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P E R FO R M I N G A RT S M AGA Z I N E

INSIDE

SEP / OCT 2018

Music and Movement across the Globe, Instruments from the Banned Countries, Ryan Haddad on Dating, and More.


“First Republic shares our passion for innovation and world-class performance.” ANDREA MILLER

Founder, Artistic Director and Choreographer, Gallim Dance 2017-2018 Artist in Residence, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

(855) 886-4824 | firstrepublic.com | New York Stock Exchange symbol: FRC MEMBER FDIC AND EQUAL HOUSING LENDER


CONTENTS

Stanford Live Staff & Sponsors Welcome

P—10

Upcoming Events

P—12

Campus Partners

P—18

Scene & Heard

Behind the Scenes

Movements

Membership By Emily K. Holmes This season invites us to consider music’s relationship to the circulation of humans across time periods and continents.

P—20

P—40 P—42

Stanford Live & Bing Concert Hall Donors

P—44

Calendar

P—46

Plan Your Visit

P A G E ­­— 30

P—9

P—47

Artist Voices

Infographic

Ryan Haddad and Tim Miller

Music and Musicians from the

on Dating

Banned Countries

p—22

p—28

Featurette

Timeline

Janáček’s Intimate Letters

Jordi Savall Traces the Routes of Slavery

p—26

p—38

5


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Sep/Oct 2018 Volume 11, No. 1

S TA N FO R D L I V E M AG A Z I N E S E P / O C T 2 0 1 8

STAFF

FOUNDATION & GOVERNMENT PARTNERS

Paul Heppner President

Chris Lorway Executive Director

Mike Hathaway Vice President

Bryan Alderman Assistant Director of Development

Kajsa Puckett Vice President, Marketing & Business Development Genay Genereux Accounting & Office Manager Production Susan Peterson Design & Production Director Jennifer Sugden Assistant Production Manager Ana Alvira, Stevie VanBronkhorst Production Artists and Graphic Designers Sales Amelia Heppner, Marilyn Kallins, Terri Reed San Francisco/Bay Area Account Executives Joey Chapman, Brieanna Hansen, Ann Manning, Wendy Pedersen Seattle Area Account Executives Carol Yip Sales Coordinator Marketing Shaun Swick Senior Designer & Digital Lead Ciara Caya Marketing Coordinator Encore Media Group Corporate Office 425 North 85th Street Seattle, WA 98103 p 800.308.2898 | 206.443.0445 f 206.443.1246 info@encoremediagroup.com www.encoremediagroup.com Encore Arts Programs and Encore Stages are published monthly by Encore Media Group to serve musical and theatrical events in the Puget Sound and San Francisco Bay Areas. All rights reserved. ©2018 Encore Media Group. Reproduction without written permission is prohibited.

Rory Brown Operations Manager Diana Burnell Assistant Ticket Office Manager Robert Cable Communications Manager Ryan Davis Associate Director of Engagement and Public Programs

IN-KIND PARTNERS

Robert DeArmond Web Developer Laura Evans Director of Music Programs, Education, and Engagement Drew Farley Technical Manager Ben Frandzel Institutional Gifts and Community Engagement Officer Elisa Gomez-Hird HR and Administrative Associate Maurice Nounou Assistant Director of Ticketing and Sales Noreen Ong Executive and Contracts Administrator

MEDIA PARTNERS

Egan O’Rourke Audio/Video Assistant Manager Kimberly Pross Director of Operations and Production Jeremy Ramsaur Lighting Manager Nicola Rees Director of Development

Stanford Live’s 2018–19 season is generously supported by Helen and Peter Bing.

Toni Rivera Operations Coordinator

Underwriting for student ticket discounts for the 2018–19 season is generously provided by the Bullard family.

Ivan Rodriguez Artist Liaison/Cabaret Manager Mike Ryan Director of Operations, Frost Amphitheater Bill Starr House Manager Krystina Tran Assistant Director of Marketing Max Williams Development Associate

PHOTO CREDITS On the cover: Jared Grimes performs in Spaces with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, photo by Lawrence Sumulong. Page 10: Illustration by Hybrid Design. Page 18: Andy Warhol (U.S.A., 1928–1987), Detail from Contact Sheet [Photo shoot with Andy Warhol with shadow], 1986. Gelatin silver print. Gift of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., 2014.43.2893. ©The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; El Anatsui (Ghana, b. 1944), Uwa, 2012. Aluminum and copper wire. C. Diane Christensen Fund for African Art and Phyllis Wattis Program Fund, 2017.7; Jess, The 5th Never of Old Lear, 1974, paper collage elements on 3-D support, 33 ⅛ x 27 15/16 in. Collection of Harry W. and Mary Margaret Anderson. Pages 20 & 21: Photos 1 and 8 by Azar Kafaei; 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7 by Harrison Truong; 4 by Joel Simon. Page 22: Photos courtesy of Ryan Haddad. Page 30: Photo by Jake Blakesberg. Page 32: Photo by Oliver Holmes. Page 34: Photo courtesy of Alliance Artist Management. Page 35: Photo by Marc Brenner. Page 40: Malpaso Dance Company, photo by Alex Boerner. Page 42 & 43: Photos by Harrison Truong.

9


WELCOME

C H R I S L O R WAY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

“I received a letter just before I left office from a man. I don’t know why he chose to write it, but I’m glad he did. He wrote that you can go to live in France, but you can’t become a Frenchman. You can go to live in Germany or Italy, but you can’t become a German, an Italian. He went through Turkey, Greece, Japan, and other countries. But he said anyone, from any corner of the world, can come to live in the United States and become an American.” — RO N A L D R E AG A N

When I came to Stanford two years ago,

of barber shops as centers of community

Stanford Live presents

it marked the second time I arrived in the

in the African diaspora. And Catalan

a wide range of the finest

United States as an immigrant. The first

composer Jordi Savall traces the music

performances from around the

was in the late 1990s to attend graduate

traditions that moved along the routes of

world, fostering a vibrant learning

school at Columbia. During those 10 years

the slave trade.

community and providing distinctive experiences through the

in New York, I experienced a society that came together around the tragedy of

This issue also provides a glimpse into two

performing arts. With its home at

9/11 and then slowly began to split apart

of our love-themed programs: Janáček’s

Bing Concert Hall, Stanford Live is

because of divisive rhetoric and a lack

Intimate Letters with Rob Kapilow takes us

simultaneously a public square, a

of empathy. Thus, we chose to present a

back to a time of poetry and penmanship

sanctuary, and a lab, drawing on

range of universal narratives this season

while Ryan Haddad’s solo play about

the breadth and depth of Stanford

aimed to connect rather than divide.

New York’s gay dating scene leaps ahead

University to connect perfor-

a century when relationships are often

mance to the significant issues,

mediated through technology.

ideas, and discoveries of our time.

Several programs explore the dynamics of human migration and the moral reckoning with universal human dignity that

Another highlight is the return of Wang

immigration compels societies to confront.

Ramirez for the U.S. premiere of Nitin

The Kronos Quartet—in partnership with

Sawhney’s Dystopian Dream. Commissioned

the Hamid and Christina Moghadam

by Stanford Live, the piece is a core

Program in Iranian Studies—will focus

component of our residency with Nitin. His

on music from Muslim-majority countries

powerful music combined with Honji and

subject to the recent travel ban. Poet

Sébastien’s dynamic movement language

and playwright Inua Ellams brings us an

creates a multisensory work that is not to

exciting new play that showcases the role

be missed! 10


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SEP / OCT 2018

Upcoming Events

S TA N FO R D L I V E M AG A Z I N E S E P / O C T 2 0 1 8

JAZZ

POP

JAZZ

Charles Lloyd

Jon Cleary

The Baylor

and the Marvels

Project

With special guest Lucinda Williams KEY:

A M P L I F I C AT I O N

AU D I E N C E I N T E R AC T I O N

WHEN: F R I DAY, S E P T E M B E R 21, 7:30 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

WHEN: SAT U R DAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 7:00 & 9:00 PM

VENUE: BING ST U D I O

WHEN: S U N DAY, S E P T E M B E R 2 3, 7:00 PM

VENUE: BING ST U D I O

Honored for his contributions

The piano player and

A husband. A wife. An

to jazz worldwide, including

songwriter is one of the great

astonishing debut. Two-time

awards from the Monterey

heirs to New Orleans’ world-

Grammy nominee the Baylor

Jazz Festival and the National

changing musical heritage.

