IB Diploma Programme Information Booklet

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Information Booklet

The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) is recognized and respected by the world's leading universities, and evidence suggests that higher rates of DP students go on to university and higher education study than non IB students.

We believe that following the IB Diploma Programme at St Andrews is an excellent way to complete your secondary education. St Andrews is a small school and as such, you will be given individual attention over the course of the two years, learn in smaller classes and benefit from a personal approach to your education.

Dear Potential IB Student,

The aim of the IB Diploma Programme is to create well rounded, internationally minded, caring and resourceful graduates.

Yours Faithfully, Andrew Emery IBDP Coordinator T: +66 (0) 38 030 701 13 www.standrews schools.com

As well as studying 6 subjects, students undertake a course in the Theory of Knowledge; a 4000 word Extended Essay, (which is ideal preparation for research essays at university) and the CAS (Creativity, Activity and Service) programme which takes them out of the class room and into the local community.

Welcome to St Andrews International School Green Valley IB Diploma programme.

The aim of the Diploma is “to develop Internationally minded people, who recognising their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world” I am sure your experience at St.Andrews will allow you to fulfill this ideology. I hope you will find this information booklet useful in helping you to make the right choices for you over the course of the next two years. We look forward to discussing your options with you in person.

Diploma candidates are expected to study six subjects, one from each group. Three of these must be at Higher Level (HL) and the others at Standard Level (SL). Arranging the course in this fashion allows you to explore some subjects in depth and some more broadly over the two year period. This allows students to have a much more holistic education than other educational systems do, whilst still allowing them to specialize in some areas.

The purpose of this booklet is to give you a brief introduction into the IB Diploma Programme at St. Andrews International School, Green Valley PART A ACCEPTANCE ONTO THE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME What you need to be eligible for the Diploma Programme. PART B CHOOSING YOUR SUBJECTS This helps you to choose your programme of study. PART C SUBJECTS This gives you more detail about what you will study within the subjects that we offer. PART D THE CORE ELEMENTS OF THE COURSE Theory of Knowledge, Extended Essay and Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS). PART E AWARD OF THE DIPLOMA This explains the IB`s 7 to 1 scale and what you require to be awarded a Diploma. PART F STUDENT SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE An explanation of the support that you can expect from your tutor and the school. PART G GENERAL INFORMATION Lessons, uniform, exams and fees, scholarships etc.

Due to the academic rigours of the IB Diploma Programme it is imperative that before allowing students to access the programme we must have proof of their academic ability and potential. This is not so that we only accept the academic elite, but to ensure that we do not set students up for failure, or enter students onto a course that is not right for them.

Students who have studied at St Andrews (or other schools that do (I)GCSEs) must achieve 5 A* C grades in their exams including Mathematics, English (first or second language) and a Science or combined Science in order to be accepted into Year 12.

Students who have come from other schools will need to provide us with reports from their previous school and have an interview with the IBDP Coordinator and Head of Secondary School, before they will be considered for the Programme. Following this, students will either be given a ‘trial period’, be asked to sit some IGCSEs or be declined entry. Students’ academic performance will be closely monitored over the first year to make sure they are keeping up with the workload and are successfully completing all units of work. Teachers will grade students 4 times a year so that you will be informed early if they are falling behind, or if their level of attainment is not what it should be.

Alongside a solid academic grounding in six subjects, the IB Diploma aims to create well rounded students. The goal of the IB Diploma at St Andrews International School is to produce students who embody the qualities indicated in the IB learner profile. It takes time to nurture and develop these qualities and students are required to regularly reflect on how they fit the profile, and which areas they need to develop further.

For those students who find the Full Diploma too difficult there is an alternative. These students may sit courses in individual subjects that they can succeed in (a C grade or above will be required at (I)GCSE level). Again, acceptance on the courses’ programme will be based on IGCSE results and/or an interview, report and a trial period.

Acceptance onto the Diploma Programme

WELL-BALANCED, understanding the importance of physical and mental balance and personal well being.

KNOWLEDGEABLE, spending time exploring issues of global relevance and importance and acquiring a critical mass of significant knowledge.

COMMUNICATORS, receiving and expressing ideas and information confidently and in a variety of ways.

PRINCIPLED, having a sound grasp of the principles of moral reasoning and demonstrating personal integrity, honesty and a sense of fairness and justice.

REFLECTORS, giving thoughtful consideration to our own learning and analysing our personal strengths and weaknesses in a constructive manner.

RISK-TAKERS, approaching unfamiliar situations without anxiety; having the confidence and independence to explore new roles, ideas and strategies; and defending those things in which we believe courageously and articulately.

OPEN-MINDED, seeking and considering a range of perspectives, and respecting the views, values and traditions of other individuals and cultures.

CRITICAL THINKERS, exercising initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to make sound decisions and to solve complex problems.

CARING, showing sensitivity towards the needs and feelings of others and demonstrating a sense of personal commitment to action and service.

Students who participate in the IB Diploma Programme develop skills to INQUIRERSbecome:, nurturing natural curiosity and acquiring the skills necessary to conduct purposeful, constructive research.

What is offered at St Andrews International School Green Valley? THE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME You must choose SIX subjects (one from each group): THREE HIGHER LEVEL (HL) and the Group 1 LANGUAGE A (First language)  English A1 (HL or SL)  Thai A1 (HL or SL)  Dutch A1 School Guided Self taught Group 2 LANGUAGE B (Second Language)  English B (HL only)  French B (HL or SL)  Mandarin B (HL or SL)  Mandarin Ab Initio (SL only)  French Ab Initio (SL only)  Dutch B (HL or SL) Group 3 INDIVIDUALS and SOCIETIES  Business Management (HL or SL)  Geography (HL or SL)  History (HL or SL)  Economics (HL or SL) Group 4 EXPERIMENTAL SCIENCES  Biology (HL or SL)  Physics (HL or SL)  Chemistry (HL or SL)  Environmental Systems and Societies (SL only)  Computer Science (HL or SL)  Sports, Exercise and Health (HL or SL) Group 5 MATHEMATICS  Maths Analysis and Approaches (HL or SL)  Maths Applications and Interpretation (SL) Group 6 THE ARTS AND ELECTIVES  Art & Design (HL)  Theatre (HL or SL)  Music (HL or SL)  Another Science and / or other subject from Group 3

Choose your SL options in the three subjects that are not so useful to you or that you are not so strong in. Think carefully about the career path you wish to follow and chose the subjects that give you the best options in the future. (If you are unsure what to do speak to your teachers or your IB Coordinator about this.)

HOW TO CHOOSE YOUR SUBJECTS?

Choose your HL options from those subjects that you enjoy the most and which will support any career aspirations you may have. Also choose HL in those subjects that you are good at. If you have done (I)GCSEs you should have at least a B grade in that subject if you studied it at this level.

Also if you don’t feel you are up to the workload of IB Diploma you can do 4 or 5 courses at the levels (HL or SL) that are appropriate for you. WHAT ARE IB COURSES?

A student may study an IB course in one or more of the six subject areas listed above by pursuing the same topics of study in that subject as that required for the Diploma, and successfully passing the corresponding exam. Students doing courses do not have to do ToK, or an Extended Essay, but ALL students must do CAS.

The answer is yes if you haven’t got the grades to do the IB Diploma Programme you can do courses in the subjects that you have gained a grade C or above in at (I)GCSE level. Students must do at least 4 courses to make it worthwhile. If you have only got three passes at IGCSE then re sitting some (I)GCSEs will be a better option for you than going on to courses.

IS THERE AN ALTERNATIVE TO THE FULL DIPLOMA PROGRAMME?

The IB Diploma Circle with the 3 Core subject areas of TOK, CAS and the Extended Essay on the inside, surrounded by the 6 subject areas on the outside.

During the course, students will focus on the improvement of their own powers of expression, in both speech and writing. They will study literary texts from different genres, as well as a wide range of non fiction and media forms, including images. They will be encouraged to read widely beyond the set texts of the course, using their independent learning to help them develop their own analytical ideas and linking literary and non literary texts to modern global issues.

