Page 1

P E R FO R M I N G A RT S M AGA Z I N E

INSIDE

J ULY / AUG 2018

A season inspired by human togetherness, plus 300 years of the Crescent City, behind the scenes with Nitin Sawhney, and more


CONTENTS

Stanford Live Staff & Sponsors Welcome

P—6

Upcoming Events

P—8

Campus Partners

P—12

Scene & Heard

The Ties That Bind

Behind the Scenes

and Unbind

Membership

By Natalie Jabbar Stanford Live’s new lineup showcases the universal aspects of our shared humanity.

P—14

P—34 P—36

Calendar

P—38

Infographic

Infographic

300 years of the Crescent City

Six degrees of Nitin Sawhney

p—16

p—28

Artist Voices

Featurette

Wynton Marsalis on the spirit

A conversation with Inua Ellams

of New Orleans

about his Barber Shop Chronicles

p—18

p—30

Featurette How Nitin Sawhney wrote music for a dance without dancers p—24

3

P—32

Stanford Live & Bing Concert Hall Donors

Plan Your Visit

P A G E­­— 2 0

P—5

P—39


“City National helps keep my financial life in tune.” So much of my life is always shifting; a different city, a different piece of music, a different ensemble. I need people who I can count on to help keep my financial life on course so I can focus on creating and sharing the “adventures” of classical music. City National shares my passion and is instrumental in helping me bring classical music to audiences all over the world. They enjoy being a part of what I do and love. That is the essence of a successful relationship.

Michael Tilson Thomas Conductor, Educator and Composer

The people you trust, trust City National.

©2018 City National Bank

Call (866) 618-5242 or visit cnb.com

CNB MEMBER FDIC City National Bank is a subsidiary of Royal Bank of Canada.


July/Aug 2018 Volume 10, No. 6

S TA N F O R D L I V E M A G A Z I N E J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

STAFF

FOUNDATION & GOVERNMENT PARTNERS

Paul Heppner Publisher

Chris Lorway Executive Director

Susan Peterson Design & Production Director

Bryan Alderman Assistant Director of Development

Ana Alvira, Robin Kessler, Stevie VanBronkhorst Production Artists and Graphic Design Mike Hathaway Sales Director Amelia Heppner, Marilyn Kallins, Terri Reed San Francisco/Bay Area Account Executives Brieanna Bright, Joey Chapman, Ann Manning Seattle Area Account Executives Carol Yip Sales Coordinator

Rory Brown Operations Manager Diana Burnell Assistant Ticket Office Manager Robert Cable Communications Manager

IN-KIND PARTNERS

Ryan Davis Associate Director of Engagement and Public Programs Robert DeArmond Web Developer Laura Evans Director of Music Programs, Education, and Engagement Drew Farley Technical Manager Ben Frandzel Institutional Gifts and Community Engagement Officer Elisa Gomez-Hird HR and Administrative Associate

MEDIA PARTNERS

Sierra Gonzalez Director of Marketing, Communications, and Patron Services Maurice Nounou Assistant Director of Ticketing and Sales

Paul Heppner President Mike Hathaway Vice President Kajsa Puckett Vice President, Marketing & Business Development Genay Genereux Accounting & Office Manager Shaun Swick Senior Designer & Digital Lead Barry Johnson Digital Engagement Specialist Ciara Caya Customer Service Representative & Administrative Assistant Corporate Office

Noreen Ong Executive and Contracts Administrator Egan O’Rourke Audio/Video Assistant Manager

Stanford Live’s 2017–18 season is generously supported by Helen and Peter Bing.

Kimberly Pross Director of Production

Underwriting for student ticket discounts for the 2017–18 season is generously provided by the Bullard family.

Jeremy Ramsaur Lighting Manager Nicola Rees Director of Development Toni Rivera Operations Coordinator Ivan Rodriguez Artist Liaison/Cabaret Manager Mike Ryan Director of Operations, Frost Amphitheater Bill Starr House Manager Krystina Tran Marketing Manager

425 North 85th Street Seattle, WA 98103 p 206.443.0445 f 206.443.1246 adsales@encoremediagroup.com 800.308.2898 x105 www.encoremediagroup.com

Encore Arts Programs is published monthly by Encore Media Group to serve musical and theatrical events in the Puget Sound and San Francisco Bay Areas. All rights reserved. ©2018 Encore Media Group. Reproduction without written permission is prohibited.

PHOTO CREDITS On the cover: Honji Wang and Sébastien Ramirez, photo Johan Persson. Page 6: Illustration by Hybrid Design. Page 12: Photo 1 courtesy of the Cantor Arts Center; 2 Li Huayi 李華弌 (China, b. 1948), Wind Nourishes, Rain Moistens, 2016. Ink and gold on paper. Collection of Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang. Pages 14 & 15: Photos 1, 2, and 3 by Harrison Truong; 4, 5, and 6 by Joel Simon; 7 by Azar Kafaei; 8 by Jessica Yeung. Page 21: Photo by Azar Kafaei. Page 22: Photo by Marc Brenner. Page 24 & 26: Photos by Johan Persson. Page 25: Photo by Suki Dhanda. Page 29: Nitin Sawhney photo by Suki Dhanda. Page 30: Photo by Marc Brenner. Page 32: Photo 1 courtesy of Cal Performances, 2 by Joel Simon. Page 34: Photo by Joel Simon. Page 33: Photo 2 by Joel Simon, 4 by Azar Kafaei.

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WELCOME

C H R I S L O R WAY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

“One of the things that’s beautiful about New Orleans is how culturally rich we are and how well we have worked together. People call us a gumbo. It’s really important that we get focused on the very simple notion that diversity is a strength, it’s not a weakness.” — M I TC H L A N D R I E U

In planning the 2018–19 program, we went

for the Arts and individual donations) has

Stanford Live presents

down a number of paths probing universal

allowed us to invite several artists to spend

a wide range of the finest

and deeply-felt expressions of life, love, and

an extended period of time on campus.

performances from around the

loss. How do artists with various cultural

Kicking this off is multidisciplinary artist Nitin

world, fostering a vibrant learning

backgrounds and histories ritualize these

Sawhney who, as you will see, has his fingers

community and providing dis-

foundational stages of being?

in many pots. His new work Dystopian Dream—

tinctive experiences through the

coproduced by Stanford Live—was developed As we researched these ideas, we found

performing arts. With its home at

with the brilliant dancers/choreographers

ourselves returning to the city of New

Bing Concert Hall, Stanford Live is

Wang Ramirez and will be a core component

Orleans, a place that embodies this nexus

simultaneously a public square, a

of Nitin’s residency with us.

sanctuary, and a lab, drawing on

of living like no other. Conveniently, it is also the 300th anniversary of its founding, so who

In addition, Nigerian-born London writer

better to talk about the city and its cultural

Inua Ellams tells us about his play Barber

legacy than the legendary Wynton Marsalis

Shop Chronicles, which I’m excited to bring to

who joins us for a public conversation in

Stanford after sold-out runs in London.

September. His lyrical statement in this issue

Finally, our summer lineup offers a tip of the

on the Crescent City was originally written

hat to a few of next year’s programs. Classic

as a tribute to the New Orleans Saints’ first

Albums Live returns to the lawn outside the

Super Bowl victory.

Bing with music by artists who have played Frost (which will re-open next May). And

A new residency initiative (supported

Lucia Micarelli, star of HBO’s Treme, makes her

through the office of the Vice President

Stanford Live debut. 6

the breadth and depth of Stanford University to connect performance to the significant issues, ideas, and discoveries of our time.


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J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

Upcoming Events

JAZZ

CLASSICAL

CLASSICAL/POP

Or Bareket

Merola Opera

Lucia

Duo

Program

Micarelli

With special guest Camila Meza

Schwabacher Summer Concert

KEY:

A M P L I F I C AT I O N

AU D I E N C E I N T E R AC T I O N

WHEN: S U N DAY, J U LY 1 7:00 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L ST U D I O

WHEN: SAT U R DAY, J U LY 7 7 : 30 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

WHEN: S U N DAY, J U LY 8 7:00 PM

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

Born in Jerusalem and

In this special Bing Concert

The Bing welcomes the

raised in Buenos Aires and

Hall performance, opera’s

young violinist best known

Tel Aviv, Or Bareket is one

greatest moments will come

for her collaborations

of the most in-demand and

to life as the young artists

with Chris Botti and her

versatile bassists on the NYC

of the famed Merola Opera

role on HBO’s Treme.

jazz scene. In this intimate

Program perform staged

show, he performs duets with

vignettes with orchestra.

pianist Nitai Hershkovits and guest guitarist Camila Meza. Copresented with the Stanford Jazz Festival

For the full calendar, visit live.stanford.edu.

