Stanford Live 2021–22 Season Brochure

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Join us! 2021-22 Season

RECONCILIATION & FORGIVENESS


S TA N FO R D L I V E MEMBERSHIP Become a member to enjoy year-round presale access, free ticket exchanges, and more. Stanford Live memberships provide vital support for performances, artist residencies, and K–12 education programs, and help create and inspire the next generation of artists and art enthusiasts. Learn more on page 42. M E M B E R P R E SA L E S B EG I N J U LY 2 2 , 2021. T I C K E T S G O O N SA L E TO T H E G E N E R A L P U B L I C O N AU G U ST 24, 2 02 1.

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2020–21 SEASON

Welcome to Stanford Live’s 2021-22 Season We take a moment to recognize that Stanford sits on the territory of Huichin, the ancestral and unceded land of the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe, who are the successors of the historic and sovereign Verona Band of Alameda County. This land was and continues to be of great importance to the Ohlone people. We recognize that every member of the community has benefited—and continues to benefit—from the use and occupation of this land. Consistent with our values of community and diversity, we have a responsibility to acknowledge and make visible the University’s relationship to Native people.

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S TA N FO R D L I V E

The pages in this brochure may seem oddly familiar to you—the obvious reason being that this season is a partial reconstruction of the year that never was. As we creatively navigated the pandemic

sation we have been having around

and planned our reopening, it was

the global stewardship of the land by

important to honor our commitments

Indigineous peoples. Rooting ourselves

to the wonderful artists that were

in these principles provided a wonderful

scheduled to grace our stages last sea-

framework to merge these two seasons

son. You’ll see many familiar faces and

and will continue to inform our planning

likely some new ones we’re excited

going forward.

to introduce you to. Above all, we are thrilled to once again Our original curatorial impulse for the

connect artists with audiences. The

2021–22 season was focused on artistic

virtual space provided some wonderful

responses to the climate crisis and

opportunities, but we’ve all missed the

self care. Both of these areas are top

magic that happens when communities

of mind at Stanford as it prepares to

gather in shared experience. And while

launch its climate and sustainability

we may have felt some security in

school and seeks to have more open

isolation, the act of coming together

conversations about the mental health,

again will be the ultimate form of

well-being, and flourishing of its faculty,

communal healing.

staff, and students. Given the impact of the pandemic on the arts and enter-

Finally, we want to thank you—our

tainment industry, it is no surprise that

audience—for being such incredible

these issues continue to inspire new

supporters of all that we do and for

values, practices, and artistic works.

sticking with us during this challenging year. We can’t wait to see you again!

As we connected with faculty, students,

by Helen and Peter Bing. Underwriting for student ticket discounts for the 2021–22 season is generously provided by the Bullard Family. Stanford Live's 2021–22 season jazz programs are generously supported by the Koret Foundation.

The Stanford Live Commissions and Programming Fund is generously supported by David and Pamela Hornik, Victoria and James Maroulis, the Maurice and Helen Werdegar Fund for Stanford Live, and other generous donors. Stanford Live's K–12 programs

and artists in Zoom meetings over the past

are generously supported by

year, we kept returning to the conver-

Gretchen and Mark Schar, the

Chris Lorway

Karim Baer

Executive Director

Associate Director of Campus Engagement and Public Programs

Laura Evans Director of Music Programs,

Will Paisley, Grace Wallis, and

Engagement, and Education

Ramiro Maxeechoga Hampson-Medina Curatorial Fellows

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Stanford Live’s 2021–22 season is generously supported

California Arts Council, and the Koret Foundation, with additional funding provided by the Kinder Morgan Foundation.


2021–22 SEASON PERFORMANCES

2021–22 SEASON

All performances and programs subject to change.

CHAMBER Mother to Mother: Reconciliation and Remembrance Silk Road Ensemble: Kinan Asmeh Omer Quartet Sundays with the St. Lawrence

15 22 29 30

CONTEMPORARY iskwē: acākosīk Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra: The No One’s Rose world premiere ft. music by Matthew Aucoin Gabriel Kahane Pink Martini Holiday Spectacular Nella

6 12 16 21 41

DANCE Dimitris Papaioannou: Transverse Orientation Kyle Abraham’s A.I.M: Requiem: Fire in the Air of the Earth Yang Liping: Rite of Spring CandyBomber Productions Presents: FRAY Lil Buck: Memphis Jookin': The Show

23 24 24 25 25

DISCUSSION/PERFORMANCE Selected Shorts National Geographic Live: Greenwood: A Century of Resilience with Alicia Odewale National Geographic Live: Wild Hope with Ami Vitale Rob Kapilow’s What Makes It Great?

26 27 27 31

16 17

FOLK Small Island, Big Song Derek Gripper & Yacouba Sissoko Jenny Scheinman's Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait

9 15 17

JAZZ Maria Schneider Orchestra Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah: Ancestral Recall Nduduzo Makhathini Abdullah Ibrahim Fandango at the Wall: Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra w/ the Villalobos Brothers Jaz Sawyer Samora Pinderhughes: The Healing Project Bessie, Billie, Nina: Pioneering Women of Jazz

10 11 11 15 32

RECITAL R. Carlos Nakai with pianist Peter Kater Abel Selaocoe, cello Gerald Finley, bass-baritone and Julius Drake, piano Jakub Józef Orliński, counter-tenor and Michał Biel, piano Cameron Carpenter, organ Johnny Gandelsman: This Is America Gil Shaham, violin and Akira Eguchi, piano Tony Siqi Yun, piano Jeremy Denk, piano: Bach’s The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book 1 Garrick Ohlson and Kirill Gerstein, pianos

8 14 18 18 21 22 29 34 34 35

SINGER-SONGWRITER Martha Redbone Frank Waln and Raye Zaragoza William Prince Anais Mitchell & Bonny Light Horseman

7 7 7 40

TANGO 10

THEATER And So We Walked: An Artist’s Journey Along the Trail of Tears Urland Presents: Bedtime Stories The War of the Worlds: Rhum and Clay Theatre Company Sea Sick: Alanna Mitchell Huff: Cliff Cardinal An Evening with an Immigrant: Inua Ellams Anthony Hudson/Carla Rossi: Queer Horror Gravest Hits Anthony Hudson/Carla Rossi: Carla Rossi Does Drag Falling for Make Believe: Ryan J. Haddad

8 26 36 37 37 38 39 39 39

VOCAL Ladysmith Black Mambazo The Tallis Scholars Vienna Boys Choir A Chanticleer Christmas Patti LuPone

14 19 20 20 40

33 33 41

ORCHESTRAL Russian National Orchestra New Century Chamber Orchestra: Berlin 1938 Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra & Chorale

28 31 35

Quinteto Astor Piazzolla

FILM WITH LIVE MUSIC 32 Sounds: A film by Sam Green and Yoni Brook with live music by JD Samson A Thousand Thoughts: A Live Documentary by Sam Green and Kronos Quartet

Basel Chamber Orchestra Sir John Eliot Gardiner English Baroque Soloists Orpheus Chamber Orchestra with Branford Marsalis

KEY 5 5 13

A M P L I F I C AT I O N

AU D I E N C E I N T E R AC T I O N

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S TA N FO R D L I V E

While we could not present our 2020 season at Frost Amphitheater due to COVID-19, live performances are happening this summer, including our ongoing partnership with the San Francisco Symphony and new collaborations with SFJAZZ, San Francisco Ballet, and other community organizations. The concert series that launched in July marked our first live, in-person performances since March 2020 with a broad range of programming— saxophonist Joshua Redman and tabla virtuoso Zakir Hussain with Stanford Jazz Workshop, the SF Symphony led by new music director 4

Esa-Pekka Salonen, comedy from Open Mike Eagle and Baron Vaughn, a festival-style mariachi performance featuring Graciela Beltrán and Lupita Infante with Mariachi Nueva Generacion, familyfavorite Alphabet Rockers, and more. Increased capacity shows in August feature Grammy-winning Gregory Porter with Marcus Shelby and Tiffany Austin; a Goat Rodeo reunion with Yo-Yo Ma, Chris Thile, Stuart Duncan, and Edgar Meyer; and a weekend of SF Ballet performances.