TERM Course Component Texts Studied 1 Unit 1.1: Non Literary: Culture, Identity and Transformation  Language of Migration  Generation Z #memyselfandi  The work of Sara Rahbar Unit 1.2: Literary: Culture, Identity and Transformation Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi Unit 1.3: Non Literary: Communication, Perspectives & Representation  Riana Duncan Cartoons  Gender and Sexuality: Inequality/ Constructions of masculinity and femininity  Stereotypes: Gender  Political Speeches  Language and Taboo Unit 2.1: Literary: Communication, Perspectives & Representation The World’s Wife by Carol Ann Duffy 2 Unit 2.2: Literary: Communication, Perspectives & Representation Fight Club by Chuck Palahnuik Subjects Offered GROUP 1: LANGUAGE A ENGLISH LANGUAGE A- LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE Course Description The IB Language and Literature course provides students with a wide range of opportunities, not only to develop their own skills in communication and analysis, but also to appreciate the influence of contexts and audiences on language use in a variety of Thetexts.broad scope of the course means that by engaging with literary texts, exploring the significance of English as a global language, understanding the processes which cause language change, and analysing the role played by mass communication and the media, students develop an awareness of their personal language choices, and the ability to reflect on assumptions and conventions within texts.

Othello

The

Paper 1: guided textual analysis (2 hours 15 minutes) The paper consists of two non literary passages, from two different text types, each accompanied by a question. Students will be asked to write a separate analysis of each of the passages focusing on the technical or formal aspect the respective accompanying questions propose, or another similar aspect of the student’s (40choice.marks) External Unseen, two different non literary text types.

|

Assessment component Weighting External/Internal Type of text

Unity 3.2:

A Doll’s

35%

3

ASSESSMENT Higher Level:

3.1:

Paper 2: comparative essay (1 hour 45 Theminutes)paperconsists of four general questions. In response to one of those studentsquestions,willbeasked to write a comparative essay based on two works studied in the course. (30 marks) 25% External Any two works studied (with the exception of those used for the individual oral and HL assessments)essay Unit Non Literary: Creativity, Representation & Identity Language and Class Language and Occupation Language and Racism Literary: Creativity, Representation & Identity House by Henrik Ibsen Unit Non Environment: Speeches of Greta Thunberg4 Unit 4.2: CommunicationTransformation,Literary: & Perspective by William Shakespeare 5 Unit. 5.1: Non Literary: Culture, Creativity & Identity Unit.5.2: Literary: Culture, Creativity & Identity Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien

4.1:

PerspectiveCommunicationTransformation,Literary:&  Advertising  Propaganda 

The paper consists of two non literary passages, from two different text types, each accompanied by a question. Students will be asked to choose one of the passages and write an analysis of it focusing on the technical or formal aspect the question proposes, or another similar aspect of the student’s choice. (20 marks)

This component consists of a prepared individual oral. Students will be asked to discuss a non literary text and a work studied in relation to a global issue present in both of them. The delivery of the oral must not take more than 10 minutes, and it will be followed by 5 minutes of questions by the teacher. (40 marks)

The paper consists of four general questions. In response to one of those questions, students will be asked to write a comparative essay based on two works studied in the course. (30 marks) 35% lExterna Any two works studied (with the exception of those used for the individual oral and HL assessments)essay

ngghtiWei Internal/External Type of text

Individual oral (15 minutes)

35% lExterna Unseen, two different non literarytypes.text

Individual oral (15 minutes) This component consists of a prepared individual oral. Students will be asked to discuss a non literary text and a work studied in relation to a global issue present in both of them. The delivery of the oral must not take more than 10 minutes, and it will be followed by 5 minutes of questions by the teacher. (40 marks)

Standard Level Assessment component

30% Internal Any thestudiedliterarynontextandwork(withexceptionofthetextorworkusedfortheHLessayassessment).

HL Thisessaycomponent

20% External Any non literary text or work studied (with the exception of those used in the individual assessment).oral

Paper 1: guided textual analysis (1 hour 15 minutes)

consists of a 1200 1500 essay written during the course. Students will be asked to develop a line of inquiry of their own choice in relation to one of the texts or works studied. This line of inquiry could be related to the central concepts of the course. (20 marks).

Paper 2: comparative essay (1 hour 45 minutes)

20% Internal Any non literary text and work studied (with the exception of the text or work used for the HL assessment).essay

50 80 Time and space

Non literary texts are chosen from a variety of sources and media to represent as wide a range of text types as possible, and works are chosen from a variety of literary forms. The study of the non literary texts and works focuses on the nature of language and communication and the nature of literature and its study. This study includes the investigation of how texts themselves operate as well as the contexts and complexities of production and reception. Focus is on the development of personal and critical responses to the particulars of communication.

Readers, writers and texts

SL

50 80 Intertextuality: connecting texts

Non literary texts and literary works are chosen from a variety of sources, literary forms and media in a way that allows students an opportunity to extend their study and make fruitful comparisons. Their study focuses on intertextual relationships with possibilities to explore various topics, thematic concerns, generic conventions, modes or literary traditions that have been introduced throughout the course. The focus is on the development of critical response grounded in an understanding of the complex relationships among texts.

50 80 Total teaching hours

In this course, students study a wide range of literary and non literary texts in a variety of media. By examining communicative acts across literary form and textual type alongside appropriate secondary readings, students will investigate the nature of language itself and the ways in which it shapes and is influenced by identity and culture. Approaches to study in the course are meant to be wide ranging and can include literary theory, sociolinguistics, media studies and critical discourse analysis among others. Syllabus Outline

Non literary texts and literary works are chosen from a variety of sources, literary forms and media that reflect a range of historical and/or cultural perspectives. Their study focuses on the contexts of language use and the variety of ways literary and non literary texts might both reflect and shape society at large. The focus is on the consideration of personal and cultural perspectives, the development of broader perspectives, and an awareness of the ways in which context is tied to meaning.

Syllabus component Teaching hours* HL

150 240 THAI A1: LANGUAGE & LITERATURE Language A: Thai language and literature

The paper consists of two non literary passages, from two different text types, each accompanied by a question. Students choose one passage and write an analysis of it. (20 marks)

35%70% 35%80%

Individual Supportedoralbyan

The paper consists of four general questions. In response to one question students write a comparative essay based on two works studied in the course. (30 marks) 35% 25% Internal assessment

Assessment SL HL External assessment

the ways in which the global issue of your choice is presented through the content and form of two of the texts that you have studied. (40 marks) 30% 20% HL Studentsessay submit an essay on one non literary text or a collection of non literary texts by one same author, or a literary text or work studied during the course. (20 marks) The essay must be 1,200 1,500 N/A 20%

Paper 2: Comparative essay

Paper 1: Guided textual analysis

This component consists of an individual oral which is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

extract from one non literary text and one from a literary work, students will offer a prepared response of 10 minutes, followed by 5 minutes of questions by the teacher, to the following Examineprompt:

2:

Course Description

It is essential at IB Diploma level that all students study at least one second or foreign language. At St. Andrews Green Valley all IB students will have to study English whether as a first or second language.

The course integrates the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing whilst consisting of the three areas of language, cultural interaction and message. English B enables the students to reach a high level of competence in the language and gives them plenty of opportunity to develop international mindedness through the study of languages, cultures, and ideas and issues of global significance.

(Students

Listening & Reading paper (Paper 2) 50% HL Listening: 1 hour + Reading: 1hr

Writing paper (Paper 1) 25% HL 1 hour 30 min (for 450 600 words) must complete one task from a choice of three options.)

The main emphasis of group 2 is on language acquisition and usage.

Oral

GROUP SECOND LANGUAGE B

Internal

The required areas of study are Identities, Experiences, Human Ingenuity, Social Organisation and Sharing the Planet. At higher level students will also study two literary texts that will principally broaden vocabulary and promote more fluent reading.

ASSESSMENT

Higher level only At St. Andrews Green Valley students who study English in group 2 will do so at a higher level. Language B (HL) enables the students to also study some literature along with the topic areas mentioned below.

External Assessment (75%)

HL Students will have an Individual Interview of 12 15 minutes with the teacher based on an extract from one of the literary texts studied in class.

