul 1828, in St. Charles, MO; d. 1 May 1876, in Cottleville, MO. Of their 8 children, Sar_~tL_l,_y_@_Hoffrn_an, b. 18 Nov 1869, in Cottleville, MO; d. 9 Feb 1961 in Upper Darby, PA; m. 28 Dec 1892 in St. Louis, MO to Andrew C. Mearkle, b. 24 Jun 1864, in Everett, PA; d. 6 Aug 1934, in Philadelphia, PA. Their daughter t\lta C..!__Mear~L~. b. 7 Apr 1900, in Toledo, OH; m. 10 Nov 1927, to David R. Loring in New York City. Their son David R. Loring, Jr, b. 1929.

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b.

Nancy T. Maupin, daughter of Cornelius and 2nd wife, Nancy Tomlin; m. David Wiant (Wyant). In the 1850 census of Albemarle Co. VA, David is given as 56 years old, a farmer with $4,000 valuation. Nancy is 52 which would make her birth date ca. 1798. They have 9 children, birth dates figured from census records: Elizabeth, b. 1825; William, b. 1827; Mary, b. 1828; James, b. 1829; Thomas, b. 1831; Sarah, b. 1834; Martha, b. 1837; John, b. 1839 and Camelia, b. 1843. Nancy was born of Cornelius 2nd wife but the records show it was Nancy T. and her husband David Wiant who took care of Cornelius and his 4th wife Mary Ellis until their deaths. Cornelius evidently never received any money on his pension claim and on 30 Dec 1852, David Wiant, as power of attorney, filed in Albemarle Co. a claim on Cornelius' pension. Cornelius' file states he is the only soldier with that name. Cornelius Dabney Maupin, son of Cornelius and 3rd wife, Mary Paul, b. 1803; d. 19 Dec 1875; m. Rebecca Johnson, b. 1806. The family appears In the 1830-40 census of Augusta Co. VA. Their children all born in Virginia. 1. James Thomas Maupin, b. ca 1836; d. 2 Mar 1922; m. 1859 to Sarah C. Oder, b. ca. 1839; d. 6 Mar 1889. Their children: a.

* b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i.

William J. Maupin, b. Feb 1861; d. 11 Oct 1934 Stuart Ashby Maupin, b. Jun 1862; d. 9 Jan 1932. Joseph R. Maupin, b. 1864; d. 8 Jun 1937 Thomas J. Maupin, b. 1866; d. 24 Oct 1924. Emma Jane Maupin, b. 1869 Mary F. Maupin, b. 1870 Walter 0. Maupin, b. May 1871, d. 27 Apr 1932 Robert S. Maupin, b. 1873; d. 12 Feb 1937 James W. Maupin, b. 1873- twin of Robert.

*Stuart Ashby Maupin, b. 22 Jun 1862; d. 9 Jan 1932; m. 15 Aug 1889, to Dieuland Meeks, b. 7 Feb 1866, d. 2 May 1942. Their children: Harry Ashby Maupin, b. 8 Aug 1890, d. 11 Jan 1950, a. Lynchburg, VA; m. 11 Aug 1919, to Ella Swartzell. Rachel Maupin, b. 9 Feb 1894; d. 13 Jun 1945; m. Roy b. Burns, 20 Jul 1918. John Thomas Maupin, b. 4 Nov 1898; d. 24 Feb 1938; m. c. Annie Lucas, 15 Aug 1919. Robert Lee Maupin, b. 29 Mar 1901 , at Stuarts' Draft, d. VA; m. 7 Apr 1924, at Charlottesville, VA to Virginia Mildred Painter, b. 12 May 1898. Their children. 1. Gladys Marie Maupin, b. 2 Nov 1924; m. 7 Oct 1944, to Samuel E. Hancock. a. Samuel Lee Hancock, b. 2 Dec 1947; m. 6 Jun 1987, to Mary Jo Harding. 170

e.

David M. Hancock, b. 1 Dec 1955; m. 10 May 1980, to Janet Matlock. c. John Mark Hancock, b. 31 May 1961; m. 4 Aug 1986, to Barbara Busch. 2. Lester Lee Maupin, b. 16 Mar 1926; m. 3 Nov 1949 to Violet L. Staley. a. Christine L. Maupin, b. 3 Jun 1952; m. 9 Jun 1975, to David Streetman. b. Robert P. Maupin, b. 9 Feb 1955; m. 23 Dec 1982, to Kimberly Saylors. c. Ricky Lee Maupin, b. 10 Apr 1962; m. 2 Apr 1983, to Elizabeth Dalton. d. Cynthia Maupin, b. 4 Jul 1964; m. 1 Jul 1983 to Gregory Wright. 3. Sidney Ashby Maupin, b. 27 Dec 1927; m. 4 Aug 1951, to Mildred Simpson. a. Pamela D. Maupin, b. 7 Apr 1956; m. 21 Oct 1978, to David Dooley. b. Lisa Ann Maupin, b. 19 Aug 1960; m. 20 Aug 1987, to Michael Lim. 4. Jo-Ann Maupin, b. 21 Jan 1932; m. 20 Apr 1951 to Robert E. Lipscomb. a. Teresa M. Lipscomb, b. 10 Mar 1952; m. James E. Martin. b. Rebecca Lipscomb, b. 16 Aug 1956; m. 19 Apr 1983, to Steven B. Ferguson. c. Robert E. Lipscomb, Jr., b. 30 Mar 1965; m. 6 Oct 1990, to Shawn Marie Clemenson. Leslie Dabney Maupin last child of Stuart A. Maupin, b. 21 Apr 1913 m. Thelma Wilber 30 Jul 1940. 2 ch. Lesley Lee, b. 18 Mar 1943 & Thomas Ashby, b. 5 Apr 1945 FOURTH GENERATION

