__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1


Flat rate postage $8.95 per catalogue within Australia, over $500 post free (Excludes Stamps of the World)

Catalogues AVAILABLE Due to the Covid-19 Virus a number of titles are marked POR (Price on Request) Please contact us for the current status on these.

STANLEY GIBBONs GB & British commonwealth

Commonwealth and British Empire Stamps 1840-1970 2020 Edition ................................... $199.95 Commonwealth Simplified Catalogue 1840 - 2010 5th Edition 2014 ........................................... POR Australia and Territories 11th Edition 2019 .................................................................................$89.95 Burma, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka 3rd Edition 2015.................................................$57.50 Belize, Guyana, Trinidad 2009 2nd Edition .................................................................................... POR Bermuda, Bahamas & North Caribbean 1st Edition 2006 ........................................................... POR Brunei Malaysia & Singapore 2017 5th Edition .........................................................................$82.50 Canada & Former Provinces 2016 6th Edition .............................................................................. POR Central Africa 2014 ........................................................................................................................... POR Cyprus, Malta & Gibraltar 4th Edition 2014 ..............................................................................$83.00 East Africa 2018 5th Edition ............................................................................................................ POR Eastern Pacific 3rd Edition 2015 ..................................................................................................... POR Falkland Is. & Dependencies 8th Edition 2019 ............................................................................$45.00 Hong Kong 6th Edition 2018.........................................................................................................$45.00 India including States 2018 5th Edition ........................................................................................$75.00 Indian Ocean 3rd Edition 2016......................................................................................................$52.95 Ireland 6th Edition 2015 .................................................................................................................. POR Leeward Islands 2017 3rd Edition.................................................................................................$69.95 North East Africa 2017 2nd Edition ..............................................................................................$79.95 Northern Caribbean Bahamas & Bermuda 2016 4th Edition ...................................................$57.50 New Zealand & Dependencies 2016 6th Edition ............................................................................ POR St. Helena & Dependencies 2017 6th Edition ...............................................................................$39.95 Southern Africa & Central Africa 2014 2nd Edition ..................................................................... POR West Africa 2nd Edition 2012 .......................................................................................................... POR Western Pacific incl. Fiji, Pitcairn, Cook Is., PNG, Solomons etc 2017 4th Edition .................$87.95 Windward Islands & Barbados 2015 3rd Edition .......................................................................$79.95 Great Britain Concise 2020 .............................................................................................................. POR Collect British Stamps 2019 70th Edition .....................................................................................$42.00 GB Specialised Queen Victoria 16th Edition 2011 .......................................................................$99.95 GB Specialised 4 Kings 14th Edition 2015..................................................................................$129.95 GB Specialised QEII pre-decimal 13th Edition 2019 ..................................................................$89.95 GB Specialised QEII Decimal Vol 4 2010 Edition .......................................................................... POR KGVI Commonwealth 9th Edition 2018.......................................................................................$95.00

foreign Countries & WORLD Western Europe Simplified catalogue 2012 2nd Edition .... $92.50 Stamps of the World, 6 volumes New 2018 Edition ........... $395.00 Stamps of the World, 6 volumes New 2020 Edition ........... $695.00 Austria & Hungary 8th Edition 2014 .......................................POR Arabia 2016 1st Edition .......................................................... $67.95 Asia Volume 1 2011 ....................................................................POR Balkans 2009 5th Edition...........................................................POR Belgium & Luxembourg 1st Edition 2018 ............................ $57.50 Central Asia 4th Edition 2007 ...................................................POR China 2018 12th Edition ....................................................... $129.95 Czech Republic & Slovakia 2016 1st Edition ....................... $63.00 Denmark & Norway 1st Edition 2018 ......................................POR Finland & Sweden 1st Edition 2017 .........................................POR France 1st Edition 2015 .......................................................... $75.00 French Colonies 1st Edition 2016 .......................................... $95.00

Germany 12th Edition 2018 ......................................................POR Japan & Korea 5th Edition ......................................................POR Italy & Switzerland 8th Edition 2013 ......................................POR Middle East 7th Edition 2018................................................. $82.95 Netherlands & Colonies 1st Edition 2017 ............................. $57.50 Poland 2015 1st Editon ........................................................... $49.95 Portugal & Spain 6th Edition 2011...........................................POR Russia 7th Edition ......................................................................POR South East Asia 5th Edition 2012 ........................................ $115.00 USA 8th Edition 2015............................................................ $119.95 We can supply a full range of Albums, Stockbooks, Stocksheets and Stockcards, Mounts and other accessories. Please contact us for your requirements. Wholesale and dealer enquiries welcome.

Stamp News Mail Order PO Box 1290, Upwey, Victoria, Australia Ph: 0425 795 693 email: kevinmorgan2@live.com

Prices do not include Postage & handling


Stamp News Australasia is published monthly by:

21st Century Auctions Pty Ltd ABN 71 627 236 113 http://www.stampnews.net.au Phone: 0425 795 693 Editor & Advertising Manager: Kevin Morgan kevinmorgan2@live.com Advertising materials & editorial submissions email: stampnewsaus@gmail.com Post: Stamp News PO Box 1290, Upwey, Vic, 3158, Australia Assistant Editor, Layout & Design: Máirín Holmes stampnewsaus@gmail.com

Contents Articles Commercial Philately in Australia: Rod Perry ...........................6 Stamps in the News: Margo Campbell .................................... 14 Postal Stationery: Ian McMahon ................................................ 22 Cinderella Corner: Vito Milana .................................................... 28 Introducing the APF: Stephanie Bromser ................................... 50 Market Matters: Glen Stephens .................................................. 56 Vietnam’s Philatelic History : Christer Brunström ..................... 66

Information Clubs & Societies ....................................................................... ......70 Products & Services Directory............................................... ......72 Subscriptions .............................................................................. ......76 List of Advertisers .............................................................. ..............78

Sub-editor: Sebastian Holmes-Morgan Subscriptions Manager: Alexandra Holmes-Morgan Printed by: Printgraphics

Stay Home. Stay Safe. Wear a mask!

Newsagent Distribution: Gordon & Gotch

RARITIES - SUPERB ITEMS AT LOW FIXED PRICES - WITH HUGE SCANS - A MUST SEE!

glenstephens.com/rarity.html EMAIL ME TO RECEIVE MONTHLY ‘NETT PRICE’ OFFER LISTS AND GOSSIP: glen@glenstephens.com Stamp News - 5


Richard Juzwin Stamp Dealers have recently acquired the Rodney Perry “Gold Medal” exhibition collection :

COMMERCIAL PHILATELY IN AUSTRALIA : 1860s TO WWI Part 3 Stamp News has kindly been given permission to publish the entire collection over the coming months.

vii. Pioneer leading contemporary Philatelic Traders (contd) Fred Hagen (1860 - 1935) In 1902 Fred Hagen produced a professional Illustrated Priced Catalogue. This was a direct challenge to his principal competitors in Sydney, Smyth & Nicolle [see next Philatelic Trader listing], who by 1902 were in their third year of publishing an equivalent catalogue. In Aug 1898, Hagen had published his List of Cash Prices Paid for Used Australasian Stamps (see following page). In this, he claimed to be “The Largest Wholesale and Retail Stamp Dealer in Australasia” Fred Hagen Ltd: Jan 9, 1911 use of NSW 2d Envelope to Castlemaine, bearing earliest use of scalloped wafer seal, inscribed Fred Hagen Ltd, by then at 182 Pitt St, Sydney. Hagen incorporated his business following the 1905 acquisition of J.H Smyth & Co.

6 - Stamp News


vii. Pioneer leading contemporary Philatelic Traders (contd) Fred Hagen (1860 - 1935)

Stamp News - 7


COMMERCIAL PHILATELY IN AUS vii. Pioneer leading contemporary Philatelic Traders (contd) Fred Hagen (1860 - 1935) Feb 4 1913 registered cover to Stanley Gibbons Inc, New York, bearing legitimate combination franking of Kangaroo ld and State issues. The Hagen firm was Australasian Agent for Stanley Gibbons Ltd at this time.

Scalloped wafer seal on reverse, introduced c1909, is the original type, showing void areas to simulated Sydney View stamp lower left and upper right. Apr 3 1914 registered cover to U.S., scalloped wafer seal on reverse “retouched�, to remedy void areas in original design. This version was first introduced in December 1913.

8 - Stamp News


AUSTRALIA : 1860s TO WWI Part 2 vii. Pioneer leading contemporary Philatelic Traders (contd.) Fred Hagen (1860 - 1935 Reverse shows scalloped blue wafer seal, a smaller format than its red predecessor, first introduced late 1912.

Mar 3, 1913 registered cover to Stanley Gibbons Inc, New York (Obverse shown 80%)

c1915 Perforation gauge inscribed for Fred Hagen Ltd, by then removed to 66 King St, Sydney. Note: ‘’Australasian Agents for Stanley Gibbons Ltd” proudly displayed.

Late that year, The Sydney Morning Herald, Dec 31, 1913, reporting on a spate of break and enters in central Sydney, stated: ‘The stamp dealer’s shop of Fred Hagen Ltd., Pitt­-street, was entered at the rear, but the thieves found nothing of value on the premises.” [Exhibitor’s emphasis]

Mercifully, for Fred, it would appear the thieves were not versed in the finer aspects of Philately. Stamp News - 9


METALLIC COMFORT STOCKBOOKS

NEW

Leuchtturm Metallic Edition COMFORT Stockbooks come in three modern colours: Silver, Gold and Bronze. They offer a particularly stylish frame for your collection. The stockbooks have, of course, all the essential quality features that you have come to expect of all LEUCHTTURM stockbooks. For covers, pages, strips, binding and interleaves, we only use selected materials, which guarantee appealing and secure storage for your stamps. Available from all stamp & coin dealers or online

renniks.com/metal

LIGHTHOUSE AUSTRALIAN HINGELESS ALBUMS

Lighthouse hingeless albums are renowned through out the World for quality & detail. The sturdy 2 x Post “Perfect” binder, together with the rich heavyweight pages are the perfect combination for your stamp collection together with other outstanding features: • Presented in meticulous editorial detail with all stamp images printed actual size on heavy (170 gsm) cream bond paper • Album pages printed on chemically PH neutral paper, providing added protection for stamps • All stamps completely protected within “see-through” Lighthouse stamp mounts • Pages printed on one side only • Spaces provided for every Australian stamp, in chronological order • Annual up-date supplement pages designed with co-operation from Australian collectors & philatelic traders • A very superior product, designed specially for the Australian market, manufactured under precise & exacting German standards • Suitable for the beginner as well as the advanced collector AUSTRALIA PRE DECIMAL ALBUM 1913-1965 Pages cover the early Kangaroos 1913-45, King George V 1913-36, King George VI & Queen Elizabeth II periods.Contained within a Red “PERFECT” binder, boxed. AUSTRALIA DECIMAL ALBUM 1966-2017 Pages cover 1966 to 2017 Available from all stamp & coin dealers or online

renniks.com/aha

NEW

SHERLOCK WATERMARK DETECTOR

AUSTRALIA’S BEST-SELLING PHILATELIC GUIDE

With the Sherlock watermark detector, reveal every detail of your stamps, whether it is watermarks or paper irregularities, quality defects or repairs. Easy to use: Insert stamp, turn on the light and you can already see the secrets of you stamps in every detail – no chemicals used, therefore no danger for your stamps. Includes White, Red, Green, and Blue lights to light up the stamp. The brightness can be infinitely adjusted. Reveal hard-to-find watermarks with this wide spectrum of colour and brightness. Compact and as sophisticated. uitable for stamps up to 50x45mm in size • Suitable attery powered (4 x1.5v AA batteries) • Battery xtra-strong Plastic case. • Extra-strong • Overall size: 93x130x150mm.

This comprehensive guide to Australian stamps, now in its 16th edition, covers issues all the way up to 31/12/2018. Includes: - Colonial Issues from 1850 onwards Kangaroos & KGV IssuesAustralian Stamps issued since 1913 - Perforated OS Issues - FRAMA issuesBCOF Issues- Australian Antarctic Territory Numismatic & Medallion First Day Covers ISBN: 9780987105776

Available from all stamp & coin dealers or online

Available from all stamp & coin dealers & bookstores or online

renniks.com/swd

renniks.com/soa16

renniks.com

FREE Product Guides here: renniks.com/pg TRADE ENQUIRIES WELCOME

HOW TO Order online renniks.com email orders@renniks.com fax

(02) 9695 7355

write

Unit 3, 37-39 Green Street Banksmeadow NSW 2019


1. SG 13: 1st Wmk 5/- grey and yellow. Super fine and fresh. CEREMUGA CERTIFICATE. Choice mint unhinged .......$3,750 2. SG 13: 1st Wmk 5/- grey and yellow. Nibbled perforations, otherwise without fault. Mint unhinged. Price reduced to...........................................................................$1,250 3. SG 14: 1st Wmk 10/- grey and pink. A choice example with very fresh gum and well centred CEREMUGA CERTIFICATE. Mint unhinged...........................................................................$4,950 4. SG 14: 1st Wmk 10/- grey and pink. Very fine and fresh. Mint lightly hinged.............................................................................$1,250 5. SG 14: 1st Wmk 10/- grey and pink. Fresh, fine used......... $975 6. SG 14: 1st Wmk 10/- grey and pink. Fresh, fine used......... $975 7. SG 15: 1st Wmk £1 brown and blue. Very fresh and fine mint hinged............................................................................................$3,300 8. SG 15/ACSC 51wc: 1st Wmk £1 brown and blue. Cancelledto-order with tidy BRISBANE corner CDS. Extra Fine....$4,500 9. SG 16: 1st Wmk £2 black and red. Very fresh, mint lightly hinged............................................................................................$9,500 10. SG 16: /ACSC 55w: 1st Wmk £2 black and rose. Cancelled-toorder "AP 15 13". Well centred without gum.....................$5,250 11. SG 16/ACSC 55Br: 1st Wmk £2 grey and deep rose. Variety: BROKEN COAST IN BIGHT. Fine used....................................$6,750 12. SG 16(F)/ACSC 55A.c: 1st Wmk £2 black and rose. SPERATI FORGERY. A scarce stamp in finer than usual condition. Used.................................................................................................$5,750 13. SG 29: 2nd Wmk 2/- brown. An exceptional quality stamp, mint with the very lightest of hinge touches...............$1,200 14. SG 30: 2nd Wmk 5/- grey and yellow beautiful stamp, mint unhinged, Ceremuga certificate...........................................$4,900 15. SG 30: 2nd Wmk 5/- grey and yellow. Nicely centred, fine used..................................................................................................... $550 16. SG 30w: 2nd Wmk 5/- grey and yellow (deep shade). Fine used. WMK INVERTED................................................................... $675 17. SG O37w: 2nd Wmk 5/- grey and yellow, perforated OS, WMK INVERTED, hinged mint. Perfin Expertisation certificate.......... ...........................................................................................................$2,750 18. SG 43a/ACSC 48B: 3rd Wmk 10/- grey and DEEP ANILINE PINK. SCARCE. Fresh, mint unhinged................................ $2,750 19. SG 43a: 3rd Wmk 10/- grey and aniline pink. Mint lightly hinged............................................................................................... $650 20. SG 44a: 3rd Wmk £1 chestnut and bright blue. A very appealing stamp. Mint lightly hinged..............................$3,600 21. SG 44w: 3rd Wmk £1 chestnut and blue, wmk INVERTED. A fine used example of this scarce variety, without faults............ ...........................................................................................................$3,300 22. SG 44b: 3rd Wmk £1 pale brown and blue. Well centred and fine used.........................................................................................$1,950 23. SG 44: 3rd Wmk £1 chocolate aned blue. Strong colours and nicely centred. Fine used..........................................................$2,150

24. SG 45b: 3rd Wmk £2 purple-black and rose. A fine example, with selvedge at right. Mint unhinged..............................$9,750 25. SG 45: 3rd Wmk £2 black and rose. A clear central cancellation. Fine used..............................................................$3,150 26. SG 45b/ACSC 56C.w: 3rd Wmk £2 purple-black and rose. Cancelled-to-order (with gum, light hinge). Very fine... $3,750 27. SG 75: 3rd Wmk £1 grey. Deep colouring for this issue. Fine used..................................................................................................... $425 28. SG 111: Small multiple wmk 5/- grey and yellow. Fine mint unhinged......................................................................................$1,100 29. SG 111/ACSC 45(v)k: Small multiple wmk 5/- grey and yellow-orange. Variety: WHITE FLAW ON ROO'S LEG. Very fine, mint lightly hinged........................................................... $425 30. SG 112: Small multiple wmk 10/- grey and pink. A very fine stamp. CEREMUGA CERTIFICATE. Mint unhinged........$2,750 31. SG 112: Small multiple wmk 10/- grey and pink, fine mint unhinged......................................................................................$1,500 32. SG 114/ACSC 57(D)va: Small multiple wmk £2 black and rose. Fine mint lightly hinged. Variety: WHITE FLAW ADJOINING NSW COAST. Fresh..............................................$5,250 33. SG 114: Small multiple wmk £2 black and red. Attractive, fine used............................................................................................ $895 34. SG 114: Small multiple wmk £2 black and rec. Nicely centred, fine used........................................................................... $725 35. SG 135: CofA Wmk 5/- mint unhinged..............................$1,250 36. SG 135: Cof A Wmk 5/- grey and yellow, fresh and mint lightly hinged................................................................................ $250 37. SG 136: CofA Wmk 10/- grey and pink mint unhinged....$2,250 38. SG 136: Cof A Wmk 10/- dark grey/bright pink mint unhinged......................................................................................$2,750 39. SG 136: CofA Wmk 10/- grey and pink . Excellent centring. Super fresh and mint very lightly hinged.......................... $750 40. SG 136(var)/ACSC 50D: CofA Wmk 10/- grey and aniline pink. A fresh and well centred example of this scarcer shade. DUNKERLEY CERTIFICATE. Mint lightly hinged..............$1,500 41. SG 136: CofA Wmk £1 grey, superb mint unhinged.....$2,950 42. SG 136: Cof A Wmk £1 grey. Very fresh and nice centring, mint lightly hinged..................................................................... $875 43. SG 138: CofA Wmk £2 black and red. Fresh mint unhinged... $8,750 44. SG 138: CofA Wmk £2 black and rose. Fine, mint lightly hinged............................................................................................$4,950 45. SG 138: CofA Wmk £2 black and red. An upper right corner example. Very fresh and totally mint unhinged $12,500 46. SG 138: CofA Wmk £2 black and red. Fine used with unobtrusive corner cancellation............................................... $775 47. SG 138: CofA Wmk £2 black and red. Nicely centred, fine used..................................................................................................... $875 48. SG 138: CofA Wmk £2 black and rose, fine lightly hinged mint. ASH Imprint pair........................................................... $14,750

Visit our website and subscribe to our monthly email

Member APTA & PTS (London)


Stamps in the News - Globally! US Post fails: Lottery loss

Reported at https://www.9news.com.au A woman in Florida has been forced to forfeit her winning lotto ticket after the US Postal Service lost it in transit to her local lottery office. Sue Burgess had been declared a winner in Florida’s “Second Chance Lottery Game”, with her ticket earning her US$1000. Because of COVID-19 restrictions, Ms Burgess’ local lottery offices were closed and could not cash out her ticket. Following state lottery instructions, Ms Burgess mailed her ticket into the registered lottery office using certified mail. Under lottery rules, a winning ticket must be delivered to a registered office in a one-week time frame to claim the prize. Despite sending her ticket via certified mail, it never made it to the office – meaning she was forced to forfeit her prize. The US Postal Service has apologised for the mistake. The Florida Lottery told local media “because the Lottery did not receive Ms Burgess’ ticket within the seven-day claim period, an alternate winner was selected and paid.” “However, if Ms Burgess’ package arrives at Florida Lottery Headquarters with a date stamp prior to the original expiration date, our Claims Processing department will process and pay her claim.”