Project is steeped in the heart

Endowment for the Arts,

An outsider from Kent,

and soul of jazz.

saxophonist Charles Lloyd

England, Cleary has become

brings his 80th-birthday

a beloved personality in his

celebration to the Bing.

adopted hometown.

Generously supported by the

Generously supported by the Koret Foundation JAZZ PROJECT

Koret Foundation JAZZ PROJECT

For the full calendar, visit live.stanford.edu.

12


S TA N FO R D L I V E M AG A Z I N E S E P / O C T 2 0 1 8

TA L K

JAZZ

JAZZ

C O M E DY

Wynton Marsalis

Jazz at Lincoln

Tord Gustavsen

Nick Thune

in Conversation

Center Orchestra

Trio

Spaces

With Sigurd Hole and Jarle Vespestad

WHEN: T U E S DAY, S E P T E M B E R 25, 7 : 30 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, S E P T E M B E R 26, 7:30 P M

WHEN: F R I DAY, S E P T E M B E R 2 8, 7:00 & 9:00 PM

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

VENUE: BING ST U D I O

WHEN: SAT U R DAY, S E P T E M B E R 2 9, 7:00 & 9:00 PM

VENUE: B I N G ST U D I O

Wynton Marsalis joins

Marsalis conceived Spaces

Tord Gustavsen and his trio

Nick Thune’s absurdist views

Stanford Live for a

as an “animal ballet,”

perform new compositions

and deadpan wit have

conversation about jazz,

performed by his own

as well as unique

distinguished his unique style

the relationship between

Jazz at Lincoln Center

arrangements of J. S. Bach

of storytelling mixed with

the arts and community,

Orchestra with dancers Lil

chorales and traditional

one-liners. The comedian and

and the irrepressible spirit

Buck and Jared Grimes.

Scandinavian hymns.

actor has appeared on The

Generously supported by

Generously supported by the

Generously supported by the

Stephanie and Fred Harman

Koret Foundation

Koret Foundation

and the Koret Foundation, with

of New Orleans.

additional support from the JAZZ PROJECT

JAZZ PROJECT

Western States Arts Federation JAZZ PROJECT

13

Tonight Show, Conan, and Late Night.


S TA N FO R D L I V E M AG A Z I N E S E P / O C T 2 0 1 8

TA L K / P O P

WORLD

E A R LY M U S I C

DANCE

Nitin Sawhney:

Delgres

Philharmonia

Dystopian

Baroque Orchestra

Dream

Mozart Magnified

Nitin Sawhney and Wang Ramirez

A Musical Life

WHEN: SAT U R DAY, S E P T E M B E R 29, 7 : 30 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

WHEN: S U N DAY, S E P T E M B E R 30, 7:00 P M

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, O C TO B E R 3, 7 : 30 P M

VENUE: BING ST U D I O

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

WHEN: T H U R S DAY & F R I DAY, O C TO B E R 4 & 5, 7 : 30 P M

VENUE: MEMORIAL AU D I TO R I U M

Acclaimed artist Nitin

Delgres, a 2018 Globalfest

A Bay Area treasure,

A theatrical realization of

Sawhney presents an evening

performer, makes music

Philharmonia Baroque

a concept originated by

of music and memories

rooted in a historical

Orchestra plays classical

Nitin Sawhney, Dystopian

featuring tabla artist Aref

moment: 1802, when slavery

jewels on period instruments.

Dream features animated

Durvesh and vocalist Eva

returned to Guadeloupe and

Nicholas McGegan leads

projections, flying by wire,

Stone.

some islanders escaped to

works by Mozart with the

and dazzling set design.

New Orleans.

Philharmonia Chorale.

Generously supported by the Koret Foundation

Generously supported by the Koret Foundation

15


POP

POP

Gavin

Diana

Turek

Gameros

WHEN: F R I DAY, O C TO B E R 1 2 , 9 : 30 P M

TA L K /C L A S S I C A L

FOLK

What Makes It

I’m with

Great?

Her

VENUE: BING ST U D I O

Deeply versatile in expression,

Network and MINT magazine,

Berkeley-based Diana

Turek serves up disco

Gameros hypnotizes with solo

shimmer, house music unz,

guitar and a voice that is “at

and electro-pop catchiness.

once strong and breathy—in

Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson VENUE: B I N G ST U D I O ( W E D) B I N G C O N C E RT HALL (THU)

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, O C TO B E R 10, 7:30 P M

This folk trio featuring Sara

and audience fave Rob

Watkins (violin), Sarah Jarosz

Kapilow returns with

(banjo, mandolin, and guitar),

Janáček’s Intimate Letters on

and Aoife O’Donovan (guitar)

Oct. 10, followed the next

has garnered acclaim for

night by a look at legendary

its blend of instrumental

Broadway composer and

interplay combined with

lyricist Stephen Sondheim.

melodies.

an instant, wounded and boldly searching” (NPR).

Funds

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

Master musician, explainer,

VENUE: BING ST U D I O

Curated by Stanford Concert

Generously supported by the WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, O C TO B E R 10, 7:00 PM T H U R S DAY, O C TO B E R 11, 7 : 30 P M

WHEN: SAT U R DAY, O C TO B E R 1 3, 7:00 PM

T H E AT E R

NEW MUSIC

Hi, Are You

Kronos

Single?

Quartet

Ryan Haddad

Music for Change: The Banned Countries

WHEN: T H U R S DAY & F R I DAY, OCTOBER 18 & 19, 8:00 PM

VENUE: BING ST U D I O

WHEN: SAT U R DAY, O C TO B E R 2 0, 7 : 30 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

Join writer/performer Ryan J.

The Grammy Award-winning

Haddad on a roller coaster

Kronos Quartet premieres

through New York’s gay dating

a new program featuring

scene, where the highs are

music from the original seven

high and the lows are lonely.

“banned” countries—Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen—among others. With support from Stanford’s Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies

16


CHAMBER

Sundays with the St. Lawrence With Anne-Marie McDermott, piano WHEN: S U N DAY, O C TO B E R 14, 2 : 30 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

Stanford’s own St. Lawrence String Quartet opens its Sunday series with pianist Anne-Marie McDermott featured in Mendelssohn’s Piano Sextet.

P O P/ C A B A R E T

John Lloyd Young Broadway’s Original “Jersey Boy”

WHEN: SAT U R DAY, O C TO B E R 27, 7 : 0 0 & 9 : 00 P M

VENUE: BING ST U D I O

The multiple-award winner from Broadway’s Jersey Boys

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comes to the Bing Studio with music from the 1950s and 1960s all in the authentic style of rock and roll, doowop, and R & B.

A not-for-profit community owned and operated by Covia. License No. 435202504 COA# 328 EPLG751-02C 8/16


New fall exhibitions are opening at the Cantor Arts Center and

SEP / OCT 2018

Campus Partners

the Anderson Collection. At the Cantor: Contact Warhol: Photography without End, opening Sept. 29, features an unparalleled collection of Andy Warhol’s photography— including images never before exhibited—and other examples of the artist’s iconic work. On Oct. 17, artist El Anatsui will be in conversation as part of the

1

2018 Ruth K. Franklin Lecture

3

on the Arts of Africa, Oceania,

2

and the Americas. El Anatsui, whose work Uwa is on display at the Cantor, is known for sculptures that draw connections between consumption and the environment. At the Anderson: Salon Style II, opening Sept. 20, features collages, watercolors, drawings, and paintings on paper from the Anderson family’s collection. On Sept. 27, Spotlight on Elizabeth Murray opens with examples of Murray’s colorful shaped canvases. For more information, please visit arts.stanford.edu. 1

2

3

Contact Warhol:

Artist El Anatsui

Salon Style II

Photography without End

in Conversation

Opens Thu, Sep 20, 11:00 AM

Opens Sat, Sep 29, 11:00 AM

Wed, Oct 17, 6:00 PM

Anderson Collection at

Cantor Arts Center

Bing Concert Hall

Stanford University

Exhibition includes some images

Presented as part of the 2018

A second group of works

that may not be appropriate for

Ruth K. Franklin Lecture on

on paper from the Anderson

young viewers

the Arts of Africa, Oceania,

family’s collection

and the Americas

18


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SEP / OCT 2018

Scene & Heard

2

1 4

6 7

20


3

1 LU C I A M I C A R E L L I

2 MUSICA EN

E L JA R D I N On July 8, Stanford Live

Grammy Award-winning

welcomed violinist and

rapper Mala Rodríguez

vocalist Lucia Micarelli, best

and Mexican electronica

known for her collaborations

band Sotomayor took the

with Chris Botti and her role

stage for an evening of Latin

in the HBO series Treme.

hip-hop and dance on July 14.

