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Stylin’ up Prom Drive

Ellsinore

Local boutique helps simplify prom shopping

Area toddler drowns

See Page 7

A drowning incident occurred on Monday, February 24th at 10:00 a.m. in Carter County at the Middle Brushy Creek, 4 miles North of Ellsinore, MO. According to reports, Adrian J. Hindle, age 2 of Ellsinore, MO, fell into the creek behind his residence. He was pronounced dead on February 28th by Dr. Sam Davila. The incident was investigated by Trooper E.M. Vanwinkle.

West Plains

The Dramatic ‘Battle’ to visit MVCC See Page 3

WEDNESDAY, March 19, 2014

Vol. 108 - Issue 8

Police Mountain View seize 120 Woman arrested, faces charges of child grams of meth during abuse, endangering welfare of child Mountain View woman day, March 5th on a Howell grandmother, Delta Fisher of Physician conclusion on traffic stop hasAbeen arrested and charged County Warrant for abuse of Mountain View. The infant the medical records stated it The West Plains Police Department seized 120 grams of methamphetamine during a routine traffic stop on Friday, March 14th in the city limits of West Plains, MO. According to reports, on Friday, March 14th officers observed a vehicle leaving the Ridgecrest Motel at the intersection of Porter Waggoner Blvd. and McFarland Avenue. The Ridgecrest Motel is a high narcotics related crime area. Officers observed the vehicle begin to pull out onto McFarland Avenue, stop, and back the vehicle back onto Porter Waggoner Blvd., let a vehicle pass on McFarland Avenue before making a left hand turn onto Porter Waggoner without using the vehicle’s turn signal. Officers activated their emergency lights and initiated a traffic stop with the gold Oldsmobile Aurora bearing a Tennessee registration. The stop occurred at Casey’s General Store on Gibson Avenue. The driver, identified as Bradley David Jump, stated he was traveling from Kansas City to Memphis, Tennessee. While speaking with Jump, he consented to a search of his vehicle. Officers located a camouflage backpack in the back seat on the driver’s side. Inside of the bag officers found a large Lay’s brand potato chip bag and inside of the bag was a plastic Ziploc style bag that contained two other plastic bags with a large amount of white crystalline substance inside. The substance field tested positive for methamphetamine and was seized as evidence along with Jump’s cell phone. Bradley David Jump, 38 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant

with abuse of a child and endangering the welfare of a child. According to court docuDelta D. ments, Delta Fisher, 39 D a w n Fisher, 39 of Mountain View, MO, was arrested on Wednes-

a child and endangering the welfare of a child-1st degree. According to court documents, on March 5, 2013 Deputies with the Howell County Sheriff’s Office responded to Mercy Hospital in Mountain View, MO, in response to an three-month-old infant being admitted with severe head trauma. The child had been brought in by her

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Obituaries Chester “Chet” Wade Robert Henry Bolander Geraldine Brim Willie Ray Bradshaw Claude R. Morgan John Joseph Tanguay E-mail: standardnews@centurytel.net

Copyright ©2014 Mountain View Standard News, LLC

was unlikely the violent trauma was caused by the two-year-old. Fisher bonded out on 3-514 and was set to appear in court on 3-17-14. The charges set forth in an indictment are merely accusations, and each defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

West Plains: Newton Street

Man new to neighborhood offers ‘Cokes and cookies’ to area children Complaints lead to ‘sex offender’ arrest A West Plains man has been arrested and charged with failure to register as a sex offender after officers were dispatched to a residence Charley H. on Newton Smith, 72 Street in West Plains, MO, on Tuesday, March 11, 2014. Officers with the West Plains Police Department made contact with a family who stated that their daughter was riding her bike when Charley Smith asked her to

come over and talk to him. That’s when he allegedly reached down her shirt. Officers spoke with Smith and he denied touching the child. Officers took statements from all parties involved but Smith refused to complete one. On Wednesday, March 12, 2014, officers spoke to the female victim about the incident at her residence and she once again stated what happene when she was riding her bike and Smith asked her to come over to talk. Officers asked if she had ever been in Smith’s

house and she said that last week she was inside with her dad and that she had been told that Smith had touched two other children in t he past week and one of the children’s dad had threatened Smith for kissing his child. Smith agreed to meet officers at the police department. He was read his Miranda Rights and asked how long he had lived there at his residence. Officers had a copy of city utilities which shows the utilities being put on his name on March 5, 2014. Officers

asked Smith if any children ever came to his trailer and he said no. Officers informed Smith that other kids had said they had allegedly been to his residence. Smith then said that two or three kids had been there and he gives them Cokes and cookies but he didn’t know any of their names. Officers asked if Smith had ever been to prison and he stated yes he went in 1999 for molestation and got out in 2009. See Offender on Page 7

Mountain View Community

for trafficking in drugs/attempt to traffic-2nd degree. He is currently being held on a $100,000 bond. The charges set forth in an indictment are merely accuGood Samaritan Care Clinic sations, and each defendant is presumed innocent until of Mountain View is hosting a and unless proven guilty. benefit in celebration of its 10 Year Anniversary on Saturday evening, March 29, 2014. For the past ten years the clinic has provided free health related services to the uninsured of southern Missouri. Throughout its existence the clinic has been funded and sustained entirely by donations and the volunteer service of hundreds of medical, dental, pharmaceutical, and Drugs Confiscated - A traffic stop on Gibson Av- administrative volunteers. This enue last Friday in West Plains led to one arrest and 120 grams found in a Lays potato chip bag. (Photo provided to celebration is open to the pubthe Standard by the West lic and will be held at First Featuring Inserts Plains Police Department) Baptist Church in Mountain THE BATTLE Edgeller & Harper Richard Bros Supermarket Town & Country Wal-Mart

had significant injury to the top of her head causing severe swelling, a bruise on the left side of her face and blood coming from both nostrils. Fisher stated that she woke up to her two-year-old son carrying the infant from the living room to the bedroom. The infant was reported to have had blood coming from her nose and she was pale.

Good Samaritan Clinic to host 10th year anniversary benefit View, MO. More information may be requested or reservations made by phoning the clinic at (417) 934-6500. Donations of $50 per person or $300 per table of 6 or 7 are requested by March 24th. All

donations will benefit the clinic. A silent auction will be held in conjunction with the clinic’s fundraising dinner. See Clinic on Page 7

Celebrating Local Clinic - The Good Samaritan Care Clinic, located on Hwy. 60 in Mountain View. A fundraiser for the clinic that provides free healthcare to the uninsured will be held on Saturday, March 29. Call 417-934-5500.

Mountain View Fire Dept.

Arson suspected in several local fires, dryness impacts number of calls The Mountain View Fire Department responded to numerous calls last week with dry temperatures resulting in

12 fire calls and several late nights for responders, “Everything is so dry with the lack of moisture,” shared Fire Chief,

MO Dept. of Conservation

Nick Heavrin, as he added that for the Mountain View Fire the “ nitrogen in the ground Department. and dryness,” are a combinaOn Tuesday, March 11th a tion of a busy week last week brush fire on M Hwy. near Montier was reported and is suspected of foul play. “We were fighting the brush fire West of M Hwy. and Hwy. 60 when we were dispatched to CR 665 just South of Montier.” Heavrin explained that the two fires, set right at dark, were located of CWD was discovered in about a mile and a half apart 2010 in a captive deer at pri- and they suspect that an invate hunting facility in south- dividual was setting the seceast Linn County owned by ond fire while responders the same private hunting pre- were fighting the first. An investigation is ongoing into serve. “While I am cautiously op- this incident which damaged timistic that these latest test over 40 acres and resorted in

Testing results show no new cases of disease Following the testing of 3,666 free-ranging deer harvested during and after the 2013 deer-hunting season, the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) has detected no additional cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Missouri free-ranging deer.

The total number of confirmed cases in Missouri freeranging deer remains limited to 10 found in 2012 and early 2013. All were from a small area of northwest Macon County near where CWD was confirmed in 10 captive deer in 2012 at a private hunting preserve. Missouri’s first case

See MDC on Page 7

See MVFD on Page 7

Howell County West Plains man fatally injured in crash A one-vehicle accident occurred on Thursday, March 13th at 12:25 p.m. in Howell County on Route CC, 12 miles West of West Plains, MO. According to reports, a 1997 Jeep Wrangler, operated by Christopher S. Evans, 32 of West Plains, MO, was travelling Westbound when the vehicle travelled off the left side of the roadway and overturned, ejecting the driver from the vehicle. The driver was pronounced dead at the scene by Howell County Coroner Tim Cherry. A passenger in the vehicle, Caiden A. Evans, 4 of West Plains, MO, was flown by Air Ambulance to Cox South in Springfield, MO, with serious injuries. The accident was investigated by Trooper C.A. Kimes and assisted by Trooper J.V. Garrison, Sgt. S.R. Richardson and Cpl. G.T. Curnes. This was the 3rd fatality for 2014 compared to 3 fatalities this time in 2013.

Howell County

MOST

WANTED

The Howell County Sheriff’s Department has issued warrants and is looking for four individuals in the Howell County area. If you have any information on the whereabouts of these individuals, do not try to apprehend them, call the sheriff’s office at 417-256-2544 or local authorities. April M. Johnson, age 38 - Wanted for probation violation for class C felony charge of possession of a controlled April M. substance exJohnson cept 35 grams or less of marijuana. When captured, she will be held without bond. Tommy L. Deluna, age 66 - Wanted for 2 class B felony warrants for distribution/delivery/manufacture/produce/attempt a controlled substance. When captured, he will be held on a $30,000 bond. (No Photo Available.) Dwayne J. Aldridge, age 32 - Wanted for probation violation for a class C felony charge of possession of a controlled Dwayne J. substance exAldridge cept 35 grams or less of marijuana. When captured, he will be held without bond. Cynthia L. Prewett, age 45 - Wanted for probation violation for a class C felony charge of passing a bad check. When Cynthia L. captured, she Prewett will be held without bond. The charges set forth in an indictment are merely accusations, and each defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.


The Standard News

Page 2

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Mark Twain Forest offers military veterans internship at Eleven Point Ranger District USDA Mark Twain National Forest is offering military veterans an internship out of the Eleven Point Ranger District, Doniphan, Missouri. The field-going internship is available through VetsWork AmeriCorps beginning April 7, 2014. The selected intern will support Mark Twain National Forest employees in a variety of jobs. Skills needed include use of hand tools and power tools; map reading; public speaking and supervisory experience. Each selected intern will receive $12,100 living allowance for the 45-week internship. Upon successful completion of the internship, they will receive an additional $5,550 education stipend. The stipend may be used to repay qualified student loans or for further education at a higher learning accredited institution, vocational or trade schools. For those who qualify, there

will be basic medical insurance for interns only. Military veterans ages 21-35 with an honorable discharge are eligible to apply. Each selected intern will receive $12,100 living allowance for the 45-week internship. Upon successful completion of the internship, they will receive an additional $5,550 education stipend. The stipend may be used to repay qualified student loans or for further education at a higher learning accredited institution, vocational or trade schools. For those who qualify, there will be basic medical insurance for interns only. The internships are being offered through a partnership between Mark Twain National Forest and Mt. Adams Institute. Mt. Adams Institute, headquartered in Trout Lake, Washington, manages VetsWork AmeriCorps, an eleven-month

natural resources management career development internship for military veterans, including those with Traumatic Brain Injury and/or Post-Traumatic Stress. The program is funded by the Corporation for National and Community Service. Established in 1993, the Corporation for National and Community Service is a federal

agency that engages more than 5 million Americans in community service through programs such as AmeriCorps. VetsWork AmeriCorps participants are temporarily placed at federal land management agencies, such as USDA’s Mark Twain National Forest, where they learn various career paths.

trict, Doniphan, Recreation Intern: http://bit.ly/NXJfU2 For additional information, contact Aaron Stanton, Mt. Adams Institute, at programs @mtadamsinstitute.com or (253) 653-4231 or Jane Mobley, Mark Twain National Forest manpower development specialist, jmobley@fs.fed.us (573) 996-2153.

Seed Swap and Garden Seminar April 3rd in WP The University of Missouri Extension, Howell County will host a Seed Swap and Garden Seminar on April 3rd, 2014 at the West Plains Civic Center from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. The $5 admission fee will support future garden-related programming. Willow Springs hosted a very successful seed swap in January, and we had many

MODOT’s SE District to host Work Zone Awareness Run/Walk April 5 in Willow Springs zone safety by taking part in a 1-mile fun run/walk or 5K. “National Work Zone Awareness Week will officially begin Monday, April 7,” said Assistant District Engineer Chris Rutledge. “Hosting the event on Saturday is a good way for us to promote the upcoming work zone awareness festivities across the state and get Missourians involved.” Registration is $10 for adults and $5 for children (under 10). Proceeds will go

requests to hold a similar event in West Plains. Trade with Neighbors and Friends Bring your heirloom vegetable and flower seeds to trade with your neighbors and friends. Vegetable seeds, flower seeds and seed potatoes are welcome. Seeds should be heirloom or heritage, clean and dry, non-hybrid, non GMO, and from the 2012-2013 growing season. Seeds should be packaged in clear, zippered sandwich bags to allow others to see the type and quality of the seed. Seeds will be swapped one for one. Beginners with no seeds to swap are welcome to up to five packages of seeds and should bring zip lock bags for the seeds. There are no guarantees made regarding availability of seeds throughout the

to MoDOT’s Benevolent Fund. “This event is a great opportunity for Southeast Missouri families to join the MoDOT team in raising awareness about the importance of work zone safety,” said Rutledge. For more information or to access the online registration form, please visit http:// www.modot.org/southeast/ news_and_information/ special_events/ ShanCo. Productions is exworkzoneawarenessrunwalk2014.htm. cited to be hosting and promoting our first Annual “Evening of Gospel” concert event this year! To kick off this event we are featuring one of the top groups in the indusBecause of financial difficul- the sale of said real estate. The member attending will have one try, Karen Peck and New ties during the past year, we are meeting will be about said prop- (1) vote by paper ballot, yea or River. Our hope and goal is to be able to host concerts like forced to attempt to liquidate the erty and no other business will nay. post property known as the VFW be discussed. Respectfully, this a few times each year in Post 3009 Camp Ground. The meeting will be held on James R. Gould the Shannon, Texas, Howell I, James R. Gould, Post Com- Saturday, April 19, 2014 at the Post Commander and Oregon county areas. This mander, hereby call for a special VFW Post 3009 in Mountain William F. Gould first event is scheduled for meeting to discuss and vote on View at 7:00 p.m. sharp. Any Post Quartermaster March 22nd at 6:00 p.m. at the Leroy Lewis Memorial Gymnasium, also known as the new High School gym located in Eminence, MO. This first event is free to anyone who would like to attend and take my word for it you will not want to miss this concert! There will be a love offering taken during the concert for Karen Peck and New River. Karen Peck and New River is a 3-time Grammy Award Nominated and 2-time GMA Dove Award Winning Southern Gospel Group. Karen’s flawless, delightful soprano voice has made its way into the hearts of Gospel Music lovers across the country and garnered an unprecedented 11 Favorite Soprano Fan Awards 50th Wedding Anniversary - The children, grandchildren and family of Kenny from the readers of The Singand Estella Smith invite you to a drop by anniversary reception as they celebrate 50 years of marriage on Saturday, March 22, 2014 from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Mountain View ing News Magazine, Southern Community Center located at 125 East First Street in Mountain View, MO. Your presence Gospel Music’s leading fan and trade will be your gift to them. publication. Karen, Susan and Jeff have also received many awards from other magazine publications and Internet publications. Over the past four years, New River has had five consecutive #1 songs in Southern Gospel Music. In addition, their album, Reach

The Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) is inviting Missourians to help kick-off National Work Zone Awareness Week in Southeast Missouri with a fun run/walk this April. The event will be held Saturday, April 5, with the race starting at the Willow Springs High School Football Field. Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m., and the race will begin at 9:30 a.m. Participants may choose to show their support for work

Selected interns will also qualify for other available federal jobs for 120 days after completing the internship. Deadline to apply is Friday, March 28, 2014. The internship begins April 7, 2014. For full position postings and application instructions: Eleven Point Ranger Dis-

VFW Post 3009 to meet to vote on selling property on Jacks Fork River

Smith’s to celebrate 50th Wedding Anniversary

evening, it is first come, first served. Garden Seminar We look forward to our great schedule of speakers that we know you will enjoy. Art Davidson, with Baker Creek will kick off the evening at 4 p.m. with a presentation on Growing Herbs. Michael Jackson, Master Gardner will share Seeding and Transplanting direction and expertise. Marilyn Odneal, with the Missouri State Fruit Experiment Station has an outstanding presentation about Raised Bed gardening, and Lou Wehmer will share his love and knowledge of Small Fruit Gardening. Local Networking There will be a break from 5:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. to allow time to visit with our guests and experts. Local organizations including the

West Plains Community Garden, The West Plains Farmer’s Market, and the local Master Gardeners chapter will have informational booths set up. There will be tropical plants as well as vegetable starts available for purchase. Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company will also have a large selection of seeds for sale. Yellow Brick Toys and Books from Willow Springs will have variety of wonderful books on homesteading, beekeeping, gardening, and other “do it yourself” topics. Participants will also have the chance to win some great door prizes. Pre-registration is requested by April 1st by calling the Howell County Extension Office at 417-2562391. Please come out and help us make this an annual event!