US Post fails: Remains to be seen? Apparently not Reported at https://7news.com.au

A man’s cremated remains have gone missing after his

14 - Stamp News

widow sent them through US Postal Service. Mark and Mary Colby were married for 44 years, until Mark died of cancer on August 31 this year. After her husband was cremated, Mary Colby sent an urn through the mail to a longtime friend in New York. Ms Colby spent AUD70 to ensure the remains headed for New York arrived by midday the following day. But they went AWOL, eventually arriving four days later. When Ms Colby got in touch with the USPS, it was unable to explain why the urn took so long. Ms Colby noted that when she was arranging to send her husband’s remains through the post, she watched a USPS video claiming it was the only choice to “trust” when shipping cremated remains. She said staff “seemed brusque and abrupt” when she tried to find out what was going on. “It wasn’t an envelope or a box with toys. It was my husband’s remains.”

Canada Post fail: Off with his head Reported at https://globalnews.ca

Canada Post is apologising after a sheet of stamps was printed showing the severed head of a John A. Macdonald statue that was recently toppled in Montreal. The sheet of stamps was printed through the postal service’s Picture Postage program, which allows people to order stamps with personalised photos for a fee. The man who ordered the stamps said he made the order as a protest against colonialism. James Bone originally tweeted out a picture of the stamp sheet, asking people to retweet in solidarity. He promised to send individual stamps to people for free “if you or your ancestors were f***ed over by Macdonald.” After getting several requests for the stamps, Bone tried to place an order for more sheets— only to receive an email from Canada Post denying the request, saying the picture was “not appropriate for use” through the program. “We apologise and will take measures to ensure our vetting and approval processes are strengthened and closely followed,” a spokesperson said. The image shows the head of a bronze statue of Macdonald that separated from its body after it was toppled by protesters in Montreal on Aug. 29. The protesters were part of a Black Lives Matter movement, which has opened a larger debate about systemic racism in Canada. Macdonald, while regularly memorialised as Canada’s first prime minister, was also responsible for the wide-


Compiled by

Margo Campbell

spread mistreatment, displacement and forced assimilation of Indigenous peoples during Canada’s founding. Macdonald’s defenders, meanwhile, point to his achievements securing Canada’s unity, including overseeing the completion of the Pacific Railway that connected the country from coast to coast. The City of Montreal removed the statue the day after the protest as officials worked to determine the best course of action moving forward.

India Post win: Postal heroes of the pandemic Reported at https://www.hindustantimes.com

In sun and rain, the postal workers face the weather and numerous other hurdles to deliver letters all year round. Amid the pandemic when life suddenly became locked down, the postal service staff have donned various hats, helping everyone deal with the disease. Right from the distribution of testing kits to delivery of medicines and money, postal employees in India have been providing, emerging as corona warriors who continued to work in the face of adverse conditions. On World Post Day (October 9) here is a glimpse of the action from behind the post counters:

“We restarted our operations in April, with staggered shifts, so that the transport of letters, urgent medicines was not hampered,” says Ashok Kumar, at Chanakyapuri Post Office. Kumar, who has been a postal employee for almost four decades, adds, “We made arrangements for safety equipment for all our employees, including gloves, masks, sanitisers. People worked in shifts; if extra work was needed to dispatch packages, we put in more time.” The postal staff has also been delivering cash to people, in need, who have been unable to access banks due to the pandemic. To deliver money to people at their doorsteps, some like Delhi-based postman Narendra Kumar RC have been working without leave. Thousands of postal workers around the country, like Kumar, have been instrumental in keeping the postal services running during these difficult times. Vijay Kumar, who works at RK Puram main post office, describes how delivery of medicines has taken priority. “During Covid-19, we have started making instant dispatches of medicines pan India,” he says. When asked if he became concerned about his personal safety at any point, Kumar says, “Of course, there was a fear. But, we took all precautions, worked over time, sometimes even with just 50% personnel capacity, so that the work doesn’t suffer.”

Covid hits Kenya Post

Reported at https://www.capitalfm.co.ke The Postal Corporation of Kenya is set to undergo a restructuring process, a move the government has said will help the troubled state-owned company bounce back to profitability. The National Treasury is looking how to ensure affected employees will be compensated as required. Stamp News - 15


Stamps in the News - Globally!

“ We cannot just start sending people home, we must have a plan for them and so we have been working very carefully to do this in a humane way,” a spokesman said. This comes a week after the National Treasury approved a Sh810 million bailout for the company to pay employee salaries dating back to March. The government claims it was unaware of some of the struggles the corporation was facing thus the late intervention in taking care of employees’ wages. “Postal Corporation is an independent self-funding institution even though owned by the government so when COVID-19 struck they did not inform us in time that all their revenues were affected when flights were halted”. The Postmaster General said “we lost Sh1.2billion in 2019/2020 because of the last two quarters when planes were grounded - about 70 % of our business came to a halt because we use passenger planes to move our cargo.”

Indigenous concerns addressed

Reported at https://www.abc.net.au The next time you send a letter or parcel in Australia, take note of the First Nation country you are sending it to. That is the dream of Gomeroi woman Rachael McPhail who is encouraging people to include the traditional place name as part of the address on their postage. 16 - Stamp News

“I would love for Australia Post and the Australian Government to make the traditional place names an official part of the address information,” she said. “I’d also love to see Aussie businesses, universities, banks, MyGov, PayPal, Star Track, Uber etc asking people for the traditional place name as part of the address information when people are filling in the forms or going through the online checkout.” Ms McPhail found out about her Gomeroi heritage when she was 30 and is named after her great-greatgrandmother, who left Country for fear of losing her lighter-skinned child. “She didn’t tell anyone she was Aboriginal because she was protecting her family, so I celebrate my Aboriginal heritage for her because she wasn’t able to,” she said. Response to the idea on social media has been positive, the only criticism being that it could make delivery of the mail more complicated — a criticism advocates reject. Australia Post supports the idea and are talking to Rachael about how the idea can be promoted. “Customers are welcome to include the First Nation name in the address. We recommend its included below the recipient’s name but above the street address,” an Australia Post spokesperson said. Rachael McPhail has tested her idea with success. “I’ve been doing this for months now and all of my


Compiled by

Margo Campbell

parcels have made it to me fine,” she said. “Australia Post haven’t lost one single package.”

Every collector’s nightmare

Reported at https://www. cbsnews.com A brazen Hong Kong burglar made off with a collection of stamps and calligraphy worth a reported $US516 million in a daylight heist. The thief struck an apartment belonging to Chinese collector Fu Chunxiao in the city’s bustling Kowloon district and took just two hours to steal the staggering haul. “I was dealt a huge blow and I feel so sad. The lost items are invaluable indeed, but I cannot tell in detail what they are right now, as my mind is racing,” said Fu. Police sources reported that the stolen goods were worth HK$4 billion ($US516 million) and included calligraphy by the Chinese Communist Party’s founder and first Chairman, Mao Zedong, along with five extremely valuable antique stamps and revolutionary items from mainland China. One of the items taken was one of the few remaining

Fu Chunxiao examples of a 1968 stamp entitled “The whole country is red.” Fu, a member of the Hong Kong Philatelic Society and prominent figure in the world of Chinese “revolutionary collectibles”, was in mainland China at the time of the burglary on September 10. The thief walked into the 16-storey residential building, prized open an iron gate and burst through a wooden door to get inside the apartment, before making off via the same route with the goods. The valuable goods were taken from a locked drawer in the apartment.

Crypto stamps in Croatia

Reported at https://www.croatiaweek.com Croatian Post has issued the first Croatian crypto stamp, designed in cooperation with the Croatian blockchain community, and the digital token Postereum was developed by Croatian company Bitx. The crypto stamp package contains all the information needed to activate or transfer the digital crypto stamp. After the purchase of the Stamp News - 17


Stamps in the News - Globally! crypto stamp, the part used for paying the postage may be detached, while the digital part remains to be used in the blockchain. The Croatian crypto stamp is envisioned as the perfect combination of the analogue and the digital. Because each physical stamp comes with a digital token on the blockchain, the crypto stamp has the potential to live forever, which adds another dimension to philately – protection from ageing. Such tokens have collectible value, just like classic stamps, transposing philately into the digital world. The crypto stamp project is important for the development of this relatively new industry in Croatia, and also for putting Croatia on the blockchain world map, as well as on the world philately map since the crypto stamp also marks an anniversary: 180 years since the world’s first postage stamp, the “Penny Black”, was issued.

The heat is on in Finland

Reported at https://www.dezeen.com Finnish Post has commissioned special heat reactive stamps as an innovative way of communicating the negative effects that rising temperatures will have on Finland. These stamps by Finnish studio Berry Creative feature three base designs: a snow cloud, a depiction of limited immigration, and a bird. These images are printed as black silhouettes against coloured gradient backgrounds. Printed in colour-transforming ink that reacts to heat,

18 - Stamp News

these symbols change from black to clear when warmed up by being rubbed with a finger, revealing additional designs underneath. The snow cloud transforms into a thunderstorm to represent the loss of winter snowfall, while the depiction of immigration turns to mass migration as climate refugees are forced to leave their homes and relocate. The bird is also made to turn into a skeleton, as a representation of the extinction of many of Finland’s native species. As the studio explained, the stamps each have jagged edges and eye-catching colour gradients to create a sense of urgency. Aiming to reach as many people as possible, the message will be sent on letters and parcels across the country to encourage the Finns to take actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Grub’s up in Greece

Reported at https://greekcitytimes.com Every year, Mediterranean countries in the EuroMed Postal Community organise a stamp issue based on a common theme. This year’s joint stamp issue is themed “Traditional Gastronomy in the Mediterranean”. Representing Greece in this year’s competition: oven-baked lamb and potatoes, moussaka, octopus and spanakopita (wild greens pie).


Compiled by

Margo Campbell

“Cooked food hails from ancient Greece, with recipes both simple and complex. World-renowned moussaka, an emblematic dish of this country, is not found anywhere else in the world as we make it. It is a dish that unites the West with the East,” the Greek Postal Serivce said in a press release.

Breaking the ice in Australia

Reported at https://www.antarctica.gov.au The forthcoming arrival of Australia’s new Antarctic

icebreaker, RSV Nuyina, in its home port of Hobart in 2021, is being marked with a stamp issue by Australia Post. The four stamps and minisheet highlight the ship’s state-of-the-art design, its role as an icebreaker and scientific research platform, and the indigenous origin of its name and its historical connection to other Australian Antarctic ships. The word “nuyina” means “southern lights” in palawa kani, the language of indigenous Tasmanians. The name also links the icebreaker to Antarctica, where the geomagnetic phenomenon (or ‘aurora australis’) can be observed in polar skies, as well as to both its immediate predecessor, the icebreaker RSV Aurora Australis, and to Douglas Mawson’s earlier Antarctic vessel, SY Aurora. The new icebreaker’s state-of-the-art design and construction will ensure superior endurance and capability for extended research seasons, while also providing an enhanced cargo carrying capacity for the potential resupply of two Australian Antarctic stations in one voyage. The ship’s two 55 tonne cranes on the bow are a key part of this capability and feature prominently on the stamps. Nuyina’s scientific trawl deck, which also features on the stamps, will be a key part of its success as a platform for marine science and sea ice studies.

Donald’s duck stamp revamp Reported at https:// news.artnet.com

As the US elections approach, even the annual the contest to design next year’s Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, better known as the Duck Stamp, is polarising. In a controversial new rule, each design is now required to Stamp News - 19


Stamps in the News - Globally! incorporate the theme of “celebrating our waterfowl hunting heritage,” and that isn’t sitting well with a lot of conservationists. The organisation Friends of Animals filed a lawsuit in Connecticut district court last month against the US Fish and Wildlife Services, citing the rule as “anti-wildlife” and “anti-conservation.” This year’s 138 entries included duck decoys, retrieving dogs, duck blinds, and hunters lying in wait. Many depicted spent shotgun shells or lost duck calls floating amid an otherwise bucolic scene. “That looks to me like litter,” Missouri artist Rebekah Knight, Richard Clifton’s winning entry to the 2020 Duck Stamp contest, depicting a Lesser who painted a decoy in the backScaup and a lost duck call. ground of her submission to the Highlighting hunting in the Duck Stamp is part of an contest, told Audubon Magazine. executive order aiming to “support and expand hunting The first Duck Stamp was issued in 1934, after Presand fishing and increase outdoor recreation opportunities ident Franklin Delano Roosevelt passed the Migratory for all Americans.” Bird Hunting Stamp Act. Under its regulations, all waterBut with the number of hunters shrinking to just four fowl hunters 16 and older are required to purchase a Duck percent of adult Americans, there are concerns that the Stamp to affix to their hunting license each year, with 98 new focus on hunting will alienate other audiences and percent of the proceeds of stamp sales going toward the hurt the cause. federal purchase and management of wetlands. After the rule change was proposed in February, the The act was a huge success, saving species like the public was invited to submit feedback. “The limits placed over-hunted Wood Duck and other wild game birds from on the creativity of artists by this rule will contribute to the verge of extinction, and combating habitat loss. The the already steady decline in the number of contest enprice of the duck stamp has risen from $1 to $25 since its introduction, with sales to date raising more than $1.1 bil- tries,” argued one response, as reported by Linn’s Stamp News. lion to support the preservation of over six million acres “Requiring a hunting theme will discourage non-huntof waterfowl habitat. ers from purchasing the stamps,” read another. “As a The stamps, which cannot be used as postage, grant hunter and life-long bird lover, I know that many people free entry to any of the more than 300 national wildlife are uncomfortable with the idea of killing birds, and refuges, and are also purchased by those looking to supwould not appreciate stamps that depict this activity.” port habitat conservation.