3 M I L E S TO H I P- H O P

4 O P E R A’ S F U T U R E

S TA R S 5

This summer’s outdoor

San Francisco’s acclaimed

concert series kicked off

Merola Opera Program, one

July 13 with Jazz on the Green

of the country’s foremost

featuring three artists: Miles

training centers, brought this

Electric Band; Kev Choice, a

summer’s crop of rising young

musician, emcee, and hip-hop

singers back to the Bing for

artist; and Sidewalk Chalk.

an evening of staged opera scenes on July 7.

8

5 CLASSIC ALBUMS

6 COMPUTER OR

LIVE

C O M P O S E R?

After the success of last

That was the question put

year’s Woodstock concert

forth during KQED’s Silicon

with Classic Albums Live,

Valley Conversation on July

the group returned to the

19 about the future of music.

Bing lawn with two more

Host Tonya Mosley poses

re-creations of rock favorites:

with panelist Ge Wang,

Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours

director of the Stanford

and Creedence Clearwater

Laptop Orchestra.

Revival’s Chronicle, Volume 1. 7 N OT R E A DY FO R

8 S TA N FO R D JA Z Z

NAPTIME

F E S T I VA L

On July 15, indie family music

Stanford Live and the

all-star Justin Roberts and

Stanford Jazz Festival

his Not Ready for Naptime

teamed up again this

Players dished out an

summer. In this intimate Bing

afternoon of whimsically

Studio show on July 1, bassist

rocking music for kids and

Or Bareket performed with

their parents.

pianist Nitai Hershkovits and guest guitarist Camila Meza.


F E AT U R E T T E

1

Are You Single? Ryan Haddad and Tim Miller Discuss Dating and Relationships

Drawing on his life experiences as a gay

or unspoken, about the possibility

man with cerebral palsy, Ryan Haddad

they may end up in a performance?

strives to bring authentic depictions of disability and intersectionality to

TM: Yeah, that happens. My personal

the stage. He and his mentor, the

life has been quite settled for a long

performance artist Tim Miller, with

time in terms of relationships. But there

whom Haddad studied autobiographical

was a period with my husband, Alistair,

storytelling, share highlights of their

when I knew I wanted to begin making

conversation with Stanford Live.

work about our political situation as a couple with him being an immigrant

RH: Your work draws on your personal

from Australia and unable to remain in

life—that’s what drew me to you and

the United States. I asked him to give me

continues to inspire me to do what I do.

the go-ahead, but I wouldn’t have done

When you enter relationships with people,

that even a year earlier because it would

particularly romantic relationships, is

have made our lives more complicated

there ever an understanding, spoken

to be talking about it so soon.

2 22


S TA N FO R D L I V E M AG A Z I N E S E P / O C T 2 0 1 8

3 1. Ryan Haddad in his solo show Hi, Are You Single? 2. Performance artist Tim Miller 3. Tim Miller with Ryan Haddad

Right before I met Alistair, I did a piece called Naked Breath about what happens when a gay man who is HIV-negative, as I am, starts a relationship with a man who is positive. In 1993 or 1994, we were talking about it all the time. I mean, it’s still complicated. I asked my friend Andrew if I could. (We had an ongoing romance.) If he had said, “I really don’t feel comfortable,” I would have changed his name, but I still would have made the

happy and content in your marriage

be my uncle saying to me, “Could you be

piece because it was something important

with Alistair. As you look back on the

any more subtle?” Then, about two years

that had happened to me. And I felt it was

journey, on the road to finding him, what

ago, my director asked, “Could we just

important to create a piece that positively

does that reflection bring you today?

change it to what he is actually saying:

shows that men who are positive and

‘Could you be any more desperate?’”

negative can be in relationships, which

TM: I think that for me, I was such a

I thought I had graduated from that

is something we take for granted now

clumsy, ambitious young gay man. But

feeling. I experience encounters with

but is still by no means simple.

I don’t think in the scheme of things

men, and many times they’re fine. I

that I was being too much of an Attila

recently had an experience with a boy

RH: When you are living life, are you

the Hun with other people’s hearts.

who I really like—and I often like boys

constantly aware, “Oh, this could be

My own heart was broken a number

who don’t like me back. It’s something

something. This could be a scene or a

of times, as well. In retrospect, I wish

that I’m used to, but this particular

story or a whole piece”? Or do you let

I could have been a little less hyper-

one just hit me in a certain way that

life happen and then reflect on it later?

ambitious, but Manhattan invites the

was so lovely and intense. And I’m

ambitious. That’s why people go there.

realizing, “Oh I’m not really that far

TM: There are certain things you can’t

off from the boy who was 22 or 23 in

imagine not performing about. With

I wish in some ways I had been less

all the work I’ve done on immigration

nervous, less desperate, less anxious.

and marriage equality, how could I

But you know, you perform that in Hi,

I want to ask you to go back 25 years

Are You Single?—that very natural, urgent

to your courtship with Alistair—or

hunger and nervous desire to find love.

anyone really—and share what

I mean, it never goes away in our lives.

is one of your fondest memories

not perform about Alistair’s green card interview and us getting married? It was something I used to worry about more. Life is so much more

Delaware, Ohio.” It doesn’t go away.

of a lovely date with a lover.

complicated than our little creative

RH: No, and there have been pockets

ventures could ever get at.

of time over the past three years since

TM: The thing that I really think of is the

I began performing it where I felt like

beach. I think of those graceful days,

RH: Your personal life has been settled

I have moved on from this character.

which feel abundant in their hours—in a

for many years now, and you’re very

There was a line in the show that used to

good way, not like on a horrible day at

23


S TA N FO R D L I V E M AG A Z I N E S E P / O C T 2 0 1 8

work or school when the clock doesn’t

RH: I’ve gone on many dates, or what

TM: I was thinking that as I talked

move—those days where it feels like

I thought were dates. But the best

about it.

there’s plenty of time to spend with

intimate moments for me have been

Alistair and our 16-year-old dog, Frida…

just a couple of sexual encounters

RH: But I will say that, recently, I was

to spend time together and talk and

that were very lovely and passionate.

with a guy who—for the first time in my

eat and walk the dog and have sex or

My mom would be like, “Oh my God!

adult life—made the beach accessible

not have sex, to go to the beach if it’s

That’s not a date,” and of course it’s

for me.

summer. We are always going to the

not. Sometimes, though, a guy will

beach. There, it’s a mixture of romantic

understand me and my body in a

TM: How did he do that? Where were

but also timeless and heavenly in

way that is intuitive and he will make

you?

a strange way. A bit like the image

me feel a kind of sexiness, that I AM

at the end of Longtime Companion.

SEXY. For as much as I get on that

RH: We were by a lake, with some

You’ve seen that movie, haven’t you?

stage and say, “I am beautiful, I am

other people too—but I was fixated on

sexy, I am...I am…I am…” and sort of

this person that I found to be Prince

perform the act of empowerment, the

Charming. He held both of my hands

truth is that when you are a disabled

and held me in the water the whole time,

TM: That final image—much criticized

body and naked with another human

totally supporting me physically and

at the time—was amazingly beautiful,

being, it’s incredibly vulnerable.

never letting me go for the entire hour

RH: No, but now I’m going to watch it. Encore_Warhol_final_ad1.pdf

1

7/24/18

10:55 AM

a brave conquering of the afterlife.

that we were in the water together. Just

You know, if we’re not going to do that

The beach is not an accessible place

like, “I’m going to do this for you: I’m

in the theater, what are we doing?

for me.

going to make this experience possible and accessible.” It’s impossible not to fall for the man who does that. For me, it was like, this is the most intimate thing I’ve ever experienced. But I don’t want to say more than that right now. It’s still relatively close to me, that story, the emotion of that beautiful moment in the water. And I want to save it for a play or performance piece of some kind. TM: What if you imagine, each time you perform the piece, that maybe someone falls in love that night. Maybe it’s you. Maybe it’s the person in the fourth row. I think your work creates the conditions for people to see each other, appreciate each other. And that includes you. Of course, you’re so lovable in your work, as well as cranky and funny. I think the work you make helps make that happen.

Hi, Are You Single? Ryan Haddad Thu & Fri, Oct 18 & 19 8:00 PM Bing Studio


An Unwavering Commitment to Excellence.