‘Evening of Gospel’ March 22 Out, has had two consecutive #1 songs for “On the Banks of the Promised Land” and “Mighty Big God” as well as receiving 2 GMA Dove Awards for Country Song of the Year and Southern Gospel Album of the Year. “Each time we go into the studio to record a new album,” Karen shares, “we’re at a different place in our walk with Christ than the last time we prepared for a recording. Therefore, obviously, each recording pulls at a different heartstring, yet the message of hope is always present. That’s what life in Christ is all about. As a result of various circumstances each of us has faced over the past years, we’re at a point in our lives where we realize that anything we achieve or accomplish is all because of Christ. It is an honor to serve Him.” With appearances on such prestigious stages as The Grand Ole Opry, Gaither Homecoming concerts, Opryland Theme Park, Dollywood and Six Flags and Missouri’s own Silver Dollar City, New River has firmly established their place at the forefront of Southern Gospel Music. The group has enjoyed many honors and accolades and they have consistently received radio airplay at stations nationwide. Hit releases have flowed their way in bunches, and they have enjoyed many Number One songs. A few of their other previous popular hits include: “Hold Me While I Cry”, “Just One Touch” and “When Jesus Passes By”. Additionally, the group’s

Number One hit, “Four Days Late”, was also named Song of the Year by readers of The Singing New Magazine in 2001 and the SGMA Awards and continues to be a favorite among audiences. The youngest of three daughters, Karen was exposed to the traditional sounds of Gospel Music at a very early age. Her parents often took Karen and her sisters, Susan and Sandra, to the allnight sings in Atlanta, and these concerts left an indelible mark on the youngsters who made a pact that someday they would share a musical ministry of their own. One of the groups often featured at the Atlanta concerts was The Lefevres, who later became known as The Nelons. It would be a mild understatement to say that Karen had aspirations of singing with this talented family. In fact, that aspiration became her greatest desire, and in 1981, this dream became a reality when Karen was invited to travel with her favorite group. She remained with The Nelons for 10 years, gaining the respect of industry peers and fans alike with her exceptional vocal ability and caring personality. Finally in 1991, the realization of yet another dream came to pass when Karen and her sister, Susan, with Karen’s husband Rickey, organized the musical entourage of Karen Peck and New River. Today the New River team consists vocally of Karen, Susan, and Jeff Hawes. Additionally, Karen’s husband, Rickey, serves as the group’s road manager and sound technician. Their son Matthew plays guitar for the group. Susan’s husband, David, is the founder and owner of the Jackson Steel Guitar Company. Dawn Hughes has traveled with the group since year 2000 as Karen Peck and New River’s assistant making New River a complete family affair. New River sets a new standard for musical perfection with rich vocal harmony that is shaded with the sophistication of Southern Gospel, country and progressive musical sounds. New River today stands not only as a talented and successful recording artist, but more importantly, effective messengers presenting the Gospel, through Jesus Christ.


The Standard News

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Upcoming Events ‘The Battle: Nowhere to Hide’ March 29-31 Preparations are underway for a drama production that promises to “shake your soul” on March 29, 30, and 31 at Mountain View Christian Church. It’s called “The Battle: Nowhere to Hide” and it pulls no punches as it uses drama, music, video, and special effects to confront crowds with a Christian message about Jesus versus Satan, life versus death, and heaven versus hell. In fact, scenes can be so intense, parents are asked to use caution with children under eight years of age. Admission may be free, but a typical church play it’s not. On March 29, 30 and 31, audiences will have a chance to face it again. For those seeking more information, the church directs them to call 417-934-6843, or go to their website at www.ijesus.me.

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Weekly forecast for the Mountain View (65548) area Wednesday March 19th

Thursday March 20th

Friday March 21st

High: 58 Low: 33

High: 67 Low: 41

High: 70 Low: 40

Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday March 22nd March 23rd March 24th March 25th

High: 57 Low: 32

High: 53 Low: 30

High: 57 Low: 33

High: 59 Low: 33

Looking Back - Through The Eyes of the Standard News

MDC: Women’s outdoor skills workshop

The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) invites women to have a weekend of fun while learning various outdoor skills at its annual “Discover Nature—Women Summer Workshop.” The weekend of hands-on learning will be May 30 to June 1 at the Windermere Baptist Conference Center in Roach along Lake of the Ozarks. Registration deadline is April 25. The workshop provides a safe and friendly environment where women learn hands-on outdoor-skills at the beginner level by selecting a group of four courses from the following offerings: archery, basic hunting, canoeing, introduction to firearms, plant-animal-tree identification, camping, fishing fundamentals, fly tying, map and compass reading, and shotgun shooting. Women attending for the first time are encouraged to attend the program a second year to complete four additional courses. The special weekend is targeted to women 18 years and older, along with young women age 14-17 when accompanied by a woman 18 years or older. The workshop is free, but a $20 deposit is required at the time of registration and will be refunded at check in. There is no deposit fee for young women aged 14–17 when registered with an adult. Participants are responsible for making room and meal reservations directly with Windermere by contacting 573-346-5200 or 800-346-2215, or online at windermereusa.org. Various lodgStandard News Archive - 1970 - The young vacation bible school enrollees of the Mountain View First Baptist ing options are available at the Windermere Conference CenChurch paraded through the town last Tuesday afternoon. Leading the parade of youngsters was Rev. R.F. Cravens. ter including lodge, motel, cabin, and camping. Accommodation prices will vary with the number of participants per room. The weekend will begin with lunch on Friday and will end Street Willow Springs. For with lunch on Sunday. MDC will provide dinner on Saturday Mark your calendars Newman Friday, March 21st information call (417) 4696:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. at no cost to participants. Workshop-weekend meal costs 0018 or (417) 855-9113. Mountain View group of Aerobics at the Mtn. View through Windermere are $5.50 for breakfast, $7 for lunch, and 8:00 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous will Senior Center $8.25 for dinner. Alcoholics Anonymous and meet at the Mountain View 6:00 p.m. To register, go online to mdc.mo.gov/node/3958 and download the brochure for full course descriptions and reg- Wednesday, March 19th Alanon meetings 8:00 p.m. Skating & Open gym at the Christian Church, located at Sacred Heart Church in on South Highway 17, in Mtn. View Family Youth istration form. For more information, call 573-522-4115, 9:00 a.m. Willow Springs. Call (417) Center until 10:00 p.m. For the basement. For quesext. 3808. - Mtn. View Garden Club 469-5550 for information tions call Tonya at 417more information call 417Use or possession of alcoholic beverages or illicit drugs, fire- Work Day, members meet 362-0494. Thursday, March 20th 934-5437. $3 admission at What Park arms, and fireworks is forbidden on Windermere property. In 7:00 p.m. 7:00 a.m. per child compliance with the American Disabilities Act, this program - Aerobics at the Mtn. View Saturday, March 22nd - Willow Springs City Mountain View Rotary Club Senior Center will make all reasonable efforts to accommodate people with 8:00 a.m. Council at the City Hall to meet at Ron’s Family 9:15 a.m. special needs. Please include a letter with the registration form South Central MO Dog conference room. Call Restaurant Exercise at the Mtn. View describing any special needs.

FYI

MV Garden Club meeting The monthly meeting of the Mountain View Garden Club will be March 26th at 1:00 p.m. at the library community room. This month’s program will be presented by member Carolyn Flynn. The subject will be a power point presentation on “Landscape Design “Bones” “ creating three levels of interest in the garden. The public is invited. The Mountain View Garden Club is a member of the South Central District of the Federated Garden Clubs of Missouri and Central Region of the National Garden Clubs, Inc.

BT Fire Department to hold consignment auction The Birch Tree Fire Department is looking for items to be consigned for an upcoming consignment auction. If you are interested in selling your items on consignment, please call the Birch Tree Fire Department at 573-292-3414.

Beginners/Advanced Line Dance Workout A free beginners/advanced line dance workout is offered each Friday from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Summersville Senior Center. This is not a class but rather exercise for those who need the motivation of music and friends. Beginners’ workout is at 1:00 p.m. and advanced begins at 1:30 p.m. All are welcome to stay for both workouts. A $1.00 donation to the senior center is suggested to cover use of the facility. Contact Kathie Cox 417-932-4866 for more information.

T HE S TANDARD N EWS

PUBLISHED WEEKLY ON WEDNESDAY BY MOUNTAIN VIEW STANDARD NEWS, LLC P.O. Box 79 - 408-3 West Hwy. 60 - Mountain View, MO 65548

Office: 417-934-2025 Fax: (417) 934-1591 Email: standardnews@centurytel.net (USPS number: 685-240) Tianna Brooks Publisher/Editor Member of • Missouri Press Association • National Newspaper Assoc.

DEADLINE AND SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION Religion & Family news.....................................Fri. noon News releases..................................................Fri. noon Submitted photos........................................Fri. 4.00 p.m. Advertising (Display)..........................................Fri. noon

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SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Howell and adjoining counties, $24 per year. Out of area, $32 and out of state $38. Postage for periodicals paid at Mountain View, Missouri. Postmaster: Send address changes to Mountain View Standard News, LLC., P.O. Box 79, Mountain View, MO 65548

CONTACT THE STANDARD NEWS Phone: 417-934-2025 Fax: 417-934-1591 E-Mail: standardnews@centurytel.net

Healthcare 10:00 a.m. Swedish Weaving at the Mtn. View Senior Center 11:30 a.m. Blood Pressure Checks at the Mtn. View Senior Center 12:00 p.m. - Willow Springs Rotary Club, 12:00 p.m. at Open Range. Contact Teresa Waggoner at (417) 4694092 for information. - Line Dancing at the Mtn. View Senior Center 2:00 p.m. Bingo at the Mtn. View Healthcare 5:00 p.m. Yoga Class at the Learning Station in the Ferguson Building, 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Call (417) 469-0209 for information. 5:30 p.m. Awana’s at the First Baptist Church in Mountain View. Tonights theme: “Prize Night” 6:30 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous, 6:30 p.m. at Mothers Against Methamphetamine (MAM) 503 E. Main

Al Anon (Help for friends & families of alcoholics) Monday - 7:00 p.m. Mtn. View Presbyterian Church 205 E. 2nd Street 417-247-7146 or 417-247-0566

9:00 a.m. - Arthritis Exercise at the Mtn. View Senior Center - Swedish Weaving at the Mtn. View Senior Center 11:00 a.m. Alcoholics Anonymous and Al-Anon Group to meet at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, located at 1551 Bill Virdon Blvd., West Plains. Call 417-255-9724 or 417-2550542 for more information. 12:00 p.m. Line Dancing at the Mtn. View Senior Center 2:00 p.m. Bingo at the Mtn. View Healthcare 4:00 p.m. Bingo at the Mountain View VFW Hall, Bingo starts at 6:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m. - 4th-6th Grade Girl Scouts to meet at Hut, 409 N. Pine Street in Mountain View. For more information call Joyce Dixon at 417-9342394. - Yoga Classes at the Mountain View United Methodist Church. Call 417-247-7153 for more information. - The University of Missouri Extension will host a Beef and Forge Seminar at the WP Civic Center. Paid registration of $15 includes dinner and reference materials. Call 2562391. 6:30 p.m. Beginner Line Dancing Classes at the Mtn. View Family Youth Center 7:30 p.m. Advanced Line Dancing at the Mtn. View Family Youth Center

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: Readers are encouraged to share their opinions by writing letters to the editor. Letters to the editor will be published without charge. Letters to the editor must be signed and include the town in which the writer lives to ensure the letter’s authenticity. If a name is left off a letter it will not be published. Names will not be withheld from the letters under any circumstances. We reserve the right to not publish a letter to the editor if anything written is considered libel. Any letter that praises or criticizes any private business in the publishing area will not be printed. We reserve the right to edit letters without changing their meaning. All letters to the editor will be published as soon as they are submitted as space permits us to do so.

Kennel Show will be held in the WP Civic Center Arena and Exhibit Hall. Get details at: http://scmkc.org/ calendar.htm 6:00 p.m. Skating & Open gym at the Mtn. View Family Youth Center until 10:00 p.m. For more information call 417934-5437. $3 admission per child Sunday, March 23rd 8:00 p.m. Willow Springs Alcoholics Anonymous and Al-Anon meetings at the Sacred Heart Church. Call 417469-5550 for more information. Monday, March 24th 9:00 a.m. - Zumba at the Mtn. View Senior Center - Aerobics at the Mtn. View Senior Center 10:00 a.m. Swedish Weaving Class at the Mtn. View Senior Center 12:00 p.m. Line Dancing at the Mtn. View Senior Center 5:00 p.m. Yoga Class at the Learning Station in the Ferguson Building, 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Call (417) 469-0209 for information. 5:30 p.m. - Kindergarten-1st Grade Girl Scouts to meet at Hut, 409 N. Pine Street in Mountain View. For more information call Joyce Dixon at 417-934-2394. - Yoga Classes at the MV United Methodist Church. Call 417-247-7153 for more information. - Zumba at the Mountain View Community Center, instructed by Mary Zitter-

(417) 469-2107 for information. - Mountain View Al-Anon will meet Mondays at 7:00 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, located at 205 East 2nd Street in Mountain View, MO. For more information call 417934-2682. Tuesday, March 25th 10:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise at the MV Senior Center 12:00 p.m. - Mountain View Chamber of Commerce luncheon at the Mountain View Community Center. Call 417934-2794 for more information. - Willow Springs Chamber of Commerce. Call (417) 469-5519 or (417) 2520918 for information. 4:30 p.m. - LHS Girls Soccer Game at Branson - LHS Boys Baseball Game vs. Norwood - Tumbling at the Mtn. View Family Youth Center until 7:30 p.m. For more information call 417-9345437. 5:30 p.m. 2nd thru 3 rd Grade Girl Scouts to meet at Hut, 409 N. Pine Street in Mountain View. For more information call Joyce Dixon at 417934-2394. 6:30 p.m. Country Dance at the Mountain View Community Center 8:00 p.m. Mountain View A.A. group meets at the Presbyterian Church in the basement. The church is located at 205 East 2nd Street in Mountain View


The Standard News

Page 4

Riverways Reflections

by Superintendent Bill Black

I want to take this opportunity to thank all of you for your interest in the future of Ozark National Scenic Riverways. I appreciate that the park is important and relevant to so many people. I enjoyed meeting many local residents and park users during the public meetings that were held in January. I am impressed and pleased with the volume of comments, as well as the tremendous level of involvement at those meetings. One thing that’s very clear is that passion for the special places and experiences of the Riverways runs deep. I realize there are lots of questions about the proposals in the Draft General Management Plan (GMP) for Ozark National Scenic Riverways and the next steps toward finalizing the GMP. I have decided to write a bi-weekly column to try to answer some of the questions raised about the Draft GMP, and to keep you updated on our progress as we read through all of your comments. In addition to giving you a status update, this week’s column will address some questions about proposed changes to motorboat use. Approximately 4000 comments were submitted on the Draft GMP. Right now we are reading through them and hope to have a full report summarizing the comments and our responses by mid-summer. We hope to have a final GMP completed later this year. It’s important to remember that the Draft GMP is truly just a “draft”. The management proposals in it were developed after listening to feedback from thousands of people about their vision for enjoying the Riverways in the future. This latest round of public comment will help us understand where it makes sense to make changes to those proposals. One of the concerns I’ve heard often relates to the proposed changes to motorboat use on the rivers. We have heard from a number of folks asking “Why is the NPS try-

ing to reduce the size of the boat motors below Big Spring?” or “What is the purpose of having non-motorized zones on the upper reaches of the rivers?” I’d like to provide some insight into why we proposed those changes. Thirty years ago, when the last GMP was developed, it would have been hard to imagine what “unlimited” horsepower for boat motors could eventually mean. Looking ahead 20 years, it is again difficult to predict what advances in jet motors might be made. In the interest of public safety and prudent management of our rivers, we recognize that “unlimited” horsepower might not be best for the park or the public. During the scoping phase of this process, and again when the alternatives were first presented, many of the public comments suggested we adjust the “unlimited” motor size below Big Spring. The proposal to designate non-motorized zones on the upper stretches of both rivers has also raised some questions. The idea stems from concerns raised by park users about congestion in some areas, where large numbers of floaters and boaters are trying to navigate the same stretches of the rivers. Many previous comments expressed the desire to have a recreational experience on the rivers that did not include motorized vessels and suggested that non-motorized zones in the upper reaches of the rivers might provide those opportunities. During the recent public comment period we heard concerns about how the non-motorized zones might impact traditional cultural activities such as gigging and trapping. As we move forward with comment analysis, we plan to make appropriate adjustments in the final GMP. I hope this answers a few of your questions about the proposals related to motor boats at Ozark National Scenic Riverways. Next time, I will provide an update on where we are in the comment analysis process and address questions we have heard about the potential impacts of the plan on horseback riding. To learn more, you can read the “Summary of Key Excerpts” from the Draft GMP by visiting the park website at www.nps.gov/ozar and clicking on the link to the Draft General Management Plan.