Tickets are on sale now, visit frostamphitheater.com for more details.


2020–21 SEASON

ORC H E S T R A L

Russian National Orchestra Kirill Karabits, conductor Mikhail Pletnev, piano Founded in 1990 by pianist and con-

WHEN:

ductor Mikhail Pletnev, the celebrated

S U N DAY,

Russian National Orchestra will per-

F E B RUA RY 2 0,

form Beethoven’s Egmont Overture,

2 02 2

Mozart’s Piano Concerto #23, and Rachmaninov’s Symphony #2.

S H OW T I M E : 7: 0 0 P M VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

ORC H E S T R A L

New Century Chamber Orchestra Berlin 1938 WHEN:

Led by music director and violinist Daniel

SAT U R DAY,

Hope, the conductorless Bay Area–based

JA N UA RY 22,

ensemble continues its distinguished legacy.

2022

In addition to performing classical pieces, the orchestra has a robust platform for

S H OW T I M E :

commissioning new works from living

7:30 P M

composers. Marking the start of a new ongoing partnership with Stanford

VENUE:

Live, the ensemble performs at Bing

B I N G C O N C E RT

with the premiere of Berlin 1938.

HALL

Generously supported by Trine Sorensen and Michael Jacobson.

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S TA N FO R D L I V E

I was first introduced to iskwē while curating an outdoor music series for Massey Hall in Toronto. Since then, she has become one of Canada's most thrilling voices, creating multidisciplinary spectacles that both entertain and shine light on important issues. —Chris Lorway, Executive Director

C ON T E M P OR A RY

iskwē acākosīk

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY,

A Juno Award–nominated electro-pop

and vocalizations will merge with

S E P T E M B E R 29,

artist, iskwē, which translates to “blue

projected video and live movement

2021

sky woman,” spotlights the importance

to create a unique, and intensely

and plight of Indigenous peoples and

visceral concert experience.

T H U R S DAY,

Supported by the Office of the Vice President for the Arts—Arts Incubator pilot program.

2021

territories in Canada. Her command of music styles includes jazz, R&B, industrial pop rock, post-rock, and trip-hop.

S E P T E M B E R 30,

Centuries of historic injustice, systemic

S H OW T I M E :

racism, and environmental degrada-

7:30 P M

tion fuel her powerful lyrics. VENUE:

The Bing Studio will be transformed

BING

into a visual installation to be experienced

C O N C E RT H A L L

prior to the concert. Then, in the concert hall, indigenous instrumentation 6


SI NGE R-S ONGW R I T E R

Martha Redbone Roots rocker Martha Redbone occu-

WHEN:

pies a unique niche in American music.

F R I DAY,

Her eclectic style amplifies her mixed

F E B RUA RY 1 1 ,

Native American and African American

2 02 2

heritage, her Appalachian birthplace, and her Brooklyn upbringing. A prolific

S H OW T I M E :

songwriter, composer for theater, and

7: 0 0 P M

creator of an acclaimed folk-style set-

& 9: 0 0 P M

ting of the poetry of William Blake, her work is united by her powerful, deeply

VENUE:

moving voice.

BING STUDIO

Generously supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.

SI NGE R-S ONGW R I T E R

SI NGE R-S ONGW R I T E R

Frank Waln and Raye Zaragoza

William Prince

Lakota hip-hop artist Frank Waln and

WHEN:

A singer-songwriter of magnitude, William

WHEN:

singer-songwriter Raye Zaragoza join

T H U R S DAY,

Prince has earned critical accolades for

T H U R S DAY,

forces in a concert that celebrates

F E B RUA RY 3,

his synthesis of country and gospel music

N OV E M B E R 11,

the identity and survival of Indigen-

2 02 2

with acoustic guitar and messages about

2021

ous peoples.

the human condition. S H OW T I M E :

S H OW T I M E :

7: 0 0 P M

7:00 P M

& 9: 0 0 P M

& 9:00 P M

VENUE:

VENUE:

B I N G ST U D I O

B I N G ST U D I O

7


R EC I TA L

R. Carlos Nakai with pianist Peter Kater

A PRE-CONCERT TALK BETWEEN R. CARLOS NAKAI AND DR. JOHNCARLOS PEREA WILL TAKE PLACE AT 6:45 PM.

Of Navajo-Ute heritage, R. Carlos Nakai

WHEN:

is the premier performer of the tradi-

SAT U R DAY,

tional cedarwood Native American flute.

F E B RUA RY 1 9,

Originally trained in classical trumpet

2022

and music theory, Nakai collaborates with many orchestras and musicians.

S H OW T I M E :

At the Bing, Nakai performs an intimate

7:30 P M

T H E AT E R

recital with Grammy Award–winning

And So We Walked

pianist Peter Kater. Generously supported by the California Arts Council, WESTAF (the Western States Arts Federation), and the National Endowment for the Arts.

An Artist’s Journey Along the Trail of Tears Retracing the path her great-great-

WHEN:

grandparents took during the forced

F R I DAY,

relocation of more than 17,000

M AY 2 0,

Cherokee from their homelands in

2 02 2

the 1830s, Cherokee performance artist

8: 0 0 P M

and activist DeLanna Studi seeks to understand her identity and the con-

SAT U R DAY,

flicts of her nation. This powerful,

M AY 2 1,

theatrical memoir draws on interviews,

2 02 2

historical research, and the Studis’

8: 0 0 P M

personal experience to convey the complexities and conflicts the Cherokee continue to wrestle with today.

S U N DAY, M AY 2 2 , 2 02 2 2 : 30 P M

The script was developed in close collaboration with individuals and institutions within the Eastern Band of Cherokee and Cherokee Nation as well as with the support of Native Voices Theatre and the American Indian Center and Process Series at UNC-Chapel Hill. Major support was provided through the Arts and Society Initiative of the Thomas S. Kenan Institute for the Arts.

8

VENUE: B I N G ST U D I O

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL


FOL K

Small Island, Big Song

VENUE:

to create a hybrid concert experience

B I N G C O N C E RT

and address shared cultural and

HALL

environmental challenges.

Meeting producers BaoBao Chen and Tim Cole, I was impressed by their expansive vision for tracing Oceanic song lines and especially struck by their humility and respect for Indigenous traditions and economic realities—they use the Fair Trade Music model, with 50 percent of profits going to the artists.

Generously supported by Mary and Clinton Gilliland and by the National Endowment for the Arts.

—Laura Evans, Director of

WHEN:

Small Island Big Song celebrates 5,000

W E D N E S DAY,

years of Pacific Islander culture. The

F E B RUA RY 9,

project is a collective of Indigenous

2 02 2

musicians who share an ancient seafaring ancestry across the islands

S H OW T I M E :

of the Pacific and Indian Oceans.

7 : 30 P M

The artists are drawn from 16 island nations, sharing musical traditions

Music Programs, Engagement, and Education 9


JA Z Z

Maria Schneider Orchestra

A P R E- C O N C E RT TA L K B E T W E E N MARIA SCHNEIDER A N D LO R E N S C H O E N B E RG W I L L TA K E P L AC E AT 6:45 P M .

Known as a breakaway jazz orchestra

WHEN:

leader and composer, Minnesota-born

SAT U R DAY,

Maria Schneider formed her first band in

M A RC H 26,

1988. She's a 2019 NEA Jazz Master and

2022

multi–Grammy Award winner for her work in classical, jazz, and even pop with the

S H OW T I M E :

late David Bowie. Today the 18-member

7:30 P M

Maria Schneider Orchestra performs worldwide, tackling lush and complex

VENUE:

works that bring new energy to the

B I N G C O N C E RT

jazz orchestra landscape.

HALL

Generously supported by The Wollenberg Foundation and by the Koret Foundation.

TA NG O

Quinteto Astor Piazzolla 100 Years of Piazzolla WHEN:

Argentine composer Astor Piazzolla

T H U R S DAY,

revolutionized tango music and brought

N OV E M B E R 4,

it to the modern world stage with his

2 02 1

trademark sound of nuevo tango. Now an ensemble formed in his name cel-

S H OW T I M E :

ebrates the centennial of his birth and

7 : 30 P M

his inspirational fusion of tango with classical music, jazz, and other genres.