WILLIAM MAUPIN (21) Son of John {7), grandson of Daniel (3), of Gabriel (1 ). William Maupin was born in 1760 in the county of Albemarle and died in the same county about 1843. He served with the American army during the Revolution and took part in the entire campaign in Virginia which ended with the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown. The canteen used by William Maupin during the Revolution is still preserved by his descendants in Albemarle. He was known as "Mountain Billy Maupin" and is so spoken of by Dr. Socrates Maupin and by w. H. Miller in his History and Genealogies. The reason for the name Is unknown. He married 27 Nov 1802, Jane Jameson, daughter of Samuel Jameson, who settled on Moormans River near the Mauplns in 1747. Jameson and his old neighbor, Daniel Maupin (3) died the 171


b.

Nancy T. Maupin, daughter of Cornelius and 2nd wife, Nancy Tomlin; m. David Wiant (Wyant). In the 1850 census of Albemarle Co. VA, David Is given as 56 years old, a farmer with $4,000 valuation. Nancy is 52 which would make her birth date ca. 1798. They have 9 children, birth dates figured from census records: Elizabeth, b. 1825; William, b. 1827; Mary, b. 1828; James, b. 1829; Thomas, b. 1831; Sarah, b. 1834; Martha, b. 1837; John, b. 1839 and Camelia, b. 1843. Nancy was born of Cornelius 2nd wife but the records show it was Nancy T. and her husband David Wiant who took care of Cornelius and his 4th wife Mary Ellis until their deaths. Cornelius evidently never received any money on his pension claim and on 30 Dec 1852, David Wiant, as power of attorney, filed in Albemarle Co. a claim on Cornelius' pension. Cornelius' file states he is the only soldier with that name. Cornelius Dabney Maupin, son of Cornelius and 3rd wife, Mary Paul, b. 1803; d. 19 Dec 1875; m. Rebecca Johnson, b. 1806. The family appears in the 1830-40 census of Augusta Co. VA. Their children all born in Virginia. 1. James Thomas Maupin, b. ca 1836; d. 2 Mar 1922; m. 1859 to Sarah C. Oder, b. ca. 1839; d. 6 Mar 1889. Their children: a.

* b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i.

William J. Maupin, b. Feb 1861; d. 11 Oct 1934 Stuart Ashby Maupin, b. Jun 1862; d. 9 Jan 1932. Joseph R. Maupin, b. 1864; d. 8 Jun 1937 Thomas J. Maupin, b. 1866; d. 24 OCt 1924. Emma Jane Maupin, b. 1869 Mary F. Maupin, b. 1870 Walter 0. Maupin, b. May 1871, d. 27 Apr 1932 Robert s. Maupin, b. 1873; d. 12 Feb 1937 James W. Maupin, b. 1873- twin of Robert.

*Stuart Ashby Maupin, b. 22 Jun 1862; d. 9 Jan 1932; m. 15 Aug 1889, to Dieuland Meeks, b. 7 Feb 1866, d. 2 May 1942. Their children: Harry Ashby Maupin, b. 8 Aug 1890, d. 11 Jan 1950, a. Lynchburg, VA; m. 11 Aug 1919, to Ella Swartzell. Rachel Maupin, b. 9 Feb 1894; d. 13 Jun 1945; m. Roy b. Burns, 20 Jul 1918. John Thomas Maupin, b. 4 Nov 1898; d. 24 Feb 1938; m. c. Annie Lucas, 15 Aug 1919. Robert Lee Maupin, b. 29 Mar 1901, at Stuarts' Draft, d. VA; m. 7 Apr 1924, at Charlottesville, VA to Virginia Mildred Painter, b. 12 May 1898. Their children. 1. Gladys Marie Maupin, b. 2 Nov 1924; m. 7 OCt 1944, to Samuel E. Hancock. a. Samuel Lee Hancock, b. 2 Dec 1947; m. 6 Jun 1987, to Mary Jo Harding.

170

e.

David M. Hancock, b. 1 Dec 1955; m. 10 May 1980, to Janet Matlock. c. John Mark Hancock, b. 31 May 1961; m. 4 Aug 1986, to Barbara Busch. 2. Lester Lee Maupin, b. 16 Mar 1926; m. 3 Nov 1949 to Violet L. Staley. a. Christine L. Maupin, b. 3 Jun 1952; m. 9 Jun 1975, to David Streetman. b. Robert P. Maupin, b. 9 Feb 1955; m. 23 Dec 1982, to Kimberly Saylors. c. Ricky Lee Maupin, b. 10 Apr 1962; m. 2 Apr 1983, to Elizabeth Dalton. d. Cynthia Maupin, b. 4 Jul 1964; m. 1 Jul 1983 to Gregory Wright. 3. Sidney Ashby Maupin, b. 27 Dec 1927; m. 4 Aug 1951, to Mildred Simpson. a. Pamela D. Maupin, b. 7 Apr 1956; m. 21 OCt 1978, to David Dooley. b. Lisa Ann Maupin, b. 19 Aug 1960; m. 20 Aug 1987, to Michael Lim. 4. Jo-Ann Maupin, b. 21 Jan 1932; m. 20 Apr 1951 to Robert E. Lipscomb. a. Teresa M. Lipscomb, b. 10 Mar 1952; m. James E. Martin. b. Rebecca Lipscomb, b. 16 Aug 1956; m. 19 Apr 1983, to Steven B. Ferguson. c. Robert E. Lipscomb, Jr., b. 30 Mar 1965; m. 6 OCt 1990, to Shawn