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Capitol Report: Congressman Jason Smith Reining In Executive Overreach

The Constitution is clearCongress has the duty to write laws and, once they are enacted, it is the President’s responsibility to enforce the laws. Article II, section 3 of the U.S. Constitution declares that the President “shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed.” However, President Obama has failed on multiple occasions to enforce acts of Congress that he disagrees with. President Obama has also stretched his regulatory authority to put in place policies that are too extreme to get through Congress. The President’s executive overreach is accelerating at an alarming rate. Examples of President Obama’s failure to execute laws include: - Delaying the ObamaCare individual mandate for special interests; - Refusing to enforce federal immigration laws; - Ignoring welfare work requirements, a clear violation of the 1996 welfare reform law; - Failing to enforce federal drug laws This week the House of Representatives acted to reign in the Obama administration’s executive overreach. The

House passed the Executive Needs to Faithfully Observe and Respect Congressional Enactments of the Law Act or ENFORCE the Law Act to restore balance to the separation of powers outlined in the Constitution. The ENFORCE the Law Act allows the House or the Senate to authorize a lawsuit against the Executive Branch for failure to execute the laws. This legislation also provides for expedited consideration of the claim so that the courts cannot stall the lawsuit. Additionally, the House passed the Faithful Execution of the Law Act to strengthen current laws and to ensure that all federal executive officials fully execute the laws on the books. The Faithful Execution of the Law Act promotes transparency and honesty by requiring all federal executive officials who are not enforcing federal law to report to Congress on their reasoning for non-enforcement. It is a shame that Congress has to pass laws requiring the Executive Branch of our government to follow the Constitution. However, the Obama Administration has failed time and time again to uphold Article II, section 3 of the U.S. Constitution that says the President “shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed.” I remain committed to working with my colleagues in the House of Representatives to hold the Obama Administration accountable and restore the balance of power outlined in the Constitution.

Beauty In and Around the Community A Better Choice Why not plant a Bradford pear? Spring is a common time to plant trees, and those pears are sure popular. Most folks recognize their beautiful white flowers in the spring, the glossy green leaves that turn a deep red in the fall, and the pretty pyramid shape of the tree. Well, there are several good reasons why some other tree might be a better choice. First reason not to plant a Bradford pear is that they are becoming an invasive species. When first developed, their fruit was thought to be sterile. However, over the years it has become apparent that they do reseed, and do so prolifically. The literally take over nearby flower beds, unmowed grassy areas and fields. Recently they have been placed on the invasive species list. Bradford pears are also very susceptible to wind damage. Large limbs are easily torn off in storms, leaving the tree misshaped, or having to be taken out altogether. Those ornamental pears are properly called Callery pears....and there are a number of different types. Bradford is the most common, and also the weakest of the group. Some say that the others, Cleveland or whatever cultivar, are better; but none of them are the strongest type of trees and all are invasive. Another drawback is that they are so common. For a period of time it seemed that Bradford pears were the only tree that anyone planted. If they ever get a pest or disease problem, all will be susceptible. The Dutch Elm disease wiped out many cities and towns of almost all their

trees years ago because Elm trees were planted in such great numbers. It makes much more sense to diversify. If you buy what is most popular, you are passing up the chance to try some of the other wonderful trees that are available in many nurseries. The fact that the Bradford pear is not a native species might make it less tolerant to our growing conditions here in Missouri. When you choose natives, you have an advantage of hardiness built into the tree. A few suggestions might include our native dogwood. They are popular and common, and appreciate afternoon shade. Redbuds are another native. Yellowwood and fringe trees both are natives with white flowers in the spring. So is the serviceberry. It is actually the first to bloom in the spring. Many crabapples are available in the nursery trade. Make sure that any selection of crabapple is listed as disease resistant. The fruits they bear are variable; some tiny, some large, some red, some yellow etc. Check with your nurseryman. There are also many other varieties of small flowering trees that are desirable to plant in your yard. Have some fun and do some investigating....and pass the offerings of the Bradford pears by in favor of something else.

Policy Decisions Affecting Our State

Cause for Concern No. 1 This week the Senate debated many worthy issues. There are, however, a few issues that we, as the Missouri General Assembly, have not debated that I have been concerned with and wish to address. The state has long been a leading promoter of ethanol, a corn-based fuel that is blended with regular petroleum gasoline. In 2006, Missouri was one of the first states to mandate that most fuel contain 10 percent ethanol. Despite the objections of many legislators, and the disapproval of the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules, (JCAR) the governor decided to enact a rule that would allow the sale and usage of E15 blends in our state. I am troubled by the fact that the governor encouraged this rule change despite the fact that the release of the blend is beyond the scope of the 2006 ethanol law. The Joint Committee on Administrative Rules voted last year to not allow the sale of the E15 blend. JCAR is charged with the responsibility to review administrative rules filed by state agencies for compliance with Missouri statutes. Pursuant to Section 536.014, RSMo., a rule shall be invalid in the event that there is an absence of statutory authority to promulgate the rule; the rule is in conflict with state law; or the rule is arbitrary and capricious. Late last year JCAR disapproved a rule promulgated by the Missouri Department of Agriculture that would have allowed greater amounts of ethanol to be blended into the gasoline (E-15) sold for most vehicles. The decision was based on the fact that the rule went beyond what’s allowed under a 2006 state law that required Missouri gasoline to contain a 10 percent ethanol blend. It was deemed to be an overreach of power and that the rule was better left to the legislature to make a policy decision, not an executive agency. But this did not stop behind-the-scenes efforts between the governor and the Department of Agriculture. Together they decided to develop a plan and move forward with a rule allowing the sale of E15. At this point there is nothing the General Assembly can do to stop this. The change could take effect as soon as May 30 if the Department of Agriculture publishes the rule in time; and the E15 blend could be available as soon as this summer at any of the state’s 3,800 gas stations, if the business chooses to sell the blend. I do not support the sale of E15; it violates the 2006 law and the ruling by the JCAR, which states: “the Legislature — not an executive agency — must make the policy decision about whether to allow it.” E15 blend may also pose a threat to owners of some vehicles that may accidentally fuel up with the blend, or are unaware that it may not be meant for use in their car. While it may be a few cents per gallon cheaper than even the E10, many vehicles are not equipped to use the E15 blend, and by filling a vehicle with the blend, it may result in the need for repairs to the engine and possibly void the vehicle’s warranty. Cause for Concern No. 2 Missouri’s constitution defines marriage as between one man and one woman. In 2004, voters passed a constitutional amendment that bars same-sex marriage in our state. Just a few months ago, our governor issued an executive order stating same-sex couples, who married in other states, could and should file state income taxes jointly. The governor claims he is allowing the filings because federal law also allows joint filings, and Missouri law currently requires that the state tax filings mirror those filed with the federal government. Any couple who files a joint federal tax return is now required to file a joint state return. Missouri is among 32 states that bar same-sex marriage; with the governor’s executive order, Missouri is the only state to allow same-sex couples married elsewhere to file joint returns. I stand with the people of the state who voted in 2004 to declare marriage to be between one man and one woman in our state. I am deeply worried that the governor issued this executive order knowing full well how the citizens of his state felt. The 2004 vote was overwhelmingly against same-sex marriage in our state. That year, 71 percent of Missouri voters opposed same-sex marriage. Welcoming Capitol Guests As always, I appreciate it when groups from around Missouri and from our community back home come to visit me at the Capitol. This week I had visitors from Missouri State Teachers Association; Missouri Library Association; Willow Health Care, Inc.; Ripley County Prosecutor, Chris Miller; members of the Missouri Health Care Association; Dr. Leonard Scott and several other pediatricians from the district; members of the Missouri Soil and Water Districts; a group of home-schooled children from Willow Springs and last but certainly not least, Andy Miller, assistant district engineer for the Missouri Department of Transportation. If you would like to arrange a time to come and visit me in Jefferson City, or if you ever have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact my Capitol office at (573) 751-1882.

Eminence Area Chamber of Commerce Lifetime Achievement award banquet March 29 The Eminence Area Chamber of Commerce has unanimously chosen Dan Searcy, Letha Searcy, Andy Bressler and Barbara Bressler to be the honorees of the Lifetime Achievement Award for Community Service for 2014. Please join us at 5:00 p.m., March 29th at the Leroy Lewis Memorial Gymnasium as we celebrate and honor these two couples for their lifetime commitment to our community.

Our very own Dr. Dale Haverstick and friends will be playing music as the entertainment for the evening. We are looking forward to Dr. Haverstick’s performance and appreciate his willingness to again share his many talents. Suzanne Chilton co-author with husband, Dan Chilton, of the recently released book Blue and Gray Cross Current will be our guest speaker for the evening. Suzanne and Dan are originally from Eminence -

after retirement they returned home and became involved in the community. Local businesses and residents are sponsors and have made donations to cover extra expenses and their names will be printed on the placemats along with pictures of the honorees. If you would like to be a sponsor you may contact Nancy Brewer at 573226-3318. Project Prom will be preparing the meal as well as the decorations, agendas and placemats. The Project Prom provides a safe and fun environment for after the Prom. This is a very large project and we greatly appreciate the time effort and money that goes into making this happen. Meal tickets are $10.00 in advance and $12.00 at the door. To purchase meal tickets call Carolyn Dyer at 573-2263492.


The Standard News

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Page 5

Death Notices Willie Ray Bradshaw

Chester “Chet” Lavaughn Wade Chester “Chet” Lavaughn Wade was born on October 19, 1928 at Montier, MO., the oldest child of Arthur C. and Lena Ellen (Martin) Wade. He

passed away on March 6, 2014 at Mountain View Health Care at the age of 85 years, 4 months and 15 days. Chet attended Turkey Oak Rural School in Montier for his first 8 grades of education and graduated Mountain View High School in 1947. He served his country in the United States Army during the Korean War from February 1951 to November 1952 and

then was honorably discharged from the Army Reserves in 1956. He was a lifetime member of the VFW Post #3009 of Mountain View, MO and took an active part in the organization. Chet was united in marriage to Helen Jones on March 2, 1963. They had no children but enjoyed all their nieces and nephews. Chet spent most of his work life in the local flooring mills. Some years were spent in Birch Tree at Missouri Hardwood Flooring and then at Smith Flooring in Mountain View where he was head grader and worked until he retired in 1996. He is preceded in death by his parents; his wife Helen; and a niece DeAna Joye Wade. He is survived by two brothers Wayne and wife Dorothy of Napavine, WA and Paul and wife Deloris of Mountain View, MO; one sister Lena Vines and husband Bud of Mountain View, MO; several nieces, nephews, many cous-

ins, and friends. Chet spent his last 3 years at the Mountain View Health Care Nursing Home where he was very happy and content. He loved all the ladies at the home and especially his great niece Holly Murphy, who took such good care of him. He considered all of them “his girls” and our special thanks go to them and all the staff at Mountain View Health Care. All those who knew and loved Chet will miss him greatly. In lieu of flowers the family requests memorial contributions be made to the Mountain View V.F.W. Post #3009 Funeral Services were held Monday, March 10, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. at the Duncan Funeral Chapel in Mountain View with Punkie Stevenson officiating. Interment was in Old City Cemetery under the direction of the Duncan Funeral Home of Mountain View. Online condolences can be sent to www.duncanfuneralhomes.com

Robert Henry Bolander Robert Henry Bolander, 96 of Springfield passed away on Saturday, March 8, 2014. Robert was born on February 19, 1918 in Martin, Ohio. He married Jean Butts Bolander on June 22, 1946. They moved to Mountain View, Missouri in 1964. Robert served in the Army for 5 years and was a 32nd degree Mason. Robert was preceded in death by his parents: Henry and Bertha Bolander, his brothers; Elmer and Henry Bolander, and

sisters: Helen Stern, Alice James and Mary Winters. He is survived by his children: Gilbert Bolander and wife, Barbara, Beverly Piper and husband Edward, Henry Bolander and wife, Louise, Paul Bolander, John Bolander and wife, Brenda, Dorothy Brainard and husband, David. He is also survived by many grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Robert was lovingly cared for by the outstanding staff of Christian Health

and Rehab East of Springfield, Missouri. Robert was always a giving person and his final wish was to donate his body to science. Arrangements are through Gorman-Scharpf Funeral Home in Springfield, Missouri. In lieu of flowers donations can be given in Robert Bolander’s memory to: Christian Health and Rehab East, 3535 E Cherokee Street, Springfield, MO 65809

Claude R. “Buck” Morgan Claude “Buck” Morgan, 80 of Freeman, Missouri, died Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at his home. Buck was born January 30, 1934 in Preston, Missouri, the son of Orlan B. and Eula L. (Crawford) Morgan. He attended Wheatland, Missouri High School. Buck moved to Kansas City, Missouri in 1951 where he met his

wife, Connie Taber. They were married on March 14, 1953 in Bentonville, Arkansas. They lived in Kansas City for 34 years before moving to Freeman in 1974. Buck worked for American Rental in Kansas City as a truck driver, retiring in 1988 as a dispatcher. He was a former member of the Team-

Birch Tree United Methodist movie night The Birch Tree United Methodist Church would like to invite the public to join us for a family movie night to be held at the BTUMC on Friday, March 21, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. please join us for a night filled with fun and fellowship.

For more information please call Pastor Julie Sanders at 417-599-9222 or Judy Shaw at 417-247-2387. Every one welcome. Birch Tree United Methodist Church is located at 3rd Street in Birch Tree, MO.

sters Union. He was a member of Freeman Baptist Church. Buck was preceded in death by his parents, one brother, Herbert Morgan and a son, Claude “Gene” Morgan on October 9, 1998. He is survived by his wife, Connie, of the home; one daughter, Debbie Carter, Harrisonville, Missouri; three sisters, Evelyn Zacharias, Holden, Missouri, Marilyn Long, Clay Center, Kansas and Geraldene Wohler, Wichita, Kansas; 3 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Friday, March 7, 2014 at Atkinson Funeral Home in Harrisonville, Arkansas. Interment/graveside was held Saturday, March 8, 2014 at Freeman Cemetery in Freeman, Missouri.

The Elmores in concert at First Church of God The Elmores will be appearing in concert at the First Church of God in Mountain View on Sunday, March 16th at 3:00 p.m. Marti, a highway patrol officer, and Patty, a homemaker, began singing with their family and testifying to God’s blessings on their lives over 20 years ago. Their

children are grown and gone but the blessings continue. The Elmores have sung across this country and in nearly every church in this region. The concert will be followed by a dinner at 4:30 p.m. served by the youth group. The fried-chicken dinner with trimmings is an effort to raise

funds for the youth to attend youth camp this summer. Donations will be welcomed. The Church of God is located on Fifth Street behind Signal. The congregation invites everyone to come and let the Elmores bless you with their talent, their spirit and their love, plus enjoy the food and fellowship!

Ukrainian Egg workshop to be held at MVUM Ukrainian eggs are an ancient and traditional folk art common to Eastern Europe in the area of Poland and the Ukraine. The custom of creating these beautiful eggs began over 2000 years ago, before the birth of Christ. Each design and color on the egg has meaning which changed to Christian imagery with the arrival of Christianity in Europe. The egg designs are created with wax on the white eggs, then progressively dyed and waxed to achieve beautiful

and meaningful art. A workshop about Ukrainian eggs will be held at the First Presbyterian Church, 2nd and Ash in Mountain View on Saturday, March 29 at 1:00 p.m. All members of the community who are interested in art, eastern European culture, or Christian customs are invited to attend. There is no

charge. An opportunity to enroll in a hands-on class to learn to create the Ukrainian eggs yourself will be offered at the workshop, as well. For further information, contact the minister at the church Rev. Diane Cooke at 417 257 8349 or workshop instructor Nancy Hedrick at 801-6949284.