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL 10


2021–22 SEASON

JA Z Z

Nduduzo Makhathini WHEN:

Pianist Nduduzo Makhathini is at the

T H U R S DAY,

forefront of a new generation of South

A P R I L 28,

African jazz musicians, bringing together

2022

South African traditions with progressive jazz. He has become a rising star

S H OW T I M E :

in the jazz world with his recent debut

7:00 P M

recording on the fabled Blue Note label.

& 9:00 P M

Coming from a long family line of healers, his artistry reflects his belief in the

VENUE:

healing power of music.

B I N G ST U D I O

Generously supported by the Koret Foundation.

JA Z Z

Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah Ancestral Recall Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah is an

WHEN:

Edison Award–winning and Grammy-

SAT U R DAY,

nominated jazz trumpeter and composer

O C TO B E R 9,

from New Orleans. Described by the

2 02 1

New York Times as a musician “breaking new ground,” Adjuah is a skillful player

S H OW T I M E :

who blends the sounds of modern hip-hop

7: 0 0 P M

with ancient, diasporic rhythms. His

& 9: 0 0 P M

bold new album, Ancestral Recall, combines music styles and folklore from

VENUE:

the African and Caribbean diaspora with

B I N G ST U D I O

the Indigenous cultures of New Orleans. Generously supported by the Koret Foundation.

11


S TA N FO R D L I V E

C ON T E M P OR A RY

The No One's Rose

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, AU G U ST 25,

A world premiere featuring music ranging from J.S. Bach to new music by Matthew Aucoin. A co-production with American Modern Opera Company

2 02 1

In partnership with the American Modern

2 02 1

Opera Company and Stanford Live,

7: 30 P M

7: 30 P M T H U R S DAY, AU G U ST 26,

PBO brings the world premiere of a new, multifaceted, genre-defying piece after

S U N DAY,

more than six years in the making and a

AU G U ST 2 9,

reschedule from its original premiere in

2 02 1

October 2020. The core of The No One's

2 : 30 P M

Rose is the poetry of Paul Celan, who wrote some of the most arresting accounts

VENUE:

of the Holocaust, set to a new score for

BING CONCERT

period instruments by the award-winning

HALL

Matthew Aucoin. Originally envisaged as a meditation on what happens after a catastrophe, The No One's Rose assumes more significance in the wake of the pandemic. A star cast of artists join forces to bring to life this bold new work, including

ORC H E S T R A L

Davóne Tines, Julia Bullock, Anthony Roth

Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra & Chorale

Costanza, and Paul Appleby, all directed by the visionary Zack Winokur. Co-commissioned by Stanford Live and Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra & Chorale. Generously supported by the Stanford Live Commissions and Programming Fund, the Koret Foundation, and the Ross E. Armstrong & Jonas (Jay) K. Stern Jews & Music Fund.

One of the Bay Area’s greatest musical treasures, the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra & Chorale plays classical and baroque jewels on period instruments. The performances at Stanford Live include the world premiere of 2018 MacArthur Fellow Matthew Aucoin’s The No One's Rose, Bach’s Christmas Oratorio, PBO’s revival of Handel’s Radamisto, Bach’s Mass in B Minor, and an evening of a curated performance with recently named PBO Creative Partner Davóne Tines.


P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 1

WHEN:

P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 3

F R I DAY,

Bach’s Christmas Oratorio

D EC E M B E R 1 0, 2 02 1

Led by Music Director Richard

S H OW T I M E :

Egarr, PBO’s holiday performance

7: 30 P M

of Bach’s Christmas Oratorio

WHEN: THURSDAY,

PBO Sessions with Davóne Tines, bassbaritone and PBO Creative Partner

F E B RUA RY 17, 2022 S H OW T I M E : 8:00 PM

Recently named PBO Creative

features a talented cast, with many

VENUE:

Partner in May 2021, Davóne Tines V E N U E :

making their PBO debuts.

BING CONCERT

will curate and perform a program

HALL

featuring members of the Orchestra,

BING STUDIO

Chorale, and special guest artists. P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 2

WHEN:

P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 4

W E D N E S DAY,

W E D N E S DAY,

Bach’s Mass in B Minor

2 02 2

Handel’s Radamisto (1728 version)

Richard Egarr directs the

S H OW T I M E :

In a new staging from Christophe

Baroque masterpiece by Bach

7: 30 P M

F E B RUA RY 2 ,

in a performance that continues PBO’s partnership with The

VENUE:

Juilliard School’s Historical

BING CONCERT

Performance program.

HALL

WHEN: SAT U R DAY,

A P R I L 20,

A P R I L 23,

2022

2022

7:30 P M

7:30 P M

Gayral, Richard Egarr directs

F R I DAY,

S U N DAY,

PBO’s revival of Handel’s operatic

A P R I L 22,

A P R I L 24,

hit Radamisto.

2022

2022

7:30 P M

2:30 P M VENUE: BING CONCERT HALL


S TA N FO R D L I V E

VO CA L

Ladysmith Black Mambazo The five-time Grammy-winning choral

WHEN:

group from South Africa honors the

W E D N E S DAY,

legacy of late founder Joseph Shabalala

F E B RUA RY 1 6,

as they continue to perform worldwide.

2 02 2

From brilliantly harmonized a cappella songs sung in Zulu to traditional English

S H OW T I M E :

gospel songs such as "This Little Light"

7: 30 P M

and "Amazing Grace," Ladysmith Black Mambazo’s spirited work soothes

VENUE:

the soul and brings a smile.

B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

R EC I TA L

Abel Selaocoe WHEN:

The captivating and prodigiously tal-

S U N DAY,

ented South African cellist transcends

M A RC H 13,

most definitions of classical music

2022

while adhering firmly to its tenets. Collaborating with orchestras, beatboxers,

S H OW T I M E :

South African artists, and contemporary

2:30 P M

and traditional chamber ensembles as well as performing as a solo artist

VENUE:

and the leader of his trio, Chesaba,

B I N G C O N C E RT

Selaocoe’s vast repertoire links Western

HALL

and non-Western musical traditions. From the nuances of Bach, Debussy, and Shostakovich to the vibrancy of Chesaba’s Ka Bohaleng to his versatility as a vocalist, Selaocoe is a young musician whose curiosity is equaled only by his unfolding talent. Generously supported by Jeanne and Larry Aufmuth.

14


2020–21 SEASON

C H A M BE R

Mother to Mother Reconciliation and Remembrance WHEN:

Featuring a soprano solo, string quartet,

F R I DAY,

and texts read by Stanford students,

A P R I L 29,

this performance is a reflection on the

2 02 2

story of Amy Biehl (1967–93), a Stanford

By reflecting on Amy Biehl’s story and her parents' circuitous journey toward understanding, we start to see reconciliation as a process that evolves and shifts, and doesn’t necessarily arrive. Biehl’s life touched so many at Stanford. We look forward to bringing those voices together for a deeper discussion of her life and the forces of historical and personal reconciliation.

undergraduate alumna and Fulbright S H OW T I M E :

Scholar who died in the lead-up to South

7 : 00 P M

Africa’s first democratic election. A newly commissioned piece by distinguished

VENUE:

South African composer Bongani

B I N G ST U D I O

Ndodana-Breen anchors a program that explores heartfelt responses to tragedy and urgently seeks ways forward.

—Laura Evans, Director of Music Programs,

Supported by the Office of the Vice President for the Arts.

Engagement, and Education

FOL K

JA Z Z

Derek Gripper & Yacouba Sissoko

Abdullah Ibrahim The godfather of South African jazz

WHEN:

and a 2019 NEA Jazz Master, pianist

W E D N E S DAY,

This spellbinding performance by South

WHEN:

Abdullah Ibrahim brings irresistibly

A P R I L 27,

African guitarist Derek Gripper and kora

F R I DAY,

swinging grooves and a deeply spiritual

2022

player Yacouba Sissoko will transport

O C TO B E R 8,

quality to his playing.

audiences to the musical worlds of Mali,

2 02 1

Senegal, and South Africa. Generously supported by the California Arts Council, WESTAF (the Western States Arts Federation), and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Generously supported by the Koret Foundation.