Since Harker’s founding in 1893 we have offered unrivaled academic programs and extracurricular offerings for students to explore their interests, discover their passions, and develop the skills to succeed in an ever-changing world. We are honored to have educated the students of the Valley for 125 years and will proudly continue our unwavering commitment to excellence for generations to come. The Harker School is celebrating its 125th anniversary. To learn more about our history, or to attend one of the special anniversary events.

then&now

The Harker School | San Jose, CA | K-12 College Prep | www.harker.org


Left Page 1. Leoš Janáček and Kamila Stösslová 2. The composer with his muse

1

Intimate Letters, with Strings Attached Excerpted from Intimate Letters: Leoš Janáček to Kamila Stösslová (John Tyrrell, translator), with permission from Princeton University Press

In 1917, the Czech composer Leoš Janáček met Kamila Stösslová while on holiday at a spa resort in Moravia. He was 63, and she was 26. Undeterred by her lack of feeling and her spasmodic replies, he sent her more than 700 love letters. And perhaps fueled by his own unrequited love, he went into high gear, composing some of his greatest music, including the String Quartet No. 2—called, fittingly, Intimate Letters, which is the focus of Rob Kapilow’s first program this season. What follows are snippets of their correspondence from 1917 to 1924. 2 26


F E AT U R E T T E

S TA N FO R D L I V E M AG A Z I N E S E P / O C T 2 0 1 8

July 16, 1917 Accept these few roses as a token of my unbounded esteem for you. You are so lovely in character and appearance that in your company one's spirits are lifted; you breathe warmheartedness, you look on the world with such kindness that one wants to do only good and pleasant things for you in return. You will not believe how glad I am that I have met you…

LJ

August 20, 1919 You can't imagine what joy you've given me with that ring for luck. I'll certainly not lose it or break it. So you'll have an inheritance with me...

January 9, 1920 Your present, decorated with ribbons, is on my writing desk. I, who work by the pen, take great pleasure in it. I drag everyone to have a look at it. But with this silver pen I won’t write anything ordinary; when I take it in my hand, it will be something special that I write… August 27, 1922 So you can be angry such a long time? Believe me, you’ve made my holidays sad by it. It doesn’t matter about the holidays! But believe me that I need your twittering and your scrawling as the dry weather needs the rain, the dawn needs the sun, the sky needs the stars. Yes, that last comparison is the best. “What’s the sky without that little star?!...So, dear Mrs. Kamila, make up now for what you’ve not done! July 8, 1924 …Oh you know, Kamila, I’m so unutterably fond of you. I’d call out “Kamila” all the time! And sometimes, ah, I fear to say it...because it’s something not to be uttered. Not for this passion, for something higher...They say of me that I’ll live forever; that’s metaphorical. But it’s possible to live forever in other ways. Eternal life springs from you, from that dear Kamila. Oh, I’d write things like that without stopping! […]

August 20, 1919 I'm sending you here a Uttle ring with my name you'll like it and the main thing is that [the man] from whom this ring [comes] had great luck I've had it now for ten years and I've had luck too except that it got caught in my hair a lot. So I wish that for the next ten-twenty-thirty years that you wish the ring will bring you the same luck for yourself that I've had so far myself…

August 25, 1922 You know very well why I don’t want to stay at your place. For I still haven’t forgotten about the last time. Why cause pain to another person unnecessarily. I had thought I wouldn’t write to you again.

July 9, 1924 I hope you’ve got my letter already. I’m by the water the whole time, I’m already so black that I can’t even tell you… I write a bit sadly but I’ve read your letters and so I sense that love of yours for me. Where I’m sorry is if someone is suffering. It would have cost me my life. So be terribly cheerful because that’s what I wish… I never thought I’d correspond with some man and I resisted even you I didn’t want to talk to you. But fate wanted otherwise so we’ll now leave everything to fate. It’s better that you’re so old now if you were young my husband would never permit this…

July 15, 1924 You know that I opened your last letter with misgivings? And I had reason to. How can one not want you, when one loves you?... …But not to want you, though that’s an impossibility—I can’t do that. You are entire in my soul; so it’s enough for me to want you always. And to forget you, that would be sad for me and it’s impossible. So I’ll be merry according to your order… I walk here isolated; the weather’s chilly. Luckily I brought work with me.

27

What Makes It Great? Janáček’s Intimate Letters With Rob Kapilow Wed, Oct 10, 7:30 PM Bing Studio


Music and Musicians from the Banned Countries For more than 40 years, San Francisco’s Kronos Quartet has embodied a spirit of fearless exploration. Its newest program, Music for Change, is a direct response to the 2017 executive orders limiting travel to the United States and highlights the rich diversity of artistic voices from the original seven “banned countries.” Here’s a snapshot of some of the notable musicians and music from the region.

3 1 2

4

L I BYA

I R AQ

Along with Morocco,

Iraq has developed a music

Algeria, and Tunisia, Libya

culture incorporating unique

inherited the musical

instruments such as the

traditions of Andalusian

coconut fiddle called the joza

Spain, developing its own

and the hammered dulcimer

unique manifestation of

as well as unique rhythms

this heritage in recent

including the 10-beat jurjuna

centuries, known locally

SY R I A

rhythm and the rousing chobi

IRAN

as ma’luf. Following

The center of the music world

rhythm, which accompanies

Persian music has a deep

independence, the new

in Syria is the city of Aleppo.

line dances.

history dating from well before

nation-state created large

In addition to being famous

the birth of Islam. In recent

state ensembles in the

for classical art music, Aleppo

centuries, Iran has developed

middle of the 20th century

is also known for a genre of

creative new manifestations

in an effort to promote

beloved sing-along songs called

of Persian music culture and

traditional Libyan music,

qudud halabiya. The dabkeh is

refined elegant instruments

led by prominent figures

a folk dance popular throughout

like the kamancheh, setar, and

like singer and composer

Greater Syria, an obligatory

tar, creating a high classical

Mohamed Hassan.

component of weddings and

art form that is the pride of

other celebratory events.

the present-day nation-state of Iran.

28


6

2

3

4

YEMEN

Yemen was home to a dynamic Jewish population

1

that was geographically isolated from other Jewish peoples and developed its

5

own unique music and dance

6

traditions. Starting in 1949, the majority of the Yemenite Jewish population migrated to Israel. They brought with

7

them devotional songs

7

(diwans) with rich poetry and rhythmic dances propelled by instruments called sahn nuhasī, which are large copper plates also used as regular kitchenware.

5

SOMALIA

Somalia shares musical attributes with other countries of the Horn of Africa. One of the common instruments in the region is the shareero, a type of lyre. Similar to Sudanese music, the music of Somalia is also pentatonic.

S U DA N

Sudan’s music is different from the music of the rest of the Arab world in that the musical scales are composed of only

—Compiled by Ari Marcus, ‘18

five rather than seven notes per octave. In other words, Sudanese music is pentatonic

Music for Change: The

rather than heptatonic. This

Banned Countries

difference gives Sudanese

Kronos Quartet

music a unique character and

Sat, Oct 20

was central to the style of

7:30 PM

musicians like Abdel Karim

Bing Concert Hall

el Kabli. 29


M A I N F E AT U R E

1

Movements By Emily K. Holmes

Whether we move across the globe

when in peril. When considering why

As daunting a task as this imperative

for an indefinite stay or just cross

and how people move and migrate, it is

might seem, the stakes of minimizing

the street for the afternoon, we are

essential to avoid what contemporary

the diversity of our collective individual

creatures who live in states of near

Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi

experiences into one dominant

constant transit. Our experiences of,

Adichie calls “the danger of the single

narrative are high: “The consequence

and reasons for, travel from one place

story” in her eponymous 2009 TED talk

of the single story is this: it robs people

to another are as innumerable and

(viewed over 15 million times online).

of dignity. It makes our recognition

varied as we are ourselves: we might

Adichie reflects on the impossibility

of our equal humanity difficult.”

change locations briefly to travel, when

of “engaging properly” with a subject

afforded a chance at leisure—or to

without taking into account “all of the

For, as Adichie astutely notes, dominant

evacuate in urgent search of safety,

stories of that place and that person.”