8


JAZZ

P O P/ W O R L D

Jazz on

Música en

the Green

el Jardín

Miles to Hip-Hop

Latinas Take Over!

WHEN: F R I DAY, J U LY 1 3 6: 30 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L L AW N

WHEN: SAT U R DAY, J U LY 14 6: 0 0 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L L AW N

Three bands perform at this

Grammy Award–winning

outdoor concert: the Miles

rapper Mala Rodríguez and

Electric Band; Kev Choice, a

Mexican electronica band

musician, emcee, and hip-hop

Sotomayor take the stage for

artist; and Sidewalk Chalk, a

an evening of Latin hip-hop

horn-driven unit that blends

and dance.

elements of jazz, funk, hip-

Hosted by Sonido Clash

hop, and R & B. Copresented with the Stanford Jazz Festival

WHEN: F R I DAY, J U LY 20, & SAT U R DAY, J U LY 21 7:00 PM

POP

DISCUSSION

JAZZ

Classic Albums

Silicon Valley

Terrence

Live

Conversations

Brewer

Future of Music: Computer or Composer

Acoustic Jazz Quartet

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L L AW N

WHEN: T H U R S DAY, J U LY 1 9 7 : 30 P M

Known for its faithful re-creations of classic rock albums from

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

WHEN: F R I DAY, J U LY 2 7 8:00 PM

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L ST U D I O

cover to cover, Classic Albums Live returns for two nights of rock favorites: Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours on July 20 and Creedence Clearwater Revival’s Chronicle Volume 1 on July 21.

10

Tonya Mosley, KQED’s

Guitarist and Stanford Jazz

Silicon Valley bureau

Workshop faculty artist

chief, will host a special

Terrence Brewer presents his

evening of conversation and

new project, the Acoustic

performance looking at how

Jazz Quartet, in the intimate

technology is influencing

Bing Studio.

the future of music.

Copresented with the Stanford

Copresented with KQED

Jazz Festival


Roberts With the Not Ready for Naptime Players WHEN: S U N DAY, J U LY 15 2:00 PM

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L L AW N

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Three-time Grammy Award nominee Justin Roberts is truly one of the all-stars

FA M I LY L AW G R O U P, P. C .

of the indie family-music scene. For nearly 20 years, Justin has been creating the soundtrack to families’ lives, crafting songs that navigate the joys and sorrows of growing up.

JAZZ

Andrea Motis Quintet With Wycliffe Gordon & SJW 50/50 Jazz Orch. WHEN: SAT U R DAY, AU G U ST 4 8: 0 0 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

Barcelona-bred prodigy Andrea Motis returns to Stanford Jazz Workshop to share her astonishing trumpet and vocal talent. She’s accompanied by her band, which includes Joan Chamorro, founder of the famed Sant Andreu Jazz Band. Copresented with the Stanford Jazz Festival

To learn what Encore can do for your business, visit encoremediagroup.com.

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L A W

Justin

Business, meet box office.

F A M I LY

FA M LY

Proud to Support the Arts at Stanford


J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

Campus Partners

Looking for more things to do this summer? The Cantor Arts Center and the Anderson Collection offer free family activities every second Sunday of the month. These family-focused days of art talks, hands-on art making, and gallery adventures are for visitors of all ages. On

1

July 19, as part of the

3

墨境 Ink Worlds exhibition,

2

the Cantor hosts Michael Knight in conversation with Chinese painter Li Huayi about his unique approach to ink. Then on July 26, the Anderson Collection presents a free screening of Eva Hesse, a documentary by Marcie Begleiter. One of the few women recognized as central to the New York art scene, Hesse had over 20 group shows scheduled for 1970 in addition to being chosen for a cover article in Artforum magazine. For more, visit arts.stanford.edu.

1

2

3

Second Sunday: Family Day

The J. Sanford and

Film Screening: Eva Hesse

Vinie Miller Distinguished

July 8 & Aug 12

Lecture Series:

11:00 AM–4:00 PM

Artist Li Huayi

Terraces and galleries Copresented by the Cantor

Thu, July 26, 6:00 PM Denning Resource Center

Thu, July 19, 6:00 PM

Presented by the Anderson

Cantor Arts Center

Collection at Stanford University

Arts Center and the Anderson Collection at Stanford

Presented in conjunction

University

with the exhibition 墨境 Ink Worlds: Contemporary Chinese Painting from the Collection of Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang

12


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J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

Scene & Heard

2

1 4

6 7

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3

1 T H E VO I C E O F C H I L E

2 SEASON PREVIEW

Called “the best young

Also on April 28, Stanford

Chilean songwriter of his

Live executive director Chris

generation” by none other

Lorway offered Stanford Live

than Joan Baez, Nano Stern

members an exclusive preview

brought his indie-folk-rock-

of the 2018–19 season,

jazz fusion to the Bing Studio

which was followed by a

on April 28.

performance by jazz pianist Emmet Cohen.

3 URIEL HERMAN

4 LIGHTS, CAMERA…

MUSIC! 5

Uriel Herman poses with fans

On April 20 under the baton

following his performance

of Keith Lockhart, the Boston

on April 29. The classically

Pops Esplanade Orchestra

trained jazz pianist made a

celebrated over 50 years

stop at the Bing Studio as

of film composer John

part of his U.S. debut tour.

Williams—the man behind the soundtracks for E.T., Star Wars, Harry Potter, and more.

5 BING FLING

6 MUSIC AND

AC T I V I S M The Boston Pops

On May 9, Arturo O’Farrill’s

performance was part of

Cornel West Concerto featured

Bing Fling, Stanford Live’s

the African American scholar

annual gala recognition event

and activist Dr. Cornel West

for Bing members. Guests

in full oratorical splendor.

were treated to a preconcert reception and dinner in the 8

Bing’s Gunn Atrium. 7 A N A RT I S T LO S T

8 G I V E FAC E

TO O S O O N John Bernd was one of

Stanford Live’s partnership

the first artists in the NYC

with the Stanford Concert

dance community to be

Network continued with

diagnosed with HIV. In an

Give Face, Stanford’s very

evening conceived by Ishmael

own fierce, fabulous, fantastic

Houston-Jones, who danced

drag show presented April 27

with Bernd in the 1980s,

in the Bing Studio.

excerpts from Bernd’s works were presented in the Bing Studio on May 4 and 5.


300 Years of the Crescent City New Orleans is one of America’s most vivid sites of cultural encounter. Seated near the mouth of the Mississippi River, the city has been a vital port of entry for new cultural influences. It has been a scene of violent clashes over race, resources, and customs. But, as a nexus where disparate cultures commingle, it has also been an incubator of new and manifestly American forms of expression through performance, cuisine, and community living. To mark the city’s tricentennial this year, we put together a timeline highlighting this history of fusion.

Early 1700s

1789

1827

French Canadian explorer and colonial

Saint Louis Cemetery was established.

A group of students donned colorful

administrator Pierre Le Moyne d’Iberville

Because the city is built on a swamp,

costumes and danced through the

and his brother Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne

the deceased have to be buried above

streets of New Orleans on Mardi Gras,

de Bienville landed at the mouth of

ground. Burial sites feature elaborate

emulating the pre-Lenten revelry they’d

the Mississippi River in 1699. In the first

stone crypts and mausoleums with

observed while visiting Paris. Several

decades of colonization, the indigenous

decorative artwork embellishing the

decades later, a secret society of

tribes of the Mississippi Valley—

tombs. These distinctive cemeteries

businessmen called the Mistick Krewe

including the Natchez, the Houma, and

have come to resemble small villages.

of Comus organized a torch-lit carnival

the Chitimacha peoples—helped the

They are known by the nickname of

procession with marching musicians and

French survive the difficult, swampy

“Cities of the Dead” and have come

rolling floats, setting the stage for the

climate. Iberville coerced other tribes to

to emblematize New Orleans’s unique

public celebrations that would define the

join him in making war on the region’s

relationship to death and mourning—

city’s festive spirit. The all-white Krewe

most powerful tribe, the Chitimacha.

from jazz funerals and voodoo altars

of Comus became the focus of cultural

to its vampire lore.

debate about the relationship between race and the civic tradition more than a

1718

century later when required by the city to integrate or cease parading.

Bienville wrote to the directors of the Mississippi Company in 1717 that he had discovered a crescent bend in the river, seemingly protected from tidal surges and hurricanes, and proposed the new capital of the colony be built there. La Nouvelle-Orléans was born.