S H OW T I M E : 7:30 P M

S H OW T I M E : 7: 0 0 P M

VENUE:

& 9: 0 0 P M

B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

VENUE: B I N G ST U D I O

15


S TA N FO R D L I V E

C ON T E M P OR A RY

Gabriel Kahane In a new Stanford Live co-commission,

WHEN:

composer and singer-songwriter Gabriel

W E D N E S DAY,

Kahane’s new song cycle offers a medi-

M AY 11,

tation on digital surveillance, the impact

2022

of a culture obsessed with efficiency and convenience, and the role of tech-

S H OW T I M E :

nology and the Internet in mediating

7:30 P M

our lives today. VENUE: Generously supported by the Stanford Live Commissions and Programming Fund.

F I L M W I T H L I V E M USIC

32 Sounds A film by Sam Green and Yoni Brook with live music by JD Samson WHEN: F R I DAY, F E B RUA RY 1 1 , 2 02 2 S H OW T I M E : 7 : 30 P M VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

16

Commissioned by Stanford Live, 32 Sounds by Academy Award–nominated filmmaker Sam Green is an immersive new “live cinema” documentary that explores the universal influence of sound. The film weaves thirty-two specific audio recordings into a cinematic meditation on the power of sound to bend time, cross borders, and profoundly shape our perception of the world around us. Commissioned by Stanford Live; The Arts Centre at NYU Abu Dhabi, UAE; C41 Media; Arizona Arts Live at University of Arizona; Green Music Center at Sonoma State University; and Ferst Center for the Arts at Georgia Tech. Produced by ArKtype.

B I N G C O N C E RT HALL


2021–22 SEASON

F I L MS W I T H L I V E M USIC

A Thousand Thoughts A Live Documentary by Sam Green and Kronos Quartet

FOL K

Kannapolis: A Moving Portrait Jenny Scheinman

S H OW T I M E :

with archival footage and filmed inter-

7:30 P M

views with prominent artists such as

WHEN:

Oscar-nominated filmmakers Sam

W E D N E S DAY,

Green and Joe Bini teamed up with

O C TO B E R 6,

Grammy-winning Kronos Quartet

2021

for a multimedia performance piece that blends live music and narration

Philip Glass, Tanya Tagaq, Steve Reich,

Jenny Scheinman, a violinist, fiddler,

WHEN:

singer-songwriter, and the project’s

SAT U R DAY,

VENUE:

Wu Man, and Terry Riley. Together on

conceptual director, writes and performs

JA N UA RY 1 5,

B I N G C O N C E RT

stage, Green and Kronos interact with

original and archival Americana Roots

2 02 2

HALL

the stirring cinematic imagery to craft an important record and exploration of

music that stirs deep yearnings to return to a simpler time. Working with film-

S H OW T I M E :

late 20th and early 21st century music.

maker and director Finn Taylor (The Darwin

7: 30 P M

Transcending the typical live music and film event, this collaboration becomes

Awards, Cherish, Dream with the Fishes), her project Kannapolis features archival

VENUE:

a meditation on music itself—the act of

film from the Great Depression by

B I N G C O N C E RT

listening to it closely, the experience

H. Lee Waters to weave a compelling

HALL

of feeling it deeply, and the power that

narrative of a time long past. Themes of family, community, and hands-on industry underscored by labor songs and fiddle tunes resonate with fresh

it has to change the world. Produced in association with ArKtype, C41 Media, The Department of Motion Pictures.

meaning in modern times.

Kannapolis is a poetic reflection on an earlier time in America. In old film shots, everyday people seek joy amid division, and we experience something akin to empathy for the past, reconciling differences in favor of our human commonalities. —Laura Evans, Director of Music Programs, Engagement, and Education Commissioned and developed by Duke Performances, this is the first in a series of works entitled “From The Archives.” Waters’ archive is provided by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University’s David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

17


S TA N FO R D L I V E

R EC I TA L

Gerald Finley, bass-baritone and Julius Drake, piano

WHEN: F R I DAY, F E B RUA RY 4, 2 02 2

Grammy Award–winning Canadian

S H OW T I M E :

bass-baritone Gerald Finley performs

7: 30 P M

a recital program that includes a new song cycle by Mark-Anthony Turnage

VENUE:

set to the poetry of Thomas Hardy

B I N G C O N C E RT

and a selection of songs by Schubert.

HALL

R EC I TA L

WHEN:

Jakub Józef Orliński, counter-tenor and Michał Biel, piano

F R I DAY, M A RC H 11, 2022

Polish countertenor Jakub Józef Orliński has quickly emerged as one of the most

S H OW T I M E :

vibrant performers on the internation-

7:30 P M

al classical music scene, triumphing in both concert and recordings. With

18

VENUE:

Michał Biel on piano, Orlinski performs

B I N G C O N C E RT

a program to include works by Purcell,

HALL

Schubert, Handel, Naginski, and Copland.


2021–22 SEASON

VO CA L

The Tallis Scholars WHEN:

For more than four decades, the Tallis

T H U R S DAY,

Scholars have sought to bring the

M AY 5,

sacred vocal music of the Renaissance

2 02 2

to new audiences around the world. The group performs Antoine Brumel’s

S H OW T I M E :

evening-length The Earthquake Mass with

7 : 30 P M

interstitial music composed by Stanford alum and renowned composer David Lang.

VENUE: MEMORIAL C H U RC H

Generously supported by the Stanford Live Commissions and Programming Fund.


S TA N FO R D L I V E

VO CA L

A Chanticleer Christmas WHEN:

It wouldn’t be the holidays with-

T H U R S DAY,

out Chanticleer at Memorial Church.

D EC E M B E R 16,

San Francisco’s treasured men’s

2021

vocal ensemble creates a new Christmas program each year, activating

S H OW T I M E :

the church’s gorgeous acoustics

7:30 P M

to create a feeling of community and serene beauty.

VENUE: MEMORIAL C H U RC H

VO CA L

Vienna Boys Choir In a traditional holiday concert backed

WHEN:

by a 500-year history, the beloved boys

M O N DAY,

choir raises harmony to new levels,

N OV E M B E R 29,

expressing peace, faith, and hope. Estab-

2 02 1

lished at Vienna’s Imperial Chapel in 1498 by Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I,

S H OW T I M E :

members of the choir today often

7: 0 0 P M

have a long lineage preceding them in the choir. Generously supported by David Wollenberg and The Wollenberg Foundation.

20

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL


2021–22 SEASON

C ON T E M P OR A RY

Pink Martini Holiday Spectacular WHEN: S U N DAY,

Pound for pound, no other band does

D EC E M B E R 12,

what Pink Martini does. Fronted by the

2021

dynamic vocalist China Forbes, Pink Martini has performed with more than

S H OW T I M E :

50 of the world’s great orchestras and

4:00 P M

recorded nine albums. With the combined power of a dozen musicians, they offer

VENUE:

a rollicking mix of classical, jazz, and old-

B I N G C O N C E RT

fashioned pop. Come break in the

HALL

holidays with a swingin' good time at the Bing.

R EC I TA L

Cameron Carpenter WHEN:

While known for his digital, tailor-made

T H U R S DAY,

International Touring Organ, this per-

M A RC H 31 ,

formance sees the Grammy-nominated

2 02 2

organist return to playing some of country's finest pipe organs—in this

S H OW T I M E :

case, the famed pipe organ of Memorial

7 : 30 P M

Church. His theatrical stage presence and virtuosic technique will be on

VENUE:

display in his interpretation of Bach’s

MEMORIAL

Goldberg Variations.

C H U RC H

Generously supported by Jeanne and Larry Aufmuth.