(There will be 3 listening texts and 3 reading texts. The specifications for the length of the listening texts are as follows: HL Text A = up to 3 min ... Text B = up to 4 min ... Text C = up to 5 min Assessment (25%) assessment

LANGUAGE ENGLISH

FRENCH B Course description French B is a foreign language learning course designed for students with some previous experience of the language (usually 3 to 5 years). The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and intercultural understanding. The course is based on five themes: 1. Experiences 2. Identities 3. Human ingenuity 4. Sharing the planet 5. Social organization At Higher Level, students will study 2 literary works. The course will provide students with the opportunity to master the grammatical foundations of the language, increase their language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) and encourage an exploration of the cultures for which French is spoken. ASSESSMENT External Assessment Paper 1: Writing (25%) SL: One1h15writing task of 250 400 words HL: One1h30writing task of 450 600 words Paper 2: Listening and reading comprehension (50%) SL 45 mn + 1h HL 1h +1h Internal Assessment Individual oral (25%) 12SL 15 mins based on a picture 12HL 15 mins based on a literary extract

FRENCH AB INITIO Course description French Ab initio is a foreign language course to be studied over 2 years at STANDARD LEVEL ONLY by students who have no, or very little, experience of learning French. Over the course of the two years you will be expected to reach the equivalent of IGCSE level and will study topics such as: descriptions, routine, entertainment, the media, food, school, work, holidays, the weather, my town, shopping, health, relationships, new technologies, sport and the environment. The programme meets the needs of the following IB students:  Those who have had little or no opportunity to study French in their earlier education.  Those who are interested in learning a new foreign language as part of their IB diploma. ASSESSMENT  Assessment  SL  External assessment (2 hrs 25 hours) 75% Paper 1 (1 hour) 25% Productive skills writing (30 marks)  Paper 2 (1 hour 45 minutes) 50%  Listening comprehension (45 minutes) (25 marks) Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks)

• identities • experiences • human ingenuity • social organization • sharing the planet

Listening comprehension (45 minutes) (25 marks) Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks)

Listening comprehension (1 hour) (25 marks)

ExternalSL assessment (3 hours) 75% Paper 1 (1 hour 15 minutes) 25% Productive skills writing (30 marks) Paper 2 (1 hour 45 minutes) 50%

Productive skills writing (30 marks) Paper 2 (2 hours) 50%

Internal assessment 25%

A conversation with the teacher, based on an extract from one of the literary works studied in class, followed by discussion based on one or more of the themes from the syllabus. (30 marks)

ExternalHL assessment (3 hours 30 minutes) 75% Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes) 25%

Mandarin is another language choice which designed for students with some previous Mandarin learning. Mandarin language B subjects are available at SL and HL. The differences between levels are determined by the assessment objectives, the depth and breadth of syllabus coverage, the assessment details, the assessment criteria, literature coverage and suggested teaching hours. This subject integrated listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Five prescribed themes are common to the syllabuses of language B; the themes provide relevant contexts for study at all levels of language acquisition in the DP, and opportunities for students to communicate about matters of personal, local or national, and global interest.

ASSESSMENT

The five prescribed themes are:

MANDARIN B

Course Description

A conversation with the teacher, based on a visual stimulus, followed by discussion based on an additional theme. (30 marks)

Reading comprehension (1 hour) (40 marks)

Internal assessment 25%

MANDARIN AB INITIO Course Description Mandarin is another language choice which designed for students with some previous Mandarin learning. Mandarin language B subjects are available at SL and HL. The differences between levels are determined by the assessment objectives, the depth and breadth of syllabus coverage, the assessment details, the assessment criteria, literature coverage and suggested teaching hours. This subject integrated listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Five prescribed themes are common to the syllabuses of language B; the themes provide relevant contexts for study at all levels of language acquisition in the DP, and opportunities for students to communicate about matters of personal, local or national, and global interest. The five prescribed themes are: • identities • experiences • human ingenuity • social organization • sharing the planet ExternalSLASSESSMENTassessment (2 hrs 25 hours) 75% Paper 1 (1 hour) 25%

Course description

The main focus of the course is on language acquisition and intercultural understanding.

Dutch B is a foreign language learning course designed for students with some previous experience of the language (usually 3 to 5 years).

The course will provide students with the opportunity to master the grammatical foundations of the language, increase their language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) and encourage an exploration of the cultures for which Dutch is the primary means of expression.

minutes)

written texts (50%) Internal assessment (25%) Individual oral

External Assessment (3 hours)

Paper 1 (1 hour

Five prescribed themes are common to the syllabuses of language B; the themes provide relevant contexts for study at all levels of language acquisition in the DP, and opportunities for students to communicate about matters of personal, local or national, and global interest.

Prescribed themes

The five prescribed themes are: identities • experiences • human ingenuity • social organization • sharing the planet. The themes allow students to compare the target language and culture(s) to other languages and cultures with which they are familiar. The themes also provide opportunities for students to make connections to other disciplinary areas in the DP. (SL) (75%) 15 Productive skills One writing task of 250 400 words (25%) Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three assessment: A conversation with the teacher, based on a visual stimulus, followed by discussion based on an additional theme.

DUTCH B Assessment component Weighting

Paper 2 (1 hour 45 minutes) Receptive skills

Individual oral assessment: A conversation with the teacher, based on an extract from one of the literary works studied in class, followed by discussion based on one or more of the themes from the syllabus.

Distinction between SL and HL

Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes) Productive skills One writing task of 450 600 words from a choice of three, each from a different theme, choosing a text type from among those listed in the examination instructions.

External Assessment (3 hours) (75%)

Internal assessment (25%)

At both levels of language B (SL and HL), students learn to communicate in the target language in familiar and unfamiliar contexts. They describe situations, narrate events, make comparisons, explain problems, and state and support their personal opinions on a variety of topics relating to course content. The study of two literary works originally written in the target language is required only at language B HL. The distinction between language B SL and HL can also be seen in the level of competency the student is expected to develop in the receptive, productive and interactive skills

Paper 2 (2 hours) Receptive skills Comprehension exercises on three audio passages and three written texts, drawn from all five themes. (50%)

Assessment component Weighting (HL)

Conceptual research project (25%)

Examination Paper 2 - 2 hours 15 minutes (40%)

ExaminationSL Paper 1 - 1 hour 15 minutes based on a pre issued case study (30%)

Section A: answer 3 questions, Section B: answer 1 compulsory question

ASSESSMENT ExaminationHL Paper 1 2 hours 15 minutes based on a pre issued case study (35%)

Section A: answer 1 question, Section B: answer 2 questions, Section C answer 1 question based on a pre studied organization Examination paper 3 (new in 2024 and details yet to be released by IB)

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Section A: answer 2 questions, Section B answer 1 compulsory question, Section C: answer 1 compulsory extended response question

Conceptual research project (25%)

Examination Paper 2 - 1 hour 45 minutes (45%)

Course Description Business management is a rigorous, challenging and dynamic discipline in the individuals and societies subject group. The role of businesses as distinct from other organisations and actors in society is to produce and sell goods and services that meet human needs and wants by organising resources. Profit making and risk taking in a competitive environment characterise most business organisations. This course is designed to give students an understanding of business concepts, practices and skills. It further enables them to assimilate principles of business and management and to become critical and effective participants in local and world affairs. Emphasis is also placed on understanding the effects of technological, social and political change on the routine business functions of marketing, human resource management and finance. The course also encourages the appreciation of ethical concerns and corporate social responsibility. The subject is studied in a holistic manner and students apply six key topics (culture, change, ethics, globalization, innovation and strategy) to all aspects of business management. Students develop the ability to think critically, make ethically informed decisions, and appreciate the nature and pace of change as well as the ability to think strategically and undertake financial analysis.

Section A: answer 1 question, Section B: answer 1 question, section C: answer 1 question based on a pre studied organisation

GROUP 3: INDIVIDUALS & SOCIETIES

Course details Students can opt for the higher or standard level syllabus. Both incorporate the core themes of Population Management, Disparities in Wealth, Environmental Sustainability and Resource Consumption. Standard level takes 2 optional themes, whereas Higher level takes 3 optional levels and a unit on globalisation.