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1890

1960s

2005

Ferdinand Joseph LaMothe, known

Dooky Chase’s Restaurant, originally

Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans,

professionally as “Jelly Roll Morton,” was

founded in 1941 as a sandwich shop,

flooding 80 percent of the city

born. In the late 1800s, brass bands and

evolved into one of the country’s

and leaving 40,000 people

ragtime piano were popular, while poor

first African American fine dining

(disproportionately people of color)

New Orleans neighborhoods added a

restaurants and became an epicenter

stranded in the Superdome and the

West African and Caribbean touch to

for civil rights organizing, jazz

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center

local music. From this mix emerged

performances, and Creole cooking.

for five days. In Louisiana, 1,577 people

Charles “Buddy” Bolden, a cornetist who

Thurgood Marshall, Oretha Castle

lost their lives. Relief efforts were

formed a group in 1895, fusing these

Haley, and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.,

monumental, with more than 1 million

influences with blues, black Baptist music,

among others, held strategy sessions

volunteers flocking to New Orleans to

and his own legendary improvisations—

over meals by chef Leah Chase in the

help rebuild the city.

in effect, inventing jazz. Louis Armstrong

upstairs meeting room.

was born soon thereafter in 1901.

1930s –1940 s

1970

In 1938, Tennessee Williams moved to

The first New Orleans Jazz and Heritage

New Orleans to write for the federal

Festival debuted as a relatively small-

Works Progress Administration,

scale event in Louis Armstrong Park,

eventually immortalizing the French

attracting a mere 350 attendees. The

Quarter’s romantic decay in numerous

festival has since become one of the

plays including A Streetcar Named Desire

city’s major annual events, attracting

and Vieux Carré.

half-a-million-strong crowds and major

2017

international music acts. This same year Mayor Moon Landrieu inaugurated

Inspired by conversations with jazz

and began to oversee desegregation of

band leader Wynton Marsalis, Mayor

government and public services.

Mitch Landrieu and his administration undertook the removal of four divisive

1987 Big Chief Allison “Tootie” Montana was the recipient of a fellowship as a Master Traditional Artist from the Folk Art Program of the National Endowment for the Arts. Tootie was one of the city’s most famous “Mardi Gras Indians.” The more than century-old tradition among African American men involves dressing on Mardi Gras day in elaborate, handmade costumes reminiscent of the American Plains Indian dress and the beadwork of Yoruba peoples in Nigeria to pay homage to enslaved ancestors and the indigenous allies said to have aided those escaping bondage.

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Confederate monuments from public sites in New Orleans, reminding us, “There is no other place quite like it in the world that so eloquently exemplifies the uniquely American motto: e pluribus unum—out of many, we are one.”


ARTIST VOICES

The Spirit of New Orleans By Wynton Marsalis

Down on the Bayou where

drained and sprinkled with

becomes laughter. In New

Sundayed in Jackson

the mighty Mississippi kisses

gris-gris dust to house a

Orleans we bury our dead

Square or of the River Walk

Lake Pontchartrain and

wild, unruly population. A

above ground. They always

lovers holding hands…of

spills into the Gulf of Mexico.

city with they own cuisine,

walk amongst us…but

many who have fallen in

There sits that jewel of the

they own architecture,

that music…It always ends

love here, proposed here,

Southland. What the French

they own music…streets

happy. So when a strong

honeymooned here. Not just

lost to the British who

with names like Dorgenois

rain brings angry winds

the howling ghouls of the

gave it to the Spanish who

and Tchoupitoulas.

howlin’ down the Mississippi

frat-boy drunks on Bourbon

or up from the Gulf, those

Street, but they also bring

lost it back to the French who sold it to America

Drummers drag rhythms

misty winds carry the

the angels of all who have

for…Well, some folks say

in dirgey solemnity down

dreams of ghosts, yes, but

romanced in and with this

Jefferson conned Napoleon

neighborhood streets as

not just the goblins of Marie

beautiful land on the Delta.

in a card game and won

horns moan, mock, and moo.

Laveau the Voodoo queen,

it for some jambalaya

Man, hot notes echo against

or the tortured spirits of the

Yes, the ‘haints become

and a chicory coffee.

the sky with such weight

legendary, lascivious lovelies

more famous but the

as to be objects. Objects

of Storyville sporting houses,

Saints endure. Where

New Orleans, N’Awlins, the

of sorrow so passionately

or even the undead demons

were you when 85,000

Crescent City, the Big Easy,

played that the dead begin

of corrupt politicians who

people gathered in the

the northern capitol of the

to cry. Then that trumpet

have steeled our idealism

last open-seated stadium

Caribbean, Groove City.

calls and everyone falls

over three colorful centuries.

in professional football to

Man, they have things down

in behind the band for a

They also bring the spirits

witness John Gilliam run our

there you wouldn’t believe.

second line parade and

of Saints, of those who have

very first kickoff 94 yards for

A mythic place of Mardi

those musicians get to

lived here in quiet dignity

a touchdown? When Tom

Gras and mumbo, Voodoo

hollerin and shoutin and

and sanctified religiosity,

Dempsey kicked that 63-

and the moss-covered,

folks get to struttin and

of those who have raised

yard field goal with half a

alligator-spiked pathways

steppin and the living let go

kids in the shadow of the

right foot? When Tom Fears,

of backcountry swamp

of the dead and sorrow soon

St. Louis Cathedral and

Hank Stram, and Jim Mora

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S TA N F O R D L I V E M A G A Z I N E J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

prowled the sidelines? Were

your college days, the length

demons, goblins, AND saints

you there when Howard

of the Civil War, WW II)…

away forever. There goes

Stevens, Danny Abromowicz,

then 43 years is an eternity.

old Jean Lafitte, the pirate,

Rickey Jackson, and

You ever wait for something

relocated to Houston; there

Archie Manning donned

so long that waiting for it

goes old Jelly Roll Morton

the black and gold? Ahhh,

becomes the something?

off somewhere in Memphis

those New Orleans Saints!

You ever see grown folks

with that diamond still

Confined to a purgatory of

put bags over their heads

sparklin in his front tooth.

their own making, looking

in public, covering up to

for the fast track to hell.

hide from themselves like

We live the moment. Laissez

Maybe a brand-new dome

an old alcoholic who won’t

les bon temps rouler! Let the

would appease the gods of

admit? We can’t help it.

Good Times Roll. I think I

football—a Superdome.

We’re with our Saints even

hear that trumpet calling

when we ain’t. New Orleans

the children of the Who

Fathers bounced kids on

people are stubborn and

Dat Nation home—not

their knees while explaining

hate to leave home. Down

Gabriel’s or the horns that

how we would certainly blow

here, people like to brag

blew down the walls of

our 30-point halftime lead

about how they handle

Jericho—that jazz trumpet

by game’s end…and the

tragedy. Epochal hurricanes

conjuring up the spirit world

Saints did not disappoint.

like Betsy and Camille

with a Congo Square drum

Were you there when the

are discussed as if they’re

cadence. Ghosts, goblins,

Dome Patrol brought us

people. “Betsy was bad but

and ‘haints aggravate.

to the upper chambers

Camille, Lawd Have Mercy,

Saints congregate. I hear

of purgatory in search of

the water was up here to

them now bringing that

playoffs, playoffs...playoffs?

my neck.” Nobody brags on

43-year second line to a

Yes, ‘haints become famous

Katrina. She swept through

glorious crescendo. “Who

but Saints endure. Just ask

here like death on a high

Dat Say What Dat When

Deuce. If 4 years is a long

horse. Those floodwaters

Us Do Dat?” It’s like waiting

time (your high school years,

seemed to run all the

43 years to hear somebody say “I Love You” back. And they do. Let the tale be told ‘bout the black and

“A mythic place of Mardi Gras and mumbo, Voodoo and the moss-covered, alligator-spiked pathways of backcountry…”

gold won the Super Bowl. And those jazzmen still play sad songs, but they always end happy…they always do. —Excerpted from wyntonmarsalis.org

Wynton Marsalis in Conversation Tue, Sep 25 7:30 PM Bing Concert Hall

19


M A I N F E AT U R E

1

The Ties That Bind and Unbind By Natalie Jabbar

In her poem “Human Family,” the late

Steeped in a media landscape replete

In its past season, Stanford Live

writer and activist Maya Angelou

with discord and downright divisiveness,

focused on how America and Canada

recounts the vast differences that

we may find it difficult to grasp, let

define themselves—for better and for

divide us, only to conclude with the

alone believe, Angelou’s sentiment on

worse—through their artistic voices.

following refrain:

our bleakest days. But it is precisely

From Taylor Mac’s American pop

this vital recognition of our human

odyssey to poet Claudia Rankine’s

We are more alike, my friends,

togetherness that inspired the themes

conversation about race in the

than we are unalike.