20 - Stamp News


August_sub_ad_FINAL 21/06/2020 12:45 am Page 1


Postal Stationery Welcome to the postal stationery column for November 2020. This month’s column includes new issues from Australia Post and examines an unusual connection between Australia’s first embossed envelopes and Costa Rica. The Costa Rican Connection – the Introduction of Embossed Stamped Envelopes by the Commonwealth of Australia The Costa Rican embossed envelopes with a design of Columbus described in the October Postal Stationery column have an unusual connection with the development of the first embossed stamped envelopes for use throughout Australia. The first Commonwealth stamped envelopes for use throughout Australia were issued in 1913 and were impressed with the 1d red Kangaroo and Map stamp (Figure 1). These were followed in 1914 by envelopes impressed with the King George V sideface stamp (Figure 2). Unlike the envelope stamps of most other countries at that time, these stamps were not embossed. In the mind of the Commonwealth Stamp Printer, J B Cooke, this represented a significant security risk and so on 10 December 1913 he wrote asking the Postmaster-General’s Department to approve the preparation of ½d, 1d and 2d dies for embossed stamps to be Figure 1 1d Kangaroo and Map Envelope STO for Vacuum Oil used in the production Figure 2 1d King George V Sideface Envelope STO for Vacuum Oil of stamped envelopes. Figure 3 1d Queen Victoria from Victoria Engraved by De La Rue and modified by He included with his Samuel Reading letter a sample of an Figure 4 10c Costa Rica Columbus Design Engraved by Waterlow envelope featuring the 22 - Stamp News


Ian McMahon Figure 5 3d Victoria Registered Envelope Design Engraved by Bridgeland and King Figure 6 1d + ½d King George V ‘Star’ Stamped Envelope Figure 7 1d King George V ‘Star’ Stamped Envelope STO for Vacuum Oil head of King Edward VII and suggested that the die feature a design similar to the sample but with the portrait of King George V. He proposed an oval frame for the ½d value, a round frame for the 1d value and a flat oval frame for the 2d frame and the inclusion of the inscription ‘Australia Postage’. In his letter Cooke suggested that the engraving of the dies could be done by Mr Samuel Reading of Melbourne, who had been involved in producing the die for the Kangaroo and Map stamps. The Department did not agree to his request, not fully appreciating the advantages of using embossed dies. Cooke remained concerned at the security risks and tried again to convince the Postmaster-General’s Department arguing that the use of embossed stamps on envelopes, which were made of unwatermarked paper, was essential to protect against forgery. Not only was the paper for the Post Office issued envelopes unwatermarked but the envelope stamps were also printed directly on private envelopes. He pointed out that no other country was taking as substantial a risk with the possibility of forgStamp News - 23


Postal Stationery ery and consequent loss of revenue as Australia was by not using embossed envelope stamps. His arguments were on this occasion persuasive as the PMG’s Department reversed its previous decision and agree to the purchase of the three dies but suggested that the dies might be cut in the Note Engraving and Printing Branch of Treasury. The Commonwealth Note Printer, T S Harrison, was consulted and responded that it was not possible to engrave Figure 8 1d King George V Oval Stamped Envelope STO for Hobart Savings Bank Cameo relief dies in the Note Printing Branch tor to put the engine tuned background to the letterin their entirety because ing. Furthermore, Harrison felt that the die could “this class of seal if properly executed requires the not be engraved in Australia to the required level of skill of very high-class operators.” He claimed that workmanship and suggested that the work be done an engraver was needed to ‘sink’ the die, a puncher in London and that even there it would be difficult to execute the lettering and a geometric lathe opera-

Figure 9 Stamped Envelope for 50 years of Official Diplomatic Relations Between Australia and Mauritius 24 - Stamp News


Ian McMahon

Figure 10 9 Stamped Envelope for 100th Anniversary of the Apostleship of the Sea stamped envelope to find men capable of doing the engraving to the appropriate standard. With his letter, Harrison provided copies of an embossed envelope which he claimed had been produced from a die made in Australia (a colonial issue featuring Queen Victoria, presumably an envelope from Victoria, (Figure 3) and another envelope from a die cut in London (a Costa Rican envelope featuring the head of Columbus). In his letter he points to the poor work of the Australian envelope (which he described as ‘flat’) compared with the Costa Rican envelope with its “exquisite modelling of the face of Columbus” as evidence that the cutting of the dies could not be done in Australia. Figure 4 illustrates the stamp area of a Costa Rican stamped envelope that was produced by Waterlow Brothers, London. In addition, Harrison did not like the designs suggested by Cooke, commenting that the round

die was ‘ugly’. He suggested that an oval design similar to the Costa Rican stamp be used and that only a single design was needed for the three values. Cooke responded in a letter dated 7 April 1915 saying that the Victorian envelope which Harrison claimed had been printed using a die engraved in Australia had in fact been printed from a die engraved by De La Rue in London. Harrison’s use

Figure 11 Brindabella Range, Namadgi National Park Stamp News - 25


Postal Stationery of this envelope to suggest that the work couldn’t Reading. Cooke then finalised the arrangements for be done in Australia was therefore not appropriate. the cutting of the dies and forwarded to the Postmas(Presumably this confusion arose because, although ter-General’s Department a copy of an undertaking the die had originally been produced in London, it signed by Reading to produce the three dies to the had later been recut in Australia. As Cooke mentions satisfaction of the Stamp Printing Branch for £60. in a later letter, this die had been obtained in 1869 The specification for the work was: “Required for and had been in continual use until 30 December the purpose of embossing envelopes three steel dies 1912. G Kellow in his book ‘The Stamps of Victo be cut according to design to be supplied. The toria’ mentions that the first embossed Victorian workmanship throughout to be of the highest order stamped envelope was issued in 1869, printed from possible, and to be subject to the entire approval of a die produced by De La Rue. However, in 1881 a the Commonwealth Stamp Printer. The dies to be new die was cut by Arthur Williams. Samuel Readcut in steel and after cutting to be hardened. Time ing modified the die in 1886 by adding the words allowed for cutting the three dies referred to, four ‘Stamp Duty’ and again in 1901 when he removed months from the date of the issuing of the official that inscription.) Cooke commented that there were order.” advantages in having different designs for each deIn a letter dated 11 April 1916, Cooke reported nomination as it helped postmasters in country post that Reading had satisfactorily completed the dies offices, where the only light at night was from a hurand enclosed proofs for the Postmaster-General’s apricane lamp, to distinguish different denominations proval. He commented that “It will be remembered and pointed out that different dies were used for that there was a difference of opinion as to whether United Kingdom stamped envelopes. He also subwe should send to London to have the dies engraved mitted examples of Papuan stamps produced from a or entrust the work to a local engraver. The statedie engraved by Reading and a 3d registered envement was made that the work could not be satisfaclope with a stamp engraved by Messrs Bridgeland torily performed in Australia. I am of the opinion and King of Melbourne (Figure 5) which he claimed that the engraver has been fortunate in his effort to were equal to the work of De La Rue. He forwarded three designs, one each in the denominations ½ d, 1d and 2d, for consideration by the Postmaster-General’s Department. The ½d design would be engraved by Mr Reading, the 1d by Messrs Bridgeland and King and the 2d by Mr Purvis of Little Bourke Street Melbourne. To finally resolve the issue, the Postmaster-General decided to meet with Cooke. Following this meeting the Postmaster-General’s Department agreed to approve the adoption of the design Cooke had submitted for the ½d die for all three values. The Figure 12 Pre-Paid Postcard Showing the Water Tower at Gulargambone, Department also agreed to New South Wales have the dies cut by Samuel 26 - Stamp News


Ian McMahon turn out a first class die, the engraving of the head being equal to anything we could have obtained in London, and we have given the Australian an opportunity of showing his skill.” The Postmaster-General’s Department accepted the dies on 3 May 1916 which were then used to produce envelopes impressed with ½d green, 1d carmine and 2d violet stamps featuring King George V in a star (or octagonal) frame (Figures 6-7). The ½d green and 2d violet were intended for stamping private stationery. The final design was not inscribed ‘Postage’ Figure 13 Pre-Paid Postcard Showing the Water Tower at Narrandera, New but that was added to the deSouth Wales sign in 1921. The star design was finally replaced by a new 21 July 2020 depicting alpine National Parks and design depicting a portrait of King George V in an were sold for $2.40 each. The postcards show: View oval frame in 1928 (Figure 8). from Falls Creek, Alpine National Park; Brindabella Stamped Envelopes Range, Namadgi National Park (Figure 11); and Blue On 25 September 2020, Australia Post issued a Lake, Kosciuszko National Park postcard stamped envelope (selling for $1.35) celebrating 50 years of official diplomatic relations between AusWater Tower Art Postcards tralia and Mauritius which features an illustration Four pre-paid postcards featuring water tower art of two flowers in the indicium, the Golden Wattle were issued on 7 September 2020 and were sold for and Trochetia boutoniana from Mauritius (Figure $2.40 each. The water towers featured come from the 9). Cover design by Jo Muré with the photograph towns of Gulargambone (New South Wales, Figof Trochetia boutoniana by Mr Kadrewvel Pillay ure 12), Winton (Victoria), Narrandera (New South Vythilingum. Wales, Figure 13) and Snowtown (South Australia). The Stella Maris: The Apostleship of the Sea The water tower artists were Jenny McCracken, stamped envelope (selling for $1.35) issued on 25 Guido van Helten, Apparition Media and Vans the September 2020 commemorates the 100th anniverOmega with Sam Brooks respectively. sary of Stella Maris: The Apostleship of the Sea which was founded in Glasgow in 1920 (Figure 10). PSSA On-Line Meeting –Postal Stationery the Apostleship of the Sea provides visitation and The Postal Stationery Society of Australia (PSSA) support services to seafarers. The envelope was held its fifth online meeting on 23 September 2020 designed by Jason Watts with images from Stella with a presentation by Mark Diserio on Jonathan Maris, Apostleship of the Sea, Australia with an indiBear and Victoria’s Patent Advertising Booklet & cium incorporating the organisation’s logo. Envelope. Future topics are expected to include Queensland Postal Stationery. Details will be placed Alpine National Parks Pre-Paid Postcards on the PSSA Facebook and Web pages. Three pre-paid postcards featuring were issued on Stamp News - 27


Cinderella Corner Lending A Hand: Australian Cinderellas And Adopted Designs

Welcome to the November edition of Cinderella Corner. While the Australian cinderella landscape is vast, it is trumped by the breadth of labels issued overseas, particularly in Europe, for well over a century. In Australia, some cinderellas present striking similarities to the designs found in their overseas counterparts. With the wonderful assistance and research of collector John Patterson, this Cinderella Corner explores some of these Australian cinderellas with designs drawn from overseas labels.

Australian Industries Fair

The following has been provided by John Patterson: I was recently struck by the design similarities between a cinderella advertising a Czechoslovakian Industrial Machinery Fair from 1956 (as illustrated in Figure 1) and the well known Australian cinderella advertising the 2nd Australian Industries Fair run by the Victorian Chamber of Manufacturers in Melbourne in March 1958 (as illustrated in Figure 2). A little bit of digging has uncovered some very interesting connections which persist to this day. To track this through we have to examine some of the design elements. Both stamps feature an image of a machinery cog as a central design element. The cog was a common image on cinderellas advertising industrial fairs throughout the early to mid 20th century (and indeed still is). It featured as an element in a 1932 cinderella advertising an Irish industrial fair and was used as the main design element for the 1947 New Zealand Industries Fair. More pertinently for our story, it was

also the central design element in the poster stamp released by the Victorian Chamber of Manufacturers to promote their first Australian Industries Fair which was held in Melbourne in 1955 (as illustrated in Figure 3). This 1955 stamp also features two other design elements which will become central to the story – a global “grid” intended to represent the interconnectedness available through international trade fairs, and the visual device of splitting the stamp into two separate colours – red and blue. The 1955 Australian Industries Fair was by all accounts widely considered a great success. A document at https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-957337653/view?partId=nla.obj-957399759 in Trove indicates that the Czechoslovakian exhibition was by far the largest and most popular of the numerous country displays presented at the fair, winning praise as “the finest postwar exhibition seen in Australia”. In 1956 Czechoslovakia decided to convert a popular cultural festival held annually in the town of Brno since 1927 into the first Czechoslovakian Industrial Machinery Exhibition. To promote this exhibition they designed the logo shown on the 1956 cinderella which incorporates variations of three design elements obviously borrowed from the 1955 Australian cinderella – the cog, the global grid and the use of red and blue on opposite sides of the stamp. The red and blue has been curved to resemble the outline of a globe. Interestingly it also resembles the shape of the front of the most famous exhibition building in the Brno exhibition complex – the Brno Exhibition Hall. This image became the logo for the entire fair and featured in various forms throughout the exhibition – there are fabulous photos accessible online of the 1956 Czech exhibition. They also used the same design the next year to promote the 1957 Czechoslo-

L-R Figures 1-4 28 - Stamp News


Vito Milana

Figure 8 vakian Industrial Machinery Exhibition. In 1958 the Victorian Chamber of manufacturers borrowed the design back to form the basis for the advertising logo for their second Australian Industries Fair, also located in Melbourne. They modified the Czech design slightly by removing the gridlines and bending the blue and red arms down to the text, removing the arrow heads in the process. The biggest design change was the inclusion of the map of Aus-

L-R Figures 5-7

tralia and in the middle of the map they placed a very familiar design element – the Flying Kangaroo logo used by Qantas Empire Airways at the time. At first glance this seems like a strange inclusion, however the National Library of Australia holds a poster with the same design which also includes the text: “Fly Qantas, B.O.A.C. : intending visitors should advise Chamber of Manufactures Melbourne date of arrival” . So it seems likely that the design for the 1958 stamp was originally intended to entice potential foreign visitors and exhibitors to the Melbourne Exhibition and that the Exhibition organisers decided to continue to use the design for their general advertising for the exhibition. The inclusion of the map and kangaroo possibly influenced a subsequent design change in the Czechoslovakian Exhibition logo. From at least 1960 on the Czech logo has included a large black B (for Brno) in the middle of the cog. Throughout the 1960s the Brno fair organisers released many variations of the logo to promote the fair each year – some of these are fabulous examples of communist era European advertising pop art. A modernised version of the logo is still in use to this day by the organisation which has run the fair since 1959, MSV Brno. It seems to me that this modern logo can be traced right back to the original 1955 Australian cinderella. One final observation – I find it interesting that the Czech stamp designers persisted with the red and blue colour scheme – it may be reading too much into it but it’s possible that this was a subliminal reference to the use of the trade fair to help break down barriers between the communist world and the west, remembering that this design was used at the height of the cold war, and that red was the colour symbol at the

Figure 9 Stamp News - 29


Cinderella Corner time for communism, and blue by extension a colour that represented the west. The designer(s) have cleverly avoided the inference that the two colours are in opposition, instead conveying the idea that they are working together in this usage.

Seventh Australasian Philatelic Exhibition

The Seventh Australasian Philatelic Exhibition was held in the Adelaide Public Library Lecture Room from 20 to 23 October 1936. A commemorative label was issued for the event, as illustrated in Figure 4. Measuring 46mm by 32mm and imperforate on all four sides, it bears the text: Seventh Australasian Philatelic Exhibition / Adelaide Public Library Rooms / Oct. 20th to 23rd 1936. It also appears that Postal Stationery items sold over the four days were rather popular with collectors and attendees. The label is often found affixed to covers designed to commemorate the exhibition, along with specially created registration labels. Of more interest, however, is the strikingly similar cinderella illustrated in Figure 5 that advertises the Third International Philatelic Exhibition. This American label bears the text: Third International Exhibition – New York Grand Central Palace – May 9th to 17th 1936. There are only a few notable differences between the two labels, namely variations in the: • Width of red and blue lines, as separated by the white spacing • Font • Size of central oval • Shade of blue

Figure 12 The New York label also appears to be slightly smaller than the Australian one. After speaking to a Melbourne-based cinderella and revenue enthusiast, who had more than five decades of collecting experience, I was informed that the New York exhibition cinderella was designed and produced following an unauthorised adoption of the design of the Australian one and, in the 1930s, this caused some concern.

War Loan Bonds And Liberty Loans

Perhaps the most prevalent and available of the Australian World War I cinderellas are those that promote and encourage the purchase of War Loan Bonds and Liberty Loans. These publicity labels were extended across the latter part of World War I (1917 - 1918) and, as an extended set, number 13 different ones. One of these labels is illustrated in Figure 6. The khaki and black label features the text: Buy War Bonds / By Authority : A. J. Mullet. Govt. Print. The label’s design was adopted from a Canadian version, and a 7 March 1918 letter sent from Australia to Canada requests permission to use the design. The

L-R Figures 10 & 11 30 - Stamp News


Vito Milana Canadian version, which dates to 1917, is illustrated in Figure 7. The key difference is that the Canadian label has the word Victory instead of War. A maple leaf also replaces the Australian soldier’s ANZAC pin.

East Brunswick Kindergarten

The early years of the post-WWII period saw a surge in fundraising efforts to help restabilise economies and other nationwide efforts. One such movement was Victoria’s East Brunswick Kindergarten Building Fund, which ran from 1948 to 1950. The 4x3 sheetlet of cinderella labels illustrated in Figure 8 features the text: MERRY CHRISTMAS 1948 / EAST BRUNSWICK KINDERGARTEN Each label also features an image of a waving Santa Claus with a Christmas tree slung over his shoulder. The left of the sheet also has additional text about the fundraising efforts of the Building Fund. The label’s design was adopted from an earlier USA anti-Tuberculosis (TB) seal, as illustrated in Figure 9. Produced nearly two decades earlier, the 1930 label bears striking resemblance to the Australian one. Key differences exist in the colouring of the label and the text, including the HEATH TO ALL expression typed at the base of the USA cinderella.

Anti-TB Labels

For nearly a century, various Australian organisations have produced Christmas anti-TB seals as means to advertise and fundraise. Of the 100s produced, a few lifted designs from earlier USA and Great Britain-issued ones, with a few of these now explored. The 1946 label illustrated in Figure 10 was produced by the South Australian Tuberculosis

Association (Adelaide). Coloured green, red and black, it features Santa Claus with a white sack flung over his shoulder. The label is rouletted 7 and measures 18.5mm x 25.5mm. Along with the year 1946 it features the text: SEASONS GREETINGS. This label is pictured alongside Great Britain’s 1936 issued anti-TB label. This cinderella is slightly larger than the Australian issued one, is coloured grey, red and black, and is perforated on all four sides. Figure 11 illustrates a block of four of the first Australian seal issued by the South Australian Tuberculosis Association (Adelaide) in 1943. Multicoloured and rouletted 10, each label measures 22mm x 16.5mm and features an image of a child swinging a bell and holding a lantern. Each label features the text: greetings 1943. The label’s design was adopted from the USA 1937 anti-TB label, illustrated as a block of four also in Figure 11. Aside from being perforated and offering minor differences in the font and colouring, the labels are remarkably similar. After a few years of absent productions following World War II, the Anti-Tuberculosis Association of New South Wales (Sydney) produced the sheetlet of anti-TB seals illustrated in Figure 12. Each multicoloured label in the 4x4 sheet measures 17mm x 29mm and is perforated 11. The sheetlet offers three different designs, each sporting the text: SEASONS GREETINGS. The label illustrating the child at a fireplace (sheetlet position R1C3; R2C2; R3C1; R3C3) is a replica of the 1948 USA anti-TB seal, as illustrated in the block in Figure 13. The design of sailing ship (sheetlet position R1C2; R2C1; R2C4; R3C3) is a replica of the 1930 USA anti-TB seal, as illustrated in the block in Figure 14.