narratives are related to power and

30


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M A I N F E AT U R E

S TA N FO R D L I V E M AG A Z I N E S E P / O C T 2 0 1 8

2 1. The Kronos Quartet performs its new program, Music for Change: The Banned Countries 2. Inua Ellams, the Nigerian-born author of Barber Shop Chronicles

privilege. “Power is the ability to not

stories that comprise any issue, group,

profound loss. These are no small topics,

just tell the story of another person but

or location. Making room for multiplicity

and these performances together

to make it the definitive story of that

creates a verdant new potential for

attend to the relevant social, political,

person,” she observes. Such defining

rebalancing justice, equality, and human

and historical contexts surrounding the

statements—dependent on intentionally

dignity—and this upcoming season at

creation of music and our varied life

selective information that denies nuance

Stanford Live features a much-needed

journeys.

and omits room for difference—can

and nuanced counterbalance to the

be more easily weaponized against

shortsighted view towards topics of

These sonic stories use innovative

vulnerable targets. One might consider

migration, movement, and immigration

approaches to explore the ideas of

the current American administration’s

in the public realm, using music as a

circulation with all complexities intact—

aggressive anti-immigration rhetoric,

catalyst for empathetic connection.

even the most painful sides of human history. Catalan composer Jordi Savall,

which has slung denigrating language as verbal assault against migrants

Offering a thoughtful complement to

who has long been known in his prolific

and carried out policies that enforce

last season’s theme of contemplating

career for his attention to the cross-

traumatizing treatment of asylum-

what makes us different and how we

pollination of music between cultures

seekers, including young children,

shape our unique identities, this season

and time periods, remains committed

among other harmful practices. The

invites us to consider music’s relationship

to telling multilayered musical histories

antidote against such attempts at

to the circulation of humans across time

with poignant awareness of cultural and

myopic representation, to work towards

periods and continents. This topic opens

social roots. His latest composition, The

restoring dignity, Adichie concludes, is

discussions of the universal qualities of

Routes of Slavery, showcases the varied

to make room for multiple stories, to be

navigating a course through life, finding

musical traditions impacted by—and

keenly hungry to engage with the many

connections, and enduring through

created in resilient response to—the

32


Allied Arts Guild trauma of enslavement. Beginning

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with a reading of a text by Aristotle and continuing with written narrative

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interludes across many eras, the composition centers on music created during the transatlantic slave trade between 1444 and 1888. The performance additionally highlights musical evolutions from the intercultural exchanges with music in the Caribbean and Central and South America, acknowledging the many locations impacted by slavery. Though the performance is deeply historical, it additionally highlights the ongoing consequences of slavery, such as present-day racism, the refugee crises in relation to the Mediterranean Sea, and the continued existence of human trafficking. With a cast of 32 musicians from 15 countries and three continents, The Routes of Slavery exemplifies a remarkable creative approach that doesn’t shy away from the full complexity of human history and evidences music’s role as healer, community builder, and a tool for change. Presented in close partnership with the Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies and Stanford Live, Music for Change: The Banned Countries, from the Kronos Quartet, includes a selection of pieces by composers from countries originally included in the 2017 Executive Order, or travel ban: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. The program features works composed specifically for the performance, new collaborations with musicians from several of these countries (a frequent practice and core value for the group), and signature works from the quartet’s extensive repertoire. The director of the Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program, Professor Abbas Milani, comments: “For more than four decades the Kronos Quartet has been a source of sublime music, an indispensable beacon of exhilaration

Autumn Open House

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M A I N F E AT U R E

S TA N FO R D L I V E M AG A Z I N E S E P / O C T 2 0 1 8

and healing, a shining example of

on interviews with undocumented

community. Through song and speech,

art as the embodiment of the better

young people living, working, and

the Barber Shop Chronicles portrays

angels of our souls. In these troubled

studying in the United States. López

witty, raw, and heartwarming stories of

times, no one other than the inimitable

recently told the New York Times that

friendship, family relations, identity, and

Kronos could help us recognize and

the play’s mission evolved and adapted

intercultural exchanges, with region-

celebrate the dignity, humanity,

over the last year in response to the

specific musical interludes to transition

and joy in the now sadly ‘banned’

unpredictable changes in immigration

between locales. The importance of

cultures and people.” In addition to

policies, which further sparked a

the barber shop as a core space for

the performance, the musicians are

sense of urgency; he became further

community for African-American men

developing resources to further share

committed to portraying the stories

(as well as for folks of other genders)

the work with the campus community

shared with him as a grounding and

may be better established stateside,

and have been integral partners in

humanizing response to representations

and Ellams’ global narratives add

fostering conversation about the travel

in the mass media and politics.

to the richness of multiple stories centered on key gathering spaces

ban’s impact on cultural exchange. In Inua Ellams’ Barber Shop Chronicles,

for connection like this one.

The new oratorio Dreamers, by Cuban-

the Nigerian-born and London-based

American playwright Nilo Cruz and

playwright cleverly anchors the stories

For so many of the pieces described

Peruvian composer Jimmy López,

of his characters—African men and

above, another thread beyond the

likewise uses its stage as a platform to

men from the African diaspora—in

varied experiences of global movement

shine light upon overshadowed voices.

barber shop scenes set in six cities.

and migration is memory. Music—a

Performed by soprano Ana María

Each rotating vignette is played by

form of communication not tethered to

Martínez, a chorus, and Esa-Pekka

the same actors and singers and

language—is heard, felt, and embodied

Salonen conducting the Philharmonia

poignantly showcases the barber

by both performers and listeners.

Orchestra of London, the piece is based

shop as a space for gathering in

3 3. Catalan composer and music historian Jordi Savall 4. The original company of Barber Shop Chronicles at the National Theatre, London

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S TA N FO R D L I V E M AG A Z I N E S E P / O C T 2 0 1 8

The multifaceted musician, producer,

personal relationships to immigration.

puts his own life on center stage in a

and composer Nitin Sawhney is keenly

Influenced by his Indian heritage, the

new orchestration reflecting upon his

aware of this relationship. His persistent

British-born musician has explored

past, developed during his residency

passion for intercultural musical

Indian independence, drawing from

at Stanford; the composition, which

exchanges was once the subject of a

his parents’ and his own experiences,

features tabla artist Aref Durvesh

miniseries of his own design for BBC

in his previous compositions. After

and vocalist Eva Stone, showcases a

Radio 2’s Spin the Globe program, and his

more than two decades of composing,

blend of music, memories, and the

own practice prominently addresses his

producing, and performing, Sawhney

inseparable points of intersection. Music is a creative medium particularly well-suited to multiplicity. Whether started by a singular author or not, performances are most often made manifest through collaboration. To truly work together—to make something, one might say, great—requires selfawareness, acknowledgement of and respect for individuality, and an openness to constant learning. But it is not every collaboration that results in a performance that moves us, shakes us to our core, and stirs up our own memories of making our way through life, loving in all its forms, and coping with loss as we grow. Embracing the strength found in rejecting the single story doubtlessly requires repeated attempts and flexibility and no small amount of patience; the stories of migration,

I N S P I R I N G T H E B E S T I N O U R K- 1 2 S T U D E N T S

movement, and displacement deserve this, and more. And it’s worth the effort—for, as Adichie tells us, “when we

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reject the single story, when we realize that there is never a single story about any place, we regain a kind of paradise.” —Emily K. Holmes is a freelance writer

For more information, please visit our website at: WWW.PINEWOOD.EDU

and editor based in Oakland.


Bing Concert Hall Studio Cabaret

Experience a New Side of Bing Concert Hall In Our Underground Studio Cabaret Stanford Live’s new, intimate cabaret space in the Bing Concert Hall Studio is the perfect venue to experience a wide variety of performers up close and personal. Relax and enjoy an evening of live entertainment in this unique setting. Coming up this fall: jazzy nights with pianist Jon Cleary, Tord Gustavsen Trio, and The Baylor Project; Creole blues with Delgres; comedy night with Nick Thune; Latin roots with Diana Gameros; and more being added throughout the year.

BUY TICKETS

live.stanford.edu 650.724.2464


Tracing the Routes of Slavery

Despite the fact that for hundreds of years European nations deported more than 25 million Africans into slavery, the public at large is still insufficiently aware of this period in history—one of the most ignoble and painful. A new multicultural project from Jordi Savall and his musicians on The Routes of Slavery marks a world first in the history of music, and of the three continents involved in the trade in African slaves and their exploitation in the New World.

PORTUGAL

H I S PA N I O L A

JAMESTOWN, VIRGINIA

BARBADOS

1444

1505

1619

1657

The voyage of Captain

On September 15, King

The first African slaves arrive

Richard Ligon publishes A

Lançarote de Freitas, for

Ferdinand writes a letter

in British North America.