Stanford Live explores in its 2018–19

American imagination, more than 100

season: Life, Love, and Loss.

artists unpacked notions of nationhood, identity, and nostalgia.

We are more alike, my friends, than we are unalike. 20


S TA N F O R D L I V E M A G A Z I N E J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

“The artists we bring to the stage here are authentic—their voices are coming from their own experience.” — C H R I S LO RWAY

2 Emerging from that exploration, the upcoming season seeks to transcend national borders and the rifts dividing daily across the seams of our globe by harnessing the power of live performance to showcase the universal aspects of our shared humanity. “It makes sense that one of the only ways we can break down these political divides is to get to know each other better and to take away the mythology of ‘the other,’” says Stanford Live executive director Chris Lorway. “How can we cultivate a collective sense of empathy toward all sides?” That quest for sincere engagement and deep empathy is at the root of the new season Life, Love, and Loss. What does it mean to chart a life? How do we form bonds of affection? What happens when we lose people important to us? No matter who we are or where we are from, these questions are central to our existence, though we may answer them in astonishingly different ways. And these are the questions that artists from around the world will illuminate on stage this year through music, movement, theater, conversation, film, and more. Travel to New Orleans, a vibrant city teeming with different culture and

peoples, where the sounds of jazz

mining industry. Imagine navigating the

from the likes of the Branford Marsalis

New York dating scene as a queer man

Quartet fill the electric air. Follow the

with cerebral palsy during Ryan Haddad’s

bodies of Circa, a human circus from

one-man show Hi, Are You Single?

Australia, as they twist their limbs beyond comprehension. Listen to

As they weave together ideas like

Catalan musician and composer Jordi

migration, solace, lineage, rituals, and

Savall and a global array of artists

community into the larger themes of

as they pay musical tribute to the

life, love, and loss, this season’s artists

historic routes of slavery. Experience an

invite us to witness how multifaceted

immersive audio-visual performance

but also how connected we as humans

from Sō Percussion as the group reveals

are. Whether they are choir singers or

the complex layers of Britain’s coal

writers, violin players or contemporary

21


M A I N F E AT U R E

S TA N F O R D L I V E M A G A Z I N E J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

3 1. Honji Wang and Sébastien Ramirez will be in residence at Stanford this fall 2. A scene from Monchichi, which Wang Ramirez performed in the Bing Studio last season 3. Inua Ellams’ Barber Shop Chronicles captures the way community and culture come to life in everyday gathering spaces

dancers, they are all storytellers as well.

artists who will spend extended periods

open to these artists so that they can

If, as the late great political philosopher

of time on campus, interacting with

use Stanford to inform their own arts

Hannah Arendt once wrote, “storytelling

faculty, students, and the community.

practice,” Elam continues. “This is one of the first steps for truly making

reveals meaning without committing

Stanford a destination for the arts.”

the error of defining it,” then each of

“One of our major goals for the arts

these live performances tells a story

at Stanford is to make our university a

that unveils some aspect of a culture

vibrant home for arts and artists. We see

Residencies like these can be

or a history without reducing it to a

artists’ residencies as a vital component

transformative for the artist, audience,

mere data point. And that complex

of this strategy. Next year’s Presidential

and students alike. Stanford political

story, in this era of distilled, distorted,

Residencies with Nitin Sawhney and

science PhD candidate and lifelong

and simplified sound bites, is an

Wang Ramirez will be an opportunity

ballet and contemporary dancer Glory

incomparable gift.

for these artists to interact more closely

Liu took a master class from visiting

with Stanford students, particularly,

international hip-hop duo Wang Ramirez

To support the next generation of

and with the Stanford community

(Honji Wang and Sébastien Ramirez) last

such vital storytelling and art making,

more generally,” says Harry Elam, vice

year. She says working intensely with

Stanford Live and the university at large

president for the arts and senior vice

Honji Wang, learning the duo’s stories,

are also now making an investment in

provost for education.

and then ultimately seeing them perform was both enriching and unforgettable:

supporting cutting-edge artists and bringing them to campus. Through the

“The residencies also are about

“To have them come to us and bring a

newly established Stanford Presidential

helping the artists in ways that

different set of traditions, languages,

Residencies on the Future of the Arts,

only Stanford can. The intellectual

and stories opened our eyes to the much

the university can invite a number of

possibilities of this university will be

larger world of dance.”

22


S TA N F O R D L I V E M A G A Z I N E J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

As a scholar who focuses on political

from the experience they are talking

theory and American politics who is also

about,” says Chris Lorway. “The

passionate about movement, Liu says

artists we bring to the stage here are

dance—and the arts more broadly—is

authentic—their voices are coming from

an essential language that offers us a

their own experience.”

“We’re staying in the home that we love, thanks to Avenidas Village!”

way to express ideas that may otherwise be difficult to communicate.

And perhaps by listening to these genuine voices as they embody and

“A large part of the national

perform love, life, and loss—and by

conversation that’s happening now

engaging in that magical dialogue

is referred to as that empathy wall—

that happens during the performance

‘we don’t understand the people in

between the artist and each of us—we

Louisiana’ and so forth,” she explains.

might remember that we are, as Maya

“But a lot of dancers are using art

Angelou suggested, more alike than we

as an empathy vehicle. Artists like

are unalike.

Wang Ramirez are using dance as a conversation to transcend ethnic and

Natalie Jabbar is assistant director of

national boundaries.”

public relations for Stanford’s School of Humanities and Sciences.

Nitin Sawhney, a British Indian musician, composer, and producer, will be in residence at Stanford this fall as part of the new Stanford Presidential Residencies on the Future of the Arts. Sawhney will collaborate with the returning dancers Wang Ramirez to produce Dystopian Dream, a surreal and transcendent journey about loss,

Dystopian Dream Nitin Sawhney and Wang Ramirez Thu, Oct 4, & Fri, Oct 5 7:30 PM Memorial Auditorium

Shop Chronicles is supported through this initiative. Ellams, a writer who immigrated from Nigeria to London as a teenager, takes audiences into the intimate space of African barbershops

• 24/7 assistance • Access to a network of over 200 vetted vendors • Discounts on services

surrender, and continuity. In addition, Inua Ellams’ acclaimed play Barber

“Joining Avenidas Village gives us all the benefits of a retirement community, but we didn’t have to move!”

Barber Shop Chronicles A Fuel, National Theatre, and West Yorkshire Playhouse coproduction Thu, Nov 8–Sat, Nov 10 Roble Studio Theater

• Socializing • Cultural outings • Transportation assistance • And more!

in Johannesburg, Kampala, Accra, and London where they will witness stories

“Call (650) 289-5405 for a free personal consultation to see if Avenidas Village will work for you as well as it has worked for us! We love it!”

unravel with every strand of hair shorn. Whether in the artistic residencies or the full range of the 2018–19 offerings, the curators of Stanford Live’s season wanted to ensure that each cross-cultural voice or expression had emanated from an informed, experiential representation. “We’ve become a society of talking heads, a lot of whom are not coming

www.avenidasvillage.org 23


F E AT U R E T T E

1

Nitin Sawhney: How I Wrote Music for a Dance Without Dancers By Judith Mackrell

He has composed for films, TV series,

Sawhney was still recovering from

and orchestras. But his Dystopian Dream

the marathon of writing music for

could be his most ambitious work yet.

all eight episodes of the BBC series Human Planet. He admits he was

Editor’s Note: This article was originally

not at his most receptive when the

published in the Guardian on June 2, 2016.

choreographer said to him: “Right Nitin, what I want here is 10 minutes

Nitin Sawhney has always loved

of just banging.” As he recalls: “I was

writing music for dance, but he finds

like, ‘What? What kind of banging?’

working with choreographers a very

How is that going to work for me?”

specific discipline—with very specific restraints. “You have to suspend

However, once he’d worked out that

your ego,” he laughs and mentions

Khan wanted something that “sounded

a particularly challenging moment

very tribal, very primal,” he went

during a collaboration with his good

on to write music unlike anything

friend Akram Khan. It was late and

he’d ever composed before. “It was

2 24


S TA N F O R D L I V E M A G A Z I N E J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

3 a ticking that gradually expanded into this huge pulse,” he says of his compositions for what became 2010’s Vertical Road. “It sounded so epic, so strong—it was like the beginning of the universe. Working with someone else’s vision can be such a revelation. Once you start digging into their thoughts, you create something you would never have got to by yourself.” He may be a DJ, a producer, a guitarist, and a composer who’s written for films, TV shows, video games, and symphony orchestras, but dance has always been a force in Sawhney’s life. His mother trained as a bharata natya dancer when she was a young woman in India; and during his own teenage years in Kent, he became heavily involved in the local street dance scene. Seated in his Brixton studio, a magical hive crowded with instruments and recording equipment, he says: “I was a breakdancer when I was a kid. I was really into it.” Later, as a young composer, it was his study of classical kathak music that led Sawhney to write his first scores for dance, working with Britishbased performers like Nahid Siddiqui. Collaborating with Khan—a pairing that began with the 1999 solo Fix— has brought a wider involvement with the art form. He makes proud mention of a charity event at which he performed a solo choreographed by Hofesh Shechter—“a rave dance with a glitter ball”—and says he now attends dance performances regularly, and attentively. “It’s amazing to see how dance is put together. As a musician, it’s such a wonderful

vocabulary. You can hear music in

1–2.

every movement the body makes. Even

Sébastien Ramirez and

when there’s no movement, there’s a tension that is always exciting.”