21


C H A M BE R

Silk Road Ensemble: Kinan Asmeh WHEN:

Syrian composer and clarinetist Kinan

W E D N E S DAY,

Azmeh, a longtime member of the

A P R I L 6,

ensemble, and Syrian Armenian visual

2022

artist Kevork Mourad have created an impressionistic multimedia reflection on

S H OW T I M E :

the Syrian uprising of 2011 and its after-

7:30 P M

math. Joined by half a dozen Silkroad artists, their work reflects a sense of

VENUE:

sustained urgency and continued hope

B I N G C O N C E RT

for their homeland and communi-

HALL

ties around the world. The experience includes engagement programs that invite audiences to share in the process of exploring tragedy and hope through multiple lenses.

R EC I TA L

Generously supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Johnny Gandelsman

Syrian clarinetist Kinan Azmeh's return visit with the Silk Road Ensemble and visual artist Kevork Mourad is a gift that allows us to gain empathy for Syrian suffering through music and art.

This Is America Curated by violinist Johnny Gandelsman,

WHEN:

—Laura Evans, Director of Music Programs,

This is America is a series of 20 new solo

SAT U R DAY,

Engagement, and Education

violin works from a diverse group of

F E B RUA RY 1 9,

American and United States–based

2 02 2

composers. The invited composers were asked to reflect on the events of the

S H OW T I M E :

past year and to consider the impact the

7: 0 0 P M

period had on both them and their

& 9: 0 0 P M

communities. Each piece in the series was commissioned by an individual or insti-

VENUE:

tution, and Stanford Live chose to support

B I N G ST U D I O

a new work by Bay-Area composer and cellist Marika Hughes. 22


S TA N FO R D L I V E

DA NC E

Transverse Orientation

In 2018, I travelled to Montreal to see Dimitris' piece The Great Tamer. His visual landscape was both immaculate and raw and had me on the edge of my seat for the entire performance. I couldn't wait to see what was next.

WA R N I N G :

—Chris Lorway, Executive Director

2022

T H I S P RO D U C T I O N C O N TA I N S N U D I T Y. WHEN: SAT U R DAY, M AY 14,

Dimitris Papaioannou

7:30 P M

Stanford Live has joined an interna-

elaborate stage imagery in enigmatic

S U N DAY,

tional consortium to commission the

but powerfully moving ways. Transverse

M AY 15,

latest creation by groundbreaking

Orientation makes it United States pre-

2022

Greek director, choreographer, and

miere at Stanford Live.

4:00 P M

visual artist Dimitris Papaioannou, whose work ranges from experimental

VENUE:

theater to the opening and closing

MEMORIAL

ceremonies for the 2004 Olympic Games

AU D I TO R I U M

in Athens. His epic, evening-length works combine movement, music, and

Generously supported by the Stanford Live Commissions and Programming Fund.

23


DA NC E

Rite of Spring Yang Liping Chinese dance legend and renowned

WHEN:

choreographer Yang Liping—a 2018

F R I DAY,

judge on So You Think You Can Dance:

JA N UA RY 21,

China—brings her stunning reimagining

2022

of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring to Stanford. A product of her native Chinese culture

SAT U R DAY,

intermingled with the Tibetan concept of

JA N UA RY 22,

nature and life, Liping’s Rite of Spring

2022

spins an abstract legend of the path of salvation embodied by the sacrifi-

S H OW T I M E :

cial peacock. Through spectacular set

7:30 P M

design and exquisite costumes, the

DA NC E

A.I.M A new work by Kyle Abraham and Jlin Led by the extraordinary choreographer

WHEN:

and MacArthur genius Kyle Abraham,

SAT U R DAY,

A.I.M brings together an eclectic music

D EC E M B E R 4,

and movement vocabulary, from classi-

2 02 1

cal to modern and hip-hop. Following a week-long residency at Stanford, they'll

S H OW T I M E :

perform a new work inspired by Mozart's

7: 30 P M

Requiem in collaboration with producer

Co-commissioned by Stanford Live; Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts; University Musical Society of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and International Summer Festival Kampnagel; and generously supported by the Stanford Live Commissions and Programming Fund.

24

VENUE:

universe where time, space, and life

MEMORIAL

coexist in endless reincarnation.

AU D I TO R I U M

Generously supported by the Koret Foundation and the Stanford Live Commissions and Programming Fund.

Requiem: Fire in the Air of the Earth

and composer Jlin.

production creates a distinctive

VENUE: MEMORIAL AU D I TO R I U M


2020–21 SEASON

DA NC E

CandyBomber Productions Presents: FRAY WHEN:

With visuals based on authentic game

T H U R S DAY,

design and music performed by a DJ

M AY 26,

onstage, FRAY fuses hip hop and ballet

2022

to tell the story of two brothers, the universe of video games they love and

F R I DAY,

inhabit, and the very real world outside

M AY 2 7,

where they must confront challenges

2022

knowing life is not a programmed game. This unique performance coin-

S H OW T I M E :

cides with the release of a video game

8 :00 P M

based on the production, which audiences can play in the lobby of Bing

VENUE:

prior to the show.

B I N G ST U D I O

DA NC E

Memphis Jookin’: The Show featuring Lil Buck In this new production, renowned dance

WHEN:

artist Lil Buck conceives, choreographs,

M O N DAY,

and performs an ode to his hometown

F E B RUA RY 28 ,

of Memphis, Tennessee, birthplace of the

2 02 2

singular dance style known as Memphis Jookin’. The 90-minute show chronicles

S H OW T I M E :

the emergence of the art form, from

7: 30 P M

local street dance to international phenomenon. Eight dancers and a DJ

VENUE:

perform alongside Lil Buck to a soundtrack

B I N G C O N C E RT

that evokes the energy of the streets and

HALL

the clubs where Memphis Jookin’ was born.

25


DIS CUS SION / P E R FOR M A NC E

Selected Shorts The popular program is produced by

WHEN:

Symphony Space in New York City and

S U N DAY,

broadcast on more than 150 stations

D EC E M B E R 5,

nationally. The stories are mostly fiction,

2021

sometimes classic, sometimes new, and always performed by great actors

S H OW T I M E :

from stage, screen, and television who

2:30 P M

bring these short stories to life. At the

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, M A RC H 2 , 2 02 2 7 : 0 0 P M O N LY

T H E AT E R T H U R S DAY, M A RC H 3, 2 02 2

Urland Presents: Bedtime Stories

F R I DAY, M A RC H 4, 2 02 2

An immersive multimedia work, Bedtime Stories unfolds before an intimate audi-

SAT U R DAY,

ence of 100 on the Frost Amphitheater

M A RC H 5,

stage. Conceived by Dutch collective

2 02 2

URLAND, Bedtime Stories celebrates voice and storytelling. This pitch-perfect nar-

S H OW T I M E :

rated performance takes its inspiration

7:00 PM

from radio plays, using actor Thomas

& 9 : 00 P M

Dudkiewicz’s voice and well-timed sound effects to lead the audience into a

VENUE:

strange and brilliantly dark world and

F RO ST

to bring to life an enchanting cast

A M P H I T H E AT E R

of characters. Special thanks to Productiehuis Theater Rotterdam, Gemeente Rotterdam, and Fonds Podiumkunsten.

Bing, the show features a curated

VENUE:

selection of stories about reconcilia-

BING CONCERT

tion and forgiveness.

HALL


2020–21 SEASON

DIS CUS SION / P E R FOR M A NC E

National Geographic Live After a successful inaugural series in the 2019–20 season at Stanford Live, National Geographic Live returns to the Bing with informative, entertaining, and awe-inspiring events that bring the world closer by combining National Geographic’s media resources with live presentations by explorers, photographers, reporters, and scientists.