Thank You The Brewer Family would like to thank everyone that helped in anyway during the loss of our baby “RC”. To everyone that donated money, helped with the benefit, prayed for us and was there for us, we thank you. Robert Brewer Doug & Marla Brewer James & Lisa Bradford Adam & Jim McVicker

Willie Ray Bradshaw was born July 14, 1956 in Van Buren, MO to Ray Arvol Bradshaw and Ola Jane (Price) Bradshaw. He passed away

at his home in Winona, MO March 1, 2014 at the age of 57. Willie Ray was united in marriage to Suzanne (Stines) Bradshaw and to this union two children were born, April and Amanda. Later he mar-

ried Dena Bradshaw and to this union one child was born, Alaina. He is preceded in death by his parents, an infant brother, one sister Tammy (Bradshaw) Lucas, and his wife Debra Bradshaw. He is survived by his girlfriend, Karen Fingers of the home; his daughters April Bradshaw of Birch Tree, MO, Amanda (Bradshaw) Blake and Alan of Greeley, CO; and Alaina Bartlesville, OK; seven grandchildren Scott, Melanie, and Ashley Dodds; Cheyenna Martin, James Vermillion, and Trea and Shakaila Blake; three brothers Dennis and girlfriend Rose Gann, Roy and wife Tabby, and Raymond and wife Bridget all of Winona, MO.; two sisters Geraldine (Bradshaw) Martin of Birch Tree, MO and Bonita

Bradshaw and fiancé Michael Needels of Winona, MO; and numerous nieces, nephews and friends. Willie Ray attended Winona High School and accepted the Lord at the age of 19. He worked at various jobs throughout his life. He would help anyone and everyone he could. Willie Ray enjoyed fishing and being in the log woods working with his brothers and friends. He will be sadly missed by those who knew and loved him. Funeral Services were held Friday, March 8, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. with Bro. Don Woody officiating. Interment was in Mt. Zion at Winona, Mo under the direction of the Duncan Funeral Home of Winona. Online condolences can be sent to www.duncanfuneralhomes.com

Geraldine Brim Geraldine Brim the daughter of Arthur Ray James and Lela Bell (Crabtree ) James was born June 22, 1938 at Joy, Missouri in Dent County. She passed away at the Brent B. Tinnin Nursing Center in Ellington, Missouri on March 10, 2014 making her age 75 years 8 months and 18 days. Geraldine was united in marriage to Cloe Harvey Brim. To their union 4 children were born, Evelyn Louise, a still born daughter, Janet Lenore and Ricky Lynn. When she lived in the Summersville/Hartshorn area she attended the Hartshorn Assembly of God Church and Midvale Church. She enjoyed all the churches that came to the nursing home to hold services. She enjoyed fishing, camping, gardening, and canning. She loved to quilt, needlepoint and crafts. She enjoyed spending time with her family

and friends. Geraldine is preceded in death her father Arthur Ray James, mother Lela Bell James, the father of her children Cloe Harvey Brim, 2 daughters, Evelyn Louis Brim and a still born daughter, brothers, Archie James and a infant brother, sisters, Shirley Mattoy and Wilma Gant and half sister Goldie May James. She is survived by her children Janet Stoops and husband Steve of Ellington, Missouri; Rick Brim and Candance of Willow Springs, Missouri; grandchildren, Missi Piatt and husband Boone of Salem, Missouri, Jessica Gresham and husband James of Ellington, Missouri, Steven Stoops and Lori Stoops both of Ellington, Missouri, Jennifer Counterman of Mountain View, Missouri, Billie Brock and husband Chris of Mountain View, Missouri, Roger Counterman and wife Tiffany

of Mountain View, Missouri, Phillip McKee of Oklahoma, Elizabeth Brim, Sara Brim and Marlana Brim all of Willow Springs, Missouri; one sister Nadine Cameron and husband Nick of Alabama, four brothers, Donnie James and wife Beverly of Licking , Missouri, Frank James and wife Donnetta of Licking, Missouri, David James and wife Alta of Licking, Missouri and Danny James and wife Lynda of Hermann, Missouri. She is also survived by 15 great grandchildren and a host of other family members and friends. Funeral Services were held on Thursday, March 13, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. at Bradford Funeral Home chapel with rev. Gary Steelman officiating. Interment was in Antioch Cemetery under the care of Bradford Funeral Home of Summersville, Missouri. Online condolences may be left at bradfordfuneralhome.net

John Joseph Tanguay John Joseph Tanguay was born April 20, 1943 in Boston, MA the son of Roland Tanguay and Sophie (Stefanczak) Tanguay. He passed away Tuesday, March 11, 2014 at West Plains, MO at the age of 70 years. John was united in marriage to Genevieve Ramay 32 years ago in Las Vegas, NV. He was preceded in death by his parents. He is survived by his wife Genevieve Tanguay of Birch Tree, MO; three sons Anthony

Tanguay and wife Kayla of Birch Tree, MO; Kenny Tanguay of Swansboro, NC, and Johnny Tanguay of Braintree, MA; three daughters Christine Tanguay of Lewisville, TX, Tania Tanguay of Huntington Beach, CA and Deb Gifford of Pembroke, MA; two sisters Diane Ronayne and Donna Ronane; several grandchildren including Kingston Tanguay of Birch Tree, MO; and numerous other family and friends. John was an over-the-road

truck driver and worked for several trucking companies. He also worked as a jeweler at a jewelry store. John loved fishing, target shooting, and visiting at the pawn shop. He especially enjoyed spending time with his grandson Kingston and spoiling him. Arrangements were under the direction of Duncan Funeral Home of Mountain View, MO. Online condolences can be sent to www.duncanfuneralhomes.com

Church Directory


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Howell County Sheriff’s reports are printed directly off reports provided by the Howell County Sheriff’s Office and are public record. Persons arrested for criminal offenses, or charges set forth in an indictment, are merely accusations and they are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

INCIDENTS Saturday, March 1, 2014 Members of the WP/HC SWAT team travelled to Wright County in the Mtn. Grove area to assist Wright County and Mountain Grove PD with the service for a high risk narcotics search warrant at the address of 8693 Hwy. N, just outside of Mountain Grove, MO. Upon the service of the search warrant SWAT cleared the secured the location and then turned the scene over to the Wright County Sheriff’s Department and the South Central Drug Task Force for the processing of evidence. Wednesday, March 5, 2014 Deputy Jason Long was dispatched to State Route E Highway in West Plains, MO, for a report of an assault at this location. Upon his arrival, he spoke to the victim who stated that she had been assaulted by a female subject that she knows while at this residence and wished to pursue charges. While on scene, Deputy Long spoke with a female identified as the suspect and statements were taken from both parties and paperwork will be sent to the prosecutors office for the filing of charges. The sheriff’s office was contacted by Mountain View Police about a domestic assault that had occurred in the city and had continued out into the county. The male suspect had been arrested on an unrelated warrant. The victim wished to pursue charges for the assault. Charges will be sent to the prosecutor. A male subject came to the sheriff’s office and reported someone had used his name, social security number and address to file for a 2013 tax return. Saturday, March 8, 2014 Deputy Aaron Galiher attempted to stop a red Ford Expedition on Porter Waggoner in West Plains, MO. After a vehicle pursuit the driver was arrested for possession of methamphetamine and endangering the welfare of a child. Sunday, March 9, 2014 Deputy Matthew Kassing responded to a fight at Coble Stone Entertainment Complex where a male subject of West Plains was arrested for resisting arrest and failure to obey Deputy Sheriff. He was booked at the Howell County Jail and will be placed on a 24-hour hold pending formal charges. Tuesday, March 11, 2014 A male subject of Mountain View, MO, was arrested for possession of less than 35 grams of marijuana and unlawful use of drug paraphernalia. He was booked at the Howell County Jail. Wednesday, March 12, 2014 Deputy Rodney Harper responded to CR 1240 in West Plains, MO, to take a burglary report. A male subject reported that someone broke into his metal building and stole several items during the early morning hours. A full investigation is on-going at this time. Deputy Rodney Harper responded to Private Road 7380 in West Plains, MO, for an attempted burglary call. A female subject reported that someone unknown to her caused damage to the front door of her residence in an effort to gain entry. A full report has been done in this incident. Deputies were dispatched to State Route 14 in West Plains, MO, in reference to a male subject walking down the roadway carrying a tent. Contact was made and the subject was determined to have run away from a residence in West Plains, MO. The subject was transported to the West Plains Police Department. Saturday, March 15, 2014 Ashley Osgood of West Plains, MO, was stopped by Deputy Matthew Kassing for a traffic offense and subsequently was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. She was booked and released at Howell County Jail. Sunday, March 16, 2014 Miriah Thomas of Mountain View, MO, was issued a citation for failure to maintain financial responsibility by Deputy Matthew Kassing. COMMITMENTS Friday, March 7, 2014 Randy Louis Beard, 52 of Caulfield, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment. He was released on 3-9-14 for time served. Christopher Dean Wake, 25 of St. Louis, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment. He was released on 3-9-14 for time served. Ethan Levi Belcher, 23 of West Plains, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment. He was released on 3-9-14 for time served. Terry Lynn Burnett, 48 of West Plains, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment. He was released on 3-9-14 for time served. Samantha Kay Enderle, 28 of Mountain View, MO, was

The Standard News booked for a court ordered commitment. She was released on 3-9-13 for time served. Sunday, March 9, 2014 Derral Byrnes, 22 of West Plains, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment. He was released on 3-11-14 for time served. Monday, March 10, 2014 Gerald Stephen Woodruff, 52 of West Plains, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment. He was released on 3-12-14 for time served. Nikolay G. Seu, 23 of Willow Springs, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment. Tuesday, March 11, 2014 Travis Jason Mask, 48 of West Plains, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment. He was released on 3-13-14 for time served. Wednesday, March 12, 2014 James Daniel Irvin, 32 of Mountain View, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment. He was released on 3-14-14 for time served. Thursday, March 13, 2014 Harry Lee Tiller, 35 of St. Joseph, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment. Friday, March 14, 2014 James Michael Cochran, 26 of Mountain Grove, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment. Christopher Dean Wake, 25 of St. Louis, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment. Randy Louis Beard, 52 of Caulfield, MO, was booked for a court ordered commitment.

Missouri State Highway Patrol reports are printed directly off reports provided by the Missouri State Highway Patrol and are public record. Persons arrested for criminal offenses, or charges set forth in an indictment, are merely accusations and they are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

ARRESTS Daniel R. Bradshaw, 21 of Winona, MO, was arrested on Wednesday, March 12th at 2:55 p.m. in Howell County for a felony warrant through Stoddard County for driving while suspended or revoked. He was taken to the Howell County Sheriff’s Department where he is being held without bond. Bobby J. Little, 33 of Mountain View, MO, was arrested on Thursday, March 13th at 1:43 p.m. in Howell County for 2 misdemeanor Shannon County Warrants. He was taken to the Mountain View Police Department where he is listed as bondable. Magen J. Tackitt, 20 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on Thursday, March 13th at 10:34 p.m. in Howell County for a Willow Springs PD Warrant for disorderly conduct. She was taken to the Howell County Jail where she is listed as bondable. Roger L. Ledgerwood, 57 of Birch Tree, MO, was arrested on Friday, March 14th at 6:03 p.m. in Howell County for possession of marijuana-misdemeanor and possession of drug paraphernalia. He was cited and released. Jenifer L. Drexler, 39 of Birch Tree, MO, was arrested on Saturday, March 15th at 4:39 p.m. in Howell County for felony possession of methamphetamine, misdemeanor possession of marijuana, misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia, no valid driver’s license and misdemeanor Winona PD warrant for shoplifting. She was taken to the Winona Police Department where she is listed as bondable. ACCIDENTS A two-vehicle accident occurred on Monday, March 10th at 12:29 p.m. in Texas County on Hwy. 17, 14 miles South of Houston, MO. According to reports, a 1999 Isuzu Rodeo, operated by Stephen K. O’Neal, 57 of Salem, MO, crossed the center line and struck the trailer being towed by a 1999 International Tractor Truck, operated by Jesse R. Murphy, 22 of Doniphan, MO, which then struck a bridge. Murphy required no treatment at the scene and O’Neal was taken by ambulance to Texas County Memorial Hospital in Houston, MO, with moderate injuries. The accident was investigated by Cpl. D.B. Pounds and assisted by Sgt. G.H. Falterman and the Missouri Department of Transportation. A two-vehicle accident occurred on Thursday, March 13th at 3:34 p.m. in Texas County on Hwy. 17 in Summersville, MO. According to reports, a 2011 Chevrolet Cruze, operated by Cynthia K. Hobbs, 51 of Hartshorn, MO, crossed the center line and collided with an oncoming 2000 Peterbilt 379 Tractor Truck, operated by Andrew U. Helton, 79 of Summersville, MO. Hobbs was taken by helicopter to Mercy Hospital in Springfield, MO, with serious injuries. Helton required no medical treatment. The accident was investigated by Trooper T.R. Nelson and assisted by Sgt. J.R. Kinder, Cpl. C.R. Haden, CVO J.L. Gregory, the Summersville PD and the Missouri Department of Transportation. A one-vehicle accident occurred on Thursday, March 13th at 12:25 p.m. in Howell County on Route CC, 12 miles West of West Plains, MO. According to reports, a 1997 Jeep Wrangler, operated by Christopher S. Evans, 32 of West Plains, MO, was travelling Westbound when the vehicle travelled off the left side of the roadway and overturned, ejecting the driver from the vehicle. The driver was pronounced dead at the scene by Howell County Coroner Tim Cherry. A passenger in the vehicle, Caiden A. Evans, 4 of West Plains, MO, was flown by Air Ambulance to Cox South in Springfield, MO, with serious injuries. The accident was investigated by Trooper C.A. Kimes and assisted by Trooper J.V. Garrison, Sgt. S.R. Richardson and Cpl. G.T. Curnes. This was the 3rd fatality for 2014 compared to 3 fatalities this time in 2013. DROWNING A drowning incident occurred on Monday, February 24th at 10:00 a.m. in Carter County at the Middle Brushy Creek, 4 miles North of Ellsinore, MO. According to reports, Adrian J. Hindle, age 2 of Ellsinore, MO, fell into the creek behind his residence. He was pronounced dead on February 28th by Dr. Sam Davila. The incident was investigated by Trooper E.M. Vanwinkle.