Honji Wang perform in Dystopian Dream 3.

Sawhney has become such an integral

The acclaimed artist

part of the British dance scene, he’s

and polymath Nitin

been made an associate artist of Sadler’s Wells, the UK’s premier dance house. He feels a deep affection for the London venue and his latest project is almost a love letter to it. The work is part of No Body, a series of multimedia installations designed for 25

Sawhney


F E AT U R E T T E

S TA N F O R D L I V E M A G A Z I N E J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

Sébastien Ramirez and Honji Wang perform in Dystopian Dream

different parts of the building, which,

emotion that’s been contained here

the geography. Arranged over three

although inspired by dance, involve no

and is still imprinted on its walls.”

floors, it will begin in the foyer and then move upstairs until it ends in a

live performance. Instead, the event is conceived as a choreography of light,

Working with the video artist Nick

rehearsal room where, he promises,

imagery, and sound, with creations

Hillel, Sawhney trawled through

“there will be some kind of revelation.”

by lighting designers Michael Hulls

an archive of old photographs and

This physical ascent is Sawhney’s way

and Lucy Carter and film by Siobhan

playbills from the theater, piecing

of referencing the wells around which

Davies and Russell Maliphant.

together a history that dates back

the first theater on the site was built: “I

to the early 1800s, when comedians

wanted to create the feeling that the

At first, Sawhney wasn’t clear exactly

like Joseph Grimaldi were its stars.

installation was rising from the depths

why they should be ditching live

This progresses to the 1930s, when

of the past and up into the light.”

performance. “To be honest, I couldn’t

Margot Fonteyn was its fledgling

get my head around where it was

ballerina, before reaching the

For his next dance project, another

coming from.” But, turning the idea

present day. Working with Hillel’s

Sadler’s Wells coproduction, Sawhney

over, he began to see it as a great

images, Sawhney composed his own

is very much in the physical here and

opportunity to work in a new genre

impressionistic, aural recall of the

now. It’s a staged concert of his album

and communicate something of what

theater’s history, which the audience

Dystopian Dream that will feature

the theater means to him. “I had the

will listen to through headphones as

the hip-hop/contemporary dance

idea of an installation that would

they walk through the installation.

duo Wang and Ramirez. During the writing of Dystopian Dream, Sawhney

explore the history of the building— all the performers who’ve left their

The final crucial component of Indelible,

says he had an almost cinematic

mark on the stage, all the heightened

as Sawhney has titled his creation, is

narrative running through his head,

26


and he imagined that at some point the album could be turned into a fully choreographed piece. He worked with Wang and Ramirez at the album’s launch, where they performed to the track “Redshift.” “They captured everything I was hoping for. This album has lots of layers, and they got that. They can work in ways that are symbolic but also deeply personal. They can go from something intimate to something quite epic.” Sawhney talks of feeling a visceral thrill whenever he watches his music take on an independent physical life. “When I conducted the London Symphony Orchestra, that was

Our life here

wonderful. A month earlier, I’d been imagining this music in my head. Now all these people were performing

Chris Gandel and Misty, joined in 2014

it. Dance is such a human, such a full-bodied form of expression; it’s always going to draw you in.”

Amazing

SMILES Frequent Wags.

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Nitin Sawhney: A Musical Life Sat, Sep 29 7:30 PM Bing Concert Hall Dystopian Dream Nitin Sawhney and Wang Ramirez Thu, Oct 4, & Fri, Oct 5 7:30 PM Memorial Auditorium

401 Webster Street, Palo Alto, CA 94301

websterhousepaloalto.org

A not-for-profit community owned and operated by Episcopal Senior Communities. License No. 435294364 COA #246. EPWH755-01KB 090117


Six Degrees of Nitin Sawhney

Nitin Sawhney is one of the most distinctive and versatile musical voices around. A true polymath, he is a world-class producer, songwriter, DJ, multi-instrumentalist, orchestral composer, and cultural pioneer—a latter-day Renaissance man in the worlds of music, film, video games, dance, and theater.

AKRAM KHAN

In 2002, Sawhney worked with dancer and choreographer Akram Khan, writing the music for Khan’s work Kaash, which toured worldwide. These two kindred spirits converged again with zero degrees (2005), bahok (2008), Confluence (2009), and Vertical Road (2010).

ANOUSHKA SHANKAR

He produced Anoushka Shankar’s Grammynominated album Traces of You, which features vocals by Norah Jones.

J O H N H U RT

Sawhney’s 2011 studio work, Last Days of Meaning, is a “parable about entrenchment and dogmatism” in modernday Britain, according to the artist. On the album, songs and instrumental pieces are interspersed with spoken Nitin Sawhney: A Musical Life

reflections voiced by actor John Hurt.

Sat, Sep 29 7:30 PM Bing Concert Hall Dystopian Dream Nitin Sawhney and Wang Ramirez Thu, Oct 4 Fri, Oct 5 7:30 PM Memorial Auditorium

28


A N DY S E R K I S

Sawhney composed the music for the Ninja Theory video games Heavenly Sword and Enslaved: Odyssey to the West, both of which star actor Andy Serkis.

C L A I R E FOY

He also recently scored Andy Serkis’ directorial debut Breathe, which features The Crown star Claire Foy.

MIRA NAIR

Sawhney’s notable film and TV scores include music for the BBC series Natural Fantasia and Human Planet and for Oscar-nominated director Mira Nair’s adaptation of Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Namesake.

PAU L M C C A RT N E Y

Sawhney’s 10 studio albums include 2008’s London Undersound, which contains the song “My Soul” recorded with Paul McCartney.

29


F E AT U R E T T E

In Conversation with Inua Ellams Writer of Barber Shop Chronicles

A key performance in Stanford Live’s

shared a little about his purpose in

one would fund me to do this, but the

upcoming season upholding universal

creating this work for the stage.

idea stayed with me. The idea of the poems turned to conversations, to

human dignity—rooted in the common experiences of life, love, and loss—is

What inspired you to write this play?

scenes, to settings, to drama, to politics, to anthropology, to history, to the

Barber Shop Chronicles, a play by UKbased Nigerian playwright Inua Ellams

Years ago I learned of a charity that was

contemporary—to everything really. I

that transcends identities, borders,

trying to train barbers in the very basics

wanted to capture the fragility of black

and creeds. Depicting the barbershop,

of counseling, and I never realized how

men in their own setting.

a space where everyday tasks of life’s

intimate the conversations could get

upkeep give way to profound community

between barbers and clients. Initially

bonds, Ellams’ play offers a supple view

I wanted to be voyeuristic and create

of human continuity across the cultural

poems. Just to record the conversations

I went to London, South Africa, Uganda,

complexities of the African continent

and try and write poems about the

Nigeria, and Ghana. I met individuals,

and diaspora. Before the premiere, he

interactions between these men. No

transcribed and recorded, mixed things

30

How did you approach the piece?


S TA N F O R D L I V E M A G A Z I N E J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

“I’ve tried to create that sense of camaraderie and a safe space for the men in the play to be themselves.” — I N UA E L L A M S

together, created whole new characters,

of precision is out there in the public.

scrapped some, and created this play

Maybe the Caribbean men have more

Barber Shop Chronicles

that is 40 percent verbatim, 60 percent

light shown on the many facets of the

A Fuel, National Theatre, and West

invented. It was a lot of work drawing

island, but I don’t think there are that

Yorkshire Playhouse coproduction

strands together and churning. I’ve tried

many of African men.