For too long people, companies and countries have not planned adequately for the future. This will become essential as populations increase, the climate changes and the world becomes more globalised. IB Geography teaches students why these problems occur and, more importantly, how to deal with them effectively. It considers real life case studies on both an international and a local scale. Students will analyse these significant problems and look for relevant and practical solutions.

Some of the key issues that we face in geography are: Why is there conflict about the Mekong River and who decides what happens there?

Why are Megacities growing and what is their effect on the environment? How is the climate changing and what are the impacts? Why is the population of LIC’s increasing so rapidly , whilst HIC’s is reducing? What is going to happen to the resources we use and how can we improve the way we manage them? What are the effects of living in a more globalized society? What are the problems of forced migration and what are the effects on the people?

course conceptually and contextually embodies international and global awareness in several distinctive approaches. It examines key world issues such as sustainable and economic development and climate change

ASSESSMENT HL  Examination Paper 1 (35%)  Examination Paper 2 (25%)  Examination Paper 3 (20%)  Coursework (20%) SL  Examination Paper 1 (35%)  Examination Paper 2 (40%)  Coursework (25%)

Issues are focused on contemporary events that are happening in the world today and address solutions of the future

GEOGRAPHY

Anyone who watches the news will understand why geography is an increasingly important subject. Every day there are problems in the world that are related to the subject of geography; every day these problems are dealt with poorly. The geography

The course focuses on the history of the 20th Century.

Course

Develop key historical skills, including engaging effectively with sources 
 Increase students’ understanding of themselves and of contemporary society by encouraging reflection on the past.

Develop an understanding of, and continuing interest in, the past Encourage students to engage with multiple perspectives and to appreciate the complex nature of historical concepts, issues, events and developments

Course Content

HISTORY Entry Guidance:

The course is divided into:

Evaluate different perspectives on historical issues and events, and integrate this evaluation effectively into a response. Evaluate sources as historical evidence, recognizing their value and limitations. Synthesize information from a selection of relevant sources. Structure and develop focused essays that respond effectively to the demands of a question. Reflect on the methods used by, and challenges facing, the historian and demonstrate evidence of research skills Formulate an appropriate, focused question to guide a historical inquiry.

Students need not have studied history prior to starting the DP history course. In particular, it is neither expected nor required that specific subjects have been studied for national or international qualifications in preparation for this course. The specific skills and knowledge required are developed throughout the course itself. Aims

Paper 1 Standard Level & Higher Level. Prescribed Subject 3: The move the global war Paper 2 Standard Level & Higher Level. World History topic 10: Authoritarian states (20th Century) World History Topic 12: The Cold War: Superpower tensions and rivalries

This course enables students to Demonstrate detailed, relevant and accurate historical knowledge. Demonstrate understanding of historical concepts and context. Demonstrate understanding of historical sources. Formulate clear and coherent arguments. Use relevant historical knowledge to effectively support analysis. Analyse and interpret a variety of sources. Integrate evidence and analysis to produce a coherent response.

Promote international mindedness through the study of history from more than one region of the world Develop an understanding of history as a discipline and to develop historical consciousness including a sense of chronology and context, and an understanding of different historical perspectives

45%

History of Europe Section 15: Versailles to Berlin: Diplomacy in Europe (1919 1945)

25%

25%

Economics is a dynamic social science, forming part of group 3 individuals and societies. The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a social science, Economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements.

 Paper 3 Higher Level only. History of Europe

30%

Internal

External

20%

Internal assessment Higher Level – 20% Historical Investigation

The IB Diploma Programme economics course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. These economic theories are not to be studied in a vacuum rather, they are to be applied to real world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability.

External assessment Standard Level – 75% Externally assessed written examination (Paper 1) 1 hour Externally assessed written examination (Paper 20 1 hour 30 minutes assessment Standard Level – 25% Historical Investigation assessment Higher Level – 20% Externally assessed written examination (Paper 1) 1 hour Externally assessed written examination (Paper 2) 1 hour 30 minutes Externally assessed written examination (Paper 3 HL only) 2 hours 30 minutes

The ethical dimensions involved in the application of economic theories and policies permeate throughout the economics course as students are required to consider and reflect on human end goals and values.

History of Europe Section 13: Europe and the First World War (1871 1918) History of Europe Section 14: European states in the inter war years (1918 1939)

35%

CourseEconomicsDescription

20%

Historical Investigation (30%)

ExternalSL assessment 70%

Examination Paper 1 (30%)

ASSESSMENT

A policy paper with the syllabus content including HL extension material. Includes both quantitative and qualitative questions. Internal assessment 20% This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Students produce a portfolio of three commentaries, based on different units of the syllabus (excluding the introductory unit) and on published extracts from the news media. Each of the three commentaries should use a different key concept as a lens through which to analyse the published extracts.

An extended response examination which assesses microeconomics and ExaminationmacroeconomicsPaper 2 30%

An extended response examination which assesses microeconomics and ExaminationmacroeconomicsPaper 2 (40%)

Examination Paper 1 (1 hour and 15 minutes) 20%

Internal assessment 30%

A data response examination assesses international economics and development

The Economics course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues, and raises students’ awareness of their own responsibilities at a local, national and international level. The course also seeks to develop values and attitudes that will enable students to achieve a degree of personal commitment in trying to resolve these issues, appreciating our shared responsibility as citizens of an increasingly interdependent world.

Examinationeconomics Paper 3 (1 hour and 45 minutes) 30%

HL External assessment 80%

A data response examination assesses international economics and development economics

3 commentaries based on different sections of the syllabus and published extracts from the media. The maximum length is 750 words for each commentary.

80%  Written

(80%) Internal assessment 20%  Practical Coursework (20%)

External

PHYSICS

Investigations and experiments feature strongly during the course. These are used as the basis for the internal assessment. Students, with all other scientists, complete a Group 4 project, which gives the opportunity for original research.

GROUP 4: EXPERIMENTAL SCIENCES

Course Description Physics is the study of the properties of matter and energy and the relationships between them both at micro and macro levels. Standard level students follow the core syllabus and one of the option topics. The option topics can be chosen from; further mechanics, biomedical physics, historical physics, astrophysics, relativity and optics. Higher level students study the core concepts in further depth alongside the same two options.

Why Study Physics? Physics is a useful qualification for many career options in the fields of engineering, earth science, meteorology, medicine, teaching, astronomy, scientific research, technical writing and many more. Physics also supports other subjects you may study like science, geography, history…. It used to be called `natural Philosophy. ` Physicists tend to be adaptable and able to think creatively in unfamiliar situations. What do I need to study Physics?

Topics studied include: Measurements, Mechanics, Thermal Physics, Electricity and Magnetism, Waves, and Atomic and Nuclear Physics.

A minimum of a grade ‘C’ must be attained in IGCSE Physics / Combined Science for students to take the course at the Standard Level; an A or B is required for the Higher Level course. Mathematics is an essential tool in Physics, so ability in this subject is essential. If you are not confident in Maths, you can still make worthwhile progress at standard level if you are prepared to work. If you want to take higher level physics you should be taking either maths SL or maths HL. Most of all you need the right attitude. IB Physics is demanding and challenging. People who give up easily are unlikely to succeed.

ASSESSMENT assessment Examination Paper(s)

Course Description

CHEMISTRY

Requirements A C grade in combined science IGCSE is a minimum, but those opting for chemistry at higher level should have a B or A grade. The mathematical requirements are a sound understanding of basic maths, in particular ratios and algebra. For higher level chemistry, students should also be taking IB Maths at Standard or Higher level. assessment 80% Examination Paper(s) (80%) assessment 20% Coursework (20%)

 Written

Internal

 Practical

Starting with Atomic Structure and looking particularly at the electron, the course moves on to classify and explain different ways in which atoms bond and the structures they make. The Periodic Table is a powerful way of classifying elements and understanding their behaviour and is studied in detail. The energy changes which accompany chemical reactions are studied in the Energetics topic, and the way the speed of reactions can be changed, the study of Kinetics, gives a surprising insight into their reaction mechanisms. The concept of equilibrium is extended to cover the behaviour of Acids and Bases and Oxidation/Reduction. Finally Organic Chemistry introduces the complex behaviour of carbon and its compounds. Students also choose two Options from a menu which includes Biochemistry (the chemistry of life) Environmental Chemistry, Medicines and Drugs, Industrial chemistry and other topics. Why should I study Chemistry? Chemistry is the central science with links both to physics through physical chemistry, and biology through organic chemistry. As such it is required (at higher level) for a large number of science based degrees and career options from Petrochemical Engineering to Medicine. Learning chemistry gives the scientist powerful tools for understanding and explaining how materials behave. For those not planning on a science based degree Standard Level chemistry offers a compact and accessible body of knowledge which touches on many aspects of everyday life.