True and Exact History of the

the service of God and

to Nicolás de Ovando, the

Island of Barbados, in which

the Infant Prince Henry, is

governor of the West Indies,

he describes the music of

the first major commercial

making several requests,

the slaves.

venture of the Portuguese

including for the dispatch

in West Africa.

of 100 slaves for the mines in Hispaniola (present-day Dominican Republic and Haiti).

38


The Routes of Slavery Jordi Savall Sun, Nov 4 4:00 PM Bing Concert Hall

FRANCE

MASSACHUSETTS

FRANCE

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA

1685

1782

1848

1963

The “Black Code,” promulgated

Abandoned by her master,

The decree on the abolition

In Why We Can’t Wait, which

by Louis XIV, is the name by

the slave Belinda Sutton,

of slavery is published.

describes the 1963 Birmingham

which the royal edict of March

aged 70 years, petitions the

campaign, Martin Luther

1685 on the “Policing of Blacks”

legislature of Massachusetts

King Jr. writes, “Few people

was enforced until 1848.

for a pension as reparations

consider the fact that, in

after a lifetime of labor.

addition to being enslaved for two centuries, the Negro was, during all those years, robbed of the wages of his toil.”

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SEP / OCT 2018

Behind the Scenes

Part of the process of season planning involves visiting different venues to experience the works under consideration for Stanford Live. I believe that it’s crucial that one member of the curatorial team sees a work live in advance of programming it. Over the summer, Laura Evans and I

1

were able to see a number of shows at Toronto’s Luminato

4 2

Festival. And just last month, our new Frost Director of Operations Mike Ryan and I toured Colorado’s stunning Red Rocks Amphitheater to better understand operating procedures at outdoor venues in preparation for reopening Frost Amphitheater next summer. Here are a few shots from our travels.

3

C H R I S LO RWAY E X EC U T I V E D I R EC TO R

1

2

3

4

R E D RO C K S

AT T H E I L LU S I O N I S T ’ S

M A L PA S O DA N C E

R I OT

TA B L E

C O M PA N Y

Red Rocks is a naturally

In a private dining room,

This Cuban company

RIOT took the Dublin Fringe

formed outdoor venue just

Scottish illusionist Scott Silven

performed Dreaming of Lions

Festival by storm in 2016,

outside of Denver. While there,

hosted an evening of dining

along with other works with

winning the award for Best

we saw the artists Portugal.

and whiskey tasting interwoven

Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro

Production. It’s a fun mix

The Man and Leon Bridges.

with illusion, mentalism, and

Latin Jazz Ensemble.

of dance, drag, circus,

storytelling.

and comedy.

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S E P / O C T 2018

Membership

Stephanie and Fred Harman pose with Wynton Marsalis following his performance in September 2016.

Meet Our Members FRED HARMAN

a high level. But at Stanford, I

level, both create shared,

I love being involved in an

was grateful to find so many

communal experiences that

organization that presents

musical outlets including the Longtime Stanford Live

are emotionally powerful and

some of the world’s top

Stanford Band (for just five

supporter Fred Harman

greatly enrich community life.

artists in some of the most

years!), Jazz Ensemble, and

becomes chair of our Advisory

Given all the time we spend

stunning venues around,

pit orchestra for Ram’s Head

Council this fall. He recently

in front of screens, these

including Bing Concert Hall

productions. Music was my

shared his thoughts on

moments bring us back to an

and the soon-to-reopen Frost

main thing and that naturally

Stanford Live as he looks

essential human experience

Amphitheater. It’s an honor to

carried over as an alum

ahead to his new role.

that most everyone is craving.

support Stanford’s and Chris

supporting Stanford Live.

How did your connection to

You and your wife, Stephanie,

performing arts on behalf of

As a co-owner of the Golden

have many volunteer

our community both in and

State Warriors, this is an

I grew up playing trumpet in

commitments, such as

around Stanford.

exciting time for you! What

a family of classically trained

serving on the Stanford

connects basketball and live

musicians but lacked the

Hospital Board. So why

performance?

discipline to play classically at

deepen your involvement

I suppose at a very basic

with Stanford Live now?

Stanford Live begin?

Lorway’s aspirations for the

42


Membership Relaunch Earlier this year, Stanford Live relaunched our membership program with streamlined membership levels and additional benefits. Members can now enjoy 12 months of member benefits from the date of their membership gift, replacing our former season-based membership program. We offer four member presale levels, with no minimum ticket purchase, plus complimentary ticket exchanges throughout the season. At higher levels, members receive invitations to exclusive events, fee-free ticket orders, reserved parking, and more. Not a Stanford Live member? Join today at live.stanford.edu or contact the membership team at supportstanfordlive@stanford.edu or 650.725.8782.

Join the Future of Frost Stanford’s beloved Frost Amphitheater is undergoing an extensive renovation and will reopen in spring 2019. With a new, state-of-the-art stage, improved patron amenities, and accessibility, Frost will be able to host events in style—from concerts to ceremonies to screenings—including a Stanford Live summer performance series. We invite you to be part of Frost’s exciting future. Your gift of any size will help renew this historic venue. Gifts of $1,000 or more will receive special recognition. For more information or to give online, please visit arts.stanford.edu/frost.

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Stanford Live Members Stanford Live thanks the following members for their support: BING CIRCLE ($25,000+) Anonymous Jeanne & Larry Aufmuth Helen & Peter Bing The Bullard Family Roberta & Steven Denning Ann & John Doerr Jill & Norm Fogelsong Scott & Molly Forstall Jill Freidenrich Mary & Clinton Gilliland Marcia & John Goldman Drs. Lynn Gretkowski & Mary Jacobson Leonard Gumport & Wendy Munger Cynthia Fry Gunn & John A. Gunn Stephanie & Fred Harman Rick Holmstrom & Kate Ridgway The Hornik Family Leslie & George Hume Fong Liu Deedee & Burton McMurtry Phyllis Moldaw Barbara Oshman Mindy & Jesse Rogers Marian & Abraham Sofaer Trine Sorensen & Michael Jacobson Bonnie & Marty Tenenbaum David Wollenberg Priscilla & Ward Woods

BING DIRECTOR’S CIRCLE ($15,000–$24,999)

SUSTAINER ($2,500–$7,499)

Joan F. Lane Leatrice Lee Debra & Mark Leslie Carrick & Andrew McLaughlin Linda & Tony Meier Nancy & Lawrence Mohr William Reller Condoleezza Rice Madeline & Isaac Stein

Keith Amidon & Rani Menon Jonathan, Frances & Alison Axelrad Jim & Becky Campbell James Canales & James McCann William Coggshall & Janet Littlefield Sissy & Theodore Geballe Judy & Jerrol Harris Kari & Michael Kirk Charlotte & Larry Langdon Betsy & Matt Matteson Judy M. Mohr & Keith W. Reeves Betsy Morgenthaler Og & Ogina Kenneth Weinberg Albert Yu & Mary Bechmann Foundation

BING ARTIST’S CIRCLE ($7,500–$14,999) Anonymous (5) Fred Alvarez & Beth McLellan Alvarez Carla Baird & David Crane Felicity Barringer & Philip Taubman Alison & Joe Barta Sally Benson & Terry Surles Recia & Mark Blumenkranz Iris & Paul Brest Janice Brody & Bruce Rule Eva & Chris Canellos Regina & Gerhard Casper Diane & Stephen Ciesinski Ann & David Crockett Julia & James Davidson Margaret Dorfman Susan Ford Dorsey & Michael Dorsey William Draper III Debbie Duncan & Bill Stone Barbara Edwards Melissa & Trevor Fetter Mary & William Fitch Jean-Marc Frailong & Richard Halton Maggie & Fred Grauer Ann M. Griffiths Gail & Walter Harris Eleanor & Bruce Heister Anne & Jack Holloway Larry Horton & George Wilson Elizabeth & Zachary Hulsey Mary Ittelson Lucie Jay Sallie De Golia-Jorgenson & John Jorgenson Betty & Bob Joss Roberta & Charles Katz Lisa Keamy & Lloyd Minor Kathy & John Kissick Ingrid Lai & William Shu Carolyn & William Langelier Laura & Gary Lauder Bren & Lawrence Leisure Cynthia & Richard Livermore Rick & Amy Magnuson Jane & Michael Marmor Victoria & James Maroulis Jim McLaughlin & Cathy McMurtry Bill Meehan David Morandi Tashia & John Morgridge Dean Morton Susan & Bill Oberndorf John O’Farrell & Gloria Principe Lynn & Susan Orr Anthony Paduano & Ruth Porat Donna & Channing Robertson Barbara & Greg Rosston Tom Sadler & Eila Skinner Meryl & Rob Selig The Honorable & Mrs. George P. Shultz Barbara & Arnold Silverman Dr. Harise Stein & Mr. Peter Staple Diane & Hal Steuber Andrea & Lubert Stryer Lena & Ken Tailo Carol & Doug Tanner Lorna & Mark Vander Ploeg Karin & Paul Wick Susan & David Young