Thu, Nov 8–Sat, Nov 10

to create that sense of camaraderie and a safe space for the men in the play to

Roble Studio Theater —Courtesy of the National Theatre, 2017

be themselves. What is the significance of the different places in the play? The UK, South Africa, Uganda, Nigeria, and Ghana? Simply because they’re Anglophone Africa rather than Francophone Africa—I wanted to create a diasporas conversation between black African men in the UK and black African men on the continent. And those were the places I had the most friends and ins into barbershops. What do you want people to take away from the piece? Just how vast, complex, and nuanced the continent is. The very many types of black men that exist. The stereotypes created for us, for the actors perfumed on television, all of them lack in grace and specificity and are tired and dated. It is just so multilayered, multifaceted, a plethora of identities that we don’t have represented in the UK, and I wanted to share that. To show the kaleidoscopic nature of masculinity on the continent and here. And we know that black men know that, but I don’t think that level

EAP 1_3 S template.indd 1

4/11/18 10:09 AM


J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

Behind the Scenes

We are proud to continue to deepen our partnerships with other organizations in the Bay Area. In particular, Stanford Live has been working closely with UC Berkeley’s Cal Performances to bring several artists to the region for an extended period, allowing a larger number of audiences to experience

1

the work. “Our projects with

3

Stanford Live have been 2

model artistic collaborations,” says Matías Tarnopolsky, executive and artistic director of Cal Performances. “We are thrilled to be partnering again on an exciting and deeply relevant new piece of music, Jimmy López’s Dreamer, which receives its premiere next March in Berkeley and at Stanford.” In addition to Dreamer, audiences on both sides of the Bay will be also be able to experience a variety of shows including Mouthpiece, Barber Shop Chronicles, and Jordi Savall’s The Routes of Slavery C H R I S LO RWAY E X EC U T I V E D I R EC TO R

1

2

3

Composer Jimmy López with

Last season’s production of the

Mouthpiece, the two-woman

conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen,

“guerrilla folk opera” Counting

show created and performed

who will lead the premiere of Dreamer, an oratorio

Sheep was presented in the

by Amy Nostbakken and Norah

Bing Studio before the Cal

Sadava, will start its Bay Area

co-commissioned with Cal

Performances run in Oakland’s

run in the Bing Studio next

Performances and based

Metro Opera House.

January before heading to

on stories of young people

Berkeley in March.

enrolled in the DACA program in Berkeley.

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“Our broker at First Republic knows us and understands us — and that is extremely valuable.” M A R C M C M O R R I S , Co-Founder and Director, Carrick Capital Partners M A R J O R I E M C M O R R I S , Founder and Director, The Helix School Foundation

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Membership

J U LY / A U G 2 0 1 8

1

Meet Our Members Ayleen and Emory Lee have been Stanford Live members since 2012 For Emory and Ayleen Lee,

The couple’s commitment to

anniversary at Jeremy Denk’s

their support for Stanford

public service began when

recital this season. Ayleen

Live reflects several important

Emory was in graduate

notes, “What I like about Bing

aspects of their lives.

school, around the time of the

is going to a program I may

Vietnam War. Emory says, “The

know little about but I think I

Emory cofounded the

dissertation I was working on

should go see. And I have an

Stanford Asian Pacific

seemed totally irrelevant, so

enjoyable experience.”

American Alumni Club and

I basically dropped out and

Ayleen attended Stanford

started doing volunteer work

With their many commitments,

Law School after the couple

in Chinatown.” This led to a

why is it important to the

began raising a family, but

career at the U.S. Department

Lees to support Stanford Live?

they met in the 1950s when

of Health and Human Services

“Simply because we love the

Ayleen was attending Mills

and a lifetime commitment to

music and the opportunity it

College. Emory recalls, “There

the importance of public

creates for people to become

was a Stanford/Mills College

service.

acquainted with Stanford. Stanford Live really provides a

exchange. A group of us went up to Mills and that’s how

The Lees are often at Stanford

wonderful service and helps to

I met Ayleen.”

Live programs and even

open up the campus.”

celebrated their recent wedding 34


2

3

4

Bing Memberships, concert and series sponsorships, and giving to our annual fund all help make Bing Concert Hall a home for amazing arts experiences. To make a gift to support Stanford Live, please contact our Development Department at 650.725.8782 or supportstanfordlive@stanford.edu. 1

2

3

4

Ayleen and Emory Lee

The Stanford Symphony

Jeremy Denk’s Charles Ives

Although their interests

are pictured in their Palo

Orchestra’s Beethoven

recital on January 28

lean toward classical and

Alto home.

Project during the inaugural

marked Ayleen and Emory’s

jazz, Ayleen and Emory aren’t

season at the Bing was

anniversary.

afraid to take a chance on

a particular highlight for

other offerings like Selected

Ayleen and Emory.

Shorts’ holiday show last year.

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Stanford Live Members Stanford Live thanks the following members for their support: BING CIRCLE ($25,000+) Anonymous Jeanne & Larry Aufmuth Helen & Peter Bing The Bullard Family Roberta & Steven Denning Ann & John Doerr Jill & Norm Fogelsong Scott & Molly Forstall Jill & John§ Freidenrich Mary & Clinton Gilliland Marcia & John Goldman Drs. Lynn Gretkowski & Mary Jacobson Leonard Gumport & Wendy Munger Cynthia Fry Gunn & John A. Gunn Stephanie & Fred Harman Rick Holmstrom & Kate Ridgway The Hornik Family Leslie & George Hume Trine Sorensen & Michael Jacobson Fong Liu Deedee & Burton McMurtry Phyllis Moldaw Barbara Oshman Mindy & Jesse Rogers Marian & Abraham Sofaer Bonnie & Marty Tenenbaum Priscilla & Ward Woods

BING DIRECTOR’S CIRCLE ($15,000–$24,999) Carol & Myles Berg Shawn & Brook Byers Lynn & Jim Gibbons Morton Grosser Catherine & Franklin Johnson Marlo Kahn Kitch & Justin Kitch Joan F. Lane Leatrice Lee Debra & Mark Leslie Sandra Magnussen

Carrick & Andrew McLaughlin Linda & Tony Meier Nancy & Lawrence Mohr William Reller Condoleezza Rice Madeline & Isaac Stein

William Coggshall & Janet Littlefield Sissy & Theodore Geballe Judy & Jerrol Harris Kari & Michael Kirk Iris & Hal Korol Charlotte & Larry Langdon Betsy & Matt Matteson Judy Mohr & Keith Reeves Betsy Morgenthaler Og & Ogina Kenneth Weinberg

BING ARTIST’S CIRCLE ($7,500–$14,999) Anonymous (5) Fred Alvarez & Beth McLellan Alvarez Carla Baird & David Crane Felicity Barringer & Philip Taubman Alison & Joe Barta Sally Benson & Terry Surles Nancy & James Bildner Recia & Mark Blumenkranz Iris & Paul Brest Janice Brody & Bruce Rule Eva & Chris Canellos Regina & Gerhard Casper Diane & Stephen Ciesinski Ann & David Crockett Julia & James Davidson Margaret Dorfman Susan Ford Dorsey & Michael Dorsey William Draper III Debbie Duncan & Bill Stone Barbara Edwards Melissa & Trevor Fetter Mary & William Fitch Jean-Marc Frailong & Richard Halton Maggie & Fred Grauer Ann M. Griffiths Gail & Walter Harris Eleanor & Bruce Heister Anne & Jack Holloway Larry Horton & George Wilson Elizabeth & Zachary Hulsey Wende & Tom Hutton Mary Ittelson Lucie Jay Sallie De Golia-Jorgenson & John Jorgenson Betty & Bob Joss Roberta & Charles Katz Lisa Keamy & Lloyd Minor Kathy & John Kissick Ingrid Lai & William Shu Sujitpan Lamsam & Scott Sagan Carolyn & William Langelier Laura & Gary Lauder Bren & Lawrence Leisure Robert Lence Cynthia & Richard Livermore Rick & Amy Magnuson Jane & Michael Marmor Victoria & James Maroulis Jim McLaughlin & Cathy McMurtry Bill Meehan David Morandi Tashia & John Morgridge Dean Morton Susan & Bill Oberndorf John O’Farrell & Gloria Principe Lynn & Susan Orr Anthony Paduano & Ruth Porat Donna & Channing Robertson Barbara & Greg Rosston Tom Sadler & Eila Skinner Meryl & Rob Selig The Honorable and Mrs. George P. Shultz Barbara & Arnold Silverman Peter Staple & Harise Stein Diane & Hal Steuber Andrea & Lubert Stryer Lena & Ken Tailo Carol & Doug Tanner Lorna & Mark Vander Ploeg Karin & Paul Wick David Wollenberg Susan & David Young