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

TRANSFERS Thursday, March 13, 2014 Carl Wayne Delancey, 36 of West Plains, MO, was transferred to the Missouri Department of Corrections. Nicholas Alan Barrett, 22 of West Plains, MO, was transferred to the Missouri Department of Corrections. Preston Andrew Barnhart, 22 of Willow Springs, MO, was transferred to the Missouri Department of Corrections. Willie Gene Day, 31 of Mountain View, MO, was transferred to the Missouri Department of Corrections. Christopher Allen Roberts, 22 of Pomona, MO, was transferred to the Missouri Department of Corrections. Tanner Sloan Huffman, 20 of Koshkonong, MO, was transferred to the Missouri Department of Corrections. Friday, March 14, 2014 Martha Lou Brumble, 41 of Eminence, MO, was transferred to the Missouri Department of Corrections. Kelisha Denise Evans, 32 of West Plains, MO, was transferred to the Missouri Department of Corrections. ARRESTS Monday, January 13, 2014 Kelisha Denise Evans, 32 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for probation/parole violation and tampering-1st degree. She is currently being held without bond. Monday, February 24, 2014 Gordon Lawrence Gearhart, 21 of Willow Springs, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for assault-2nd degree. He bonded out on 3-11-14 and is to appear in court on 3-11-14. Friday, February 28, 2014 John David Carter, 44 of Willow Springs, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for receiving stolen property and probation/parole violation. He was released per court order on 3-14-14. Thursday, March 6, 2014 Jenny Louise Walker, 35 of Mountain View, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for probation violation. She was released per court order on 3-14-14. Anthony Skyler Goodman, 27 of Ferguson, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for misdemeanor failure to appear and a Licking PD Warrant for misdemeanor failure to appear. He bonded out on 3-10-14 and is to appear in court on 3-14-14. Friday, March 7, 2014 Austin Lee Pribble, 19 of Birch Tree, MO, was arrested on a Mountain View Warrant for 3 counts of felony failure to appear. He was transferred to the Mountain View PD on 3-12-14. Dustin Lee Roberts, 30 of Missouri, was arrested on a Wright County Warrant for 2 counts of misdemeanor failure to appear and a Willow Springs Warrant for driving while revoked/suspended and 3 counts of contempt of court. He bonded out on 3-11-14 and is to appear in court on 4-15-14. Saturday, March 8, 2014 Dominique Shiane Hood, 20 of Summersville, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for passing a bad check, felony stealing and a Texas County Warrant for failure to wear seatbelt and operating a motor vehicle on highway without valid license. She bonded out on 3-10-14 and is to appear in court on 3-14-14. Kristian Dee Watson, 35 of Houston, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for endangering the welfare of a child1st degree and possession of a controlled substance except 35 grams or less of marijuana. He is currently being held on a $20,000 bond. Louise Luvesta Gargione, 54 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Taney County Warrant for misdemeanor failure to appear. She was transferred to Taney County on 3-11-14. Sunday, March 9, 2014 Joshua M. Golden, 22 of Mammoth Spring, AR, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for driving while revoked/suspended, unlawful use of drug paraphernalia and exceeding the posted speed limit. He was released for time served on 3-10-14. Josh Earl Johnson, 20 of Mountain View, MO, was arrested on a Mountain View Warrant for 2 counts of misdemeanor failure to appear. He was transferred to the Mountain View PD on 3-12-14. Monday, March 10, 2014 Samantha Jean Hughes, 20 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for felony stealing. She bonded out on 3-10-14 and is to appear in court on 3-31-14. Tanner Sloan Huffman, 20 of Koshkonong, MO, was arrested for receiving stolen property. He is currently being held without bond. Amanda Sue Roark, 28 of Caulfield, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for felony failure to appear. She is currently being held on a $9,000 bond. Jeffery Clarence Rosson, 18 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for domestic assault-2nd degree. He is currently being held on a $25,000 bond. James William Woodby, 20 of Emmitsburg, MD, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for assault-2nd degree, tampering-1st degree and property damage-1st degree. He is currently being held on a $17,500 bond. Tuesday, March 11, 2014 Tracy Dawn Sloniker, 44 of Caulfield, MO, was arrested on a bond revocation from Howell County on a charge of 2 counts of possession of a controlled substance except 35 grams or less of marijuana. She bonded out on 3-14-14 and is to appear in court on 3-17-14. William Albert Williams, 54 of Raleigh, NC, was arrested for possession of up to 35 grams of marijuana. He was released on a summons on 3-11-14 and is to appear in court on 4-28-14. Jeremy Jonathan Hancock, 36 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for failure to register as a sex offender. He bonded out on 3-11-14 and is to appear in court on 3-31-14. Wednesday, March 12, 2014 Joshua Ray Green, 30 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Green County Warrant for probation violation. He bonded out on 3-12-14 and is to appear in court on 3-17-14. Larry Arthur Marsh, 40 of Missouri, was arrested on a West Plains Warrant for driving a motor vehicle on highway while license is suspended/revoked, unlawful use of a weapon and misdemeanor stealing. He is currently being held on a $5,000 bond. Angelia Colleen Marsh, 36 of Missouri, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for possession of a controlled substance except 35 grams or less of marijuana. She is currently being held on a $7,500 bond. Daniel Ray Bradshaw, 21 of Winona, MO, was arrested on a Stoddard County Warrant for felony failure to appear. He is currently being held without bond. Charley Herman Smith, 72 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for failure to register as a sex offender. He is currently being held on a $2,500 bond. Thursday, March 13, 2014 Clinton Ray Highfield, 40 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Douglas County Warrant for misdemeanor failure to appear. He bonded out on 3-14-14 and is to appear in court on 424-14. Casey Joe Hicks, 37 of Branson, MO, was arrested for probation/parole violation. He is currently being held without bond. Daniel Paul Williams, 28 of Dresden, TN, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for unlawful use of drug paraphernalia. See Reports on Page 8


Wednesday, March 19, 2014

The Standard News

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MVFD the Missouri Department of Conservation arriving with their dozer to fight the flames. Numerous firefighters from Mountain View and Birch Tree Fire personnel fought both fires till after midnight. “When it got into the rough timber we couldn’t get to it,” shared Heavrin. Department heads believe that this isn’t the first time that this individual has been suspected of arson. The Shannon County Sheriff’s Department is the investigating agency which can be contacted at 573-226-3615 Other calls include: A brush fire was reported on Monday, March 10 off of County Road 2930. There was approximately three acres burnt. The department responded later on Monday on WW Hwy. in Texas County when a brush fire was reported on CR 665 in Texas County. Mountain View Fire and Birch Tree Fire assisted the Texas County Fire Department in the rural call. On Wednesday morning,

Offender Officers showed Smith a copy of the Missouri Sex Offender Notication Form from the Howell County Sheriff’s Department and asked if he signed the form on January 8, 2014. Smith stated that the signature was his. Officers then advised Smith that he must register in three business days a change of address. Smith stated that he was aware of that and stated that he needs to do that. Officers then asked Smith why he was living within 1,000 feet

From Page One March 12, The department was dispatched to Hwy Y, North of Mountain View for a camp trailer fire. The structure was a complete loss. There was no one home at the time. Electrical lines were closely displayed near the camp trailer which delayed fire fighters in getting the flames under control. During the afternoon on Wednesday reports of a brush fire and shed fire burnt off approximately 3 acres, located off of WW Hwy. On Thursday, March 13 a report of a trailer house fire off of county road 2990. The trailer was being used for storage. Trash was being burnt close to the trailer when it got out of control and caught the storage unit on fire. The department was called out to Roberts’ Wood Products for a report of a fire alarm. It was a false alarm. The department was called out to a propane leak on March 13 at approximately 10:30 p.m. at a residence near the MV Family Youth Center.

From Page One of a daycare. Smith stated that he was not aware there was a daycare around. Charley Herman Smith, 72 of West Plains, MO, was arrested and charged with failure to register as a sex offender. He is currently being held in the Howell County Jail with bond set at $2,500. The charges set forth in an indictment are merely accusations, and each defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

On Friday, March 14 a grass fire was reported on Plum Street in Mountain View where a vehicle backfire caused a yard

fire. On Saturday, March 15 responders were dispatched to CR 3140 during the evening hours where a brush fire got out

of hand and was close to structure. Rain on Sunday should help in the lack of moisture in the ground, but officials still

MDC results suggest our efforts to limit the spread of CWD may be working, the threat of this infectious disease remains significant,” said MDC State Wildlife Veterinarian Kelly Straka. “Therefore, continued surveillance is important.” Of the 3,666 deer tested, 1,520 were from Department’s CWD Containment Zone of Chariton, Randolph, Macon, Linn, Sullivan, and Adair counties. Of the 1,520, 206 were from the 30-square-mile CWD Core Area around the private hunting preserve in Macon County where cases of the disease were discovered in captive deer. The remaining 2,146 test samples were gathered from deer harvested outside of the six-county Containment Zone as part of MDC’s ongoing statewide sampling effort. As done in the past two years, MDC again worked with local landowners during January and February to harvest and test 147 free-ranging deer as part of 206 samples collected in the CWD Core Area. The effort was done to monitor infection rates and help limit the spread of the disease from deer to deer by reducing local deer numbers. “More than 90 percent of Missouri land is privately owned, so landowners are vital to deer management and to our ongoing efforts to limit the

caution burning. “It is going to get warmer this week and things are going to dry out in a hurry,” shared Heavrin.

From Page One spread of CWD,” Dr. Straka said. “We greatly appreciate the cooperation of local landowners in the CWD Core Area who participated in this effort. Their sacrifice in temporarily reducing local deer numbers is helping to protect the health of deer throughout the state.” She added that MDC will continue working with hunters and landowners to test harvested free-ranging deer for CWD during future deer seasons. Missouri offers some of the best deer hunting in the country, and deer hunting is an important part of many Missourians’ lives and family traditions. Infectious diseases such as CWD could reduce hunting and wildlife-watching opportunities for Missouri’s nearly 520,000 deer hunters and almost two million wildlife watchers. Deer hunting is also an important economic driver in Missouri and gives a $1 billion annual boost to state and local economies. Lower deer numbers from infectious diseases such as CWD could hurt 12,000 Missouri jobs and many businesses that rely on deer hunting as a significant source of revenue, such as meat processors, taxidermists, hotels, restaurants, sporting goods stores, and others. CWD also threatens the investments of thousands of private land-

owners who manage their land for deer and deer hunting, and who rely on deer and deer hunting to maintain property values. Chronic wasting disease infects only deer and other members of the deer family by causing degeneration of the brain. The disease has no vaccine or cure and is 100-percent fatal. CWD is spread both directly from deer to deer and indirectly to deer from infected soil and other surfaces. Deer and other

Clinic Items will be displayed in the gym of the First Baptist Church on Friday, March 28th from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday, March 29th from 9:00 a.m. until the dinner closes that evening. Visit as often as you wish to check your bids’ standing. Donations are being

cervids can have CWD for several years without showing any symptoms. Once symptoms are visible, infected animals typically die within one or two months. Once well established in an area, CWD has been shown to be impossible to eradicate. For more information on CWD, including what MDC is doing to limit the spread, and what hunters and others can do to help, go online to mdc.mo.gov/node/16478.

From Page One

accepted from local and area businesses, craftsmen, quilters and seamstresses. You do not need to attend the meal to participate in the silent auction. For more information on the silent auction contact Midge Hall at 417-362-0284 or Joan Bailey at 417-247-8404.

Local boutique donates dresses for prom

Missouri caps season with NIT appearance by Benjamin Herrold Sports Columnist Missouri’s NCAA Tournament hopes were dashed for good in Atlanta last Friday, when the Tigers fell 72-49 to Florida in the SEC Tournament quarterfinals. Missouri (22-11) hung tough with the No. 1 Gators for about 30 minutes, but Florida pulled away in the final 10 minutes. The game came the day after Missouri’s double overtime win against Texas A&M. Missouri’s loss to Florida was a nice effort, but also a reminder that Florida, which went 21-0 against SEC teams this season, is one of the nation’s most complete teams. For the first time since 2008, Missouri’s name wasn’t called on the NCAA Tournament’s Selection Sunday. It broke a string of five straight NCAA Tournament appearances by the Tigers, which tied for the longest streak in school his-

tory. Missouri has made the tournament 26 times altogether, but appearance number 27 will have to wait until at least next year. Missouri was selected to play in the second-tier National Invitational Tournament. The NIT does have a lot of history, if not very much prestige these days. Heading into this year’s edition, Missouri is just 1-7 in the NIT, although as a 2 seed the Tigers have a decent chance to make a run in the tournament. The teams in Missouri’s quarter of the bracket are certainly manageable, as one would expect in the NIT. But an inability to take care of manageable opponents is why Missouri is in the NIT. Still, beating Davidson, Southern Miss or Toledo and then one of Minnesota, High Point, St. Mary’s or Utah is all it would take to get to the NIT’s final four, at world-famous Madi-

son Square Garden in New York City. But the NIT is less about matchups and more about simply seeing the Tigers play good basketball. Play hard, play reasonably smart, win a few games and give some positive final note to what has been at times a frustrating season. Making a run in the NIT isn’t cause for throwing a parade, but it beats playing poorly in the NIT. Should the Tigers make a run to the NIT’s final four, playing at storied old Madison Square Garden would be a great experience for them and some nice exposure for the program. And hey, as challenging as this season was, the NIT brings another chance or two to see the Tigers in action at Mizzou Arena, and a fairly cheap chance at that. Regardless of what happens in the NIT, the story of this season has been written, of course. Even if they won’t

make it every year, the Tigers’ goal going into each season should be to get into the NCAA Tournament, and they had a few too many bad losses to make that happen this year. Next year will be a big year for Missouri, trying to get back into the NCAA Tournament and avoid getting too much negative momentum for the program. The NIT may not be much consolation, but it’s a chance to get a leg up on building some positive momentum.

Prom Dress Donations - Rosietish Boutique in Mountain View will be donating 26 prom dresses to area students at Liberty High School. The drive was held at the store during the month of February. Customers who brought in a prom dress received 15% off the purchase price of a new prom dress. Owner Latisha Yates matched every dress donated with a dress from the store. Dresses are still being accepted at the store and Yates commented that she will still match dress for dress on donations. If any schools would like to be included in the prom dress donations, contact Rosietish Boutique at 417-274-1911. “We would like to continue this and make it something huge for the area,” explained Yates. Pictured above showing off the donated dresses is Chelsea Talbert. (Photo: Standard/ Wagner)

Talons take first in tourney

First - The Tri-County Talons 18s team competed in a tournament held Saturday, March 8th at Fair Grove. The 18s team took First in gold. Pictured above, back row, left to right, Coach Kayla Smith, Brenley Stearns, Brook Conway, Cheyenne Day, Johanna Walkup and Kylie Acklin. Front row, left to right, MaKayla Elliott, Kaitlyn Raith and Courtney Thomas. (Photo provided to the Standard)

Grizzly Cheer Team clinics, tryouts set Area high school seniors and Missouri State University-West Plains students interested in trying out for the 2014-2015 Grizzly Cheer Team are invited to attend the clinics from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Friday, April 4, and 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Saturday, April 5, at the Missouri StateWest Plains Student Recreation Center, 323 W. Trish Knight St. Cheer team hopefuls must attend at least one of these two clinics to try out for the squad, Cheer Team Coach Keena Simpson said. Attendance at both clinics is preferred, she added. In addition to preparing for tryouts, these sessions will give student ath-

letes the opportunity to learn more about the demands of college cheerleading and begin learning the basics necessary to be successful collegiate cheerleaders, Simpson said. Tryouts will begin at 2:00 p.m. Saturday, April 5, at the recreation center. Seven men and seven women will be chosen at this time. “We would like any and all area high school seniors, men and women, interested in becoming a Grizzly cheerleader to attend the clinics and tryout,” Simpson said. “We also invite any current Missouri StateWest Plains students who are interested in cheerleading. Former Grizzly cheerleaders

who would like to help with the clinics and tryout are welcome to attend, as well.” Cheer team members receive a $500 scholarship each year for being part of the team, Cheer Team Coordinator Rachel Peterson said. The cheer team attends home games and matches for both the Grizzly volleyball and Grizzly basketball teams, as well as some away games and community and university events. No experience is necessary to try out. For more information, including tryout requirements, contact Peterson at 417-255-7978 or visit the Grizzly Cheer Team website at http:// www.wp.missouristate.edu/ cheerteam/default.htm.


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Mountain View Police Department reports are printed directly off reports provided by the Mountain View Police Department and are public record. Persons arrested for criminal offenses, or charges set forth in an indictment, are merely accusations and they are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

CITATIONS Monday, March 10, 2014 Morgan B. Mullery, 22 of Union, MO, was issued a citation for speeding. Wednesday, March 12, 2014 Kevin Carson Horton, 29 of Mountain View, MO, was issued citations for failure to show proof of insurance, knowingly driving while license is suspended/revoked and failure to register a motor vehicle. Thursday, March 13, 2014 Thomas Nelson Thompson, 60 of Mountain View, MO, was issued a citation for failure to wear seatbelt. Friday, March 14, 2014 Tomas Hernandez Salinas, 38 of Birch Tree, MO, was issued citations for driving with no valid driver’s license and failure to wear seatbelt. Kelly Rae Lewis, 28 of Hollister, MO, was issued a citation for failure to register a motor vehicle. Kimberly Marie Randolph, 43 of Birch Tree, MO, was issued a citation for failure to obey a stop sign. Corey J. Curtis Haas, 27 of Willow Springs, MO, was issued a citation for failure to register a motor vehicle. Mary Kathleen Dodd, 51 of Brentwood, TN, was issued a citation for speeding. Owen Dewayne Taber, 29 of Mountain View, MO, was issued a citation for failure to obey a stop sign. Rebecca A. Cooke, 59 of Oxly, MO, was issued a citation for failure to show proof of insurance. Jennifer A. Collins, 36 of Birch Tree, MO, was issued a citation for speeding. Saturday, March 15, 2014 Inna Grigoryevna Pavlova, 18 of Willow Springs, MO, was issued a citation for possession or purchase of intoxicants by a minor. Nataliya Y. Shkinder, 26 of Sioux Falls, SD, was issued a citation for speeding. Charles Lawerence Lee, III, 19 of Walland, TN, was issued a citation for speeding. Blaine Taylor Lawson, 19 of Mountain View, MO, was issued a citation for failure to wear seatbelt. Jason Lawredence Beauford, 43 of Wewoka, OK, was issued a citation for failure to register a motor vehicle. Sunday, March 16, 2014 Stevi Simone Jessica Penrod, 20 of Sacramento, CA, was issued a citation for speeding. Wynesther P. Cousins, 38 of Houlka, MS, was issued a citation for speeding. INCIDENTS Monday, March 10, 2014 Officers responded to a report of two small children accidentally locked inside a vehicle. Officers responded to a two-vehicle accident. Driver of vehicle was transported to Mercy EMS for minor injuries. Tuesday, March 11, 2014 Officers were advised of a female subject residing at the James Street Apartments who was having suicidal thoughts. She wished to seek treatment on her own accord. Officers arrived and secured the scene for EMS. EMS transported the female subject to OMC in West Plains. Officers were advised of a possible burglary at Joshua Street. Officers arrived and spoke with a male subject who resided there. He stated that he had arrived home from work and saw that his garage door was open as well as the gate to his backyard. The residence was searched and cleared, no contact was made. The male subject did a walk through of the residence and advised that no items were missing. Wednesday, March 12, 2014 Alarm company called and advised that a burglar alarm went off at Casey’s and individual that answered the phone gave incorrect credentials. Checked it out and it was a new employee arriving to make donuts. An individual came in after court and wanted to know if the could get a ride to their house. Officers gave him a ride to city limits. Report of $48.92 in diesel fuel was pumped and driver left without paying at Signal. A female from out of state called to report possible animal abuse. Report was that a dog was attacking suspects chickens and suspect shot and hit dog on the head with the gun. Unknown location of occurrence. Thursday, March 13, 2014 Officers did an ambulance assist at 4th Street. Saturday, March 15, 2014 Alarm at Casey’s, all was okay, one of the workers was in the store and it was check out all was okay. Officers responded to an alarm at Walgreen’s Pharmacy. Officers responded to an alarm at U.S. Cellular. Sunday, March 16, 2014 A traffic stop was conducted on U.S. 60 West. The driver was arrested for suspicion of driving while in an intoxicated or drugged condition. the individual was later released to another party. Monday, March 17, 2014 An individual came in and advised that him and his ex-wife got into a dispute due to her drinking. He advised that she shoved him but didn’t wish to pursue charges.