ASSESSMENT External

Chemistry is concerned with understanding the materials that make up our world, and the way that they react with each other. It also looks at how we can manipulate and control those reactions. Chemistry is an experimental science and practical work is a cornerstone of the course with one double lesson being used for practical most weeks.

Students investigate a wide range of chemical properties and reactions in the laboratory and use the theories they study to help explain and interpret the outcomes of their experiments. This work is assessed and forms 24% of the final mark.

Course Content Standard level students follow the core syllabus. Higher Level students study the core concepts in further depth. Investigations and experiments feature strongly during the course. These are used as the basis for the internal assessment and are marked according to predefined criteria. Included in the internal assessment is the Group 4 project. This is an inter science project involving students from all the science disciplines working together to solve problems and investigate an overarching theme. Topics studied include; Cells, Human Health & Physiology, Human Reproduction, Excretion, Classification, Plant Science, Ecology & Conservation, Respiration & Photosynthesis, Nucleic Acids and Proteins, Nerves, Muscles, Movement and Genetics. Students are also required to study 2 options (HL) or 2 options (SL) chosen from a varied selection chosen by the teacher. Current options Are Neurobiology and Behaviour and Ecology & Conservation. Requirements Prospective students should have gained a C at IGCSE Biology or similar for Standard Level, and an A or B for Higher Level. This is a rigorous course which requires an ability to think independently, make cross topic links and memorise a great deal of new information.

BIOLOGY

Course Description Biology is the study of living organisms. Students are encouraged to wonder about the world around them and ask questions such as; Why is 50% of human DNA identical to the DNA of a banana? Will scientists soon be able to create whole body parts? How can a human survive with a pig heart? Why do men have nipples? And what is Natural Selection? IB Biology students have the opportunity to begin to answer questions like these by studying the physiology of various plants and animals, including humans. This in turn leads to an appreciation of the interdependence of life on earth and the holistic nature of the subject.

ASSESSMENT SL & ExternalHL assessment 80%  Written Examination Paper(s) (80%) Internal assessment 20%  Practical Coursework (20%)

ASSESSMENT External assessment 75%  Written Examination Paper(s) (75%) Internal assessment 25%  Practical Coursework (25%)

During the course, students will study seven different topics which include; Systems and Models, Environmental Value Systems, The Ecosystem, Human Population Carrying Capacity and Resource use, Conservation and Biodiversity and Pollution Management.

Course Description

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS & SOCIETIES

The most important aspect of the Environmental Systems and Societies course is hands on work in the laboratory and/or out in the field. The course includes a compulsory fieldwork trip to collect the data required to submit two Internal Assessments worth 24% of the overall mark.

Requirements Prospective students should have gained a C at IGCSE Science or similar for Standard Level. This is a rigorous course which requires an ability to think independently, make cross topic links and memorise a great deal of new information.

Environmental Systems and Societies is an inter disciplinary subject that bridges the gap between Biology and Geography. It attempts to explain the interactions between living organisms and their environment in a simplified, logical way. Study of this subject will enable students to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. Students will evaluate the scientific, ethical and socio political aspects of a wide variety of issues that affect our world. Despite the theoretical nature of the subject there is a large amount of practical fieldwork incorporated into the topics. The course aims to foster an international perspective, awareness of local and global environmental concerns and an understanding of the scientific method Course Content

COMPUTER SCIENCE Course Description The Diploma Programme computer science course is engaging, accessible, inspiring and rigorous. It is underpinned by computational thinking, which involves the ability to think procedurally, logically, concurrently, abstractly, recursively and think ahead. I also involves utilizing an experimental and inquiry based approach to problem solving to develop algorithms and express them clearly. During the course, the student will develop computational solutions. This will involve the ability to: • identify a problem or unanswered question • design, prototype and test a proposed solution • liaise with clients to evaluate the success of the proposed solution and make recommendations for future developments. Course Content STANDARD LEVEL HIGHER LEVEL External assessment 70% · Written Examination Paper(s) External assessment 80% · Written Examination Paper(s) Internal assessment 30% Practical Coursework Internal assessment 20% Practical Coursework Standard Level/Higher Level core: HL extension: Topic 1: System fundamentals Topic 2: Computer organization Topic 3: Networks Topic 4: Computational thinking, problem solving and programming Topic 5: Abstract data structures Topic 6: Resource management Topic 7: Control Requirements Prospective students should have gained at least a grade C at IGCSE ICT or Mathematics for Standard Level and higher grades for the Higher Level. This is a rigorous course, which requires an excellent ability to think logically and solve problems using computational thinking. ASSESSMENT

These courses are for students who enjoy developing their mathematics to become fluent in the construction of mathematical arguments and develop strong skills in mathematical thinking. Students taking this course will be fascinated by exploring real and abstract applications with and without technology. Students who choose Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches at SL or HL should be comfortable in the manipulation of algebraic expressions and enjoy the recognition of patterns and understand the mathematical generalisation of these patterns .

The maths teachers and the IB Coordinator will advise students on the most suitable course for them to study based upon iGCSE grades, teacher recommendations and future university courses. All the courses are designed to enable students to; Enjoy mathematics and develop an appreciation of the elegance and power of mathematics Develop an understanding of the principles and nature of mathematics Develop logical, critical and creative thinking, and patience and persistence in problem solving Appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other disciplines.

Course Description

All diploma candidates are required to complete a mathematics course. The subject caters for differing degrees of ability by offering three different courses;

Extensive use is made of graphic calculators in all Mathematics courses. Students wanting to follow these courses must therefore buy their own graphical calculators. It is beneficial if all students have the same calculator. St Andrews recommends the Texas TI - 84 Plus graphical display calculator.

GROUP 5: Mathematics Analysis and Approaches SL and HL, Mathematics: Applications and Interpretations SL

Mathematics: Analysis and approaches HL Mathematics: Analysis and Approaches HL is designed for students with competence and a strong background and ability in Mathematics. This course is both challenging and interesting, establishing mathematical techniques required for further education in Mathematics, Engineering and Technology and Science courses at university. Students who wish to take Mathematics: analysis and approaches at higher level will have strong algebraic skills as there is a stronger focus of calculus

Mathematics: Analysis and approaches SL and HL

Mathematics: Analysis and approaches HL Mathematics: Analysis and approaches SL Mathematics: Applications and interpretations SL

Section B: Compulsory extended response questions based on the whole syllabus.

Internal assessment 20%

External assessment 80% Paper 1: 1.5 hours, no calculator allowed 40%

HIGHER

Section B: Compulsory extended response questions based on the whole syllabus.

Section A: Compulsory short response questions based on the whole syllabus.

Section A: Compulsory short response questions based on the whole syllabus

Two compulsory extended response problem solving questions based on the whole syllabus.

Mathematical exploration a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics

Mathematical exploration a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics. Mathematics: Applications and interpretations SL The course is designed to provide a realistic option for students with varied backgrounds and abilities who are unlikely to study Mathematics in detail beyond the IB. The skills needed to cope with the mathematical demands of a technological society are developed and emphasis is placed on the application of mathematics to real life situations and exploring mathematical models

Section B: Compulsory extended response questions based on the core syllabus.

80% Paper 1: 2 hours, no calculator allowed 30%

Section B: Compulsory extended response questions based on the core syllabus. Paper 2: 1.5 hours, calculator required 40%

ASSESSMENT LEVEL

External assessment

Mathematics: Analysis and approaches SL Mathematics Standard caters for students who anticipate a need for sound mathematical background in preparation for their future studies. Students embarking on this course are expected to already possess a comprehensive knowledge of concepts and to be equipped with the skills needed to apply mathematical techniques correctly. It is a demanding course since it contains a broad range of mathematical topics.