Conclusion

The labels offered for comparison in this Cinderella Corner are, without a doubt, a snapshot of the array that exist. Feedback is welcomed and readers may like to offer other examples. I extend my thanks to John Patterson for his research and assistance is building and creating this piece. L-R Figures 13 & 14 Stamp News - 31


Glen Stephens Rarity Offers For 20 years, my ’Stamp Rarity Page’ has been a “must visit” place for many collectors and dealers, globally - tinyurl.com/GlenRare   Large clear photos, and lots of detail, and FIXED NETT PRICES.  “Philatelic Porn” as one client jokingly described it as!   No 20% “Buyer Fees” to add on top etc.  All credit cards accepted - even Amex, and with NO insulting extra fees to you either! Each month I’ll add here, a couple of items from that page, for the possible interest of readers.  Choice material, and special collection offers etc, from all over the globe.  Material on that page often sells FAST - within hours of being listed up, and it changes often - weekly mostly, so do bookmark this page, and check often - tinyurl.com/GlenRare

Cook Islands 1936 £1 Pink “Arms” top value superb MUH Corner Block 4:   

Outstanding item - this £4 was an absolute FORTUNE back then in the middle of the Great Depression .. a few week’s wages literally.  A MUH Block of the £1 Kangaroo of this same era is Cat $13,000 as 4 singles!  These stamps were printed on a heavily chalk faced Cowan paper.  This paper sucks in any humid air like a magnet to the chalk coating, and this mean the paper stays damp during our summer months, stored in unventilated albums, hence foxing and rust spots are NORMAL on these over the past 90 years.  This is an unusually clean and fresh and bright block, as it was in the UK near all its life, bought from a recent immigrant.  SG 121, £480=$A950 as HINGED singles.  (And double that is used of course - rare stamps either way.)  These are clean and fresh and flat and untoned MUH original gum WITH corner sheet audit number (often guillotined off by printer in final trim up) and the attractive pink Jubilee Lines on both sides.  $A425 (Stock 825BX)

GB 1840 “Penny Black” attractive 4 Margin used - $A275:   Clean and fresh. “The World’s First Stamp”  Even 2 or 3 margin, common plate number real roughies these days, can cost $100s, as many 1000›s are sold to China each year by Gibbons and others, in a large consumer marketing drive, and prices are up.  This is Lettered «A. J.» with a lightly struck Salmon Vermillion Red Maltese Cross cancel, as you will agree - so much nicer than a usual heavy BLACK MX as most 1d Backs have!   Every collector wants a “Penny Black” on the frontispiece page of their album, no matter what country they collect.  If your initials are “A.J.” - even better!  SG #1G with Red MX -  “From £425” = $A850  Clean and flat and fresh, and totally free of the usual aging and gook and gunk and hinges - now 180 years old.  GREAT eye-appeal, as you can see, a 4 good margins, fault free copy, for ONE THIRD of Gibbons.  Only $US190 as I type: $A275 (Stock 352BK)

Malaya/Singapore stamps used 1950s on COCOS Gibraltar 1940 KGVI 2d Grey *SIDEWAYS WATERMARK* Perf 13½:

One of the great rarities of Gibraltar, and believed only one sheet issued in error, and of that not all copies survived.  SG 124ab, £800=$A1600.  Excellent perfs and centering as you can see, and with clean gum MLH .. many of this series have the ugly yellowed gum.  The key to a Gibraltar KGVI collection, indeed to any KGVI Commonwealth collection.  Facial appearance you cannot better.  SG Cat $1,600, for just $A450 (Stock 467KR)   

Order via: tinyurl.com/GlenOrder  All Cards accepted with ZERO fee - even Amex!  Bank Deposit fine, or Money Orders. PayPal is accepted in ANY major currency, saving you fees -  contact me first.  LayBys/Layaways always OK with me!

GLEN STEPHENS

PO Box 4007, Castlecrag, NSW, 2068, Australia. - Phone (02) 9958 1333 e-mail me: glen@glenstephens.com - www.glenstephens.com/rarity.html Life Member: American Stamp Dealers Association (New York.) Philatelic Trader’s Society. (London.)


Glen Stephens Rarity Offers For 20 years, my ’Stamp Rarity Page’ has been a “must visit” place for many collectors and dealers, globally - tinyurl.com/GlenRare   Large clear photos, and lots of detail, and FIXED NETT PRICES.  “Philatelic Porn” as one client jokingly described it as!   No 20% “Buyer Fees” to add on top etc.  All credit cards accepted - even Amex, and with NO insulting extra fees to you either! Each month I’ll add here, a couple of items from that page, for the possible interest of readers.  Choice material, and special collection offers etc, from all over the globe.  Material on that page often sells FAST - within hours of being listed up, and it changes often - weekly mostly, so do bookmark this page, and check often - tinyurl.com/GlenRare

Australia 1903 Postage Due, 10/- Fresh MLH:

These early high value monocolour Postage Dues are WILDLY under-priced by the market, and that will change one day soon. ACSC tells us this and 20/- were ONLY on sale in NSW, and almost none were used, and clearly almost none were bought Mint. ACSC tells us the same story occurred with the later 10/green (same cat value mint) and estimates about 50 exist globally of those Mint AND used, combined. ACSC D44, Cat $A3,750. SG D43, £2,000 = $A4,000. Fresh MVLH. These were printed on CHALKY paper, near 120 years back. The Chalk faced paper absorbs moisture of course, and the slightly damp stamps in Summers get bad foxing spots and gum toning VERY usually. This has neither, probably being in Europe most of its life. No usual hinge remains after 120 years, and clean and fresh, and as you can see has FAR better perfs and centering than generally found on these terrors. One of Australia’s very rarest stamps, for WAY less than a set of PO year albums! A true Blue Chip piece to put away, at $2,400 BELOW SG price. Been decades since I had one. $1,600 (Stock 476KX)

GB 1848 10d Brown Embossed, attractive 4 margin - SG $3,000 for $A525:

In my experience, the 10d Embossed are 5 times scarcer than either the 6d or 1/-, despite simiar catalogue values. Attractive used, no ugly hinge remains to hide thins or tears, lighter numeral cancel than the often seen “Killers” of this era, with the 2 intact vertical silk threads, and no usual added corners or margins!  SG 57, £1,500=$A3,000.  These stamps were rather carelessly hand crimped onto sheets of paper, and existing mutiples show the impressions touching, and indeed often overlapping the adjoining unit are common.  Getting one with 4 clear straight margins is suprisingly scarce - check other dealer offerings!.  Many that exist were cut octagonal shape by bored postal clerks, and sold and affixed to mail in that mutilated form. Most you see on cover are thus. $A525 (Stock 384JA)

Malaya/Singapore stamps used 1950s on COCOS ISLAND: Most know abacus had a very strong sale of Cocos Island covers in March 2019 - all lots were dreaded ‘’T’’ lots, so for local buyers, 10% was added to hammer price you see, PLUS the 20% buyer fee, so they fetched huge money. One airletter was invoiced for $35,000! Lot 2477, the 1954 Royal Visit group (of which I have a lovely KGVI cover in this group here, with Malaya and Singapore franking) - cost a local about $A1,050 each. These 4 covers here I bought decades back. Never seen them before or after. No idea of real price, but they are in stock at $A400. At abacus they’d clearly have got double or treble that! PLUS. There were many 4 figure and indeed many 5 figure prices in there - the airletter shown on link here was about $A35,000 invoice! Heaps of links and full details here - tinyurl. com/CocosEnv Not only keen ozzie buyers want this area as COCOS is now Australia, but well-heeled SINGAPOREANS do too, as it is “home issue” stuff to them. $A400 (Stock 593HW)

Order via: tinyurl.com/GlenOrder  All Cards accepted with ZERO fee - even Amex!  Bank Deposit fine, or Money Orders. PayPal is accepted in ANY major currency, saving you fees -  contact me first.  LayBys/Layaways always OK with me!

GLEN STEPHENS

PO Box 4007, Castlecrag, NSW, 2068, Australia. - Phone (02) 9958 1333 e-mail me: glen@glenstephens.com - www.glenstephens.com/rarity.html Life Member: American Stamp Dealers Association (New York.) Philatelic Trader’s Society. (London.)


Introducing the Australian Philatelic Federation November in Melbourne is synonymous with the Spring Carnival and the Melbourne Cup. At the time of writing this article for publication, Melbourne is in lockdown. We do not know if the format of the 2020 Melbourne Cup will be the same as before. Will the crowds be allowed to attend? Will the International horses and Jockeys be allowed to travel? Bradford Baker has provided the following article on the Melbourne Cup. Brad is a horse racing enthusiast who is also a philatelist. His collections include Australian first day covers, Melbourne Cup and horse racing covers and John F Kennedy first day covers. Brad has been collecting horse racing covers for the past 25 years. He usually goes to race meetings each week and has been hampered in his collecting as Covid 19 has imposed limitations on race meetings, stamp auctions and stamp club events. This makes it difficult for Brad to locate covers missing from his collections and to obtain relevant jockey and trainer signatures. I asked him how he was coping, and he replied, “At least the horse races are on the TV.” I do hope he will get to the Melbourne Cup this year.

Figure 1: Archer, first cup winner, pictured on the 1960 Centenary Melbourne Cup 5d stamp

1861. With the gold rush of the 1850s people had flooded to Victoria to find their fortune and the population of the State had grown to 500,000 with 25,000 living in Melbourne. Racing had begun in Victoria in 1838 near the site of the current day Southern Cross Railway Station with the first meeting at Flemington in 1840. The Victoria Racing Club (VRC) was not formed The Melbourne Cup until 1864 and racing at Flemington was conducted The Victorian Colony was barely 25 years old when by separate clubs, the Victorian Turf Club (VTC) the first Melbourne Cup was run at Flemington in and the Victorian Jockey Club (VJC). Each of these Clubs had their own Victoria Derby but it was under the auspices of the VTC that the Melbourne Cup commenced in 1861. Frederick Standish is credited with the idea of the Melbourne Cup, a handicap race over two miles. He was a Captain in the Royal Artillery and a heavy gambler. Standish came to Victoria in 1852 leaving his gambling debts behind in England and in 1858 became Victoria’s Chief Figure 2: 1960 Centenary Melbourne Cup 5d stamp race day cover postmarked Commissioner of PoFlemington, with Flemington Carnival racebook cover used as cachet 50 - Stamp News


Stephanie Bromser

Philatelic Development Officer, APF

from Melbourne, ‘refuelling interstate rivalry’ and adding to the excitement of the Melbourne Cup. The next day Archer ran in the Melbourne Town Plate, also over two miles, and won that race too. Thoroughbreds were a hardy breed in those days. A 20-mile ‘winner take all’ match race had been held at Flemington in 1858. There was a crowd of about 4,000 at Flemington when Archer won the Cup in 1861. Some Figure 3: First Day Cover with 70c Flemington gutter pair, postmarked Flem- said the crowd was kept ington with commemorative Melbourne Cup cancel down by the news of the deaths Burke and Wills that reached Melbourne a lice. He held that office till 1880 and was noted for couple of days before the Cup. bringing in aboriginal trackers to assist in the hunt Archer came back the next year and carrying and capture of the bushranger Ned Kelly. In 1881, 64.5kgs, defeating Mormon, who carried 56kgs, he became Chairman of the VRC in 1881 holding winning by 8 lengths. In 1862, the crowd had almost that position till his death in 1883. doubled to 7,000 from the previous year. Archer Seventeen horses contested that first Melbourne came back two days later and won the All Aged Cup on the Thursday 7th November 1861 and raced Stakes over a mile, carrying 65.5kgs. for £710 (710 gold sovereigns) and a gold watch valued at £200. The winner was Archer, shown in figure 1, ridden by his regular jockey John Cutts and trained by Etienne de Mestre. de Mestre was something of a 19th Century Bart Cummings. He trained a record five Melbourne Cup winners from 1861 to 1878. That record stood for 99 years until broken by Bart Cummings, who later went on to train the winners of twelve Melbourne Cups. The favourite for the first Cup was the Victorian champ, Mormon, who had the topweight of 64kgs, but Archer, starting at odds of 6 to 1 and carrying 60kg, beat him easily by 6 lengths. The win- Figure 4: 1960 Centenary Melbourne Cup 5d first day cover postmarked Nowra, where Archer was stabled ning bets on Archer took money Stamp News - 51


Introducing the Australian Philatelic Federation The VTC and the VJC merged in 1864 to become the VRC and under the VRC, the Melbourne Cup showed promise and became more popular. In 1865, Melbourne Cup Day was declared a half-day holiday becoming a full day holiday in 1877 allowing larger crowds to attend Flemington racecourse. The half and full-day holiday has chopped and changed over the past 100 years. Front Cover from Flemington Carnival Final Day race book used as cachet for Melbourne Cup Souvenir Cover postmarked Flemington, on Melbourne Cup Day on 1st November 1960, which was a half-day holiday in 1960, is shown at figure 2. Figure 5: Phar Lap winning the 1930 Melbourne Cup Crowds grew quickly. In 1870, 20,000 attended the Melbourne Cup and in of the Flemington Racecourse stamp, issued on 7th 1878, 80,000 saw Etienne de Mestre train his fifth October 2014, and cancelled with the Flemington Melbourne Cup winner, Calamia. Two years later Home of the Melbourne Cup pictorial postmark. The the crowd, estimated at 100,000, saw the unbeatMelbourne Cup was originally run on a Thursday, en Grand Flaneur win the cup. The record crowd when the racing Spring Carnival was raced over for the Melbourne Cup was 122,736 in 2003 when three days, on a Thursday, Friday and Saturday. It Makybe Diva won the first of her three Melbourne changed to a Tuesday in 1875, when an extra day Cups. was added to the racing Spring Carnival. The Spring The Melbourne Cup has been run continuously at Carnival was then conducted over a period of eight Flemington since 1861. Figure 3 shows an Austradays with racing on Saturday, Tuesday, Thursday and lian Racecourses first day cover with a gutter pair Saturday. The first Saturday was designated Derby Day, Tuesday was Melbourne Cup Day, Thursday was Oaks Day and the final Saturday was Final Day. With the Cup now being run on the first Tuesday of November, the latest it can be run is November 7th. However, in 1916, it was postponed to the following Saturday due to rain and during World War II from 1942 to 1944 the Cup was run on a Saturday. The folklore grew as the Melbourne Cup rose Figure 6: 1978 Australian Horse racing first day cover with 50c Phar Lap, signed in stature and status. A by Tommy Woodcock, Phar Lap’s trainer movie, starring a young 52 - Stamp News


Stephanie Bromser

Philatelic Development Officer, APF

the first Internationally bred horse win. The improvement of the quality of the Australian and New Zealand thoroughbred was to improve due to World War I. English and European breeders concerned that important breeding lines might be lost due to war sent thoroughbreds to Australia and New Zealand to preserve them. Melbourne Cup winners Poitrel, Night Raid, Peter Pan, Hall Mark and Phar Lap were just a handful of the major race winners from these Figure 7: 1934 ABC advertising cover for the radio broadcast of the Cen- imported sires. By the 1930s, the Great tenary (of Melbourne) Melbourne Cup World Depression was hitting Australia hard and the public Nicole Kidman, was produced telling the story of was looking to Champions to bring them out of the Archer walking from Nowra, in NSW, a journey of mire. Melbourne Cup winner Phar Lap was among 800 km to Flemington to run in the Melbourne Cup. those Champions and this lifted the profile of horse Figure 4 shows a first day cover postmarked Nowra, racing and the Melbourne Cup. Archer’s hometown sent to Sydney. I don’t really Phar Lap is without a doubt the greatest racehorse want to spoil a good story with the facts but the borever to race in Australia & was voted the 22nd best ing truth is that newspapers from the time record he sailed south from Sydney to Melbourne on the steamboat City Of Melbourne along with de Mestre, and other Melbourne Cup entrants. Archer repeated this sailing trip in 1862. Although untrue, the long walk piqued the public interest. However, it was not always smooth sailing on the steamboat from Sydney. In 1876 the City of Melbourne struck severe weather resulting in the deaths of 11 horses and the ship sought refuge at Eden before returning Sydney. With the success of the Cup, interest grew from outside the Australian colonial states. The first New Zealand horse to run in the Melbourne Cup was Lurline in 1874. The first New Zealand horse to win was Carbine in 1890 carrying 66kgs the heaviest weight ever carried by a winner, in the biggest Figure 8: Papua to Melbourne Cup flight cover, postmarked Port field of 39. Comedy King who won the Moresby Papua, 28th October 1936. 329 items of mail were carJubilee Melbourne Cup in 1910 was ried on the flight. Stamp News - 53


Introducing the Australian Philatelic Federation

Figure 9: 150th Running of Melbourne Cup first day cover, postmarked 1st November 2010 and Flemington Horseshoe cancel. Cosmic Original Art cachet (12 of 30) horse to race in North America in the 20th Century. He had 51 race starts for 37 wins, three seconds and two thirds, earning £66,738 the third-highest prizemoney won by a horse in the world at the time of his death. In today’s money that prize money equates to $6,603,667. In Australia, he was trained by Harry Telford and the usual jockey was Jim Pike. He ran three times in the Melbourne Cup. In 1929 as a 3-year-old he ran third. He won in 1930 by 4 lengths. Figure 5 is a card showing the win of Phar Lap in the 1930 Melbourne Cup and carrying 62kgs. A crowd of 72,000 people were at Flemington that day to watch Phar Lap. From his last 35 starts, he won 32 races with two close seconds. The unplaced run was in the 1931 Melbourne Cup where he carried 68kgs, the highest weight ever carried by any horse in the Cup. Included in those 32 wins, were wins on each of the four days of the 1930 Spring Carnival, winning four races at distances from one mile to the two-mile Melbourne Cup with the distances totalling over five miles. His last win was in the Agua Caliente Handicap in 54 - Stamp News