The Standard News

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Reports He is currently being held without bond. Andrew James Cole, 26 of West Plains, MO, was arrested for probation violation. He is currently being held without bond. Jacob Adam Counts, 29 of Willow Springs, MO, was arrested on a Willow Springs Warrant for misdemeanor failure to appear. He is currently being held on a $5,231.90 bond. Shane Mitchell Linstrom, 20 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for misdemeanor failure to appear. He is currently being held on a $1,000 bond. Jeremy Lynn Eades, 26 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on

From Page Six a Howell County Warrant for court clerk failed to perform act or duty. He is currently being held without bond. Friday, March 14, 2014 Missie Joe Collins, 39 of Bucyrus, MO, was arrested on a Texas County Warrant for 2 counts of felony failure to appear. She was transferred to Texas County on 3-15-14. Adnan Mohammed Almakrami, 25 of Kansas City, MO, was arrested on a Clay County Warrant for misdemeanor failure to appear. He bonded out on 3-14-14. Joseph Dewayne Holek, 25 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for

Letter to the Editor:

Closing of Doe Run’s Herculaneum Smelter Dear Editor Once again Representative Jason Smith has been busy spreading misinformation and untruths about the closing of Doe Run’s Herculaneum Smelter earlier this year It conveniently helps his rant against government regulations. I suspect he thinks this will gather him votes to get re-elected this year. Smith is sorely ill-informed. For more than 110 years, Doe Run and its predecessor, St. Joe Lead, had few regulations to restrict their behavior. Day and night that smelter belched out fumes of lead, cadmium, arsenic and other toxic compounds. By 2001, lead dust was clearly visible on the streets of Herky. When the EPA was formed in the ’70s, it set the national ambient air quality standard for lead. It was based on a THEN acceptable blood lead standard. In the intervening time, the EPA failed to revise that air standard every five years, as it was supposed to. In 1990, sound science lowered the blood-lead standard and the EPA again failed to revise its standard. Science has now found that no blood-lead levels are acceptable. Doe Run also had ample opportunity to either upgrade their old dinosaur of a smelter or replace it with a totally new process that IS much less polluting. It was Doe Run and billionaire Ira Rennert who decided not to improve their processing of lead. They were the ones to send their lead ore to China and have been doing so since early in the 21st century A federal court agreed with a 2007 citizen lawsuit that the EPA was negligent regarding air lead standards. Instead of upgrading its smelter or changing the process, Doe Run chose to close and send its lead concentrate and jobs to China to poison people there. Rep. Smith needs to upgrade his ideas on the regulation of lead. Sincerely, Tom Kruzen Ozark Riverkeepers Mountain View, MO

tampering-2nd degree. He bonded out on 3-16-14 and is to appear in court on 3-31-14. Blake Auston Lox, 17 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for DWI-alcohol intoxication and minor visibly intoxicated. He was released on a summons on 3-14-14 and is to appear in court on 4-21-14. Jerry James Drake, 28 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for domestic assault-2nd degree. He is currently being held on a $30,000 bond. Magen J. Tackitt, 20 of West Plains, MO, was arrested for peace disturbance. She bonded out on 3-15-14. Shirley Ann Brown, 21 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for probation violation. She is currently being held without bond. Kimberly Ann Schneider, 47 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for misdemeanor failure to appear. She is currently being held without bond. Saturday, March 15, 2014 Bradley David Jump, 38 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for trafficking in drugs/attempt to traffic-2nd degree. He is currently being held on a $100,000 bond. Nathanial Isacc Cash, 20 of Mountain View, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for felony stealing. He is currently being held without bond. Robert A. Smith, 33 of

Norwood, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for 5 counts of forgery. He is currently being held without bond. Jason Paul Emmel, 32 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for assault-1st degree. He is currently being held without bond. Lacey Ranel Smith, 30 of Winona, MO, was arrested on a Carter County Warrant for operating a motor vehicle on highway without valid license. She is currently being held on a $1,000 bond. Joshua Paul Sandy, 44 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for misdemeanor failure to appear. He is currently being held on a $2,500 bond. Christian Nathaniel Graves, 32 of Cabool, MO, was arrested on a Texas County Warrant for driving while revoked/suspended and failure to register a motor vehicle annually. He bonded out on 3-15-14 and is to appear in court on 5-5-14. Travis Wayne Brown, 33 of West Plains, MO, was arrested on a Howell County Warrant for misdemeanor failure to appear and a West Plains Warrant for felony failure to appear. He bonded out on 3-1514 and is to appear in court on 3-20-14. Sunday, March 16, 2014 Ashley Nicole Osgood, 28 of West Plains, MO, was arrested for unlawful use of drug paraphernalia. She was released on a summons on 3-16-14 and is to appear in court on 4-21-14.

Lifeguard course April 7-12 The Missouri State UniversityWest Plains University/Community Programs (U/CP) Department will host a lifeguard course April 7-12 at the West Plains Civic Center. The course is part of the Jeff Ellis and Associates International Lifeguard Training Program (ILTP). Candidates must pass a written exam with a score of 80 percent or higher, pass individual technical performance exams and pass simulation practical exams to qualify for licensing.

There is a $115 fee for the course, which covers an online course and test, a completion card and tuition costs. Only 16 students will be accepted. Missouri State-West Plains Aquatics and Wellness Coordinator Keri Elrod said this is a great opportunity for area residents who may be interested in a summer job at one of the area pools to obtain the required ILTP certification. For more information or to register, call the U/CP office at 417-255-7966.

Area businesses, individuals donating items for annual auction Items are quickly coming in from area businesses and individuals for Missouri State University-West Plains’ 20th annual auction set for April 11 at the West Plains Opera House. Organizers said each year the community rallies to sup-

port the event, which raises thousands of dollars to help the campus grow and provide the best possible education for area students. The auction will begin at 6:00 p.m., with doors opening at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are $35 per person, or $350 re-

serves table seating and tickets for eight individuals. Guests are asked to wear semiformal attire. The event’s theme this year is “Mad Hat,” and everyone is encouraged to wear his or her favorite fun hat, organizers said.

Free adult education, literacy (GED) classes The Houston AEL/HSE Program offers free Adult Education and Literacy (AEL) classes in your community. AEL provides a flexible classroom setting where adults who are at least 16 years of age have the opportunity to learn at their own pace.

Our classes offer individualized learning assistance for a variety of interests. Many students who participate in the AEL/HSE program are preparing for the High School Equivalency (HSE) test. AEL/HSE classes are free to the student and are funded by the state and federal govern-

ments. Interested students can stop by during class hours. Classes are available Tuesday -Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to noon in Methodist Church Fellowship Hall at the corner of Oak and Third Street, Birch Tree, Missouri, or contact the instructor at 573-226-3462.

Letter to the Editor:

Tragedy of the Commons Dear Editor: One of the themes of the Republican party is there are too many regulations. Our U.S. congressman, Jason Smith, said he knows there are too many because there are lots of pages! What nonsense. There is a story about the Inuits of Alaska being asked what they feared most? They had much to fear from polar bears to cold to stormy seas. They answered, “We fear most the heedless ones amongst us.” The heedless ones amongst us are also a threat to us. We can consider if certain regulations make sense by honestly looking at costs and benefits and seeing how they may help promote the greatest good for the greatest number. Many situations require regulations in order to avoid the “tragedy of the commons.” (“The tragedy of the commons is an economics theory by Garrett Hardin, ac-

cording to which individuals, acting independently and rationally according to each one’s self-interest, behave contrary to the whole group’s long-term best interests by depleting some common resource.” Wikipedia) There are many examples of this in history – from the collapse of the Easter Island civilization to the collapse of the cod and herring fisheries. To avoid the tragedy of the commons there needs to be rules that can be enforced to make users of the commons behave in the group’s long term interest rather than in their individual short term interest. Especially in our predatory capitalistic economic system there is pressure to use the commons first and as completely as possible before others do. The rules to protect the commons can be made by a cooperative of users or by a government body, but there need to be rules based on scientifically valid evidence, not conjecture and

wishful thinking (is that really thinking?) or historical practice. Only through understanding the complex interactions of real world systems can we expect to make good decisions. Locally we have two issues that are impacted by a debate about regulations: The National Scenic Riverways management plan and new regulations for new wood burning stoves. As we debate these issues we need to recognize that the commons are threatened by individuals whose actions are uninformed and only recognize the individual’s short term needs. We already see the degrading of the Scenic Riverways by actions of the heedless ones amongst us. Our clean air is degraded by the use of poor quality stoves. We need to consider the long term costs to the commons versus the short term costs to the individual. We need some “commons sense.” Jim Vokac Willow Springs

It’s not too late for area businesses and individuals to donate, organizers said. “We are always looking for new items to spark the interest of our guests,” said Barbara Nyden, assistant professor of accounting/entrepreneurship and a member of the auction committee. “There are no items too small, too large or too unique to be included in the auction.” The event is being sponsored by the West Plains Opera House, FMC Transport, Landmark Bank, Burton Creek Pharmacy, E-Communications, Gammill Quilting Systems, Grisham Properties, Ozark Independent Living, Penmac, Physical Therapy Specialists Clinic and Sheridan & Sheridan. Those wishing to donate items, become a sponsor or purchase tickets can call the Missouri State-West Plains development office at 417255-7240 or e-mail WPDevelopment@MissouriState.edu. To take a sneak peek at the current list of auction items, v i s i t www.wp.missouristate.edu/ development/auction.htm or www.facebook.com/ MSUWPAuction.

Chili supper, pie auction

A chili and soup supper will be held on Friday, April 4, 2014 at 5:00 p.m. at the Mountain View Senior Center located at 903 East Fifth Street. The supper will be a goodwill donation followed by a pie auction at 5:30 p.m. All the money raised will go towards the Mountain View Senior Center. If you are interested in making a donation or bringing a pie to the auction, contact 417-934-6504. All donations will be greatly appreciated.


Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Health Strategies for Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease Dear Savvy Senior, Are there any proven strategies to preventing dementia? My 80-year-old mother has Alzheimer’s which has me wondering if there is anything I can do to protect myself. Concerned at 53 Dear Concerned, While there’s currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, new research indicates that there are a number of healthy lifestyle strategies that can help most people reduce the risk of getting it. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, the key factors that increase the risk of getting Alzheimer’s are advanced age, family history and heredity, but research shows that our general health plays a factor too. While we can’t do much about our age, family or genes, we do have control over how we treat our body and brain. Some medical experts even estimate that by following these healthy tips now in middle-age, you can actually reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer’s by as much as 50 percent, or at least delay its onset by a few years. Here are the recommended strategies. Manage health problems: Studies have consistently shown that Alzheimer’s disease is closely related to conditions, like diabetes and heart disease. So, if you have high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes you need to treat them with lifestyle changes and medication (if necessary) and get them under control. Left untreated, these diseases over time will cause damage to the vessels that feed blood to the brain making them more vulnerable to damage, and increasing your risk of dementia. Exercise: Aerobic exercise increases blood flow to all parts of your body, including your brain, to keep the brain cells well nourished. So choose an aerobic activity you enjoy like walking, cycling, dancing, swimming, etc., that elevates your heart

The Standard News rate and do it for at least 30 to 40 minutes three times a week. Eat healthy: A heart-healthy diet, like the Mediterranean diet, will also help protect the brain. A Mediterranean diet includes relatively little red meat and emphasizes whole grains, fruits and vegetables, fish and shellfish, and nuts, olive oil and other healthy fats. Also keep processed foods and sweets to a minimum. Sleep well: Quality, restful sleep contributes to brain health too. Typically, adults should get between seven and nine hours of sleep daily. If you have persistent problems sleeping, you need to identify and address the problem. Medications, latenight exercise and alcohol can interfere with sleep quality and length, as can arthritis pain, sleep apnea and restless leg syndrome. If you need help, make an appointment with a sleep specialist (see sleepeducation.com) who will probably recommend an overnight diagnostic sleep test. Challenge your brain: Research shows that mind challenging activities can help improve memory, slow age-related mental decline and even build a stronger brain. But, be aware that mind-challenging activities consist of things you aren’t accustomed to doing. In other words, crossword puzzles aren’t enough to challenge your brain, if you’re already a regular puzzle doer. Instead, you need to pick up a new skill like learning to dance, play a musical instrument, study a new language or do math problems – something that’s challenging and a little outside your comfort zone. Brain-training websites like Lumosity.com and BrainHQ.com are excellent mind exercising tools because they continually adapt to your skill level to keep you challenged. Socializing and interacting with other people is another important way to stimulate the brain. So make a point to reach out and stay connected to friends, family and neighbors. Join a club, take a class or even volunteer – anything that enhances your social life. Reduce stress: Some stress is good for the brain, but too much can be toxic. There’s growing evidence that things like mindfulness meditation, yoga and tai chi are all good ways to help reduce stress. For more tips, call the National Institute on Aging at 800222-2225 and order a free copy of their booklet “Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease: What Do We Know?” Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book.

Mercy receptionist recognized for 25 years of service Debbie Reed began working at Mountain View clinic in 1988 A lot can depend on a first impression, but there’s no pressure if you’re receptionist Debbie Reed. For more than 25 years, her smile has greeted patients at Mercy Clinic General Surgery – Mountain View. “She’s just wonderful,” said Dr. Linda Milholen. “She puts people at ease. If I’m tied up in surgery, she keeps them informed. She has a good sense that if someone is sick, she’ll take them right to bed.” Today, Debbie continues to run the front desk at the clinic where she began at age 33. In 1988, before it joined Mercy, it was a private practice that also delivered babies. “As the years went by, those babies started bringing in their own babies for check-ups,” added Debbie. “It’s gone by so fast. It feels like I started yesterday.”

To mark Debbie’s dedication, Dr. Milholen presented her with an award and flowers – but Dr. Milholen says the true gift has been Debbie’s commitment and compassion. “She’ll be talking away with someone and it’s almost like she’s known that person her whole life. Now that’s a gift. She has never, ever met a stranger.” Of course, during her time at the clinic, Debbie met a few roadblocks. “I began by typing Medicare and Medicaid forms. Back then, everything was on paper,” said Debbie, who has remained a receptionist for most of her tenure. “Trust me, I didn’t want to update to this computer system – I wanted a paper chart! – but now I really do like it better.” “And she really loves kids,” explained Dr. Milholen. “She

is 11 times a grandmother, which is one of her biggest assets in the office. If someone brings in a child, Debbie gets out her box of toys and coloring books and they go to town.” Debbie plans to dedicate another decade to Mercy before she retires to focus on her grandkids. “They’re each so unique. I find them fascinating and can’t wait to spend more time with them.”