PARTNER ($1,000–$2,499) Anonymous (5) Marian & Jim Adams Lysbeth Anderson & John Working Keith Baker Linda & Laurence Baker Therese Baker-Degler Lindy Barocchi Celia Oakley & Craig Barratt Lisa Barrett Deborah & Jonathan Berek Mildred & Paul Berg Jill & Bruce Bienenstock Celeste & Wendell Birkhofer Carolyn & Gary Bjorklund Linda & Steve Boxer Susan Breyer Joan & Thomas Brown Terri Bullock Jane Shaw & Peter Carpenter John Carter & Edie Goldberg Tasha Castaneda Andrew Chan Donald Cheu Holly & Andrew Cohen Sheila Cohen & Richard Mazze Alexis & David Colker Joanne & Michael Condie Janet & Richard Cory Sommer William Coughran Jr. Toni Cupal & Mike Volpi Cornelia L. Dekker Debra Demartini Tom Dienstbier & Joyce Firstenberger Stan Drobac & Michelle Swenson Diane Elder & Bruce Noble Patricia Engasser Stanley Falkow & Lucy Tompkins Margaret Ann & Don Fidler Rona Foster & Ken Powell Lorien French Betsy & David Fryberger Aileen Furukawa Jane & Bruce Gee Susan Goodhue Ed Haertel & Drew Oman David Hants & Ilze Silis Eric Hanushek & Margaret Raymond Joerg Heilig Anne & William Hershey Caroline Hicks Karen Hohner & Randall Keith Leslie Hsu & Richard Lenon Dorothy & Rex Jamison Pamela S. Karlan Julie Kaufman & Doug Klein Grace Kim Kay & Ed Kinney Doug Fitzgerald & Amy Ladd Albe & Ray Larsen Ayleen & Emory Lee Lucy & Jason Lee Philip Lee & Carlene Wong Shirley Liebhaber Kristen & Felix Lo Joan Mansour Sandra & Joseph Martignetti Yoshiko Matsumoto & John Ryan Vicki & Jim Merchant Dick Miller & James Stutts Martha Morrell & Jaime Tenedorio Paula Moya & Ramon Saldivar Joyce & Joseph Nishimura Mary Jane & Richard Otte Carmela & Eli Pasternak Edward & Nadine Pflueger Jin-Piao Trust Shirley & Bob Raymer

SUSTAINER ($2,500–$7,499) Keith Amidon & Rani Menon Jonathan, Frances & Alison Axelrad Mary Bechmann James Campbell James Canales & James McCann

36

Katherine & Gary Reback Rossannah Reeves Sara Eisner Richter & Michael Richter Diane & Joe Rolfe Amy Rosenberg & John Slafsky Nancy & Norman Rossen Diana & Philip Russell Doris Sayon Elizabeth & Mark Schar Fund of The Greater Cincinnati Foundation Diane Shemanski Deborah & Michael Shepherd Sally Dudley & Charles Sieloff Susan Speicher Linda & Jeffrey Suto Onnolee & Orlin Trapp Mary & John Wachtel Ben Wegbreit Dr. Irving Weissman & Ann Tsukamoto-Weissman Karen & Rand White Mansie & Gary Williams Elizabeth F. Wright Sharon & Robert Yoerg

ADVOCATE ($500–$999) Anonymous (6) Laura Adams Dorothy Anderson Lois & Edward Anderson Janice & William Anderson Markus Aschwanden & Carol Kersten Marie & Douglas Barry Elaine Baskin & Kenneth Krechmer Melody & Walter Baumgartner Richard Baumgartner & Elizabeth Salzer Ann & John Bender Susan Berman & Leon Lipson Charlotte & David Biegelsen Richard Bland & Marlene Rabinovitch Jeanie & Carl Blom Vera Blume Bonnie & William Blythe Patty Boone & Dave Pfefer Charles Bliss & Caroline Bowker David Braker Prudence Breitrose Laura Breyfogle & David Warner Maude & Philip Brezinski Katharine Carroll & Alison Rosenthal Chanin & Dotson Family Gloria & Michael Chiang Joyce Chung & Rene Lacerte Kalyani Comal & Arun Ramakrishnan Paula Cooper Jacqueline & Robert Cowden Suzanne & Bruce Crocker Melanie & Peter Cross Ken Daigle & John Schramm III Richard De Luce Donato Desopo & Marian Sagan Christina Reid Dickerson Michael Dickey Carol Dressler Michael Duff Kathleen Dumas Robert Dutton & Carol Walsh-Dutton Eleanor Eisner Maria & George Erdi Anna Espinosa Sally & Craig Falkenhagen Jeffrey Fenton Alex Fielding Joan & Allan Fisch Robert Flanagan & Susan Mendelsohn Diana & Freeman Ford Leah & Lawrence Friedman Drs. Margaret L. Forsyth & Glenn D. Rennels Sarah & Stan Freedman Carol C. & Joel P. Friedman Dianne & Wesley Gardiner Martha Gates & Spencer Commons Karen & Edward Gilhuly Elizabeth Gish Charles Goldenberg & Pamela Polos Jan Newstrom Thompson & Paul Goldstein Margaret & Ben Gong Edward Goodstein & Francesca Eastman Elizabeth & Jeff Grammer Brian & Susan Gray Sally Gressens & Lee Yearley


Ester Gubbrud & Charles Ross Elizabeth M. Gulevich Jeanette & Harold Guthart Jamie Hale Ann Hammond Clark Sara & Michael Hammond Joyce & James Harris Fran & Steve Harris Katherine Hill & Edward Stabler Freda Hofland & Lester Thompson Robin & Linc Holland Chris Iannuccilli & Michele Schiele Alyson & James Illich Sally & Rob Jackson Leigh & Roy Johnson Lil & Todd Johnson Martha & Michael Kahn Inge Keuppens & Marc Vanlerberghe Mary Lou Kilcline Barbara Klein & Stanley Schrier Renate Klipstas Christina Kong Jeffrey Koseff & Thalia Anagnos Linda & Fredric Kraemer Jean Lane Mr. & Dr. Kurt F. Lang Lisa Lapin Cathy & Stephen Lazarus Joan & Philip Leighton Doreen & David Leith Roxanne Leung Sanford Lewis Irene Lin Marcia Linn & Jack Morris Sherry Listgarten Drs. John & Penny Loeb Teri Longacre & Richard Hildebrandt Rachel & Zohar Lotan Kathryn Naylor Low Patricia & George Lundberg Ruth Lycette Kathy Mach & David Scherer Charlene & Dick Maltzman Allison & Nino Marakovic Bettina McAdoo & Gordon Russell Marylin McCarthy Penny & Jim Meier Elyce Melmon Evelyn Miller Maureen Missett Jose Montoya James Murphy Katherine Jolluck & Norman Naimark Mariam Nayiny Kirstin & Frederic Nichols Christine & Ronald Orlowski Shari & Donald Ornstein Nancy & Stephen Player Barbara & Warren Poole Kitty & Lee Price Kathryn Pryor Richard & Karen Recht Kyoko Robinson Christine Robles Maureen & Paul Roskoph Ann Rossi Elise & Jay Rossiter Loren & Shelley Saxe Paula & George Schlesinger Cora Schmid Sue Schmitt Schwabacher Family Robyn & Mark Setzen Craig Sherman & Susan Shin Judith & William Shilstone Judy & Lee Shulman Diane & Branimir Sikic Mary Ann Sing Hannah & Richard Slocum Karen & Frank Sortino Nancy Stanwood Barbara & Charles Stevens Judith Stewart Tracy Storer & Marcia Kimes Edward Storm Eleanor Sue Rosalinda & Michael Taymor Carol & Christopher Thomsen Wendy & Roger Von Oech Penelope & Robert Waites Joan & Roger Warnke Patti & Ed White John & Jane Williams Polly Wong & Wai Fan You

Marilyn & Irvin Yalom Wai Yau Mitchell & Kristen Yawitz Mary H. Young Roy Zemlicka Selma Zinker