Mexico, the then richest race in the world. Telford due to financial problems, could not make the trip to North America and his strapper, Tommy Woodcock, took over his training. Figure 6 shows a 1978 Horse Racing first day cover with the 50c Phar Lap stamp affixed and signed by Tommy Woodcock. Shortly after the race Phar Lap died and Australia went into mourning. There was conjecture at the time how he died, but recent tests proved it was by arsenic poisoning, but no one knows whether it was deliberate or accidental. ABC Radio (3AR) commenced Radio Broadcasts of the Melbourne Cup in 1925. Figure 7 shows an Australian Broadcasting Commission advertising cover for the 1934 Centenary (of Melbourne) Melbourne Cup broadcast postmarked with Victoria and City of Melbourne slogan cancel. Those listening would have heard Peter Pan win his second Melbourne Cup, having previously won in 1932. Due to falling crowds, in 1933 the VRC had evicted the commercial radio stations when they refused to withhold betting odds. The race callers took up positions


Stephanie Bromser

Philatelic Development Officer, APF in the Pioneer Hotel, on Scotchman’s Hill, across the Maribyrnong River and broadcast from there until 1946 when the ban was lifted. The Pioneer Hotel can be seen in the top left corner of figure 5. ABC Radio was permitted to continue broadcasting on course. Scotchman’s Hill was a popular place for those not wanting to pay admission to the racecourse to watch the races. There was no problem putting a bet on there with the illegal Starting Price (S.P.) bookmakers. 1936 saw 8 gold miners from Wau, PNG, pay £200 each, to charter a flight with Guinea Airways to the Melbourne Cup. The flight in a Lockheed Electra was piloted by Tommy O’Dea. The miners saw Wotan win the Cup at odds of 100 to 1 but there is no information on whether the miners backed the winner. Figure 8 is one of 329 items of mail carried on the flight, sometimes referred to as the Papua to Melbourne Cup flight, postmarked Port Moresby Papua, 28th October 1936. Fashion for those attending the Cup Carnival was dress to impress with morning suits, business suits and jacket and tie for the men and the women dressing to compliment the men’s attire. There have been those attending over the years in what today we would call ‘cosplay’ which added to the colour of the occasion. In 1962, the Fashions on the Field competition was introduced and on Derby Day in 1965 English model Jean ‘The Shrimp’ Shrimpton shocked the crowd when she wore a skirt that was 7.5cm above the knee. In 1973, Australian went metric and the Cup went metric too. It was shortened by 61 metres and run over 3200 metres. Gala Supreme won the 1973 Cup, ridden by Frank Reys, the first indigenous jockey to win the Melbourne Cup. 1985 was the first million-dollar Cup when the prize money was raised to $1,000,000 and won by What A Nuisance. The Melbourne Cup trophy today is a three handled gold Loving Cup and has been of this design since 1919 being made by James Steeth. The cup is award-

ed to the owner of the winning horse and smaller replicas are given to the trainer and jockey. The VRC knows the location of all the Loving Cup trophies since they were introduced in 1919 except for three. Missing are the Cups won by Trivalve 1927, Phar Lap 1930 and Rivette 1939. Recently one of these Cup resurfaced. Over time the Melbourne Cup had become slightly taller and slimmer. Owner of Beldale Ball, Lady Susan Renouf (then Sangster) had asked why her cup was different from others. From weights and measurements, it is believed to be Phar Lap’s Cup. A detailed check of VRC archives found that Harry Telford had sold back Phar Lap’s Cup in the 1940s to the VRC. To save money on a new Cup, it was rebadged for the 1953 Cup won by Wodalla. That check also found that Wodalla’s Cup had been sold back to the VRC in the 1970s. That Cup was rebadged for the 1980 Melbourne Cup won by Beldale Ball. The Melbourne Cup trophy was to appear on a stamp again in 2010 for the 150th Melbourne Cup. Figure 9 shows a Cosmic Original Art cachet first day cover for the 150th Melbourne Cup postmarked with Flemington Horseshoe first day of issue postmark, 1st November 2010. AusVipex 2020 AusVipex 2020 is the Australian virtual one-frame exhibition organized by the Australian Philatelic Federation. By the time this issue of Stamp News is published, the exhibits (and maybe the results) should be available for viewing on the website: ausvipex2020.com.au. Figure 10 shows the official logo. The exhibits range from International Large Gold to entries from first-time exhibitors. Many philatelic classes are represented including Traditional, Postal History, Postal Stationery, Open, Revenues and the newest FIP class of Postcards. This is a great opportunity to see these exhibits without having to travel to the exhibition. Stamp News - 55


Market Matters “Knowledge Is Power”.

My mantra in this hobby has always been “Knowledge Is Power”. I’ve typed it 100s of times, and it always applies. Good literature is essential for your special collecting field, and probably the most salubrious general publication ever issued connected to this stamp hobby is the absolutely massive “The Royal Philatelic Collection” by Sir John Wilson. The Abacus Public stamp auction in Melbourne recently saw a copy of this being invoiced for $A4,325 on an estimate of just $A500! Near ten times the presale estimate. This copy had many very keen bidders, and was missing the heavy cloth covered wood outer slipcase, and was described as having age foxing/spotting on the pages etc. “The Royal Philatelic Collection” book cost 60 guineas (or £63) in the UK in 1952, and $US180 in the US. No wonder the USA book seller was offering instalment plans! There is an attachment in the prospectus detailing a payment plan for the individual collector - pay $US48 upfront, and then 11 monthly instalments of $US12 each. It is a superb book, and the physical overall SIZE of it surprised me - like some leather bound Medieval religious tome in a major city Rare Book library! £63 was about SEVEN MONTHS GROSS salary in the UK at that time - hence the payment plan being offered! It weighs 7 kilos, or about 15 pounds - the legal maximum weight of carry-on baggage of planes in Australia. It is MASSIVE.

Seven Months’ salary to purchase!

The British were hit far harder by WW2 than here, and in fact rationing was still in place in the UK until 1953, the year QE2 was crowned. Large food parcels were sent heavily to Britain from here after the War for many years, at the special cheap 5/10d rate. British wages were far lower than here - as this piece in “The Telegraph” newspaper tells us - “In 1950, the average UK annual salary was just over £100.” Published in 1952, this massive work was a printing venture of Lord Kemsley, owner of the prestigious Dropmore Press. 1,500 copies were leather bound. I guess there would be very few copies still in private hands - most copies would be in philatelic libraries 56 - Stamp News

Stamp book just sold for $4,325. worldwide, most larger and longer established clubs and Societies have one I feel sure. A lot more global discussion on this huge book is here - tinyurl.com/KGVbook European Auctions have sold them at very high prices, and Prestige/Abacus Auctions have obtained $2,600 and $2,800 in the past for these exact same quite massive books. They are in full Morocco Red leather, a very thick goatskin binding, with an outer hard wooden slip-box for storage The colour plates are of exceptional quality, with glassine interleaving pages with captions printed on etc, and exceptional colour matches. The photos I took nearby of some Australia States issues show this well - these stamps cut out would pass as the real McCoy to many, due to high quality plates that were made for this limited edition print run on a ‘spare no expense’ budget! Indeed often singles cut from pages of this book in the past have been passed off as genuine classics and imperfs. The very sharp image of the Western Australia 4d 1854 “Inverted Frame” is excellent resolution for something printed near 70 years back. The late Rodney Perry was defending a forged copy of this stamp on stampboards he sold at Public Auction years back (as genuine) and stated there were no good colour ref-


Glen Stephens

Some superb stamp colour plates. erence copies to compare the fine detail against - until this page in his library was pointed out to him! eBay spivs offered a photocopy of the Tasmania 1853 1d Blue Courier block 4 shown above, and the mad Bunnies bid it up to $650. You just can’t make this stuff up - details on the link posted nearby. Talk about brain bypasses. Seldom will you ever own a stamp book weighing 7 kilos - it is quite something quite impressive to hold in the flesh! More photos of it here - tinyurl.com/KGVbook

Corny sales video from 1952!

In the link nearby you can access the wonderful old black and white Pathe News film clip from 1952 on YouTube, with Sir John Wilson, the Keeper Of The Royal Collection trying (very woodenly!) to spruik up buyer interest in the book. Sir John Wilson was very hard of hearing, so they needed to do it several times as you can see. A fun view it really is! This was the glowing description in a Prestige Public Auction for this huge tome PHILATELIC LITERATURE: “The Royal Philatelic Collection” by Sir John Wilson (1952), being a complete catalogue of the most important and valuable stamp collection ever formed, compiled by the

Keeper of the Royal Collection himself. Without doubt, this is the finest philatelic book of all time, produced on the highest-quality paper, extensively illustrated with black & white plates and some exceptional colour plates. This is the Deluxe edition bound in red Morocco leather with the Royal coat-of-arms emblazoned in gold on the face. In its original wrapping & slipcase (defective). If this book had been published in any other field of endeavour it would be worth very many thousands of dollars. Because it’s “only” philately, it has never achieved its potential, and is a gift at our estimate. Weighing 7 kilograms, this impressive volume should be the cornerstone of every philatelic library worth the name. I have a nice example here I bought in an estate with the original red cloth bound wooden slipcase etc. Mine was priced up at $A1,750 - a snip compared to whomever went crazy at auction paying $A4,325 for a foxed and no slipcase copy, but that is the vagaries of the stamp auction system. Buyers seldom ask stamp dealers for such pieces - the Abacus buyer/underbidders will kick themselves!

Sorting Kangaroo Stamp Watermarks.

The Australian first three Kangaroo watermarks are known locally as First, Second and Third watermarks. All dealers and collectors here know them thus, and have done for 70 years or more. The ACSC Catalogue thankfully, also names them thus. The later Small Multiple Crown, (“Small Multi”) and the last watermark, “CofA” are far easier to sort, so let’s ignore those here. The “Large Multiple” watermark only appeared on a few KGV heads. The first three as can be seen, are all a single Crown over A watermark, and to the collector (or dealer!) not used to handling them, are often very hard to pick apart. Sadly the foreign catalogue makers all have wildly varying diagrams and names for them, to make things tougher still, and consequently sales and auction descriptions all over the world are a Stamp News - 57


Market Matters totally confusing mess. The Seven Seas Stamps “Australia Stamp Catalogue” (ASC) calls them “Watermarks 5, 6, and 7”. Gibbons call these “Watermarks 2, 5 and 6”. Scott calls them “Watermarks 8, 9 and 10”. Michel and Yvert catalogues etc, call them something else again. It is an international MESS and no wonder collectors are perplexed! It is a rather Monty Python arrangement, totally confusing to all collectors and dealers globally, and it is a shame there is not an outbreak of common sense, which sees all publishers simply align them with the terminology (and images) used here. That is, to the terms used for decades by the Brusden White ACSC, the leading The Australian stamp watermarks catalogues for Australian material of course. near every Roo facially when on an album page, or Over 40 plus years as a dealer, I have handled Hagner, or image. However that is down to decades and sold way over a MILLION Kangaroo stamps, of practice and experience, and it can’t be taught by probably double that actually, and am one of the books! biggest stockists of these issues globally. I can sort These first three Kangaroo watermarks generally have stamps of all the same colour in each, to make it even harder. All are just a single Crown over the letter A. Naturally the usual hinges and gunk and gook on the reverses accumulated over a century, can make them VERY hard to pick apart, to a person not familiar with them. A 2/- Brown varies vastly in price between these three watermarks, so sorting them accurately is vitally important. A Second Watermark 2/- brown sells for FIVE times that of a Third Watermark for example. The same as a 9d Violet or a 5/- … many times the price, or $100s of dollars more in the case of the 5/- stamp.

THOUSANDS are misdescribed on eBay.

This is the 1915 “Second” Watermark 58 - Stamp News

1,000s of Roo stamps I see offered on eBay and similar collector describer sites etc, are just plain and appallingly wrong, as of course the amateur sellers


Glen Stephens lighter fluid, if you can’t locate specific watermark fluid. I personally use only those. The big plus with the latter fluids is, you also often see repairs and thins, or pressed creases etc, at the same time! Few collectors realise that watermarks are easily sorted via Fluid, and they are safe to use even on mint stamps of course, which absolutely amazes most collectors. Clearly these illustrated products are flammable, so do READ and pay attention to the labels! For even faster ID, hold the stamp to a very BRIGHT light. Those small new style 5000 Lumen super bright LED small flashlights you can buy for $5 or $10 anywhere today are superb for this. Any such super bright backlight often shines through the thickest of stamp papers, and are FANTASTIC for watermarks, and I use my little $10 unit all the time. Quick, cheap and easy to use. simply “self-decide” they have the SCARCEST watermark every time! Human nature sadly. Given the choice of owning a $20 stamp, or a $200 one, they of course... And many of the eBay style buyers are just as clueless, so a really perfect storm. The Blind leading the Blind. Can’t beat those eBay “Bargains”. (Until it comes time to sell them one day, to a real dealer of course, and THEN the penny drops. Friendly eBay seller “jiminybob3741825” has long ago closed their account, and decamped with your money!) An experienced eye can quickly sort them all by typical colour nuances, and/or more often, by the perf characteristics as well in most cases, without ever seeing the watermark. However for those who need to sort their Kangaroos by watermarks, and are new to it, here are some practical tips following, that you may want to note and try out. For detecting harder to see Kangaroo watermarks, all those silly $100s cost price wacko watermark machines are a total waste of money in my view. If I ever need to look up anything, which is seldom thankfully, I use a $2 black watermark tray, and a few $’s bottle of watermark fluid - or use Ronsonol or Zippo

Near zero cost methods.

These two methods above cost almost nothing, and between them, sort out 99% of these watermarks accurately and quickly, and you are good to go in most cases. I repeat, those loopy $100s type gizmo

Can you sort this at a glance? Stamp News - 59


Market Matters “watermark” machines are a waste of space. I have not turned mine on for 25 years. Still sitting in the original box with a layer of dust on it now. The SECOND watermark Kangaroos really should never be an issue for anyone. The SHARP wide corners of the crown are totally distinctive. As that was a short WWI emergency use, printed on paper made for the wider KGV heads, it means the SECOND watermark almost never sits “well centred” on each Kangaroo stamp - often half a watermark is on each side of the stamp, hence an instant clue. The photo nearby showing the reverse shows that watermark from the reverse, AND the vertical paper grain. That leaves the First and Third watermarks to sort quickly - SG 12 and SG 41. A 2/- First Watermark costs 5 or 10 times the price of a 2/- brown Third, so getting it correct is really important, if you are a collector and do not want to get ripped off on eBay etc. The 1915 SECOND watermark 2/- brown, SG 29 (SG £150) sells in Superb Used condition for about $A250, and the year later 1916 THIRD watermark SG 41, (SG £14) is $A20 or so. The stamp illustrated on the previous page has no year date, but I can tell for certain at a first glance, is it the scarce SG 29. Can

Double the value, based on paper weave. 60 - Stamp News

you? NOT being able to, clearly will cost you. BOTH have vertical mesh paper. Those 2 watermarks look REALLY similar to all novices for some reason, and are the ones that most collectors get wrong. Near everything one sees on amateur seller outlets like eBay of COURSE mis-described by the dreamer sellers as “1915 Secund Watarmak, Trew Bargeen et $100”. Durrhhh. And the eBay Bunnies hoover them up, as they are equally clueless. $100 for a $10 stamp - true genius. To sort a FIRST from a SECOND or THIRD watermark Kangaroo is the world’s simplest task. The latter two printings were are on VERTICAL mesh paper always, and the First Watermark, alone of all Roos, is on HORIZONTAL mesh paper - always. See the reverse of a Second Watermark shown nearby. Tons more discussion here - tinyurl.com/RooWmk

Paper CURL is the key.

They hence are SO easy to sort apart, I fail to understand how folks mess it up so regularly. You can SEE the paper mesh direction easily with the naked eye in the scan here, and can indeed often see it from most scans. And the fastest, simplest, cheapest, and most certain test, is just to observe the ready PAPER CURL. Place any Kangaroo stamp, mint or used, back of stamp upwards, in the upright palm of your hand. Within seconds, your body heat makes all FIRST Watermark stamps curl noticeably from top to bottom, and SECOND and THIRD watermarks curl side to side. It is THAT fast, that accurate, that cheap, and that simple! The same “curl” test works to sort out many other papers, such as the notoriously tricky New Zealand “Arms” stamp series etc, where the actual watermark is far less easily seen visually, as the paper used on those is so thick. I sold this New Zealand £4 Arms stamp shown nearby on my Rarity Page recently. The stamp is the very scarce 1935 New Zealand 1935 “ARMS” £4 Light Blue. It is on the thick, chalk-faced “Cowan” paper, with very obvious HORIZONTAL mesh. You can see that grain readily with the naked eye. The much later, and half the SG cat value, VERTICAL mesh version, SG 212, is often


Glen Stephens

These will be handy if printed up. passed off by less informed sellers, as this quite rare stamp - SG F166.

Very scarce WW2 era NZ stamp.