Mercy St. Francis offers workshop on living a healthier life

Are you tired or hurting all the time? Don’t let chronic health problems drive what you can and cannot do. Mercy St. Francis Hospital, University of Missouri Extension – Houston, and the Mountain View Senior Center are sponsoring a free, six-week Health Care Management Course to help adults and family members manage chronic conditions. The self-management program, developed by Stanford University by the Patient Education Research Center, will include the following goals: - Improve your knowledge of living a healthy life with a chronic condition - Identify and learn the latest pain management approaches - Learn to manage fatigue and stress more effectively - Find solutions to problems caused by your condition - Identify ways to deal with anger, fear, frustration, depression - Discuss the role of exercise 25 Years of Service - Debbie Reed was recognized and nutrition in chronic disease

for 25 years of service at Mercy. She is pictured with Dr. Milholen. (Photo provided to the Standard)

Mercy Clinic General Surgery – Mountain View (100 W. US Highway 60) provides surgical and diagnostic procedures on an outpatient basis using the latest minimally invasive technologies, including high-definition monitors. Procedures include: upper GI surgery, gall bladder surgery, breast biopsy, colonoscopy, hernia repair, bronchoscopy, laparoscopic surgery and more.

management - Learn new ways to communicate with family and friends - Learn how to form a partnership with your health care team Classes will start Wednesday, April 2, in the Sisters Dining Room of Mercy St. Francis Hospital (100 W. US Highway 60). The weekly workshops will run from 10:00 a.m. to noon each Wednesday through May 7. Classes are highly participative, where mutual support and success builds confidence in participants’ ability to manage their health while maintaining active and fulfilling lives. Participants will also receive a free book, “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions.” The $20 fee for the course has been waived, thanks to a grant from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. While the course is free, you do need to pre-register; call (417) 934-7000 to get more information.

Hospice of Care provides training Texas County Memorial Hospital Hospice of Care will provide training for new Hospice of Care volunteers on Friday, March 21st. The training session is from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. in the Timmons Education Room of the hospital. Hospice of Care depends on volunteers to meet the needs of terminally ill patients and their

families. Volunteers provide direct services to patients as well as indirect services that support Hospice of Care staff with daily operations. Hospice of Care is a non-profit organization that offers care for the terminally ill. They assist in providing hospice care, supplies and equipment for patients and their families in Texas County and surrounding areas.

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FEBRUARY 2014 CITY/COUNTY INSPECTIONS Bamboo House, 508 E. Main, Willow Springs. Critical: 2 Mouse droppings observed in prep area cabinets near soda fountain; observed toxic items, cleaners, stored improperly in food prep table area – toxic items may not be stored on food prep counter. Non-critical: 3 Observed prep area hand sink inaccessible, blocked by container – sink must remain free of all items, used properly for hand washing; observed cabinets near soda fountain, floor behind fryer, cooking area in need of cleaning – excessive grease buildup behind fryer must be removed; many unnecessary items/clutter at counter by refrigerator/freezer in storeroom and in prep area – clean, organize and remove items not needed or used in food prep. Will re-inspect on 3-1314. Priority items must be corrected by: critical by 2-28-14 and non-critical by 3-13-14. Big Lots, 1362 Southern Hills, West Plains. *No violations observed*. Boys & Girls Club of West Plains Area, 613 W. First Street, West Plains. Critical: 0 Non-critical: 1 Place thermometers in all cold storage units to monitor temperature. Brenda’s Restaurant, 804 St. Louis St., West Plains. Critical: 0 Non-critical: 2 Observed prep and server coolers above 41° F at time of inspection; observed several ceiling tiles in need of replacement in prep/storage areas. Chantilly’s Bakery, 216 West Main, West Plains. Critical: 0 Non-critical: 1 Observed exposed wood in need of painting/ sealing. Christine Combs Home Kitchen, 508 Humas, West Plains. *No violations observed*. Dollar General, 1397 Bill Virdon, West Plains. Critical: 0 Non-critical: 1 Place thermometers in all cold storage units. Flash Market #381, 1243 St. Louis St., West Plains. Critical: 1 Observed leak under soda fountain cabinet (correct leak, clean entire area). Non-critical: 4 Observed walk-in cooler flooring in need of cleaning; observed lights missing end caps (not properly shielded) in walk-in cooler; observed restroom door not self-closing (replace spring to make door self-closing); observed prep/service area hand sink blocked or inaccessible. Will re-inspect in March. G & W Foods, 202 N. Ferguson, Willow Springs. Critical: 0 Non-critical: 2 Observed rotisserie/cooker in deli area in need of cleaning; observed ceiling tiles in back of store with water damage and ceiling in storeroom area in need of repair due to tearing. Hitchin Post Café, 12067 St. Rt. 101, Caulfield. Critical: 0 Non-critical: 2 Wood shelving in back storeroom not painted or sealed; lights not shielded properly in back storeroom. JB’s Health Mart, 1504 Preacher Roe, West Plains. *No violations observed*. Los Amigos Restaurant, 111 3rd St., Mtn. View. Critical: 1 Observed spray bottle with cleaner solution in ware wash area unlabeled – must label all spray bottles for proper identification (corrected on-site). Non-critical: 2 Observed utensils, spatula, used during food prep stored improperly on cloth towel when not in use (corrected on-site); observed frozen hamburger patties stored uncovered in upright freezer (store items covered, protected to prevent possible contamination). Mugs, 1101 E. Main, West Plains. Critical: 0 Non-critical: 1 Observed men’s restroom without paper towels at hand sink. Ryan’s Family Steakhouse, 1321 Preacher Roe, West Plains. Critical: 0 Non-critical: 3 Observed walk-in freezer floor, dry room shelving and server area flooring in need of cleaning; observed no paper towels at meat room hand sink; observed leaks at faucets of server area hand sink and bakery prep sink. Sole Café, 655 Missouri Ave., West Plains. Critical: 0 Noncritical: 1 Observed employee drinks in prep area without proper straw and lids. Tootsies & Tweetsies Tea Room, 1282 CR 8690, West Plains. Critical: 0 Non-critical: 1 Outside dumpster must be placed on non-absorbent (concrete pad) surface. Walgreen’s, 1010 Worley Drive, West Plains. Critical: 0 Non-critical: 1 Observed light out in walk-in cooler. West Plains Civic Center, 110 St. Louis St., West Plains. *No violations observed*. West Plains Police Department, 1912 Holiday Lane, West Plains. *No violations observed*. To view all the City and County restaurant inspections – go to our website at: www.howellcountyhealthdept.com

Dustin and Stephanie Tackitt, West Plains, are the parents of a baby girl, Sierra Morgan Tackitt, born at 1:26 p.m. Feb. 24 at Ozarks Medical Center (OMC). She weighed 6 pounds, 12 ounces and was 20 inches long. Her siblings are Julianna, 8, and Jasmine, 5. Grandparents are Dan and Arreaun Moody, Caulfield; Curtis and Margaret Tackitt, West Plains; and the late Patricia Moody. David and Christina Pruett, Mountain View, are the parents of a baby girl, Natatie Kay Pruett, born on Feb. 25 at OMC (no time given). She weighed 7 pounds, 15 1/2 ounces and was 21 1/2 inches long. Her siblings are Leah, 4, and Morgan, 2. Grandparents are David Tucker, Winona; Martha Murphy, Mountain View; and Joe and Susan Pruett, Mountain View. Kord Glenn and Emily Wake, Willow Springs, are the parents of a baby boy, Elijah Michael, born at 7:09 p.m. Feb. 27 at OMC. He weighed 7 pounds, 9 ounces and was 20 3/4 inches long. Grandparents are George and Carol Mulvey, and Kevin Glenn, all of Willow Springs. Mitchell Wilson and Sylvia Mallek, West Plains, are the parents of a baby girl, Alexis Danielle Wilson, born at 5:09 p.m. Feb. 28 at OMC. She weighed 6 pounds, 8 ounces and was 19 inches long. Her sibling is Whitney, 4. Grandparents are Pamela Bea, West Plains; Daniel Mallek, West Plains; and Mark and Cindy Wilson, Sharon, Tennessee. Brian and Daisy Hite, West Plains, are the parents of a baby boy, Elijah Lee Hite, born at 3:37 p.m. March 1 at OMC. He weighed 8 pounds, 15 1/2 ounces and was 19 inches long. His siblings are Gabriella, 9; Malcom, 7; Destiny, 4; Gabriel, 2; and Alexandra, 1. Grandparents are Gary and Jean Hodges, Thayer; Lisa Walker, Poplar Bluff; and Timothy Hite, the state of Arizona.


The Standard News

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014

MDC offers TRIM grants, workshops for community forest improvements The deadline for Tree Resource Improvement and Maintenance (TRIM) cost-share grant applications is June 1. The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) is offering grants to assist government agencies, public schools, and non-profit groups with the management, improvement, and conservation of trees and forests on public land. The Tree Resource Improvement and Maintenance (TRIM) cost-share grants range from $1,000 to $25,000 and can help communities fund tree inventories, removal or pruning of hazardous trees, tree planting, and the training of volunteers and city and county employees to best care for community forests.

Additional funding for emerald ash borer management is available through a grant from the U.S. Forest Service. The deadline for TRIM grant applications is June 1. To assist potential grant applicants, MDC will hold the following TRIM-grant workshops throughout the state. Registration is required for all workshops. - CAPE GIRARDEAU: March 21, 9:00 a.m. – noon, MDC Southeast Regional Office, 2302 County Park Drive. Contact MDC Urban Forester Rocky Hayes at 573-290-5730

Youth turkey hunting clinic offered Clinic will be held on April 5 at the Everhart Wilderness Lodge Hunters age 9 through 15 who want to learn about turkey hunting can register for a youth turkey hunting clinic to be held on April 5. The clinic is cosponsored by the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) and Everhart’s Wilderness Lodge. It will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the lodge, which is northwest of Clinton. The event gives young people a chance to learn from experienced turkey hunters about turkey hunting rules and regulations, firearms safety, shotgun patterning, choke and shot selection, calling, scouting, decoy use, and equipment. The free clinic includes ammunition and lunch.

Registration is limited to 40 youths. Each youth must be accompanied by an adult sponsor. Each adult may sponsor up to two youths. Youths are encouraged to bring shotguns. For more information or to register, call Johnny and Linda Everhart at 660-8855049. Other clinic sponsors include the Missouri State and Truman Lake Chapters of the National Wild Turkey Federation, past members Westside Missouri Waterfowl Association, Remington Ammunition, and Clinton Wal-Mart. For more information on spring turkey hunting, visit MDC online at mdc.mo.gov/ node/132.

or Rocky.Hayes@mdc.mo.gov. - MACON: March 25, 10:00 a.m. to noon, Macon County Fairgrounds Floral Hall, Hwy 63 in Macon. Contact MDC Resource Forester Kyle Monroe at 573-248-2508, or Kyle.Monroe@mdc.mo.gov. - JOPLIN: March 25, 9:00 a.m. to noon, Wildcat Glades Conservation and Audubon Center, 201 W. Riviera Drive. Contact MDC Urban Forester Jon Skinner at 417-629-3423 ext. 27, or Jon.Skinner@mdc.mo.gov. - SPRINGFIELD: March 27, 9:00 a.m. to noon, MDC Southwest Regional Office, 2630 N. Mayfair Ave. Contact MDC Urban Forester Cindy Garner at 417-895-6881 ext. 1632, or Cindy.Garner@mdc.mo.gov. - JEFFERSON CITY: March 28, 10:00 a.m. to noon, MDC Runge Nature Center, one-third of a mile north of Hwy 50 on Hwy 179. Contact MDC Resource Forester Cory Gregg at 573-796-0286 ext. 25 or Cory.Gregg@mdc.mo.gov. - KANSAS CITY: April 16, 10:00 a.m. to noon, Anita Gorman Discovery Center, 4750 Troost Ave. Contact MDC Urban Forester Wendy Sangster at 816-759.7305, or Wendy.Sangster@mdc.mo.gov. - KIRKWOOD: April 23 at 6:00 p.m., MDC Powder Valley Nature Center, 11715 Cragwold Road. Contact MDC Urban Forester Mark Grueber at 314301-1506, ext. 4210, or

Ozarks Fruit & Garden Review Pruning Peaches by Marilyn Odneal Horticulture Adviser We have saved the best for last – as far as pruning goes. Here at the Missouri State Fruit Experiment Station, peaches are the last crop we prune since they can be damaged if pruned too early in the dormant season. In a pinch, you can even prune peaches when they are blooming, but we hope to finish before then. Peaches are usually trained to the “open vase” system where the main scaffolds or limbs form a vase around an open center – like a bowl.

Peaches have flower buds only on 1-year-old wood that grew the previous season. This fruitful wood is colored red and you can see both fat flower and thin leaf buds on it. This fruitful wood should line the inside of the “bowl” close to the main scaffolds – but you need to thin out and shorten some of this wood in order to thin the peach crop. You only need 10 percent of the flower buds after pruning to set fruit in order to realize a full crop. We not only prune the trees to thin out some of the flower buds, we also thin the fruit in the growing season to further

Peach Pruning - The fruitful 1-year-old red wood on this peach tree grew the previous season and will bear fruit in the upcoming season. The older, unfruitful wood is a light blonde or silvery color and can be easily distinguished from the fruitful red wood. (Photo provided to the Standard)

decrease the crop. This is done so the peaches develop into large flavorful fruit, do not crowd each other, and so the weight of the fruit does not break the limbs. Head back the older blond wood that is in the bowl to the scaffold – leaving a little stub where new shoots can grow to renew the fruiting wood. We generally use more of the “heading” cuts, with the stub of old wood left, to get a local stimulation of new growth – the new growth that will bear fruit next year. Heading cuts remove the top part of a shoot and leave buds on the lower part that will break and grow, while the thinning cuts remove the shoot or branch to a point of origin. Just remember this color code. The red wood has the flower buds that will produce fruit in the upcoming season. When this wood bears fruit, new green shoots in the canopy will initiate flower buds and then turn red at the end of the season, ready to bear fruit next year. Older wood is blonde and does not have flower buds. When pruning keep in mind you need to keep the fruit (red wood) where it can be easily picked. The fruiting wood must be well exposed to sun as well as air, so the foliage and fruit dries off readily after rain or dew. Also remove any dead, diseased or broken branches to clean the canopy for a sweet and juicy harvest of peaches in summer. Direct comments or questions concerning this column to Marilyn Odneal via email at MarilynOdneal@missouristate.edu; write to Missouri State Fruit Experiment Station, 9740 Red Spring Road, Mountain Grove, Mo. 65711; or call (417) 547-7500. Visit our website at h t t p : / / mtngrv.missouristate.edu.

Mark.Grueber@mdc.mo.gov. TRIM grants are administered by MDC in cooperation with the Missouri Community Forest Council and the U.S. Forest Service. The program provides reimbursements of $1,000 to $25,000 to grant recipients to fund up to 60 percent of money needed for

projects. Projects located in communities with The Arbor Day Foundation’s Tree City USA designation are eligible for an additional 10 percent in matching funds. Proposals are assessed on a competitive basis for their value to the community, thoroughness

as a tree-management program, the ability to promote, improve and develop a community’s urban forest, and economic feasibility. Get more information on TRIM grants, including grant applications and workbooks, online at mdc.mo.gov/node/11123.

Grass tetany prevention The cold streak and extra snow this winter has made us all want spring to get here soon. For the cow/calf producer and backgrounder, having grass growing in the pasture will be a nice change from taking the hay out to the cattle. Even when the warmer temperatures come and no hay needing to be fed, there are still management considerations for the health of the herd. Many have never experienced grass tetany problems in the herd, but it is best to be cautious, especially with the current prices of cattle. When dealing with tetany, it helps to know the cause, clinical signs, and that it is much easier to prevent than to treat. Grass tetany is most common when cattle are grazing lush spring forages, such as cool-season grasses and small grains. Pastures with a large legume component are at a lesser danger. The cause is from the deficiency of magnesium (Mg) in the diet/forage and

forages high in potassium (K), low in calcium (Ca), and low in sodium (Na). Stressed, lactating, or older cattle are most likely to be affected. Signs that cattle are affected are nervousness, stagger or falling, and muscle contractions. Treatments must be administered quickly, within a few hours, to be most effective. If one thinks they have animals suffering from grass tetany, contact your veterinarian immediately. Due to the swiftness needed for treatments, measures taken to prevent tetany are much easier to manage. Since Mg is not stored in the body, supplementing high levels of Mg year round will not benefit during the spring flush of forage. Therefore, start supplementing a month before the normal grazing to avoid issues with early growth and have adequate levels in the blood stream to prevent tetany. Producers feeding a commercial mineral need to make sure it

contains approximately 10% Mg (Univ. of Arkansas Extension). A common mix one can supplement on their own is magnesium oxide, salt and either ground corn, dried molasses, or cotton seed meal, at a 1:1:1 ratio (Sexten, 2009). The carrier is needed due to the poor palatability of Mg oxide that can lead to less than desirable intake. Keeping supplements available on a daily basis during the time of need is necessary because blood levels can fall 48 hours after the supplementation has stopped (KSU Extension). Recent cattle prices have made even the old cow with her last calf a valuable contributor to the herd. Planning accordingly will allow for the least amount of problems this spring and hopefully a more profitable year. For questions or comments, please contact Logan Wallace at the Howell County Extension Center at wallaceld@missouri.edu or 417-256-2391.