PARTNER ($1,000–$2,499) Anonymous (7) Marian & Jim Adams Therese Baker-Degler Lisa Barrett Deborah & Jonathan Berek Mildred & Paul Berg Celeste & Wendell Birkhofer Carolyn & Gary Bjorklund Linda & Steve Boxer Susan Breyer Joan & Thomas Brown Terri Bullock John Carter & Edie Goldberg Tasha Castaneda Andy & Mary Chan Donald Cheu Holly & Andrew Cohen Joanne & Michael Condie Toni Cupal & Mike Volpi Cornelia L. Dekker Debra Demartini Tom Dienstbier & Joyce Firstenberger Sally Dudley & Charles Sieloff Diane Elder & Bruce Noble Patricia Engasser Sally & Craig Falkenhagen Stanley Falkow & Lucy Tompkins Margaret Ann & Don Fidler Doug Fitzgerald & Amy Ladd Rona Foster & Ken Powell Lorien French Betsy & David Fryberger Aileen Furukawa Daniel Garber & Catharine Fergus Garber Jane & Bruce Gee Ed Haertel & Drew Oman David Hants & Ilze Silis Eric Hanushek & Margaret Raymond Joerg & Christine Heilig Anne & William Hershey Caroline Hicks Leslie Hsu & Richard Lenon Rex & Dede Jamison Pamela S. Karlan Julie Kaufman & Doug Klein Randall Keith & Karen Hohner Ed & Kay Kinney Albe & Ray Larsen Ayleen & Emory Lee Lucy & Jason Lee Shirley Liebhaber Kristen & Felix Lo Joan Mansour Sandra & Joseph Martignetti Yoshiko Matsumoto & John Ryan Richard Mazze & Sheila Cohen Vicky & Jim Merchant Dick Miller & James Stutts Chris & Saira Morace Martha Morrell MD & Jaime Tenedorio PhD Celia Oakley & Craig Barratt Mary Jane & Richard Otte Carmela & Eli Pasternak

Carol & Myles Berg Shawn & Brook Byers Lynn & Jim Gibbons Morton Grosser Catherine & Franklin Johnson Marlo Kahn Kitch & Justin Kitch

44

Jin-Piao Trust Shirley & Bob Raymer Kathy & Gary Reback Rossannah Reeves Sara Eisner Richter & Michael Richter Diane & Joe Rolfe Amy Rosenberg & John Slafsky Nancy & Norman Rossen Diana & Philip Russell Doris Sayon Elizabeth & Mark Schar Fund of The Greater Cincinnati Foundation Jane Shaw & Peter Carpenter Deborah & Michael Shepherd Susan Speicher Srinija Srinivasan Linda & Jeffrey Suto Michelle Swenson & Stan Drobac Onnolee & Orlin Trapp Ben Wegbreit Dr. Irving Weissman & Ann TsukamotoWeissman Karen & Rand White Mansie & Gary Williams Dr. Carlene Wong & Dr. Philip Lee Elizabeth F. Wright Sharon & Robert Yoerg

ADVOCATE ($500–$999) Anonymous (8) Laura Adams Bill Albright & Jeryl Hilleman Janice & William Anderson Lois & Edward Anderson Melody & Walter Baumgartner Richard Baumgartner & Elizabeth Salzer Ann & John Bender Susan Berman & Leon Lipson Charlotte & David Biegelsen Jeanie & Carl Blom Vera Blume Bonnie & William Blythe Patty Boone & Dave Pfefer David Braker Prudence Breitrose Laura Breyfogle & David Warner Maude & Philip Brezinski Katharine Carroll & Alison Rosenthal Chanin & Dotson Family Nona Chiariello & Chris Field Joyce Chung & Rene Lacerte Ann Hammond Clark Suzanne & Bruce Crocker Melanie & Peter Cross Ken Daigle & John Schramm III Richard De Luce Christina Reid Dickerson Michael Dickey Michael Duff Kathleen Dumas Robert Dutton & Carol Walsh-Dutton Eleanor Eisner Maria & George Erdi Anna Espinosa Jeffrey Fenton Alex Fielding Joan & Allan Fisch Robert Flanagan & Susan Mendelsohn Drs. Margaret L. Forsyth & Glenn D. Rennels Sarah & Stan Freedman Carol C. & Joel P. Friedman Leah & Lawrence Friedman Martha Gates & Spencer Commons Elizabeth Gish Charles Goldenberg & Pamela Polos Margaret & Ben Gong Brian & Susan Gray Sara & Michael Hammond Fran & Steve Harris Katherine Hill & Edward Stabler Linc & Robin Holland Chris Iannuccilli & Michele Schiele Alyson & James Illich


Sally & Rob Jackson Leigh & Roy Johnson Lil & Todd Johnson Katherine Jolluck & Norman Naimark Carol Kersten & Markus Aschwanden Mary Lou Kilcline Barbara Klein & Stanley Schrier Renate Klipstas Christina Kong Jeffrey Koseff & Thalia Anagnos Linda & Fredric Kraemer Edward & Miriam Landesman Mr. & Dr. Kurt F. Lang Cathy & Stephen Lazarus Joan & Philip Leighton Doreen & David Leith Roxanne Leung Sanford Lewis Irene Lin Drs. John & Penny Loeb Teri Longacre & Richard Hildebrandt Rachel & Zohar Lotan Kathryn Naylor Low Patricia & George Lundberg Vera Luth Ruth Lycette Kathy Mach & David Scherer Charlene & Dick Maltzman S. Martin & R. Zemlicka Marylin McCarthy Penny & Jim Meier Elyce Melmon Evelyn Miller Christine & Ronald Orlowski Shari & Donald Ornstein Nancy & Stephen Player Barbara & Warren Poole Kitty & Lee Price Richard & Karen Recht Christine Robles Maureen & Paul Roskoph Elise & Jay Rossiter Loren & Shelley Saxe Paula & George Schlesinger Schwabacher Family Robyn & Mark Setzen Craig Sherman & Susan Shin Judith & William Shilstone Diane & Branimir Sikic Mary Ann Sing Hannah & Richard Slocum Karen & Frank Sortino Barbara & Charles Stevens Tracy Storer & Marcia Kimes Eleanor Sue Rosi & Michael Taymor Jan Newstrom Thompson & Paul Goldstein Penelope & Robert Waites Joan & Roger Warnke Patti & Ed White John & Jane Williams Polly Wong & Wai Fan Yau Mitchell & Kristen Yawitz

SUPPORTER ($250–$499) Anonymous (15) Matthew & Marcia Allen Dana & Juliana Andersen Richard & Delores Anderson Dan & Leslie Armistead James & Jennifer Bae Anne & Robert Baldwin Betsy & George Bechtel Bethel Berhanu Pamela Bernstein Barbara Blatner-Fikes & Richard Fikes Christopher & Jane Botsford Caroline Bowker & Charles Bliss Ruth Brill Beverly Brockway Alex & Sonya Brousilovsky Jefferson Burch & Christine Weigen Lottie & Henry Burger Francis & Nancy Cavagnaro