Paper 2: 2 hours, calculator required 30%.

ASSESSMENT

Section A: Compulsory short response questions based on the core syllabus.

Internal assessment 20%

Section A: Compulsory short response questions based on the core syllabus.

Paper 3: 1 hour, calculator required 20%

Course Description

ASSESSMENT

Sports, exercise and health science (SEHS) is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigative skills. It is an applied science course within group 4, with aspects of biological and physical science being studied in the specific context of sports, exercise and health. Moreover, the subject matter goes beyond the traditional science subjects to offer a deeper understanding of the issues related to sports, exercise and health in the 21st century. Apart from being worthy of study in its own right, SEHS is a good preparation for courses in higher or further education related to sports fitness and health, and serves as useful preparation for employment in sports and leisure industries.

Internal assessment 20% Mathematical exploration a piece of written work investigating an area of mathematics.

External assessment 80% Paper 1: 1.5 hours, calculator required 40% Compulsory short response questions based on the whole syllabus. Paper 2: 1.5 hours, calculator required 40% Compulsory extended response questions based on the whole syllabus.

Students choosing this course will enjoy mathematics best when seen in a practical context and be competent and confident working with statistical data and interpreting a significant amount of text. This course has a stronger focus on statistics and probability. The course provides a sound mathematical basis for those students intending to study social sciences, natural sciences, statistics, business, psychology, design and some economics at university.

SPORT, EXERCISE AND HEALTH SCIENCE

Furthermore, in a world where many millions of people are physically inactive and afflicted by chronic disease and ill health, the sports and exercise scientist should be equally proficient when prescribing exercise for the promotion of health and well being.

The attainment of excellence in sports is the result of innate ability or skill and the dedicated pursuit of a programme of physical and mental training accompanied by appropriate nutrition. Training programme design should not be left to chance. Rather, it should be designed thoughtfully and analytically after careful consideration of the physiological, biomechanical and psychological demands of the activity. This is the role of the sports and exercise scientist who, regardless of the athletic event, should be equipped with the necessary knowledge to be able to perform this task competently.

Anatomy, Exercise physiology , Energy system, Movement Analysis, Skills in Sport, Measurement and evaluation of human performance

There are seven additional topics for higher level: Further anatomy, The endocrine system, Fatigue, Friction and drag, Skill acquisition and analysis, Genetics and athletic performance, Exercise and immunity Options

There are six compulsory topics in the core:

The course incorporates the traditional disciplines of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, psychology and nutrition, which are studied in the context of sports, exercise and health. Students will cover a range of core and option topics, and carry out practical (experimental) investigations in both laboratory and field settings. This will provide an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and understanding necessary to apply scientific principles and critically analyse human performance. Where relevant, the course will address issues of international dimension and ethics by considering sports, exercise and health relative to the individual and in a global context. At the school level, both theory and practical work should be undertaken by all students. They should complement one another naturally, as they do in wider scientific study. The Diploma Programme SEHS course allows students to develop practical skills and techniques, and to increase facility in the use of mathematics, which is the language of science. It also allows students to develop interpersonal skills and digital technology skills, which are essential in 21st century scientific endeavour and are important lifeenhancing, transferable skills in their own right. The course is available at both standard level (SL) and higher level (HL), and therefore accommodates students who wish to study SEHS as their major subject in higher education and those who do not.

There are four options. Students are required to study any two options: Optimizing physiological performance, Psychology of sports, Physical activity and health, Nutrition for sports, exercise and health

HL Component weightingOverall (%) 1 Duration Format and syllabus coverage Paper 1 20 20 20 45 Minutes 30 Multiple choice questions Paper 2 35 17.5 17.5 1 hour 15 minutes Section A: one data based question and several short answer questions Section B: one extended response question Paper 3 25 12.5 12.5 I hour Several short answer questions assessmentInternal 20 10 hours investigationIndividual ASSESSMENT SL Component weightingOverall (%) 1 Duration Format and syllabus coverage Paper 1 20 20 0 1 hour 30 Multiple choice questions Paper 2 35 17.5 17.5 2 hour minutes15 Section A: one data based question and several short answer questions Section B: one extended response question Paper 3 25 12.5 12.5 I hour Several short answer questions assessmentInternal 20 10 hours Individual investigation

Theoretical practice is an on going and highly personal record that allows students to undertake adventurous research into their chosen themes. Investigation work involves independent contextual, visual, critical and reflective responses, both in visual and written form through a comparative study.

Art making practice involves practical exploration and artistic production evidenced in a process journal and studio work. It includes opportunities for structured learning of the formal elements together with extensive exploration of a more experimental nature.

you can study another subject from groups 2, 3 or 4 or you can take: Visual Arts

This course is organized in such a way that it combines the development of technical and practical skills with intellectual and conceptual understanding.

It allows students the opportunity to express their ideas in a wide variety of media and explore themes that are wholly led by the students. The course has two components through which it encourages pupils to explore their aesthetic, imaginative and creative faculties and trains them to become artists, critics and communicators.

Throughout the course the students will keep a Visual Arts Journal (sketchbook), in which they will document their research, explorations, skills, understanding, knowledge and reflections. There are three assessment tasks: The Comparative Study, the Process Portfolio, and the Exhibition.

Curatorial practice involves consideration of the nature of “exhibition” and how artistic judgments impact on presentation and audience responses.

In this group

At both Higher and Standard Level, the programme consists of three parts, all of which are compulsory: theoretical practice art making practice curatorial practice

In order to be successful on this course, students need to manage their time well and be motivated to work independently.

An integrated relationship between studio work, investigation work and exhibition is essential throughout the course.

GROUP 6: ELECTIVES

Minimum Entry Requirements:

Students will analyze and compare different artworks by different artists. Students will additional, write a commentary on how the studied artwork has influenced their creative practice. 20%

The IB Diploma Programme theatre course is a multifaceted theatre making course of study. It gives students the opportunity to make theatre as creators, designers, directors

The Theatre course requires a real interest in Drama or Theatre, but no previous formal experience; previous IGCSE experience would be useful but is not essential. The course allows students to follow their theatrical interests and passions so a strong independent work ethic and a willingness to have their imaginations and creativity stimulated and challenged are essential.

Students select artwork that they have made over the course that shows their explorations, refinements, and developments. Students are expected to study at least three different art disciplines 40% Exhibition Students exhibit a selection of artworks demonstrating technical accomplishment, skill. In addition, students will submit a 400 or 700 word curatorial rationale for their choice of artworks, and the ideas behind their selection 20%

IB Theatre

The Process Portfolio

Why take theatre?

Couse Content

AssessmentExternal

IB Theatre is not just for those students who want to pursue a life in the arts, it is for students who want to be able to adapt to different situations, present with confidence and flair, and develop strong academic research skills.

Assessment Task

The Comparative Study

Theatre is an accessible, interesting and challenging IB Arts option; all students should try and enrich themselves in the arts in some way. As Sir Winston Churchill said when he was asked to cut the arts budget as part of the war effort ‘Then what are we fighting for?’

The IB Theatre course teaches students how to follow their own interests in a productive and academic way through research and exploration. It builds confidence, presentation and performance skills, and instils a love of and respect for Theatre and culture throughout the world.

Students select a play that they have not previously studied and develop ideas and plans regarding how it could be staged for an audience. The students submit: A production proposal of no more than 12 pages of written text (max 4000 words) and images that documents this, A list of sources.

in class: Participation, Workshops, Performance, Projects, Research, Class Lecture, and Reflection.

Production Proposal (SL 30% HL 20%)

Students experience the course from contrasting artistic perspectives. They learn to apply research and theory to inform and to contextualize their work. The theatre course encourages students to appreciate that through the processes of researching, creating, preparing, presenting and critically reflecting on theatre as participants and audience members they gain a richer understanding of themselves, their community and the Throughworld.

the study of theatre, students become aware of their own personal and cultural perspectives, developing an appreciation of the diversity of theatre practices, their processes and their modes of presentation. It enables students to discover and engage with different forms of theatre across time, place and culture and promotes international Methodsmindedness.used

Research Presentation (SL 30%, HL 20%)

ThereAssessmentareno exams in the Theatre course. Assessment is entirely through coursework.