P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 1

P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 2

Greenwood: A Century of Resilience

Wild Hope With Ami Vitale

With Alicia Odewale From documenting war zones to don-

WHEN: M O N DAY,

A native of Tulsa, Oklahoma, archaeolo-

WHEN:

ning a panda suit to remain anonymous

gist Alicia Odewale is uncovering stories

W E D N E S DAY,

among giant pandas, award-winning

M A RC H 14,

of resilience in the hundred years since

N OV E M B E R 10,

photographer and filmmaker Ami Vitale

2022

the attack on Black Wall Street in the

2 02 1

shares her images and adventures from a career spent “living the story.”

city’s vibrant Greenwood district. S H OW T I M E :

S H OW T I M E : 7:30 P M

7: 30 P M VENUE: VENUE:

BING CONCERT

BING CONCERT

HALL

HALL

27


ORC H E S T R A L

Basel Chamber Orchestra Featuring Ian Bostridge, tenor and Felix Klieser, French horn

Ian Bostridge

Leading international ensemble Basel

WHEN:

Chamber Orchestra performs with

S U N DAY,

both historical and modern instruments

M A RC H 6,

in innovative collaborations. The

2022

group’s Stanford Live program includes Britten’s Serenade for Tenor, Horn, and

S H OW T I M E :

Strings featuring renowned singer Ian

2:30 P M

Bostridge and horn player Felix Kliester, plus works by Mozart and Haydn.

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL


S TA N FO R D L I V E

2021–22 SEASON

C H A M BE R

Omer Quartet WHEN:

Stanford Live continues to support

S U N DAY,

the St. Lawrence String Quartet’s

F E B RUA RY 13,

advocacy of young quartets with our

2022

annual presentation of the winner of the SLSQ’s Ladd Prize. This year,

S H OW T I M E :

we are excited to welcome the Omer

2:30 P M

Quartet, which in a short time has already amassed major chamber

VENUE:

music competition prizes and multiple

B I N G C O N C E RT

festival and academic residencies.

HALL

At the Bing, they'll perform works by Beethoven and Caroline Shaw.

R EC I TA L

Gil Shaham, violin and Akira Eguchi, piano Lauded by the New York Times as “one of today’s preeminent violinists,”

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY,

Grammy Award–winning Gil Shaham

D EC E M B E R 8,

is a spirited master of violin. He shares

2 02 1

the stage at the Bing with his longtime duo partner, pianist Akira Eguchi,

S H OW T I M E :

performing a program that includes

7: 30 P M

Dvorak’s 4 Romantic Pieces, Sonatina, and Sonata, and Schumann’s Four Romances.

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT

In summer of 2019 at Frost, violinist Gil Shaham astounded our audiences with his virtuosic playing of Tchaikovsky with the San Francisco Symphony. We're thrilled to have him back at the Bing for his recital debut.

HALL

—Chris Lorway, Executive Director 29


C H A M BE R

Sundays with the St. Lawrence Hailed by The New Yorker “not simply for the quality of their music making, exalted as it is, but for the joy they take in the act of connection,” the acclaimed St. Lawrence String Quartet continues its fabled partnership with Stanford. The quartet remains a cultural cornerstone of the University, directing the music department’s Chamber Music Program, concertizing at Stanford Live, hosting a popular summer seminar, and running the Emerging String Quartet Program.

P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 1

P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 2

P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 3

SLSQ with cellist Paul Wiancko

SLSQ

SLSQ with special guest Gil Vonsattel

HAYDN Op. 76 No. 4 “Sunrise” WIANCKO Untitled Work for String Quartet and Cello Commissioned in honor of Sidney Drell by Persis Drell and James Welch SCHUBERT String Quintet in C major

HAYDN String Quartet Op. 7, No. 2 “Quinten” BEETHOVEN String Quartet Op. 132 GOLIJOV Tenebrae

HAYDN Op. 76 No.TBA ALESSANDRINI Piano 5tet THUILLE Piano Quintet No. 2 Op. 20

WHEN:

VENUE:

WHEN:

VENUE:

WHEN:

VENUE:

S U N DAY

BING

S U N DAY

BING

S U N DAY

BING

O C T 1 0 2021

C O N C E RT

JA N 2 3 2 02 2

C O N C E RT

M AY 8 2022

C O N C E RT

2 : 30 P M

HALL

2 : 30 P M

HALL

2:30 P M

HALL

30

30


2020–21 SEASON

ORC H E S T R A L

Sir John Eliot Gardiner English Baroque Soloists

WHEN: SAT U R DAY, A P R I L 9,

Revered as an innovative and dynamic

2 02 2

musician, Sir John Eliot Gardiner is the founder and artistic director of the

S H OW T I M E :

English Baroque Soloists. The U.K.

2 : 30 P M

group’s all-Mozart program at the Bing includes the Sinfonia concertante in

VENUE:

E-flat major, Symphony #32 in G major,

BING CONCERT

and Symphony #39 in E-flat major.

HALL

DIS CUS SION / P E R FOR M A NC E

Rob Kapilow’s What Makes It Great? Mozart’s Requiem with Stanford Chamber Chorale and guest orchestra WHEN:

Everyone’s favorite down-to-earth

SAT U R DAY,

explainer of all types of music returns

A P R I L 30,

to Stanford Live. Kapilow illustrates

2022

key points of the music and its creators before moving into a performance of

S H OW T I M E :

the piece. To top off the experience,

7:30 P M

Kapilow and the musicians take part in a lively, in-depth audience Q&A.

VENUE:

In this spring performance, the Stanford

B I N G C O N C E RT

Chamber Chorale joins Kapilow to

HALL

perform Mozart’s Requiem. 31


S TA N FO R D L I V E

JA Z Z A P R E- C O N C E RT TA L K B E T WE E N ARTURO O’FARRILL

Fandango at the Wall

A N D LO R E N

AT 6:45 PM.

Arturo OʼFarrill and the Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra with special guests Villalobos Brothers

WHEN:

In a project inspired by a fandango

W E D N E S DAY,

festival held annually at the mesh fence

O C TO B E R 1 3,

bordering Tijuana, Mexico, O’Farrill

2 02 1

brings 30 musicians from the Afro-Latin

S C H O E N B E RG WILL TAKE PL ACE

Jazz Orchestra to the Bing. Proud of S H OW T I M E :

being an American, O’Farrill said in a

7 : 30 P M

2019 NPR interview that the concert is equal to “elegant activism.” By cele-

Arturo O’Farrill proved himself a profound thinker on social justice issues at Bing in 2018. His Fandango at the Wall project with its urgent participation in our national immigration dialogue provides a platform for us to reckon with the question of who gets to seek the American dream and at what cost.

VENUE:

brating the reconciliatory bridge built

B I N G C O N C E RT

through music, “jamming across the

—Laura Evans, Director of Music Programs,

HALL

mesh” at a fandango becomes possible

Education, and Engagement

for audiences worldwide. Generously supported by the Koret Foundation.

32


JA Z Z

V E N U E : B I N G ST U D I O

Jaz Sawyer

P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 1

WHEN: F R I DAY,

Bay Area–raised educator and percussionist Jaz Sawyer explores Max Roach and Abbey Lincoln’s Freedom Now Suite. The 1960 work with lyrics by Oscar Brown Jr. was inspired by the civil rights

We Insist! Freedom Now Suite

N OV E M B E R 12, 2021

featuring Jazzmeia Horn with special guest Tongo Eisen-Martin

7:00 P M

P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 2

WHEN:

movement. In their final performance, Sawyer premieres his new work The Message Forward, exploring the power of community and education. Generously supported by the Koret Foundation.

SAT U R DAY,

The Message Forward featuring Kim Nalley World Premiere with special guest Tongo Eisen-Martin

N OV E M B E R 13, 2021 7:00 P M

JA Z Z

Samora Pinderhughes The Healing Project WHEN:

Bay Area–raised composer and activist

F R I DAY,

Samora Pinderhughes brings together

APRIL 1,

musicians, artists, and poets in a mul-

2 02 2

tidisciplinary work exploring the daily realities of violence, incarceration,

SAT U R DAY,

and detention in the U.S. With musical

A P R I L 2,

compositions, audio interviews, and

2 02 2

raw testimonials, The Healing Project is a search for what it means to live

S H OW T I M E :

and love amid hurt, an exploration of

8: 0 0 P M

vulnerability, and a celebration of healing and resistance.

VENUE:

Generously supported by the Koret Foundation. Co-commissioned by Art for Justice, Soros Justice, Unbound Philanthropy, Creative Capital, and Carnegie Hall.