Beth Charlesworth Susan Christiansen Albert & Betty Cohen Susie Cohen & Barry Weingast Elaine Costello & Warren Dougherty Richard & Suzanne Cottle Patricia & Tim Daniels Lothar de Temple Bernadine Donoghue Debra Doucette Maureen & Paul Draper Ellen & Tom Ehrlich Melanie & Stephen Erasmus Patricia & Fred Evans Joyce Farrell & Brian Wandell Nancy & Tom Fiene Barry Fleisher Shelley Floyd & Albert Loshkajian Madeleine Frankel Amy C. Friedman E. Alexander Glover The Goldhaber-Fiebert Family Paul Goldstein & Dena Mossar Harry & Diane Greenberg Linda & John Griffin Ann & Barry Haskell Tanya Hastings Karin Heck Jeffrey & Caron Heimbuck Wendy & John Hillhouse Jeanne Hochman Bebe & Rich Hoppe Rob Huffman & Emily Smith Edmon Jennings Patricia Johnson Jane & Bill Johnson Zeev Kaliblotzky Stina & Herant Katchadourian Ron Katz & Libby Roth Barney & Keats Shirley Kelley Lynn & Richard Kelson Michael & Wendy Kirst Norman & Nina Kulgein Ralph & Rose Lachman Uri Ladabaum Cathy & Dick Lampman Catherine Kawon Lee Y. K. Lee Laurie Leventhal-Belfer Reuben Levy Claire & Herbert Lindenberger Edward Lohmann Marion & Erick Mack Nancy Marks & Steve Mitchel Jane & Thomas Marshburn Mark Mathisen Laure & Sam Mazzara James McClelland & Heidi Feldman Meghan McGeary & Chih Sung Maura McGinnity & Erik Rausch Wallace Mersereau Alan F. Miller Rudolf Moos Mary Mourkas Coralie & Gerhard Mueller Kathryn & Peter Muhs Jean & Bryan Myers Fred & Kirstin Nichols Theodor & Lisa Nissim Michael McFaul & Donna Norton Joan Norton Cynthia & James Nourse Richard Olshen Dick & Sandi Pantages Gary Peltz Joseph Pickering Klaus & Ellen Porzig Lowell & Carole Price Jennifer Rose Ruth Rothman John Sack & Jeff Rensch Linda Sampson Lisa Scheidecker & Andrew Velline Angela & Samuel Schillace Joy & Richard Scott

Lorraine & Jerry Seelig Judy & Denis Severson Carla Shatz Matthew Sommer & Ih-hae Chang Scott & Gayle Spencer Kathy Stark & Christopher Aoki Elliot & Karen Stein Suzanne Stout Elizabeth Trueman & Raymond Perrault Ina Trugman James Tuleya & Karen Hurst Brigitte & John Turneaure Debbie Vallarino Teri & Mark Vershel Lisa Voge-Levin Dr. and Mrs. R. Jay Whaley Jeri & Kevin Wheaton Diane Wieder Curt Williams Warren Wu Cristina Zappacosta Selma Zinker

PERFORMANCE SPONSORS Jeanne & Larry Aufmuth Helen & Peter Bing The Bullard Family Mary & Clinton Gilliland Marcia & John Goldman Stephanie & Fred Harman Leslie & George Hume Trine Sorensen & Michael Jacobson Bonnie & Marty Tenenbaum David Wollenberg

INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERS $100,000+ The Koret Foundation $50,000–$99,999 The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation $10,000–$49,999 Anonymous California Arts Council Chamber Music America Nathan Cummings Foundation, with the support and encouragement of Jaimie Mayer Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation National Endowment for the Arts Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson Funds $1,000–$9,999 Aaron Copland Fund for Music Kinder Morgan Foundation New England Foundation for the Arts Western States Arts Federation Contributions listed are from current Stanford Live members who made gifts through 8/8/18. For corrections, or to make a contribution, please contact us at 650.725.8782 or supportstanfordlive@stanford.edu. To learn more about giving to Stanford Live, visit live.stanford.edu/give. § Deceased

45

2018–19 Advisory Council The purpose of the Stanford Live Advisory Council is to support the mission of Stanford Live and to provide advice on the strategic direction of the organization. Fred Harman, Chair Jeanne Aufmuth Peter Bing Rick Holmstrom David Hornik George H. Hume Leslie P. Hume Bren Leisure Betsy Matteson Linda Meier Trine Sorensen Srinija Srinivasan Doug Tanner David Wollenberg Ex officio: Maude Brezinski Stephen Sano Matthew Tiews

Bing Concert Hall Donors BUILDING DONORS Peter and Helen Bing Cynthia Fry Gunn and John A. Gunn John Arrillaga Family Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Roberta and Steve Denning Elizabeth and Bruce Dunlevie Jill and John Freidenrich Frances and Theodore Geballe Andrea and John Hennessy Leslie and George Hume Susan and Craig McCaw Deedee and Burt McMurtry Linda and Tony Meier Wendy Munger and Leonard Gumport Jennifer Jong Sandling and M. James Sandling Regina and John Scully Madeline and Isaac Stein Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang

BING EXPERIENCE FUND DONORS With appreciation for the following donors, who provide major support for programming and musical instruments for Bing Concert Hall. Anonymous Apogee Enterprises, Inc. The Adolph Baller Performance Fund for Bing Concert Hall Friends of Music at Stanford Fred and Stephanie Harman Fong Liu Elayne and Thomas Techentin, in memory of Beatrice Griffin Bonnie and Marty Tenenbaum The Fay S. and Ada S. Tom Family Turner Corporation The Frank Wells Family Maurice and Helen Werdegar


NOV / DEC 2018

Calendar

NOV 1 & 2

Thu-Sat

Wed

NOVEMBER 8 -10

DECEMBER 5

Barber Shop Chronicles

Philharmonic Fire

Fuel Theatre Company &

Philharmonia Baroque

the National Theatre

Orchestra

Sat

Fri

NOVEMBER 10

DECEMBER 7

Czech Philharmonic

Dwayne Dopsie and the Zydeco Hellraisers

Wed Sat

NOVEMBER 14

NOV Thu & Fri NOVEMBER 1 & 2

Estonian Philharmonic

DECEMBER 8

Chamber Choir

Paula West

Thu

Wed

NOVEMBER 15

DECEMBER 12

Circa

Neil Gaiman in Conversation

A Chanticleer Christmas

Sat

Fri

Fri

Humans

NOVEMBER 3

H. K. Gruber’s Frankenstein

NOVEMBER 30

DECEMBER 14

Decoda Ensemble

Christmas Time Is Here Dianne Reeves

Sun

DEC

NOVEMBER 4

The Routes of Slavery

Sat

Jordi Savall

DECEMBER 1

Miramar

Wed

Sat DECEMBER 15

Nat King Cole & Me Gregory Porter Sun

NOVEMBER 7

DECEMBER 16

David Bowie’s Blackstar

Sonos Handbell Ensemble

Ambient Orchestra with

with Frederica von Stade

Maya Beiser NOV 7

NOV 8–10

SINGLE TICKETS NOW ON SALE!

Presented by Stanford Live

LIVE.STANFORD.EDU OR 650.724.BING (2464)

Stanford University

Visit the Stanford Live website for updates.

365 Lasuen Street, Second Floor

All programs and prices are subject to change.

Littlefield Center, MC 2250 Stanford, CA 94305

46


Plan Your Visit

Things to Know The Interlude Café in Bing

Change your plans?

Large-print programs

Concert Hall’s lobby serves

Exchange your tickets or make

are available with 72

guests before performances

a tax-deductible donation at

hours’ notice given to

and during intermission. For

live.stanford.edu/changes.

the administrative office.

complete hours, menus, and

Please send all requests to stanfordlive@stanford.edu.

preordering options, visit

Wheelchair seating, with up

live.stanford.edu/dining.

to three companion seats per wheelchair space, is available

Volunteer usher positions

Latecomers arriving after

for all performances. Please

are available throughout the

curtain time will be seated

indicate your needs when

year. For more information,

at a suitable interval in the

purchasing tickets so that an

please send an email to

program or at intermission.

appropriate location can be

bstarr@stanford.edu.

We recommend that you

reserved for you.

arrive at least 30 minutes Sign language interpreting

prior to performances.

is available with five business Assisted-listening devices

days’ notice given to the

are available. Please visit

administrative office—call

Patron Services prior to the

650.723.2551 or email us at

show for more information.

stanfordlive@stanford.edu.

Performance Venue Information Bing Concert Hall &Bing UN

Concert Hall Ticket Office AR

2

Frost Amphitheater

3

Memorial Church

4

Memorial Auditorium

5

Stanford Ticket Office

6

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Parking for Memorial Church

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public transportation

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can be found along the Oval at the end of Palm Drive, on

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Parking is FREE on the Stanford campus in metered and lettered parking zones on weekdays after 4:00 pm and on weekends at all times. Disabled parking, loading, and servicevehicle restrictions are enforced at all times.

47

information, please consult our website: live.stanford.edu. For comprehensive campus parking information and maps, visit http://visit.stanford.edu/plan/ parking.html.


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Profile for Stanford Live

Stanford Live magazine - Sep/Oct 2018  

Music and Movement across the Globe, Instruments from the Banned Countries, Ryan Haddad on Dating, and More.

Stanford Live magazine - Sep/Oct 2018  

Music and Movement across the Globe, Instruments from the Banned Countries, Ryan Haddad on Dating, and More.