Collaborative project (SL 40% HL 25%)

Students plan and deliver a presentation (maximum 15 minutes) in which they outline and physically demonstrate their research into a convention of a theatre tradition that they have not previously studied. The students submit: A video recording of their presentation (max 15m)

Students collaboratively create and present an original piece of theatre (lasting 7 10 minutes) for and to a specified target audience, created from a starting point of their choice. Students submit: A video recording of the Collaborative performance (max 10 mins)

A project report (max 10 pages of text & images / max 4000 words) A list of all sources used.

and performers. It emphasizes the importance of working both individually and collaboratively as part of an ensemble. It offers the opportunity to engage actively in the creative process, transforming ideas into action as inquisitive and productive artists.

A list of resources used.

Students will also have to research diverse music material with the ultimate goal of improving as musicians themselves. So, if the students are interested in performing music, creating their own music, or just knowing more about music in general, the IB music course can provide the tools to improve in all of these areas.

Entry Requirements

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND ASSESSMENT

There are no entry requirements for IB Music, although some previous experience in music theory, performing, and creating is advisable.

There are four syllabus components that will lead to written work, practical work, and performances for assessment according to the following descriptions:

As creators, we will research the creative conventions of different styles of music, therefore adding more tools to our compositional palette. This knowledge, combined with nowadays music production accessibility, will benefit anyone willing to express themselves through music creation.

As performers, we will explore the details of the performance conventions of diverse music material, allowing us to expand our performance capabilities and re define what music performance personally means to ourselves.

1. Exploring music in context (SL 30%, HL 20%): When exploring music in context, students will learn how to engage with a diverse range of music that will broaden their musical horizons and provide stimuli to expand their own

Solo Theatre Piece (HL only 35%)

Music

Students research a theatre theorist they have not previously studied, identify an aspect of their theory and create and present a solo theatre piece (4 7 minutes) based on their research. Students submit: A video recording of their performance, A report (3,000 words maximum), A list of all sources used.

As a sub process of the knowledge acquired through the IB Music course, students will improve their experience as listeners, since we typically enjoy more thoroughly what we understand at a deeper level. In this respect, the course has the ability to change the relationship students have with music, making it more meaningful.

The IBDP Music course presents a holistic approach to music. It will give students the tools to create, perform and research music at a high level. Due to the nature of the curriculum and the IB Diploma Programme, students will be leading their learning based on their own interests. As a result of the IB Music course, students will improve in creating and performing music, therefore also being able to more fully enjoy music as listeners.

Written work • Practical exercises

When experimenting with music, students connect theoretical studies to practical work and gain a deeper understanding of the music they engage with. Through this theoretical and practical work as researchers, creators and performers, students will learn to experiment with a range of musical material and stimuli from the areas of inquiry across local and global contexts.

2. Experimenting with music (SL 30%, HL 20%)

Demonstrated in: (evidence for assessment)

.

Students will improve their ability to: compare and contrast excerpts develop and refine musical works over time through regular practice and work in performing and creating evaluate, reflect and refine identify, select and apply relevant stimuli and prompts identify and apply unfamiliar musical material, techniques and skills identify challenges and successes identify and implement strategies for improvement.

Students will improve their ability to: investigate and inquire listen and respond deconstruct and analyse extract information transcribe and perform transcriptions read and write notation practise and create (kinaesthetic research). in: (evidence for assessment)

Practical work for experimenting.

Demonstrated

3. Presenting music (SL 40%, HL 30%)

When presenting music, students learn to practise and prepare finished pieces that will be performed or presented to an audience. In working towards completed musical works, students expand their musical identity, demonstrate their level of musicianship, and learn to share and communicate their music as researchers, creators and performers.

music making. Students will demonstrate diversity and breadth in their exploration by engaging with music from the areas of inquiry in personal, local and global contexts

4. The contemporary music maker (HL only, 30%) Music at higher level (HL) builds on the learning of musical competencies and challenges students to engage with the musical processes in settings of contemporary music making. For the HL component, students plan and collaboratively create a project that draws on the competencies, skills and processes in all of the musical roles of the music course, and is inspired by real life practices of music making.

Students will improve their ability to: lead a project through musical decision making, collaboration and responsible use of chosen resources evaluate work in progress in order to identify areas for development and strategies for improvement

Students will improve their ability to: verbally communicate about music (for example, write, describe) in a clear, informative and concise way notate and annotate music accurately and effectively to communicate intention and purpose communicate the intention and purpose of music • effectively present created works perform music to audiences. in: (evidence for assessment) Written work • Presenting music

• implement strategies for improvement and musical solutions demonstrate musicianship, including technical proficiency, in realizing musical goals and communication of intention and purpose.

Demonstrated

Demonstrated in: (evidence for assessment) Real life music project: process evidence and final product

The IB Diploma offers a unique educational experience with its six subjects by giving both breadth and depth to its studies. This allows both specialisation in subjects suited to certain careers, whilst maintaining the opportunity to keep `options open` in the future.

The optional themes of TOK look at five different approaches to producing and using knowledge about the world: indigenous societies, language, politics, religion and technology, and how they affect us as knowers. Students look at two of these in detail.

Three additional compulsory elements of the course provide an overview, additional academic specialisation and recognition of interests outside the classroom. These are the courses in the Theory of Knowledge, the Extended Essay and CAS (Community, Action and Service).

Theory of Knowledge (TOK)

The areas of knowledge

Areas of knowledge are specific branches of knowledge, each of which can be seen to have a distinct nature and different methods of gaining knowledge. TOK distinguishes between five areas of knowledge. They are mathematics, the natural sciences, the human sciences, the arts and history

Students must explore a range of areas of knowledge. The knowledge frameworks a device for exploring the areas of knowledge. It identifies the key characteristics of each area of knowledge by depicting each area as a complex system of five interacting components. This enables students to effectively compare and contrast different areas of knowledge and allows the possibility of a deeper exploration of the relationship between areas of knowledge and ways of knowing.

Optional Themes

The interdisciplinary TOK course develops a coherent approach to learning that unites the academic disciplines. In this course on critical thinking, students inquire into the nature of knowing and deepen their understanding of knowledge as a human Assessmentconstruction.for this course is required for the fulfillment of the criteria for the full Diploma.

Students access Theory of Knowledge course through the investigation of a Core Theme, Optional Themes and Areas of Knowledge. Students become familiar with the Knowledge Framework as a tool to access these two components.

Other elements of the course

Core KnowledgeThemeand the knower is the core theme for the new TOK syllabus for 2022. This part of the course considers the methods used by individual knowers to acquire, verify, and use knowledge about the world.

1/3 (33%)

(Peterson 2003)

The Extended essay is a piece of individual personal research, presented in not more than 4000 words, in one of the subjects of the IB curriculum offered at our school. The Extended Essay should be focused in its approach, but apart from initial teacher supervisor guidance it should be the student’s own personal research. It offers IB Diploma candidates a unique opportunity to engage in the process of personal research, communicate ideas and information logically, and develop their skills of analysis, evaluation and reasoning. This can be a challenging, but academically a very important and gratifying task. Many universities view this as a good indicator of potential for a degree course. All essays are assessed externally.

See ‘A Guide to the Extended Essay’ for further details and deadline dates.

CAS is organized around the three strands of creativity, activity and service defined as follows.

2/3 (67%)

TheASSESSMENTExtended Essay

Creativity, Activity, Service (CAS) Course description “...if you believe in something, you must not just think or talk or write, but must act.”

Internal assessment Theory of knowledge exhibition (10 marks)

For this component, students are required to create an exhibition that explores how TOK manifests in the world around us. This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course.

Assessment component

CAS is at the heart of the Diploma Programme. With its holistic approach, CAS is designed to strengthen and extend students’ personal and interpersonal learning.

For this component, students are required to write an essay in response to one of the six prescribed titles that are issued by the IB for each examination session. As an external assessment component, it is marked by IB examiners.

External assessment

Weighting

TOK essay on a prescribed title (10 marks)

Successful completion of CAS is a requirement for the award of the IB Diploma. While not formally assessed, students reflect on their CAS experiences and provide evidence in their CAS portfolios of achieving the seven learning outcomes.