B I N G ST U D I O

33


S TA N FO R D L I V E

R EC I TA L

Tony Siqi Yun, piano With playing that combines poetry

WHEN:

and elegance, charismatic young

W E D N E S DAY,

pianist Tony Siqi Yun is the recent first

M AY 1 8,

prize winner and gold medalist at

2 02 2

the First China International Music Competition and is already being

S H OW T I M E :

invited to perform at major venues

7: 30 P M

around the world. Described as a “true poet of the keyboard,” Yun

VENUE:

makes his first appearance at the

B I N G C O N C E RT

Bing with a program that includes Bach

HALL

and Busoni, Beethoven, and Brahms.

R EC I TA L

Jeremy Denk, piano Bach’s The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book 1 WHEN: SAT U R DAY, F E B RUA RY 12,

Jeremy Denk is one of America’s foremost pianists. Winner of a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship and the Avery

2022

Fisher Prize, Denk was recently elected

S H OW T I M E :

Sciences. For this first solo recital with

7:30 P M

Stanford Live, Denk plays Bach’s The

to the American Academy of Arts and

Well-Tempered Clavier, Book 1. VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL 34

Generously supported by Trine Sorensen and Michael Jacobson.


2020–21 SEASON

ORC H E S T R A L

Orpheus Chamber Orchestra with Branford Marsalis The conductorless ensemble, noted

WHEN:

for its unique approach to collective

W E D N E S DAY,

leadership onstage and off, returns

JA N UA RY 1 2 ,

to the Bing for the first time since 2014.

2 02 2

This time they’re joined by saxophone virtuoso and NEA Jazz Master Branford

S H OW T I M E :

Marsalis, one of the world’s most cel-

7: 30 P M

ebrated jazz artists, in a classical turn. The program features Gioachino

VENUE:

Rossini, Joaquín Rodrigo, Claude

B I N G C O N C E RT

Debussy, and more.

HALL

R EC I TA L

Garrick Ohlsson and Kirill Gerstein WHEN:

Dual Pianos

W E D N E S DAY, F E B RUA RY 23,

In this rare duo recital by two of today’s

2022

finest pianists, Bay Area favorite Garrick Ohlsson and Russian American master

S H OW T I M E :

Kirill Gerstein team up to perform a pro-

7:30 P M

gram of Rachmaninoff, Ravel, and Busoni, including one of Busoni’s imagi-

VENUE:

native two-keyboard arrangements

B I N G C O N C E RT

of music by Mozart.

HALL 35


2020–21 SEASON

T H E AT E R

The War of the Worlds Rhum and Clay Theatre Company, written with Isley Lynn

WHEN: T H U R S DAY, O C TO B E R 2 8, 2 02 1 F R I DAY, O C TO B E R 2 9, 2 02 1 S H OW T I M E : 7 : 30 P M

In August of 2019, we took our Advisory Council members to the Edinburgh festivals and this was a favorite. In an era where facts are constantly being questioned, this production is an interesting look at one of the original "fake news" stories that captured the attention of the world.

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL 36

­—Chris Lorway, Executive Director

This work looks back through history and speaks to our times. Inspired by H.G. Wells’ sci-fi novel and Orson Welles’ radio adaptation and the wild reaction it inspired, Rhum and Clay’s The War of the Worlds wrestles with the media and the boundaries of truth in a thrilling broadcast of the end of the world. Originally commissioned by New Diorama Theatre, London. Co-produced by Brighton Festival and HOME Manchester. Supported by China Plate, Corn Exchange Newbury, New Wolsey Theatre Ipswich, and Redbridge Drama Centre. Supported using public funding by Arts Council England.


T H E AT E R

Sea Sick The Theatre Centre, written and performed by Alanna Mitchell This unique performance unites personal

WHEN:

memoir, theatrical presentation, and a

T H U R S DAY,

scientific deep dive. Mitchell, a science

A P R I L 7,

journalist whose research on human

2 02 2

impacts on the ocean’s chemistry led to many unexpected adventures, has

F R I DAY,

created a lecture-cum-performance that

A P R I L 8,

diagnoses the state of the seas.

2 02 2

Another pick from the Edinburgh Fringe in summer 2019. A wonderful example of powerful storytelling that gets to the heart of an issue that impacts us all.

SAT U R DAY,

T H E AT E R

A P R I L 9,

Cliff Cardinal's Huff

2 02 2 S H OW T I M E :

­—Chris Lorway, Executive Director

8: 0 0 P M VENUE: B I N G ST U D I O

One of Canada’s most important

WHEN:

emerging theatrical voices, Cree

T H U R S DAY,

actor and playwright Cliff Cardinal’s

JA N UA RY 27,

acclaimed solo play delivers an

2022

unabashed view of the realities facing Indigenous youth growing up on

F R I DAY,

First Nations Reserves across Turtle

JA N UA RY 28,

Island (North-Central America).

2022

Huff is a wrenching yet darkly comic tale of Wind and his brothers,

S H OW T I M E :

caught in a torrent of solvent abuse,

8 :00 P M

struggling to cope with the death of their mother. Huff is a story of Indi-

VENUE:

genous resilience and, ultimately,

B I N G ST U D I O

hope for the next generation. The Stanford Live presentation of Huff is generously supported by the National Endowment for the Arts. Huff was developed in part through The Collaborations, an initiative of Canada’s National Arts Centre English Theatre. The development of Huff was also supported by VideoCabaret.

37


S TA N FO R D L I V E

T H E AT E R

An Evening with an Immigrant Inua Ellams

many to be Boko Haram territory, award-

JA N UA RY 2 9,

winning poet and playwright Inua

2 02 2

Ellams left Nigeria for England in 1996

8: 0 0 P M

After a successful Stanford run of his award winning play The Barbershop Chronicles, we're thrilled to have Inua back to share his constantly evolving life story.

years, and then returned to London to

S U N DAY,

—Chris Lorway, Executive Director

work as a writer and graphic designer.

JA N UA RY 30,

Littered with poems, stories, and anec-

2 02 2

dotes, Inua tells his ridiculous, fantastic,

2 : 30 P M

Born to a Muslim father and a Christian

WHEN:

mother in what is now considered by

SAT U R DAY,

at age 12, moved to Ireland for three

poignant immigrant story of escaping fundamentalist Islam, experiencing

VENUE:

prejudice and friendship in Dublin, perfor-

B I N G ST U D I O

ming solo at the National Theatre, and drinking wine with the Queen of England, all the while without a country to belong to or place to call home.

38


2021–22 SEASON

T H E AT E R

Falling for Make Believe Ryan J. Haddad T H E AT E R

Anthony Hudson / Carla Rossi

Ryan J. Haddad—the 2020 recipient of

WHEN:

the Cornelia Street American Playwriting

F R I DAY,

Award—has harbored a true love for

F E B RUA RY 25,

theater since his childhood. When he was

2022

five, he created the Haddad Theater for his family to put on plays. As an actor

SAT U R DAY,

Anthony Hudson as alter ego Carla Rossi, "Portland's

today, Haddad can be seen in popular TV

F E B RUA RY 26,

premier drag clown," comes to Bing for a two-night

shows such as The Politician, Madame

2022

residency. A member of the Confederated Tribes

Secretary, and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.

of Grand Ronde, Hudson finds inspiration in the

S H OW T I M E :

drama and tension living in the in-between of race

In Falling for Make Believe, Haddad draws

and sexual orientation in white pop culture.

on stories from his childhood in a witty, whimsical memoir full of showtunes.

P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 1

Queer Horror Gravest Hits

8 :00 P M VENUE: B I N G ST U D I O

WHEN: F R I DAY N OV E M B E R 5,

Hosted by Carla Rossi and

2 02 1

culled from four years of Queer Horror’s short film nights,

S H OW T I M E :

Queer Horror: Gravest Hits presents

9: 0 0 P M

the silliest and most ghoulish international horror shorts

VENUE:

by, starring, and about queers.

B I N G ST U D I O

P E R FOR M A NC E NO. 2

Carla Rossi Does Drag

WHEN: SAT U R DAY, N OV E M B E R 6, 2 02 1

Through fresh comedy, song, and authentic stories Rossi’s

S H OW T I M E :

hourlong show is a new multimedia 8: 0 0 P M experience with outrageous commentary on culture, gender,

VENUE:

and race.