£4 was a FORTUNE in 1935 for a mint stamp, during the Great Depression - a month’s wages for those that DID have a job. A mint hinged pair of £2 Roos of same era at £4 face, is cat £8,500 in SG! It is one of the highest face values in entire KGV reign, indeed most KGVI collectors seek this stamp too, as in the KGVI album, and Murray Payne KGVI cat etc. WHY the Gibbons catalogue value for this rare stamp is only £750, is one of life’s mysteries, although it has risen 25% in the past 2 editions, so most better stamps perform WAY better than bank interest! You probably can’t find another mint example on sale globally, at ANY price, as these were always very scarce. The most ‘common’ 10/- Roo costs more than this mint, and endless examples of those are on the global market each week. Stampboards member Allanswood is a great graphic artist. He came up with the very accurate diagram shown nearby of each Australian watermark, and incorporated a perforation gauge into it - pretty handy, as Stanley Gibbons have now stopped making their famous “Instanta” gauges it seems, along with the SG Stamp Colour Charts, as reported last month.

The perforation gauge is needed for the many different KGV and KGVI heads, and the 1934 Victorian Centenary issues etc, which only range from 10½ to 15. tinyurl. com/RooWmk has his many varied submissions shown, before we got to this one illustrated, after many tweaks and suggestions along the journey. Nearby is a fuzzy copy of the ALMOST final artwork as I recall - there were later amended drafts, that I have lost. My hope is to print 10,000-20,000 of them on a thick, stout, 420 GSM hard varnished C6 postcard size, so they will last for decades. We can distribute them via magazines, and Auction catalogues etc, so you get them into as many hands as possible globally. All we need now is an Auction house/dealer sponsor etc, who wants their name and logo etc on the reverse of them all, and who will get a few 1000 for their own use! Couple $1000 super well spent, for decades of positive exposure.

STAMPEX UK 2020 went “Virtual”!

This COVID-19 madness has of course had a devastating effect on global stamp shows. Near everything, repeat EVERYTHING seems to have been cancelled globally. Regular club meetings, Nationals, and even large Internationals - as our cousins in Auckland experienced, just as NZ 2020 had started earlier year, and the rug was pulled by the authorities etc. All cancelled. Sad. For many stamp dealers, doing shows and nationals etc, are their main source of income and sales. As a fairly lucky break, I have never bothered, and sitting at home, am doing 2 or 3 times my usual sales volume as in recent years. Gazillions of collectors are stuck at home full time, or working 2 or 3 days at home and buying supplies and stamps online is where they gravitate to right now. I’ve sold more Hagners and stockbooks in the past 6 months than I sold in the past 6 YEARS! But the dealers who rely on face to face interaction at larger shows, or in retail shops, have really suffered, and I feel for them. It is nothing THEY have done wrong, Stamp News - 61


Market Matters it is just this nasty virus impacting the lives of simply everyone reading this, globally. And limiting close contact with others. I have been a member of the Philatelic Traders Society London (PTS) for over 40 years, and to their credit, they came up with an interesting initiative to try and create awareness and interaction between dealers and collectors, that ordinarily would have met face to face in London. They launched it on October 1, and called it “VIRTUAL STAMPEX”. Anything new and innovative in these strange times is to be applauded by all, and you can visit their site here - tinyurl.com/Stampex20 for more overview of exactly what Virtual Stampex was all about. Lots of leading dealers globally actively took part. Well done all. It seemed to work wonderfully. I spent a few hours poking about - many “standholders” had chatrooms where collectors could ask questions etc. Many of the savvier dealers offered 15% or 20% discounts to clients, who used a special Virtual Stampex promo code when ordering things etc. I certainly did, and saved quite a bit of money. The site will be up until at least the end of October I under-

Adjudged a success from all camps. stand, so you can visit it and see what went on. As I type, there had been 75,000 booth visits. Most impressive. Nothing will replace a real live stamp show, but top marks for trying to do something, and so well organised. Nearing 3 score and 10 years, I do NOT have accounts with Twitter, Facebook, WhatsApp, or Instagram etc, so am not nearly as plugged in as many of the more tech savvy folks about, but I do have a good deal of big picture vision I like to think, and can see these things are GREAT for the hobby. I founded and own stampboards.com – easily the world’s largest stamp Bulletin Board with over 22,000 members, who have added 7 million messages, and over 1 million stamp images. So, I do my tiny bit to keep philately exposed to a truly global audience, and the more folks we get interested in the hobby, the better for us all! Stampboards of course had many members drop in on the Virtual Stampex and it had reports there from PTS Chairman Suzanne Rae, about what was going on, and it was adjudged to be a great success, from all those who reported back, as can be seen here - an interesting read - tinyurl.com/Stampex2020

Europe’s largest stamp Event.

The new face of PTS London. 62 - Stamp News

STAMPEX is an institution in Europe, and run by the PTS. It is Europe’s largest stamp Event, and has been running for over 60 years. Stampex International ordinarily takes place twice a year at The Business Design Centre in Islington London, with some of the biggest names in philately as regular attendees. Deal-


Glen Stephens

1967 set invoiced for about £21,000. ers and collectors globally have it on their “Must DO and See” list on their calendars. To show the changing nature of this hobby, the Chairman of the PTS London, in the 40 plus years I have been a member, has been male, and an elderly male at that. Nothing wrong with that as I have typed here before - it simply reflected the average stamp dealer globally.  And none had blue painted finger nails!  These things are changing. Just like the hobby. The subject of a recent widely reported “Guardian” newspaper article was Suzanne Rae, 37, who for 2 years has been Chairman of the Philatelic Traders Society London (PTS) and was just re-elected mid-October.  PTS are now 91 years old, and run the vastly successful STAMPEX mega shows in the UK twice a year etc.  The black and white shield PTS member logo, is synonymous with reputable Stamp Dealers and Trust. Anyway, having a 37 year old, tech savvy, with real world Business acumen Millennial, heading up the PTS has seen a lot of positive changes.  The PTS have now been nudged very firmly into 2020, with a Facebook page, and blogs and Forum. And right now, a successful Virtual Stampex behind them, and other such modern things and devices, that many collectors and dealers actually use often - and it was embraced far better than I’d have predicted. Well done.

Toned £25 get near full SG - £50,000

Many assume the high catalogue figures in Stanley Gibbons for scarce pieces are simply fantasyland stuff, and nothing close to them is ever attained. Oddly, for many of the scarce offerings, the market value is indeed near full catalogue. Many Australia State imperfs in top shape fetch well above full SG price as I point out here regularly with examples. Spink London had a sale of eclectic worldwide pieces in October that some chap seemed to have accumulated like a wealthy stamp magpie. No pattern or common regions .. just unusual stamps, and many of them you do not see each day. The Northern Nigeria £25 KEVII mint he had TWO examples of, one far more toned than the other, which those who inspected the better one confirmed was pretty badly browned, but a rare stamp. SG19, cat £60,000 It was invoiced at close to £50,000 - although anyone is a genius who can work out actual Spink invoice costs, with the myriad of highlighted chunky Buyer Fees, 20% VAT on Hammer price, and VAT on Buyer Fee, and on other things in their fee soup conditions, another 3% fee to bid on line via Saleroom.com, another 3% fee to use a credit card etc, etc, and goodness what for insurance and shipping, on top of it all. The same collector had a set of a set that collectors are unaware of – the 1967 “Independent Anguilla” overprinted stamp set 16. This set with small condiStamp News - 63


Market Matters tion issues, and no Certificate, was invoiced for about £21,000 on an estimate of just £4,200. Near FIVE times higher. Full SG Catalogue on this set is £25,000. It is an issue that was surrounded in dodginess and skulduggery at the time, and was essentially cornered by the Postmaster there, and certainly never met the usual criterion for catalogue listing of being freely available at face value. However, it somehow DID get into Stanley Gibbons catalogues, and this bullish price proves forever, the benefit of that. Papua New Guinea had a set of Emergency overprints issued decades later, that WERE sold at face value, and most were long sold out before the stamp world ever heard of them, that look cheap at few $100 the complete set. I reported them to the global stamp world - a very interesting read, and most are not are of - tinyurl/com/PNG1994 The PNG Post Office just raided their supplies of unsold issues in the HQ vault at Boroko and sent them to a local printer to replace with commonly used values they had ran out of nationally. The printing work was pretty sloppy, with inverts, missing values, and irregular shaped overprint boxes, and dots and splotches etc evident right though this emergency overprinting by a printer who had never done postage stamps before. Collectors typically seek a set of 20 Papua New Guinea 1994 Overprint set. different of these PNG overprints, shown nearby. Retail is only a few $100, and I were seemingly legitimate and largely listed in Stansell many each year - a far cry from the $40,000 or ley Gibbons catalogues. I’ve seldom seen them and so the Anguilla set sold for! These were all widely they are very complex. postally used of course, and indeed a used set costs Linns Stamp News in October ran an appeal to far less than a mint set. readers for any information at all on a mystery (to them) overprint stamp - the 10c on 15c Angel Fish Other Pacific Islands also overprinted. stamp from the Cook Islands issued in the mid to Other Pacific nations in this general era went mad on latter 1990s. They could find not record of it. overprints - FIJI for instance has seemingly endless Martin J. Frankevicz is the Scott Catalogue New overprints and errors on Definitives. Most of these Issues editor, and he wrote this month that he can see 64 - Stamp News


Glen Stephens

These will be VERY scarce beasts.

we drove around a few times - takes 20-30 minutes. It is a very small place. No-one there is too far from this “PO”. Not sure if there are any other POs there. The “Post Office” side of it, was a little desk no-one was stationed at. Asked if I could cancel a few postcards (that I’d bought stamps for already, at a gift store, along with the postcards) and they handed me the self inking canceller, which was days out of sync - clearly no one had used it for ages. NZ$1 postage was for GLOBAL. To Europe or the USA etc - that has to be about the lowest rate in the world! On this link tinyurl.com/ CookSurch note my home-applied slight pen “cancel” I always employ on each stamp when overseas, in countries with low paid staff, to deter folks working in POs peeling off stamps from postcards to re-use and re-sell! That happens a LOT.

no listing of this overprint in Scott, Gibbons, Michel, or Yvert and Tellier catalogues, and says the overprint is a mystery to Scott. This very issue was illustrated and discussed on stampboards.com as far back as early 2013! Full details here - tinyurl.com/CookSurch American member, and New York dealer Steven Zirinsky even added scans of a few clearly commercial covers he had in stock, showing useage of this overprint stamps. Margo and I were in Rarotonga and Aitutaki this time last year, and went looking for the “GPO” in the Cook Islands. Not what you’d expect! It is located in a very hard to locate area in Avarua - the city centre area. These days it is a Satellite Telco called BLUESKY, down some back street, with a huge satellite dish out front, selling mobile phones top-ups and internet plans etc .. nothing at all looking like a normal PO. There were PO boxes out front and that is how folks get mail there. The entire island of Rarotonga Cancel your own postcards!

Stamp News - 65


VIETNAM’S PHILATELIC HISTORY Older Stamp News readers probably have very vivid memories of the Vietnam conflict. In Sweden and many other countries, young people organised huge demonstrations in the support of the FNL (Front National de Libération) in its struggle against the Saigon government and its US allies. The war ended when the US decided to withdraw its armed forces from Vietnam as Washington finally realised that this was a war that couldn’t be won. The US armed forces had suffered considerable losses but in no way could they be compared with the human suffering the long war had caused the Vietnamese people. Today’s Vietnam has a very long history but in this story it begins in the 1880s when France began taking a serious interest in the Indochinese region. Cochinchina in the southern part of Vietnam was made a French colony while Annam & Tonkin in the north were declared to be French protectorates. Cochinchina used stamps of its own from 1886 until 1888 and Annam & Tonkin issued a handful of provisional stamps at around the same time. Thus these two areas are listed in our catalogues as stamp

issuing territories. In 1888 the three areas were united with the creation of (French) Indochina. The first stamps were then released in 1889. Later Cambodia and Laos were added to this colonial creation. Depicted in Fig. 1 is a Tonkinese woman. This stamp was issued in 1907 is part of a long set of stamps showing women from different parts of Indochina. The Vichy government in France managed to keep control of Indochina during World War II by collaborating with the Japanese. However, it all ended with a Japanese invasion towards the end of the war. Some of the stamp issues during this difficult time depict what can only be described as fascist symbolism as shown in Fig. 2. This stamp was issued in 1943. When World War II had finally ended France wanted to regain control of Indochina but this was very much something that the local populations didn’t want. France dispatched its Foreign Legion and other military units to Indochina and the war then lasted from 1946 until it all ended with French defeat on 7 May 1954 at the battle of Diên-Biên-phu.

Figure 2

Figure 1

Figure 3

66 - Stamp News


Christer Brunström However, the problems didn’t end with the Vietnamese victory as the country was split into two parts in 1954. South Vietnam with Saigon as its capital became a firm ally of the United States and other Western nations. This certainly was not what the North Vietnamese leadership wanted. On South Vietnamese stamps the country name is usually indicated as VIET NAM CONG HOA as shown on a stamp (Fig. 3) issued in 1967. A freedom movement aiming at taking over the territory of South Vietnam was founded. It is known as FNL (National Liberation Front in English). As we’ll see later the FNL issued stamps of its own. North Vietnam with Hanoi as its capital became a socialist country under the leadership of Hô Chi-Minh who for years had championed the Vietnamese struggle for liberation from French colonial rule. Hanoi of course received much support from the Soviet Union, China and other socialist countries. On many of the early stamps the country name is given as VIET NAM DAN CHU CONG HOA (Fig. 4). The Vietnam War then raged from 1957 until 1975.

Numerous North Vietnamese stamps noted successes on the battlefield and some of them can certainly be described as highly propagandist in nature. Shown here is a 1972 stamp (Fig. 5) marking the downing of 3,500 American war planes over North Vietnam. The idea was most probably to boost morale in the country showing the people that the Vietnamese people was winning the war. Whether the claim is correct is unknown to me but the US armed forces suffered significant losses during the long war. The Vietnam War ended in 1975 with the collapse of the South Vietnamese régime and the following year the two parts were united to form the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. Hanoi now became the capital of the entire country and the name of Saigon was changed to Hô Chi-Minh City in honour of the famous statesman and freedom fighter. Since the end of the war Vietnam has undergone tremendous changes. This nation of almost 100 million people now has a very strong economy and relations to the USA appear to be very good. But, at the same time, the country is ruled by a socialist government

Figure 4 Figure 5

Stamp News - 67


VIETNAM’S PHILATELIC HISTORY with very little of the kind of democratic governance that Australians and other westerners take for granted. One of Vietnam’s major foreign policy problems is related to the South China Sea conflict where China claims a number of tiny islands which are also claimed by Vietnam and some other South-East Asian nations. Thus the Vietnamese armed forces are still on alert in order to protect the country’s territory. Many undenominated stamps have been issued to frank soldiers’ letter and one such stamp issued in 1961 is shown in Fig. 6. The historical development in Vietnam has resulted in a very complex situation when it comes to cataloguing its stamps. There were a handful of stamps for Cochinchina and Annam & Tonkin, French Indochina issued some 480 stamps and a souvenir sheet and in the 1945-1954 period Vietnam released almost 100 stamps. North Vietnam issued some 950 stamps and a number of souvenir sheets

while South Vietnam added some 520 stamps to the catalogue listings. From 1963 until 1976 the FNL issued about 69 different stamps for the areas under its control in South Vietnam. Shown here is one of the first 1963 stamps with wording in Spanish (Fig. 7). The country name on the FNL stamps is CONG HOA MIEN NAM VIETNAM. Since 1976 the Socialist Republic of Vietnam has issued several thousand stamps with ever higher denominations reflecting the constant devaluation of the dong (the Vietnamese currency unit) which still is a problem. Some issues have been targeted towards the world’s thematic collectors but most mirror the country and its development in different areas. They certainly tell a lot about this old nation which in more recent times has become a popular tourist destination attracting visitors from Australia and the rest of the world.

Figure 7 Figure 6

68 - Stamp News


The world's very largest and friendliest Stamp Bulletin Board - with a strong Aussie flavour!  A fast-growing true Community which started in 2007.  Stampboards now has over 20,000 real members from 150 countries -  who have made over SIX MILLION posts, on over 80,000 topics.   See a MILLION high resolution colour photos, showing rare stamps, errors, discoveries, cinderellas and new issues etc.  We get over 5 MILLION hits each month.  Zero cost: www.stampboards.com or facebook.com/stampboards A vast array of leading dealers and collectors are active members.  The Presidents of both APTA and the APF are members.  Senior International Stamp Judges are members.  Catalogue producers, stamp magazine publishers, and leading auctioneers are all active members.  Masses of stamp club secretaries worldwide are members, and promote their clubs and events free - does YOURS??? All entirely FREE.  If you can two-finger type you are all set - simple and intuitive.  Discuss EVERY aspect of stamps, from ANY country, and get instant answers and input.  Show and share your photos, ask questions, get advice from experts.  Buy or sell or trade the stamps you need - ALL FREE.  Loads of fun threads, jokes and general discussions too.  HUNDREDS of eBay crooks, cons and forgers have been exposed and expelled from eBay by our member reports and Detective work - essential reading.  Monthly competitions with very valuable stamp prizes.  Pop by today.  It is like your ‘local stamp club' - but you do NOT need to ever leave your home!