Completion of CAS is based on student achievement of the seven CAS learning outcomes. Through their CAS portfolio, students provide the school with evidence demonstrating achievement of each learning outcome.

Students engage in CAS experiences involving one or more of the three CAS strands. A CAS experience can be a single event or may be an extended series of events. Further, students undertake a CAS project of at least one month’s duration that challenges students to show initiative, demonstrate perseverance, and develop skills such as collaboration, problem solving, and decision making. The CAS project can address any single strand of CAS, or combine two or all three strands.

Students use the CAS stages (investigation, preparation, action, reflection and demonstration) as a framework for CAS experiences and the CAS project.

The CAS programme formally begins at the start of the Diploma Programme and continues regularly, ideally on a weekly basis, for at least 18 months with a reasonable balance between creativity, activity, and service.

Creativity exploring and extending ideas leading to an original or interpretive product or performance Activity physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle Service collaborative and reciprocal engagement with the community in response to an authentic need

As a shining beacon of our values, CAS enables students to demonstrate attributes of the IB learner profile in real and practical ways, to grow as unique individuals and to recognize their role in relation to others. Students develop skills, attitudes and dispositions through a variety of individual and group experiences that provide students with opportunities to explore their interests and express their passions, personalities and perspectives. CAS complements a challenging academic programme in a holistic way, providing opportunities for self-determination, collaboration, accomplishment and enjoyment CAS enables students to enhance their personal and interpersonal development. A meaningful CAS programme is a journey of discovery of self and others. For many, CAS is profound and life changing. Each individual student has a different starting point and different needs and goals. A CAS programme is, therefore, individualized according to student interests, skills, values and background.

The IB Diploma will be awarded to candidates who obtain a total points score of 24 points. Simply put, a satisfactory result in each of the six subjects taken will earn a student the 24 points required. However, the total points must be achieved in conformity with a number of provisions. Here are a few examples: Higher Level subjects in principle the candidate should achieve a Grade 4 or above in each subject. Nevertheless, ONE Grade 3 (but not a grade 2, nor a grade 1) will be acceptable if compensated by a Grade 5 or above in another Higher Level subject.

All subjects have an internal assessment component, each of these having their own internal deadline to spread the workload out evenly. The internal assessment weighting differs from subject to subject as can be seen in the subject outlines.

Award

The International Baccalaureate Organization has a 7 to 1 grading system. Each subject has its own predetermined criteria for grading their internal assessments as well as for the individual examinations making up the whole assessment of the subject. Although not definitive, the table below gives an indication of the standard required for each grade. It does not matter if a subject is SL or HL as they are graded the same way and technically worth the same in the award of the diploma. Universities sometimes require a certain score at HL in subjects students want to study e.g. if you want to do Maths at University you would certainly have to study it at HL and Universities may require you to get a 5 or above. Poor of the Diploma

Grade Description 7 Excellent 6 Very Good 5 Good 4 Satisfactory 3 Mediocre 2 Poor 1 Very

Award of the ExaminationsDiplomaandInternal

Assessment Internal examinations are written at the end of the first academic year, followed by mock examinations in January of the second academic year. The final external examinations begin in the last week of April.

Completion of Diploma Requirements Student A Higher Level 7,7,7 Standard Level 7,7,7 45 points the maximum possible score Student B Higher Level 5,5,5 Standard Level 4,5,5 30 points an average diploma candidate score Student C Higher Level 5,3,4 Standard Level 4,4,4 24 points a pass, the 5 at Higher Level compensates for the grade 3 Incomplete Diploma Requirements Student A Higher Level 5,2,4 Standard Level 5,5,6 27 points fails due to student getting fewer than 12 for Higher Level Subject Student B Higher Level 6,5,4 Standard Level 5,2,2 24 points fails (more than one grade 2 and not a total score of 28 points) Student C Higher Level 7,4,6 Standard Level 3,3,2 26 points fails due to fewer than 9 points on SL subjects  Standard Level subjects results at this level must not include: i) a Grade 1 ii) more than ONE Grade 2  Overall result must not include: i) more than three Grade 3`s ii) more than one Grade 3 if there is a grade 2 at Standard level  Students who only have one failing condition but gain 28 points or more will be awarded the diploma.

Theory of Knowledge and Extended Essay In addition to the subject grade allocations, a possible 3 additional points could be awarded for attainment in the Extended Essay [EE] and Theory of Knowledge [TOK] Thecomponents.matrixfor the awarding of these points is shown below. Theory Of Knowledge Grade A Grade B Grade C Grade D Grade E GradeNo N Grade A 3 3 2 2 ConditionFailing ConditionFailing EssayExtended Grade B 3 2 2 1 ConditionFailing ConditionFailing Grade C 2 2 1 0 ConditionFailing ConditionFailing Grade D 2 1 0 0 ConditionFailing ConditionFailing Grade E Failing Condition Failing Condition Failing Condition Failing Condition Failing Condition Failing Condition GradeNo N ConditionFailing ConditionFailing ConditionFailing ConditionFailing ConditionFailing ConditionFailing

Student Support and Guidance

An important part of study at Green Valley will be the tutorial guidance and support delivered by highly experienced staff. All students are assigned a tutor who, with the IB Diploma Coordinator, is responsible for ensuring that their students are making the best possible progress on their course. All tutors teach some aspect of the students’ course and are therefore aware of the curriculum content and any problems that they may encounter. A weekly tutorial session is held. Tutors also act as an important link with parents whose role we see as vital to the success of the students. The IB Coordinator provides an overview of all academic and pastoral matters connected with a student’s studies and has responsibility for all staff connected with the IB course. Regular meetings are held to discuss issues and plan an effective programme of studies.

Careers guidance is considered very important and during the second year of study students are offered advice about tertiary education choices. Students will be introduced to College and University application procedures in UK, USA ,Thailand, and other International destinations. Help and guidance will be given in completing College and University applications. Our University Guidance Councillor, Mrs Gilbert, will support our students through the process of selecting and applying for Universities.

Whilst teachers offer a great deal of support, students are encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning and progress. Over the year, four reports are prepared, two short reports and two more comprehensive reports Parent teacher interviews occur twice a year.

At appropriate times throughout the IB course assistance and direction is given by teachers, tutors and the coordinator addressing issues like: bridging the gap between IGCSE and IBDP; setting goals; time management; careers guidance; and support with the extended essay, TOK essay and in the CAS programme.

Lessons

There are academic scholarships available for those in year 11 who wish to apply. These scholarships are based on academic achievement and participation in school life.

Future years will likely be more than this depending on price rises and exchange rate

Students are expected to dress as if there were attending a meeting at an office and should wear smart trousers or skirts, a shirt or blouse (a tie is optional). Smart black or brown leather shoes should be worn.

course students, based on 2020 exam fees, 4,500B per subject they are sitting (HL or SL does not matter).

Students from St Andrews and elsewhere will be able to apply for Scholarships in year 11. Scholarships can be up to 50% of school fees.

Study leave Once exams start, students will only be required to be in school when they have exams. They will have their student room to study in during other times if they are in school.

Teacher will be available during your timetabled lesson times to help you if you require it.

The IB Diploma Examination fees will be billed directly to parents. The current cost for full IB Diploma Candidates is 27,000 Thai Baht based on exam fees for the 2020 exams.

Scholarships will be based on an interview, a letter of application and exam results.

Scholarships

Exam fees

However, smart dress is expected by all students, therefore jeans, T Shirts, and sports clothes are NOT acceptable.

Diplomafluctuations.Programme

There will be lessons when students have ‘study periods’. These lessons should be used to complete work, do CAS projects or study quietly. These are not intended as ‘free time’ and should not be used to wander about the school and disrupt other lessons.

Because not all students will make it onto the IB Diploma / Certificate Programme it is expected that all IB Diploma students will set an example to the rest of the school in all aspects of school life. IB students will be looked upon by other students as the leaders of the school and should therefore promote a positive attitude to learning and participation in all areas of school life.

General Information

IB Diploma Students’ role at Green Valley

Uniform Students in year 12 and 13 at Green Valley are not required to wear a school uniform.