Feeder Cattle Auction Report for 03/11/2014 Receipts: 3506 Last week: No Sale Year Ago: 3704 No sale last week due to ice and snow. Compared to the last feeder sale of 2 weeks ago, feeder steers were 10.00 higher with 300-500 weights 15.00 higher. Feeder heifers were 3.00-6.00 higher. Demand was good to very good, especially on thin fleshed calves. Supply was moderate and consisted of 57 percent steers, 4 percent bulls and 39 percent heifers. Near 50 percent of the offering weighed over 600 lbs. Feeder Steers: Medium and Large 1 300-350 lbs 242.50272.50; 350-400 lbs 235.00260.00, few 340 lbs thin fleshed 270.00; 400-450 lbs 227.00-245.00; 450-500 lbs 222.50-242.00; 500-550 lbs 214.00-230.00, few 510 lbs fancy 240.00; 550-600 lbs 195.00-211.00; 600-650 lbs 189.00-206.00, fleshy 187.00188.00; 650-700 lbs 184.00197.00; 700-750 lbs 178.00187.00; 750-800 lbs 166.00175.00, fleshy 162.00-165.00; 800-850 lbs 162.50-167.00; 900-950 lbs 151.00-153.00. Medium and Large 1-2 300400 lbs 224.00-238.00, thin fleshed 240.00-241.00; 400500 lbs 210.00-226.00;500550 lbs 197.50-215.00; 550600 lbs 185.00-207.00; 600650 lbs 185.00-190.00; 650700 lbs 177.50-185.00; 700750 lbs 168.00-177.00; 750800 lbs 155.00-163.00; 800900 lbs 148.50-160.00; 9001000 lbs 141.00-147.00; Pkg 10 hd 1124 lbs 139.00. Medium and Large 2 300-400 lbs 210.00-222.50; 400-500 lbs 190.00-215.00; 500-550 lbs 177.50-190.00; 550-600 lbs 167.50-180.00; 600-700 lbs 160.00-175.00; 700-750 lbs 154.00-159.00. Feeder Holstein: Steers Large 3 450-500 lbs 132.50140.00; 600-700 lbs 130.00131.50; Few 790 lbs 113.00; 850-900 lbs 110.00-117.00. Feeder Heifers: Medium and

Large 1 300-350 lbs 215.00230.00; 350-400 lbs 207.50220.00, pkg 7 hd 370 lbs fancy 231.00, pkg 9 hd 355 lbs thin fleshed 237.50; 400450 lbs 197.50-217.50; 450500 lbs 190.00-205.00; 500550 lbs 187.50-205.00, fleshy 185.00-187.00; 550-600 lbs 182.00-196.00; 600-700 lbs 162.50-178.00; 700-750 lbs 157.00-166.00; 750-800 lbs 151.50-158.00; 800-850 lbs 145.00-150.00, pkg 11 hd 808 lbs replacement heifers 155.00; few 880 lbs 139.00; Pkg 10 hd 984 lbs 133.50. Medium and Large 1-2 300350 lbs 200.00-205.00, thin fleshed 222.50-227.50; 350400 lbs 195.00-210.00; 400450 lbs 187.50-203.00; 450500 lbs 177.50-191.00; 500600 lbs 170.00-187.50; 600700 lbs 152.50-167.00; 700800 lbs 145.00-154.00; few 812 lbs 130.00. Medium and Large 2 300-400 lbs 175.00190.00; 400-500 lbs 162.50175.00; 500-600 lbs 155.00170.00; 600-650 lbs 145.00157.50; 650-700 lbs 137.00145.00; 700-750 lbs 135.00139.00. Feeder Bulls: Medium and Large 1 350-400 lbs 226.00236.00; 400-450 lbs 225.00239.00; 450-500 lbs 213.00220.00; 500-550 lbs 215.00220.00; 550-600 lbs 190.00200.00; 600-700 lbs 170.00186.00; 700-750 lbs 162.00166.00. Medium and Large 12 400-450 lbs 200.00-215.00; 450-500 lbs 190.00-205.00; 500-600 lbs 179.00-197.50; 600-700 lbs 161.00-171.00; few 863 lbs 130.00. Cow and Bull Auction Report for 03/12/2014 Receipts: 809 Last Week: 290 Last Year: 850 Compared to last week’s lightly tested sale, slaughter cows and bulls traded 3.005.00 higher. Supply was moderate and consisted of 49 percent slaughter cows, 32 percent bred cows, 8 percent slaughter bulls, 6 percent stocker/feeder cows and 6

percent cow/calf pairs. Demand was good. Slaughter Cows: Percent Lean Average Dressing High Dressing Low Dressing Breaking 70-80 95.00105.50 102.50-122.50 86.50-95.00 Outstanding Individual 127.50 Boning 80-85 92.50105.00 103.00-120.00 85.00-93.50 Lean 85-90 85.0097.00 96.00-109.00 70.00-87.50 Slaughter Bulls: Yield Grade 1-2 1155-2290 lbs 108.00-114.00, high dressing 115.00-127.00, outstanding individual 130.00, low dressing 98.00-109.00. Bred Cows: Medium and Large 1-2 3-6 yrs 1120-1495 lbs 2nd and 3rd stage 1575.00-1875.00 per head, 2 pkgs totaling 15 hd 4-6 yrs 1170-1295 lbs in 2nd and 3rd stage 1925.00-1950.00 per head, 2-6 yrs 995-1435 lbs in 1st stage 1350.00-1500.00 per head, 7 yrs to brokenmouth 1040-1530 lbs 2nd and 3rd stage 1475.00-1625.00 per head. Medium and Large 2 4 yrs to short-solid 8901262 lbs 2nd and 3rd stage 1125.00-1350.00 per head. Medium 2 3 yrs to short-solid 750-1075 lbs 2nd and 3rd stage 925.00-1125.00 per head. Stocker and Feeder Cows: Medium and Large 1-2 2-5 yrs 620-1120 lbs open or unchecked cows and heiferettes 110.00-125.00 per cwt; Cow-Calf Pairs: Medium and Large 1-2 4-6 yrs 9351095 lbs with 200-300 lb calves 1825.00-2125.00 per pair, pkg 10 pairs 4-6 yrs 1025 lbs 150 lbs calves 1925.00 per pair. Medium and Large 2 37 yrs 950-1120 lbs with 125150 lb calves 1475.001600.00 per pair. Medium 2 5-7 yrs 850-990 lbs with 100 lb calves 825.00-1075.00 per pair.


Wednesday, March 19, 2014

2007 Chevy Crew, 4x4, LT, loaded, leather! Woolsey Auto Sales 417-934-6887

STEEL BUILDINGS used for Garages, Shelters, even Homes must GO! Save THOUSANDS on Cancelled orders. LOW monthly payments available. CALL NOW 1-800-991-9251 LINDSAY 3-19-14-1t-SWC

3-bedroom home for rent. $600 a month plus deposit. 417-247-5620. 3-19-14-2t-pd

2005 Ford Freestyle, nice car, loaded,good tires,third row seat, $5,900. Woolsey Auto Sales 417-934-6887 3-bedroom, 2-bath home on 300 East 6th Street in Mountain View. New heat pump & HVAC system in 2007, new roof in 2009, newer 350 square foot shop in 2010. Nice home, $64,000. Motivated seller. Call 417-2475503. 2-5-14-tfn-pd

The Standard News

Mountain View Healthcare is accepting applications for an activity aide position. Apply in person at 1211 N. Ash, Mtn. View. MVHC is an EEO employer. 3-19-14-1t-acct

Coordinator P/T: Provide support and activities for high school exchange students. Volunteer hosts also needed. Apply online: www.aspectfoundation.org 3-19-14-1t-SWC

The Department of Economic Development is seeking to fill several Workforce Development Specialist I - Veteran Representative positions. Please view complete job announcement at w w w. d e d . m o . g o v / D E D / DEDJobs.aspx. 3-19-14-1t-SWC

DRIVE THE BEST. DRIVE MAVERICK! MAVERICK NOW HIRING IN YOUR AREA!! OTR, regional & dedicated. Exp. drivers or students with Class A-CDL for training. New student spots just opened. Great pay & home time. 2002 Chrysler PT Cruiser, Flatbed, glass and reefer. 142xxx miles, maroon in Must be 21 yrs. old & hold color, 4cyl., auto., $3,500. Class A-CDL. 1-800-289Woolsey Auto Sales 1 1 0 0 . 417-934-6887 Part-time housekeeper www.drivemaverick.com 3-19-14-1t-SWC needed. Must be available on weekends. Apply in person only at Comfort Inn, 1204 East Main Street, Willow Springs, NEED CLASS A CDL TRAINMO. 3-19-14-2t-acct ING? Start a CAREER in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses Energy Wellness Natural and offer “Best-In-Class” Pain Relief Center. Doing the impossible every day. Call for Bunker Hill is accepting ap- training. *New Academy free consultation. 417-372- plications for the following Classes Weekly *No Money positions: Housekeeping, Down or Credit Check *Certi3789. 3-19-14-4t-pd kitchen and dining room staff. fied Mentors Ready and AvailIf interested, please call at able *Paid (while training with 417-934-2333, email at Mentor) *Regional and Dedibunkerhill@msta.org, or ap- cated Opportunities *Great ply in person Monday, March Career Path *Excellent Ben24th from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 efits Package Please Call: (520) 226-4562 p.m. 3-19-14-1t-SWC 3-19-14-1t-pd

OTR Drivers needed for Solo & Team Positions. Midwest and West Coast Traffic Lanes, Competitive pay, Assigned 2013 & 2014 Kenworths. Safety/Productivity Incentives, Consistent Miles. Call 800-645-3748. 3-19-14-1t-SWC

TanTara Transportation is now hiring OTR Company Flatbed Drivers and Owner Operators. Competitive Pay and Home Time. Call us @ 800-640-0292 or apply online at www.tantara.us 3-19-14-1t-SWC

Drivers: CDL-A Train and work for us! Professional, focused CDL training available. Choose Company Driver, Owner Operators, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. (877) 3 6 9 - 7 8 9 1 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com 3-19-14-1t-SWC

“Partners in Excellence” OTR Drivers, APU Equipped PrePass EZ-pass passenger policy. 2012 & Newer equipment. 100% NO Touch. Butler Transport 1-800-5287 8 2 5 www.butlertransport.com 3-19-14-1t-SWC

Train to be a PROFESSIONAL TRUCK DRIVER through Prime’s Student Driver Program. Obtain your Commercial Driver’s License, then get paid while training! 1-800277-0212 driveforprime.com 3-19-14-1t-SWC

MISSOURI WELDING INSTITUTE, INC. Nevada, Missouri. Become a Certified Pipe and Structural Welder. Earn top pay in 18 weeks. Many companies seek our graduates. 1 - 8 0 0 - 6 6 7 - 5 8 8 5 . www.mwi.ws 3-19-14-1t-SWC

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF HOWELL COUNTY, MISSOURI PROBATE DIVISION In the Estate of MEYER M. SHEMARIA, Estate Number 14AL-PR00019 Deceased NOTICE OF LETTERS

Page 11

TESTAMENTARY GRANTED TO All PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF MEYER M. SHEMARIA, deceased: On the 5th day of March, 2014, the Last Will and Testament of the decedent having been admitted to probate, Joseph Crawford Ledbetter was appointed Personal Representative by the Probate Division of the Circuit Court of Howell County, Missouri. The business address of the Personal Representative is 333 Falck Street #17, Mountain View Missouri 65548, whose telephone number is 417-934-9309, and whose attorney is C. C. Cantrell, whose business address is PO Box 1030, Mountain View Missouri 65548, and whose telephone number is 417-934-2226. All creditors of said decedent are notified to file claims in the probate division of this court within six months from the date of the first publication of this notice or if a copy of this notice was mailed to, or served upon, such creditor by the personal representative, then within two months from the date it was mailed or served, whichever is later, or be forever barred to the fullest extent permissible by law. Such six-month period and such two-month period do not extend the limitation period that would bar claims one year after the decedent’s death, as provided in section 473.444, RSMo, or any other applicable limitation periods. Nothing in section 473.033, RSMo, shall be construed to bar any action against a decedent’s liability insurance carrier through a defendant ad litem pursuant to section 537.021, RSMo. Receipt of this notice by mail should not be construed by the recipient to indicate that he necessarily has a beneficial interest in the estate. The nature and extent of any person’s interest, if any, can be determined from the files and records of this estate in the Probate Division of the Circuit Court of Howell County, Missouri. Date of decedent’s death was August 11, 2013. Date of first publication of this notice is March 12, 2014. Cindy Weeks, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Howell County, Missouri Shanna Earls, Deputy Clerk 3-12-14-4t-acct

Are you pregnant? A childless married couple seeks to adopt. Will be Hands-On Mom/Devoted Dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Call/ TEXT. Jessica & Adam. 1800-790-5260. 3-19-14-1t-SWC

Used Single Wide. $10,000 Cash Only. Only one available. Needs moved. 417-533-3599 3-19-14-1t-SWC

Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing (subject to credit approval). Lots of room for the price. 3 BR 2 BA. No renters. 4 1 7 - 4 5 9 - 4 3 4 9 , VMFhomes.com 3-19-14-1t-SWC

WANTED! Used oil of any kind. Will pick up and provide 55gallon drum or buckets. Call 417-934-2805 and ask for Dale or Nathan. 12-12-12-tfn-acct

Family dog missing since Wednesday from the West end of airport in Mountain View, MO. Please call 417247-7447 if you have any information. 3-19-14-2t-pd

WB US 60 in Howell County Reduced for Asphalt Resurfacing Westbound US 60 in Howell County will be reduced to one lane as contractor crews perform an asphalt resurfacing operation. This section of roadway is located from Business 60 in Willow Springs to the Texas County line. Weather permitting, work will take place Monday, March 24 through Thursday, May 1 from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., including weekends as necessary. Southbound US 63 in Howell County Reduced for Milling and Asphalt Resurfacing Southbound US 63 in Howell County will be reduced to one lane as contractor crews perform milling and asphalt resurfacing. This section of roadway is located from US 60 in Willow Springs to just north of Route P. Weather permitting, work will take place Monday, March 24 through Thursday, May 1 from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. daily. Route 17 in Howell and Texas Counties Reduced for Edge Rut Repairs Route 17 in Howell and Texas Counties will be reduced to one lane while Missouri Department of Transportation crews perform edge rut repairs. This section of road is located from US 60 in Howell County to Route 106 in Texas County. Weather permitting, work will take place Tuesday, March 17 through Friday, March 21 from 7:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. daily. The work zones will be marked with signs. Motorists are urged to use caution while traveling in the area. For more information, please call Resident Engineer Lindell Huskey (417) 469-2589, the Missouri Department of Transportation’s Customer Service Center toll-free at 1-888ASK-MODOT (1-888-275-6636) or visit www.modot.org/southeast.


Page 12

The Standard News

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Troop G releases DWI checkpoint results A total of 27 arrests and 45 warnings were issued in conjunction with a sobriety checkpoint conducted in Texas County on March 15, 2014, near the intersection of U.S. Highway 60 Business and Dunn Road. Totals from this checkpoint include: 1 - misdemeanor DWI arrest; 8 - seat belt summonses; 2 - child restraint summonses; 1 - stop sign

violation summons; 1 - commercial vehicle violation summons; 1 - non-moving summons; 3 - no driver’s license summonses; 2 driving while suspended/driving while revoked summonses; 1 uninsured motorist summons; 3 felony drug arrests; 2 - misdemeanor drug summonses; 2 - misdemeanor warrant arrests. A total of six arrests and 11 warnings were issued in con-

junction with a DWI saturation conducted in Texas County on March 14, 2014. The designated highways for this saturation were U.S. Highway 63 and Missouri Route17. Totals from this saturation include: 1 - misdemeanor DWI arrest; 2 - speed summonses; 1 - seat belt summons; 1 - non-moving summons; 1 - other misdemeanor arrest.


Mountain View Standard News  

Volume 108, Issue 8

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