Join today, membership is free! No fees for the first 12 months, open to all traders in collectables, part-time or full-time. AAA Stamps

Edlins of Canberra

Pacific Coast Philatelics

PO Box 1050, Warners Bay, NSW, 2282 Ph: 0432 540 760 aaastamps@yahoo.com.au www.aaastamps.com.au

Eddie J Cummings GPO Box 289, Canberra, ACT 2601 Ph: 02 6248 7859 edlins@tpgi.com.au www.edlins.com.au

Owen Pennells, PO Box 3343, Bundaberg, QLD, 4670 Ph: 0427 551 207

A.G.T. Devine

PO Box 571, Milsons Point, NSW, 1565 Ph: 02 9299 1300 rwaugh@bigpond.net.au

56 Gardner Circuit, Singleton Heights, NSW 2330 Ph: 02 6573 4209 alan.devine@devalri.com www.devalri.com

Robert D. Andersen 141 Monash Rd, Tarragindi, QLD 4121 Ph: 07 3892 7066 daleandersen@bigpond.com.au

Ace Stamp Auctions PO Box 2076 Ellenbrook, Western Australia, 6069 (08) 9297 3040 or email stampdealer@iinet.net

Peter Barrett PO Box 5, Dover, UK CT16 1YQ Ph: 013 0482 9827 pjbchelse@aol.com www.stamo-centre.co.uk

Bexley Stamps & Coin Accessories Ken Pullen PO Box 36, KURMOND, NSW 2757   02 4573 1332 sales@bexleystamps.com.au www.bexleystamps.com.au

Blue Owls Stamps - Jude Koch 9 Yarra Street, Suite 1207 (12th Floor, Suite 07) South Yarra Vic 3141 Ph: 03 9826 1202 jude@blueowlsstamps.com.au www.blueowlsstamps.com.au

Grant Carter PO Box 16, Northcote, VIC 3020 Ph: 03 9480 2193

John Cornelius PO Box 23, Magill, SA, 5072 joda99@bigpond.net.au

Ken Cowden PO Box 108, Bateman’s Bay, NSW 2536 Ph: 02 4472 5231 Kenbetty@bordernet.com.au

Edenzac Stamps: Tim Papadopoulos Ph: 03 9791 7733 edenzac@optushome.com.au

Falcon Stamps

Gold Coast Stamp Traders

Ray Pinniger PO Box 9008, Scoresby, VIC 3179 Ph: 03 9753 3520 bevvyc@optusnet.com.au

Chris Snelling Stamps

Glyn Fairbairn PO Box 275, Currumbin, QLD 4223 Ph: 07 5533 9582 www.goldcoststamptraders.com.au sales@ goldcoastsamptraders.com.au

PO Box 121, Kotara Fair, NSW 2289 Ph: 02 4952 8205 orcstamp@bigpond.net.au www.orchidstamps.com

Stephen Joe

Glen Stephens

GPO Box 302, Suva, Fiji Ph: 679 3319183 stephenj@connect.com.fj

John Hurtado/KGV Collector PO Box 40, Russell Island, QLD 4184 kgv_stamps@live.com.au http://australiankgvusedstamps.blogspot.com

Kennedy Stamps P/L Suite 706a,   250 Pitt St, Sydney  NSW 2000 Tel:   + 61 2  92646168 Fax:  + 61 2  92645969 stamps@kennedystamps.com. www.kennedystamps.com.au

Kevin Morgan Stamps & Coins PO Box 1290, Upwey, Vic 3158 Ph:0425 795 693 kevinmorgan2@live.com www.kevinmorgan.com.au

Maree Nieuwenhuizen PO BOX 457, Bayswater, VIC 3153 Ph: 03 9762 1848 maree@mpnstamps.com

Mike Lee 7 Colbury Rd, Bayswater Nth, VIC 3153 Ph: 03 9729 5855 mlphilatelics@bigpond.com

P & D Nicholls PO Box 172, Glenbrook, NSW 2773 Ph: 02 4739 6184 panddnicholls@bigpond.com

4 The Tor Walk, Castlecrag, NSW 2068 PH: 02 9958 1333 glen@glenstephens.com www.glenstephens.com

Sydney Philatelics Graeme Fudge PO Box 122, Milton, NSW 2538 Ph: 02 4455 4011 info@sydphil.com www.stampsaustralia.com.au

Lyndsay Tooley PO Box 441, Norfolk Is. NSW 2899 Ph: 06 7232 3778 stamps@ninet.nf

Con Vayanos 64/3030 The Boulevard, Emerald Lakes, Carrara, QLD, 4211 Ph: 07 5578 1744 convayanos@hotmail.com

ACTS

PO Box 1290 Upwey, VIC 3158

Stamp News - 69


philatelic clubs & societies new zealand Air Mail Society of NZ: Ph: 03 3584838; Email: alant@snap.net Auckland PS: Mtg 1st and 3rd Tues (except Jan). Ph 09 9853212; Email kiwibrooce@ yahoo.com; Website: www.aps.gen.nz Christchurch PS: Mtg 2nd Tues, Library night 3rd Tues; GB Machin 3rd Fri odd months; Postal History 1st Mon; Postcard 3rd Tues even months. Email: secretary@ cps.gen.nz; Website: www.cps.gen.nz Dunedin PS: Mtg 4th Thurs (except Nov and Dec). Ph: 03 4557643; Email: davidallison2009@gmail.com; Website: www.dunedinstampclub.org.nz Hastings Stamp Collectors Club: Mtg 3rd Wed (except Jan and 2nd Wed Dec). Ph: 06 8765911; Email: clairemole@xtra.co.nz Hawkes Bay PS: Mtg 1st Wed (ex. Jan). Ph: 06 8439433; Email: dennmarg@paradise. net.nz Horowhenua PS: Mtg 2nd Mon. Ph: 06 3689881; Email: michael.christensen@xtra. co.nz Hutt Valley PS: Mtg 1st Tues (ex. Jan). Ph: 04 5697439; Email: richards@nec.co.nz Kapiti PS: Mtg 3rd Tues (ex Dec). Ph: 04 2971197; Email: ian.burttt@yahoo.co.nz Manaia PS: Mtg (Hawera) 1st Sun. Ph: 06 2784292; Email: peter.williams@xtra.co.nz Manawatu PS: Mtg 1st Wed, daytime meeting 3rd Tues. Ph: 06 3584565; Email: mps@inspire.net.nz Marlborough Stamp Collectors Club: Mtg 3rd Mon (except Jan and 2nd Mon Dec). Morrinsville Stamp Club: Mtg 2nd Wed. Ph: 07 8893199 Nelson PS: Mtg 2nd Tues. Ph: 03 5469092; Email: paula.hucklesby@clear.net.nz North Shore PS: Mtg 2nd (except Jan) and 4th Wed (except Jan and Dec). Email: nsps@xtra.co.nz; Website: www.northshoreps.com NZ Stamp Collectors Club Christchurch: Mtg 4th Wed. Ph 03 3895511; Email: steve@ philatelic.org.nz; Website: www.nzeal.com/philately/nzscc.htm NZ Postcard Society: Ph: 03 3848463; Email: jenny-long@clear.net.nz; Website: www. postcard.org.nz

queensland Arana Hills SC: Meeting 2nd Tues; 07 3851 0213; email: petermccloskey@bigpond.com Bayside Afternoon SC: Meeting last Wed; Ph: 07 3206 6281. Bundaberg PS: Mtg 2nd Mon 7pm, The Family Centre, Kensington St (in the Show Grounds); Ph: 07 4152 2403 or 07 4151 3062 Caboolture & District SC: Mtg 3rd Sat. Ph: 07 5498 6504 Cairns SC: 4th Tues. 7.30pm Comm. Hall, 15 Kamerunga Rd., Stratford 07 4033 2211 Caloundra SC: Mtg. 4th Thurs. Catholic Church Hall, Edmund St. 1.30pm. Ph: 07 5494 7233 City Daytime SC: Mtg 2nd Thurs. Ph: 07 3206 6281 City of Brisbane PS: Mtg 3rd Thurs; Ph: 07 3263 8573 (ah); email: desley@mycelebrant.com Collectors Club Queensland: Mtg 2nd Sunday each month 9am to 1pm - RSL Hall, 58 Arnold St, Holland Park. Contact 0409 130 266 or ccqueensland@gmail.com Enoggera SC: Mtg 1st and 3rd Mon. Ph: 07 3264 4157 Gladstone and District PS: Mtg 2nd Wed (Ex. Jan) & 4th Wed (Ex.Dec). Ph. Sec: 07 4978 1155 Ian Rippingale, Gold Coast PS: Mtg 2nd Mon, 11.30am, Southport Community Centre, Lawson St, Southport. Ph: 07 5546 3801 Gympie SC: Mtg. 2nd Sun. Jessie Witham Centre 1 - 3pm Ph. 07 5483 9188 email: sandandan@bigpond.com Hervey Bay Afternoon Club: Mtg 3rd Wed. Ph: 07 4124 1138 Ipswich SC: Mtg 1st Thurs (ex. Jan). Ph: 07 3282 2983 Junction Park SC: Mtg 1st Tues, 7.30pm, Annerley Baptist Hall, Lambton St. Contact: 07 3277 6724. PO Box 177, Annerley, 4103, righteo274@bigpond.com Lockyer Valley SC: Mtg 4th Sun, 1.30pm, Senior Citizens’s Hall, Gatton. Kerri Martin, Sec. Ph: 07 5465 3390 Email: lvsc@bigpond.com Logan City SC: Meetings 2nd Thurs, 5.30pm, Gracehouse Church, 123 Paradise Rd, Slacks Creek. Tel: 0435 854 680

70 - Stamp News

Further information can be obtained from the NZ Philatelic Federation, PO Box 58139, Whitby, Porirua, 5245, NZ. E-mail: secretary@nzpf.org.nz Postal History Soc of NZ: Auckland 1st Mon (except Jan). Ph: 09 5220311. Chapter meetings held Invercargill, Nelson, New Plymouth and Wellington. Pukekohe Stamp Club: Mtg 1st Sun. John Mounce, President 649-291-9381 johnmounce@ihug.co.nz Royal PS of NZ: Mtg 2nd Wed (ex Jan). Ph: 04 5899530; Email: office@rpsnz.org.nz; Website www.rpsnz.org.nz South Auckland PS: Mtg last Sat (except Dec), Papatoetoe, day time mtgs 3rd Fri (ex Dec and Jan). Ph: 09 2682245; Email: elowera@orcon.net.nz Southland PS: Mtg 1st Thurs (except Jan), 3rd Tue (daytime) (except Jan). Email: antqgevi@es.co.nz Taranaki PS: Mtg 1st Mon except Jan. Ph: 06 7546212; Email: murray-grimwood@ hotmail.com Tauranga & District Stamp Club: Mtg 2nd (except Jan) and 4th Mon (except Dec). Ph: 07 5765210; Email: beducker@hotmail.com Thames Valley PS: Mtg 1st Mon (except Jan). Ph: 07 8689190. Thematic Association of NZ: Ph: 04 2347218; Email: bob@gibsonz.com Timaru PS: Mtg 1st Wed. Ph: 03 6880343 Upper Hutt PS: Mtg 3rd Mon (except 2nd Mon Dec). Ph: 04 5284123; Email: teme. isaac@clear.net.nz Waikato PS: Mtg 1st (except Jan) and 3rd Wed (except Jan and Dec). Email: c.cameron@agresearch.co.nz Wakatipu PS: Ph: 03 4428865 Wanganui PS: Mtg 2nd Wed. Ph: 06 3427894; Email: g.p.phillips@xtra.co.nz Wellesley PS: Mtg 2nd and 4th Mon (ex public holidays). Ph: 9 8271240 Wellington PS: Mtg 4th Mon (except Dec); Ph: 042347218; Email: bob@gibsonz.com Whakatane PS: Mtg 2nd & 4th Thurs (except Jan) Ph: 07 3222054 or 07 3086193 Whangarei PS: Mtg 2nd Meeting: 2nd Tues (Ex.Jan) Ph 09 4348000; Email john-monica@xtra.co.nz QLD Philatelic Council, 18 Coolcrest St, Wynnum, Qld, 4178. Ph: 07 3396 0846 Fax: 07 3396 0842. Email: QPC-stamps@acenet.net.au Web: www.qpc.asn.au

Mackay and District PS: Mtg 2nd Tues. Ph: 07 4942 5433; Maryborough and Wide Bay PS: Mtg 1st Wed (ex. Jan). Salvation Army Youth 7 Comm. Hall. Bazaar St Maryborough. Ph: 07 41224708 (see also Hervey Bay) Nanango SC: Mtg 2nd Sat, 10:00am, Nanango RSL. Contact Ph: 07 3103 8938 or ema il: bowtell_harris@activ8.net.au Philatelic Society of Qld: Mtg 4th Wed 7.30pm,18 Coolcrest St, Wynnum. Ph: 07 3245 5222 Queensland Study Group: Sunday bi-monthly 1.00pm meets QPS house. Contact Ph: 07 3396 0846 email: QPC-stamps@acenet.net.au Redland Bay Coin and Stamp Club, 4th Thurs. Monthly. John Hardman 07 3206 9996 or 07 3822 6987 Rockhampton SC: Mtg 1st Tues. Ph: 07 4926 3336. email: rockystampclub@gmail.com Sherwood Afternoon SC: Mtg 2nd Tues. Ph: 07 3372 6096 Southport Afternoon SC: Mtg 2nd Sat; Ph: 07 55630384 Southside PS: Mtg 3rd Tuesday & 3rd Wednesay (9am) Ph: 07 3848 2304 (ah) email: david. appleton@mailbox.uq.edu.au Sunshine Coast SC (formerly Nambour SC): Mtg 1st Wed, 7.15pm Red Cross Rms, Price St., Nambour 07 5445 3647 Thematics Queensland: Mtg bi-monthly 9.30am. Ph: 07 3262 5605 email: j.crowsley@ uq.net.au Toowoomba SC: Mtg. 2nd Sat 1pm, Salvation Army Hall, Cnr. West St. 7 Anzac Ave. Ph. 07 4635 5623 Email: bob.benny@bigpond.com Twin Towns SC: Mtg 1st Mon; Ph: 07 5535 3168 Waterloo Bay SC: Mtg. 1st Thurs. 1pm & 4th Mon. 7pm. Redlands Multi SportsClub, Birkdale Ph: 07 3206 0815


upcoming stamp & coin fairs & events Coin & stamp fairs in Melbourne are still unable to be held due to coronavirus restrictions which are currently ongoing. However the following details have been received: The Bentleigh Stamp, Coin & Card Fair is reopening on the 3rd Sunday of the month as soon as the restrictions have been lifted. Location unchanged, Bentleigh Mc Kinnon Hall, Higgins Rd,

Bentleigh. The Strathmore Stamp and Coin Fair is reopening on the 1st Sunday of each month when restrictions are lifted. The location will be Strathmore Bowling Club, 40 Loeman St, Strathmore. The Nunawading Stamp and Coin Fair may be moving location, so we await further details about this fair.

Trouble getting Stamp News? Not a subscriber yet? See our handy form towards the back of this issue, you can also order your subscription through your favourite stamp dealer. The following Stamp Shops do keep Stamp News, though mostly for regular purchasers, so you may need to ask the dealer to order in an additional copy for you. ( dealers who have a standing order for a minimum of 3 copies monthly get a free listing here, ask for details) New South Wales Gabriele’s Philatelic Service, Gabriele Woodbine, Suite 11/17 Gerrale Street, Cronulla, Ph: (02) 9544 3333 Fax: (02) 9247 8333 e-mail: gabriele@gabrieles.com.au Web: http://www. gabrieles.com.au

Kevin Morgan Stamps & Coins, PO Box 1290, Upwey, Vic 3158 Tel: 0425 795 693 email kmorgan2@live.com Shields Stamps & Coins, 52 Burgundy St, Heidelberg, Vic 3084 Ph. 03 9459 5953 21st Century Auctions Suite 1, 1174 Burwood Hwy, Upper Ferntree Gully, Vic. 3156 tel. 0425 795 693

Tasmania The Stamp Place, Trafalgar on Collins, Shop 3, 110 Collins Street, HOBART TAS 7000, Ph: (03) 6224 3536 Fax: (03)6224-3536 e-mail: info@the- Western Australia Cygnet Stamps, 9 Grevillea Way, Heathridge, stampplace.com Web: http://www.tazitiger.com WA 6027 Ph: 08 9402 9261 Victoria Max Stern & Company, 271 Collins St, Shop 8B, Melbourne VIC 3001, Ph: (03) 9654 6751 Fax: (03) 9650 7192 e-mail: maxstern@netspace.net.au Web: http://maxstern.customer. netspace.net.au

There are also about 4950 newsagencies in Australia, and most of the major stores carry a number of copies, alternatively you can arrange with your local newsagent to put one by for you each month. Stamp News - 71


Products & Services Directory dealers MONTHLY BUY OR BID SALES See ad elsewhere in this magazine www.21stCenturyAuctions. com.au Tel: 0425 795 693 email:kevinmorgan2@live.com

GLEN STEPHENS RARE STAMPS 4 The Tor Walk Castlecrag, Sydney, NSW, 2068, Australia. Australia’s most visited stamp dealer website:

THE NEW ZEALAND

PENINSULA STAMP CLUB Meets 3rd

GLADSTONE AND DISTRICT PS Inc.

Published quarterly by the ROYAL PHILATELIC SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND (INCORPORATED) PO Box 33435, Petone, Lower Hutt, 5046, NZ Annual subscription (posted) NZ$60.00 (airmail extra)

Uniting Church Hall, Murray Anderson Road, Rosebud. Visitors most welcome. Secretary: PO Box 14, McCRAE, 3938

at 7.30pm. Venue: Neighbourhood Centre, 10 Toolooa St, Gladstone. Postal: PO Box 1089, Gladstone, Qld, 4680. Ph: (07) 4978 1155.

STAMP COLLECTOR Wednesday each month at 7.30pm, Meets on the 2nd Wednesday each month

Email - glen@glenstephens.com email me now to get on my regular lists FREE! Life Member ASDA (New York) PTS (London) ANDA (Australia) etc. Full time dealer for 25 years.