B I N G ST U D I O 39


S TA N FO R D L I V E

VO CA L

Patti LuPone Don’t Monkey with Broadway Actress and singer Patti LuPone has

WHEN:

graced the worlds of theater, film, and

F R I DAY,

television for decades. The two-time

JA N UA RY 14,

Tony winner was the original Evita on

2022

Broadway and the original Fantine in London’s Les Misérables. LuPone’s solo

S H OW T I M E :

shows draw from her mega-selling

7:30 P M

albums and theatrical appearances to

SI NGE R-S ONGW R I T E R

Anais Mitchell & Bonny Light Horseman

WHEN: S U N DAY, JA N UA RY 30, 2 02 2

Fresh from her historic Tony Award sweep with Hadestown and being named one

S H OW T I M E :

of Time magazine’s “100 Most Influential

7: 0 0 P M

People,” Anais Mitchell reimagines traditional folk songs and melodies in collabo-

VENUE:

ration with Josh Kaufmann (Hiss Golden

B I N G C O N C E RT

Messenger) and Eric D. Johnson (Fruit Bats) H A L L in her latest Grammy-nominated recording project, Bonny Light Horseman.

40

highlight her brilliant vocal power,

VENUE:

vivacious storytelling, and commanding

B I N G C O N C E RT

stage presence.

HALL


2021–22 SEASON

JA Z Z

Bessie, Billie, Nina: Pioneering Women in Jazz WHEN:

A power trio of vocalists backed by

SAT U R DAY,

an all-female band pays tribute to a

M A RC H 19,

flagship of civil rights progress that

2022

was launched by the formative work of three 20th-century African American

S H OW T I M E :

women jazz artists. The anthemic songs

7:00 P M

of Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday, and Nina

& 9:00 P M

Simone defied social norms and today continue to inspire a generational

VENUE:

movement for greater equality and

B I N G ST U D I O

self-empowerment for women, people of color, and the LGBTQ+ community. Generously supported by the Koret Foundation.

WHEN: SAT U R DAY,

C ON T E M P OR A RY

F E B RUA RY 5,

Nella

2 02 2 S H OW T I M E : 7: 0 0 P M

A 2019 Latin Grammy Winner for Best

& 9: 0 0 P M

New Artist and a Berklee College of Music alum, Nella’s music is a meeting

VENUE:

place for the folklore roots of her native

B I N G ST U D I O

Venezuela, contemporary influences, and the music of Andalusia, Spain. 41


Why Membership Matters By becoming a Stanford Live member, you help us

Enjoy Exclusive Member Benefits

continue to bring engaging and innovative artists to our

Stanford Live supporters enjoy a range of insider

stage and our community.

benefits including:

In return, you receive 12 months of exclusive benefits such as ticket presales, invitations to exclusive member events, access to members-only digital content, and more.

• Presale access to tickets ahead of the general public, including shows at Frost Amphitheater • Invitations to exclusive member events and receptions • Preferred access to online content including

Ticket sales account for a fraction of what it takes to present our programs which is why we are so grateful for the generous support of our Stanford Live members. In addition to under-

perfomances, artist talks, and more • A subscription to, and recognition in, Stanford Live magazine

writing our performance season, membership gifts also support student engagement projects, artist residency programs, K-12

Visit live.stanford.edu/support to learn more about the various

student matinee performances, teacher workshops, in-school

levels of membership, which start at $100.

teaching programs, and more. Enhance Your Experience—Become a Bing Member Become a leader in supporting Stanford Live’s mission and activities when you join as a Bing member! Your annual Bing member contribution of $7,500 or more provides a vital investment in Stanford Live’s programming and offerings. In return, you can enjoy exclusive benefits including our dedicated Bing member ticket concierge service, reserved parking for all Stanford Live ticketed performances, complimentary tickets to Bing Fling, our annual Bing member recognition event, and exclusive online content and events.

To learn more about membership levels and benefits or to make your contribution, visit live.stanford.edu/support or contact supportstanfordlive@stanford.edu or 650.725.8782. Gifts to Stanford Live are tax-deductible as a charitable contribution to Stanford University, but the tax deduction for Bing member gifts will be reduced for each complimentary ticket provided to Bing Fling. Please refer to the goods and services values noted at live.stanford.edu/bingmember and consult your tax advisor with any questions.

42


2021–22 SEASON

Venues B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L

BING STUDIO

M E M O R I A L C H U RC H

M E M O R I A L AU D I TO R I U M

F RO S T A M P H I T H E AT E R

For complete venue information, visit live.stanford.edu/venues

43


S TA N FO R D L I V E

Ticket Information

T H E M E M B E R S H I P A DVA N TA G E Alongside early access to tickets ahead of the public, enjoy these

All programs subject to change. For pricing, availability, and added shows, visit live.stanford.edu

member perks:

Early ticketing access to our most popular events this season including those at Frost Amphitheater

O U R P RO M I S E TO YO U Advance notice and purchasing options for special events and In light of COVID-19's impacts around the world, we know that there are many factors that may affect our season. We may need to move venues to make some performances work more safely—and some may be rescheduled or canceled entirely. Through it all, we promise to keep you informed and will be practicing flexible exchange policies for all affected shows. We thank you for choosing Stanford Live and staying with us during this challenging time. Read more at live.stanford.edu/faq

added programs Free ticket exchanges (except for Frost Amphitheater events) Preferred access to online content including performances, artist talks, and more Learn more on page 42, or visit live.stanford.edu/support HANDLING CHARGES AND REFUNDS

S A L E DAT E S

All phone and online transactions incur a $10-per-order handling

Bing members

July 22, 2021

fee ($4 for Stanford students). There are no per-ticket order fees. All fees are waived for Bing members and in-person orders.

$1,000+ members

August 10, 2021

$500+ members

August 14, 2021

$250+ members

August 18, 2021

All programs and prices are subject to change. Tickets are nonrefundable, except in the case of a canceled event. Frost Amphitheater events may be subject to external fees and ticket policies. DISCOUNTS

Public on sale

August 24, 2021

Shows occurring in September through December 2021 will go on sale on the above dates. The rest of the season will go on sale at a later date.

university ID or Courtesy Card may be required): Stanford employees (faculty, staff, visiting professors, postdocs, and Stanford Hospital employees): 20% off full-priced tickets or $5 off

HOW TO ORDER

Online

Discounts are available for the following categories (valid

studio cabaret, limit 2 per ID.

live.stanford.edu

Stanford students (matriculated undergraduate and graduate students): Tickets start at $15 for most events, limit 2 per ID. Stanford Alumni Association members: 10% off full-priced tickets

Phone

Bing Concert Hall Ticket Office 327 Lasuen Street Stanford, CA 94305 650.724.2464

at most performances, limit 2 per ID. Must log in through SAA website. Non-Stanford students: 20% off full-priced tickets, limit 1 per ID. Youth (under age 18): 50% off full-priced tickets. Note: Regardless of age, everyone must have a ticket, and youth under 18 must be

Tuesday – Friday: 12:00 PM – 5:00 PM

accompanied by an adult. Groups (10 or more): 10% off full-priced tickets. Contact the Box

We open 60 minutes prior to performance on performance days. 44

Office if you would like to arrange a group order. Note: Discounts cannot be combined, exceptions may apply.

For a complete list of box office policies, visit live.stanford.edu/policies



Stanford University Bing Concert Hall Ticket Office 327 Lasuen Street, MC 2550 Stanford, CA 94305

F I R ST C L A S S MAIL P R E S O RT E D U. S. P O STAG E PA I D PA LO A LTO, C A P E R M I T N O. 28

Welcome Back! 2021-22 S E A S O N SCHEDULE AND MORE INSIDE

TICKETS ARE O N SA L E N OW

L E A R N M O R E AT L I V E . STA N FO R D.E D U

SE AS ON SP ONS OR

FOU N DAT ION & G OV E R N M E N T PA RT N E RS

C OR P OR AT E PA RT N E RS

I N-K I N D PA RT N E RS

L I V E . S TA N FO R D. E D U