SUPPORTER ($250–$499) Anonymous (6) Matthew & Marcia Allen Dana & Juliana Andersen Richard & Delores Anderson Dan & Leslie Armistead Byron Bader James & Jennifer Bae Anne & Robert Baldwin Betsy and George Bechtel Mary Bellack Bethel Berhanu Pamela Bernstein Richard Boyd & Martha Crenshaw Ruth Brill Beverly Brockway Lottie & Henry Burger Francis & Nancy Cavagnaro Beth Charlesworth Susan Christiansen Albert & Betty Cohen Susie Cohen Elaine Costello & Warren Dougherty Richard & Suzanne Cottle Ann & George Crane Patricia & Tim Daniels Angel & Jonrie Davila Lothar De Temple Judith Dean & Ben Encisco Bernadine Donoghue Maureen & Paul Draper Anne Dubin Ellen & Tom Ehrlich Melanie & Stephen Erasmus Patricia & Fred Evans Joyce Farrell & Brian Wandell Barbara Blatner-Fikes & Richard Fikes Barry Fleisher Madeleine Frankel Amy Friedman E. Alexander Glover The Goldhaber-Fiebert Family Paul Goldstein & Dena Mossar Harry & Diane Greenberg Ann & Barry Haskell Tanya Hastings Karin Heck Jeffrey & Caron Heimbuck Jeanne Hochman Bebe & Rich Hoppe Rob Huffman & Emily Smith Edmon Jennings Patricia Johnson Jane & Bill Johnson Zeev Kaliblotzky Stina & Herant Katchadourian Ron Katz & Libby Roth Barney & Keats Lynn & Richard Kelson Norman & Nina Kulgein Ralph & Rose Lachman Uri Ladabaum Cathy & Dick Lampman Catherin Kawon Lee Y. K. Lee Laurie Leventhal-Belfer Reuben Levy Claire & Herbert Lindenberger Edward Lohmann Marion & Erick Mack Jane & Thomas Marshburn Michael McFaul & Donna Norton Meghan McGeary & Chih Sung Maura McGinnity & Erik Rausch Wallace Mersereau Alan Miller Steven Mitchel Rudolf Moos Mary Mourkas Coralie & Gerhard Mueller Jean & Bryan Myers Theodor & Lisa Nissim Joan Norton Cynthia & James Nourse

Gary Peltz Joseph Pickering Carole & Lowell Price Jennifer Rose Ruth Rothman John Sack & Jeff Rensch Linda Sampson Angela & Samuel Schillace Joy & Richard Scott Lorraine & Jerry Seelig Carla Shatz Russell Siegelman Matthew Sommer Gayle & Scott Spencer Kathy Stark Elliot & Karen Stein Suzanne Stout Elizabeth Trueman & Raymond Perrault Ina Trugman Brigitte & John Turneaure Debbie Vallarino Andrew Velline Teri & Mark Vershel Jefferson Burch & Christine Weigen Susan & Lew Wexler Jay & Sallie Whaley Jeri & Kevin Wheaton Diane Wieder Curt Williams Warren Wu Cristina Zappacosta

PERFORMANCE SPONSORS Jeanne & Larry Aufmuth Helen & Peter Bing The Bullard Family Roberta & Steven Denning Margaret Dorfman Scott & Molly Forstall Marcia & John Goldman Stephanie & Fred Harman The Hornik Family Michael Jacobson & Trine Sorensen Bonnie & Marty Tenenbaum Wollenberg Foundation

INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERS $100,000+ The Koret Foundation $50,000–$99,999 The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation $10,000–$49,999 Anonymous Chamber Music America Nathan Cummings Foundation, with the support and encouragement of Jaimie Mayer Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson Funds National Endowment for the Arts $1,000–$9,999 California Arts Council Aaron Copland Fund for Music Kinder Morgan Foundation Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation New England Foundation for the Arts Western States Arts Federation Contributions listed are from current Stanford Live members who made gifts through 5/21/18. For corrections, or to make a contribution, please contact us at 650.725.8782 or supportstanfordlive@ stanford.edu. To learn more about giving to Stanford Live, visit live.stanford.edu/give. § Deceased

37

2017–18 Advisory Council The purpose of the Stanford Live Advisory Council is to support the mission of Stanford Live and to provide advice on the strategic direction of the organization. Leslie P. Hume, Cochair George H. Hume, Cochair Jeanne Aufmuth Peter Bing Fred Harman Rick Holmstrom Bren Leisure Betsy Matteson Linda Meier Trine Sorensen Srinija Srinivasan Doug Tanner David Wollenberg Ex officio: Maude Brezinski Stephen Sano Matthew Tiews

Bing Concert Hall Donors BUILDING DONORS Peter and Helen Bing Cynthia Fry Gunn and John A. Gunn John Arrillaga Family Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Roberta and Steve Denning Elizabeth and Bruce Dunlevie Jill and John Freidenrich Frances and Theodore Geballe Andrea and John Hennessy Leslie and George Hume Susan and Craig McCaw Deedee and Burt McMurtry Linda and Tony Meier Wendy Munger and Leonard Gumport Jennifer Jong Sandling and M. James Sandling Regina and John Scully Madeline and Isaac Stein Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang

BING EXPERIENCE FUND DONORS With appreciation for the following donors, who provide major support for programming and musical instruments for Bing Concert Hall. Anonymous Apogee Enterprises, Inc. The Adolph Baller Performance Fund for Bing Concert Hall Friends of Music at Stanford Fred and Stephanie Harman Fong Liu Elayne and Thomas Techentin, in memory of Beatrice Griffin Bonnie and Marty Tenenbaum The Fay S. and Ada S. Tom Family Turner Corporation The Frank Wells Family Maurice and Helen Werdegar


SEP / OCT 2018

Calendar

OCT 10 & 11

Wed

Wed

SEPTEMBER 26

OCTOBER 10

Jazz at Lincoln

I’m With Her

Center Orchestra Spaces with dancers Lil Buck

Thu

and Jared Grimes

OCTOBER 11

Rob Kapilow’s Sat

What Makes It Great?

SEPTEMBER 29

Love, Life, and Loss: The Music

Nitin Sawhney:

of Stephen Sondheim

A Musical Life

Sun

OCT

OCTOBER 14

Sundays with the St. Lawrence

SEPT

Wed

St. Lawrence String Quartet

OCTOBER 3

with Anne-Marie McDermott,

Fri

Philharmonia Baroque

piano

SEPTEMBER 21

Orchestra and Chorale

Charles Lloyd and

Mozart Magnified

Thu & Fri

With special guest

Thu & Fri

Hi, Are You Single?

Lucinda Williams

OCTOBER 4 & 5

Ryan Haddad

OCTOBER 18 & 19

the Marvels

Dystopian Dream Tue

Nitin Sawhney and

SEPTEMBER 25

Wang Ramirez

Sat OCTOBER 20

Kronos Quartet

Wynton Marsalis in Conversation

Wed

Music for Change:

OCTOBER 10

The Banned Countries

Rob Kapilow’s Sun

What Makes It Great? Janáček’s Intimate Letters

SEP 26

OCTOBER 21

Seong-Jin Cho

OCT 10

BUY TICKETS TODAY!

Presented by Stanford Live

LIVE.STANFORD.EDU OR 650.724.BING (2464)

Stanford University, 365 Lasuen Street,

Visit the Stanford Live website for updates.

Second Floor Littlefield Center, MC 2250

All programs and prices are subject to change.

Stanford, CA 94305

38


Plan Your Visit

Things to Know The Interlude Café in Bing

Change your plans?

Large-print programs

Concert Hall’s lobby serves

Exchange your tickets or make

are available with 72

guests before performances

a tax-deductible donation at

hours’ notice given to

and during intermission. For

live.stanford.edu/changes.

the administrative office.

complete hours, menus, and

Please send all requests to stanfordlive@stanford.edu.

preordering options, visit

Wheelchair seating, with up

live.stanford.edu/dining.

to three companion seats per wheelchair space, is available

Volunteer usher positions

Latecomers arriving after

for all performances. Please

are available throughout the

curtain time will be seated

indicate your needs when

year. For more information,

at a suitable interval in the

purchasing tickets so that an

please send an email to

program or at intermission.

appropriate location can be

bstarr@stanford.edu.

We recommend that you

reserved for you.

arrive at least 30 minutes Sign language interpreting

prior to performances.

is available with five business Assisted-listening devices

days’ notice given to the

are available. Please visit

administrative office—call

Patron Services prior to the

650.723.2551 or email us at

show for more information.

stanfordlive@stanford.edu.

Performance Venue Information Bing Concert Hall &Bing UN

Concert Hall Ticket Office AR

2

Frost Amphitheater

3

Memorial Church

4

Memorial Auditorium

5

Stanford Ticket Office

6

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Parking for Memorial Church

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Roth Way, on Museum Way, and on Lasuen Street.

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Directions For driving directions or

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public transportation

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can be found along the Oval at the end of Palm Drive, on

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Lot and on Lasuen Street, the Oval.

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Alumni Café, Arrillaga

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Parking is FREE on the Stanford campus in metered and lettered parking zones on weekdays after 4:00 pm and on weekends at all times. Disabled parking, loading, and servicevehicle restrictions are enforced at all times.

39

information, please consult our website: live.stanford.edu. For comprehensive campus parking information and maps, visit http://visit.stanford.edu/plan/ parking.html.


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Stanford Live magazine - July/Aug 2018  
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