(President, A. Melville-Brown)

Subscription correspondence and advertising enquiries should be addressed to the Business Manager, PO Box 33435, Petone, Lower Hutt, 5046, NZ

email: mel.cricket.100@googlemail.com web: www.cricketstamp.net

Join the exciting Products & Services Directory! Single: 46mm x 24mm Double: 46mm x 50mm Triple: 46mm x 78mm Quad: 46mm x 102mm Larger spaces

$260 per year or $26 per month $520 per year or $52 per month $695 per year or $69.50 per month $990 per year or $99 per month POR

Ph: 0425 795 693 Fax: 03 9758 7506 email: kevinmorgan2@live.com

www.glenstephens.com

1000s of nett priced bargains and offers and specials. Philatelic journalist. ALL credit cards and methods of payments accepted - I even accept mint stamps in payment! Phone (02) 9958 1333. One of Australia;s biggest stamp buyers - see my buying page.

AUSTRALIAN PS meets 3 rd Monday monthly. RSL Homes, 152 Canterbury Rd (cnr Keats St) Canterbury. All visitors most welcome. Contact: 51 Camperdown St, Brighton East, VIC, 3187. www.aps.org.au

Cricket Philatelic Society

www.stampnews.net.au

BRIGHTON PS Inc.

The IPDA Inc Internet Philatelic Dealers Association

dealers & part time sellers who believe there is a need for a global organisation to represent them as accredited internet sellers. Join the IPDA. Go to www.ipdaonline.org for details.

Meets 8.00pm 2nd and 4th Tuesday and 10.30am 3rd Tuesday each month. 80 Gardenvale Road, Gardenvale, Vic, 3185. Visitors/new members welcome. www.brightonps.org.au

Kevin Morgan Stamps & Coins Postage wanted: Up to 39c pay 35% 40c to 98c pay 40% $1 and above pay 60% Regret no longer require other countries unless in substantial quantities. Tel: 0425 795 693 Email: kevinmorgan2@live.com Web: www.kevinmorgan.com.au

Always buying/selling collections, accumulations, mixed lots. We are a general dealership stocking a wide range of worldwide items plus albums, accessories, etc. Credit Cards accepted. Discounts for Seniors Card holders and Philatelic Club members on production of membership ID.

SAS/OCEANIA INVITES YOUR MEMBERSHIP Our award-winning quarterly journal, ‘The Informer’, contains regular, informative articles about Australia and States, New Zealand, PNG, and other Pacific countries by knowledgeable philatelic writers. Sample copy/ application form sent airmail for $US1.00. Mint US postage accepted. SAS/O Secretary, PO Box 24764,San Jose, CA 95154-4764, USA 72 - Stamp News

Great Britain 1839-1951

www.andrewglajer.co.uk Andrew G Lajer Ltd sales@andrewglajer.co.uk T: +44 (0)1189 344151

The Old Post Office, Davis Way, Hurst, Berkshire,RG10 0TR, UK


societies & publications MONTHLY BUY OR BID SALES

PHILATELIC SOCIETY OF CANBERRA Inc. The society has a regular program of

See ad elsewhere in meetings, with displays, exchanges and discussion nights, and welcomes this magazine visitors to Canberra. It has a flourishwww.21stCenturyAuctions. ing exchange branch, which circulates com.au to small stamp clubs in the south Tel: 0425 795 693 region, as well as in the Canberra email:kevinmorgan2@live.com area. It publishes, quarterly, a news-

AS C T

AUSTRALASIAN COLLECTABLE TRADERS SOCIETY

Features: Major Collectables Shows around Australia; discounted advertising in major collectables journals and yellow pages; regular newsletter; special discounts on accessories/albums etc.; free 6 month subscription to Stamp News; website, with free advertising for members

Join today, membership is free! No fees for the first 12 months, open to all traders in collectables, full or P/T. c/- PO Box 1290 Upwey, Vic. 3158

letter and a research journal ‘Capital Philately’. Enquiries about membership or about separate subscriptions to the journal should be directed to: Secretary: Tony Luckhurst Ph: 02 6241 1963 e-mail: tony_luckhurst@ bigpound.com

PHILATELY from AUSTRALIA

Australia $35, Br. Commonwealth £14 Sterling, United States & Canada $US28 per year. No

asubscription to this

Join the AMERICAN TOPICAL ASSOCIATION!

PHILAS STAMP

AMERICAN TOPICAL ASSOCIATION PO Box 8, Carterville, IL 62918-0008, USA PH: 1-618-985-5100 Fax: 1-618-085-5131 Visa and Mastercard welcome

www.gabrieles.com.au Hundreds of new items added to our site each month. Add your email address to our “early bird” notice list, so when new material is added to the site, you get first choice! We also post out a printed copy of our monthly offers, for those who do not use the internet, this service is also free. Our printed, 36 paged price list is also available, just phone write or email today for a free copy today. gabriele@gabrieles.com.au

www.richardjuzwin.com The leading specialist dealers in Australasian stamps and the largest private dealer (non Auction) company in Australia. info@richardjuzwin.com.au

www.sevenseas.com.au Search our website for full listing of stamps and Seven Seas albums and pages and other accessories. We look forward to serving you. stamps@sevenseas.com.au

Zealand and Pacific Islands should be without

JOIN TOPICAL STAMP COLLECTORS IN 90 COUNTRIES

Write today Airmail to :

Largest and most visited Stamp Dealer website in the Southern Hemisphere. 250 different pages of stamp bargains and archives! $4,000 prize always on offer. glen@glenstephens.com

serious collector of Australia and its States, New

Three Year Indexes - $A10 each

96-page TOPICAL TIME stamp journal containing articles and checklists, printed on slick coated paper, profusely illustrated. Membership Directory (150 pages) of 8,000 members listed under 700 topics and specialties, plus services. Biography service for 13,000 persons shown on stamps. Membership Information Board to answer your questions. Translation service. Handbooks of many topics. Much more...

www.glenstephens.com

a quarterly record of Research & information

ROYAL PHILATELIC SOCIETY OF VICTORIA INC.

International Award Winning Journal.

Many Benefits:

Internet & Email Directory

Most back issues on hand. Write to: Business Manager PO Box 642, Toorak, VIC, 3142

AUCTIONS 17 Brisbane St, Sydney 12:30pm Saturdays Second Saturday in March, July and November.

Viewing on preceding Saturday, Thursday and Friday illustrated catalogues posted free within Australia ($15 per

www.Stamps-China.com New European stamp store devoted to classic European stamps. Stock available with photo and Yvert catalogue numbers for easy reference. There are thousands of stamps, with prices starting at just 20c each, the lowest prices you can find on the Internet. Complete stock from Denmark, Finland, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Russia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. mail@stamps-europe.com

www.Stamps-Europe.com New stamp store devoted to Chinese stamps. Stock available with photo and Scott catalogue numbers for easy reference. There are thousands of stamps with the lowest prices you can find on the Internet. Complete stock from 1953 up to 1980, all stamps in perfect Mint Never Hinged condition. mail@stamps-china.com

www.sutherlandphilatelics.com.au Long-established mail order dealer comprehensively covering British Isles, Europe, Scandinavia, North America, Australasia and Japan. Prompt courteous service and an extensive user-friendly website. sutherlandphil@bigpond.com

21ST CENTURY AUCTIONS _________________________

annum posted overseas)

www.21stcenturyauctions.com.au

Lots for sale welcome

kevinmorgan2@live.com

PO box 220 Darlinghurst NSW 1300

STAMP NEWS AUSTRALASIA _______________________

Phone: (02) 9264 8301 or

www.stampnews.net.au

()2) 9264 8406 Fax: (02) 9267 4741

kevinmorgan2@live.com Stamp News - 73


Stamp News Australasia Advertising Rates & Data Commencing January 2020 Publication details Stamp News Australasia is published by Kevin Morgan, ABN 61 577 987 652, at monthly intervals, twelve times per year. Publication date is the 1st day of each month.

Advertising deadlines 1st day of month prior to month of publication (eg the June edition advertising deadline is 1st MAY)

RATES - casual (all rates include GST) All Prices now include 4 Colour Separation Full page

Half Page

Quarter Page

Eighth

1 month

$900

$450

$225

$115

3 months

$850

$425

$215

$110

6 months

$800

$400

$200

$105

9 months

$775

$390

$195

$100

12 months

$750

$375

$190

$95

All rates are now for prepaid series only, 30 day terms will incur an accounting fee of 5%. Payment via credit card on a monthly basis is also acceptable for prepayment terms at no surcharge, however American Express, Diners Club and Paypal payments will attract a 2.5% administration fee. SPECIAL NOTES 1. Advertisers may vary their display advertising sizes within a contract period. 2. If booked advertising material does not arrive by the due date the Publisher reserves the right to publish a previously published advertisement in lieu. 3. Prices are for copy supplied in digital format to the required standard. If production work is required extra charges may be necessary. Please consult.

Required submission format Advertisements should be supplied in digital format (on disk or via email). Advertisements should be provided as high resolution PDF files, with all fonts embedded. All images must be scanned at 300dpi resolution and sent as separate files, and must not be compressed by jpeg below medium quality. Price lists must be provided in Excel format. Phone to discuss other formats or alternatives. Note that MS Publisher files are NOT accepted.

Advertisement Sizes

Trimmed magazine size Full page nominal image size Half page horizontal Half page vertical Third page horizontal Third page vertical Quarter page horizontal Quarter page vertical

W 210 190 190 93 190 60 190 93

H 297 277 136 277 89 277 66 136

Advertising Contact Details Kevin Morgan Ph 0425 795 693 Stamp News, PO Box 1290, Upwey, Vic 3158. SPECIAL TERMS AND CONDITIONS Advertisers are hereby notified of the following conditions to which they signify their acceptance in submitting any advertisement: * Although oral instructions may be acted upon, no liability will be accepted for advertising instructions, alterations or cancellations made orally, they must be in writing. * No liability will be accepted for any loss occasioned by the failure of an advertisement or insert or any part of an advertisement or insert to appear in any specified issue, or for any error in an advertisement or insert. * Positions selected for advertisement are entirely at the discretion of the Publisher, except where otherwise arranged (see “Preferred Position�). * The matter, content and style of any advertisement is subject to approval of the Publisher. Advertisements held by the Publisher to be unlawful or undesirable in any way will be declined. * The Publisher reserves the right to suspend, refuse or withdraw any advertisement or order at its discretion at any time without notice. The Advertiser, in submitting an advertisement and/or material, is deemed to have agreed that no liability for claims, damages or compensation in respect thereof will be held against the Publisher. * TRADE PRACTICES: Advertisements submitted must be in strict accordance with the applicable State and Federal consumer and advertising laws in force from time to time. * INDEMNITY: In submitting any advertisement or insert, the Advertiser agrees that if any material, statement, information or matter contained in any such advertisement or insert is in breach of any statute, regulation or law (whether Federal, State or Territorial, directly, by inference or otherwise) and the Publisher publishes the advertisement or insert in good faith with no reason to be aware of such impediment and consequently suffers any penalty by reason of or arising from the publication of such material, then the Advertiser indemnifies the Publisher against the amount of any such penalty and shall pay the amount thereof and any consequential and reasonable legal costs incurred by the Publisher.


POSTAL BID SALES

A couple of examples from our stocks -

We produce regular Postal Bid Sales featuring a varied assortment of Australian and British Commonwealth stamps, priced to suit all budgets - Lots are estimated from as $1 upwards. Our sales are run fairly in accordance with best industry practices.

CONTACT US TODAY TO RECEIVE OUR CURRENT SALE LISTING – ABSOLUTELY FREE!

Or View On-Line at www.burstamp.com NEW WEB-SITE – Visit

BURSTAMP.com

to view our stock of quality Australia and New Guinea stamps

Mastercard &Visa Accepted

www.burstamp.com

PO Box 132, BURPENGARY Q 4505 Email: burstamp@bigpond.com Phone: 0409 473 150 Fax: (07) 3102 8558 Mention you saw us in Stamp News!

Come and visit us at Upper Ferntree Gully, Victoria We have excellent stocks of Australia & Territories plus Postal History, Great Britain, Commonwealth and some Worldwide. Also many collections and mixtures both on and off paper. Give us a call and let us know what interests you. We are usually open daily 9.30 to 4.30 M -F, but please call first to make sure we are here. We also buy collections, accumulations, postage lots and coins. You can also browse our website at www.21stcenturyauctions.com.au or find us on eBay. Our store name is 21st-century-auctions We take Visa, Mastercard or Paypal We are situated right opposite Upper Ferntree Gully Station on the Belgrave line at Suite 1, 1174 Burwood Highway (Callers by appointment please) Tel: 0425 7985 693 email: kevinmorgan2@live.com


Stamp News is now available online To see how a back issue looks  for FREE go to our website at www.stampnews.net.au Stamp News Australasia Magazine The cost is just AUD$4.95 for a single issue or a discounted AUD$39.95 for a 12 month subscription. This represents a huge saving over the Newsagency price of $8.95 for a single issue and $99.50 for a 12 month mailed subscription.  To purchase or subscribe go here: 

www.stampnews.net.au

(Please note that these subscriptions are handled by an external agency and in case of any difficulty you must contact them direct)

Gift options for new subscribers In 2020 we are making these new subscription offers to make your subscription even more affordable: For each 12 months of your new subscription you may choose 1 of the following: 1) Five packets of 1000 Prinz folded stamp hinges 2) 10 different British Commonwealth mint unhinged minisheets 3) 10 different Papua New Guinea mint unhinged sets  4) 10 different Norfolk Is. mint unhinged sets 5) 10 different Nauru mint unhinged sets 6) 250 grams World stamps on paper mixture 7) 250 grams Australia stamps on paper mixture 8) 250 grams Ireland stamps on paper mixture 9) 250 grams South Africa stamps on paper mixture 10) 20 different Australia Decimal unaddressed First Day covers For a lifetime subscription you will receive all 10 gifts. In the event of your chosen gifts being unavailable, we reserve the right to substitute. Please circle the gifts required and return with your completed subscription form on the facing page together with and payment to: Stamp News Subscriptions, PO Box 1290, Upwey Vic. 3158 Australia. Email and telephone subscriptions always welcome. Gifts are for NEW hard copy subscribers only.


Subscribe and Save up to $1.80 per copy over newsagency prices* *5yr subscription CHOOSE FROM OUR STAMP NEWS SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS! All prices include postage and packaging within Australia

6 months 12 months 24 months 36 months 60 months Lifetime

$54.50 $99.50 $189.50 $259.00 $429.00 $895.00

Every Month an exciting free gift for subscribers only. Please add for postage & packaging:

• Add 50% to Domestic Price for NZ and Asia Pacific • Add 100% for Rest of the World.

Please note: All subscriptions are nonrefundable and non-transferable. Office Use Only

This months free gift for subscribers: A complete thematic set or mini-sheet (may differ from those illustrated) SUBSCRIPTION FORM - ABN 61 577 987 652 Stamp News, PO Box 1290 Upwey, VIC, 3158, Australia Ph: 0425 795 693 Email: kevinmorgan2@live.com

Please enrol/re-enrol me as a subscriber to Stamp News Please start my subscription from the ................2020 issue Tick one (All prices include GST, Postage & Packaging within Australia 6 month trial subscription $54.50

1 year subscription $99.50

2 year subscription $189.50

3 year subscription $259.00

5 year subscription $429.00

Lifetime subscription $895.00

I enclose cheque/money order (CIRCLE ONE!) for the above amount - OR I hereby pay by Visa/Mastercard/Amex (CIRCLE ONE!) Card No: Name on card:................................................................................................. Expiry Date: ................................... Signature ............................................... Subscription Address: Name: ....................................................................... Address: ......................................................................................................... City:............................................ State/Postcode ........................................... Country:..................................... Phone: (..........) .......................................... Fax: (.........) .................................email:............... ...........................................


List of Display Advertisers 21ST CENTURY AUCTIONS ........33, 75 ABACUS AUCTIONS........................79 ACTS........................................69 BURSTAMP ................................. 75 COIN AND BANKNOTE MAGAZINE .....21 GLEN STEPHENS .................5, 32, 49 JIMBO'S PHILATELIC SERVICE ...........78 LESKI AUCTIONS .............................2 OZ COLONIES ..............................11

Contributor & Advertiser Deadlines December 2020 Issue 1 November 2020 January 2021 Issue 15 November 2020 We reserve the right to repeat advertising from a previous issue if material is not received in time. Email submission: stampnewsaus@gmail.com

PHOENIX AUCTIONS.......................80 RENNIKS PUBLICATIONS ..................10

SUTHERLAND PHILATELICS BUYING AND SELLING Stamps and Booklets of

RICHARD JUZWIN P/L ....... 12, 13, 20 STAMP NEWS MAIL ORDER ...............4 STAMPBOARDS.COM.......................69

GREAT BRITAIN

All reigns, Specialised Machins, Regionals GUERNSEY/ALDERNEY ISLE OF MAN JERSEY IRELAND CANADA FRANCE GERMANY JAPAN NEW ZEALAND EAST & WEST EUROPE SCANDINAVIA NEW ISSUE SERVICE available for Canada, France & UK

AUSTRALIA

Stamps, Booklets, FDC's, Special Cancels, PSEs, Flights, Exhibitions, Souvenir Covers Comprehensive PRICE LISTS on an extensive user-friendly web site

SUTHERLAND PHILATELICS ...............78

www.sutherlandphilatelics.com.au sutherlandphil@bigpond.com

Phone: (61) 7 3851 2398 PO BOX 448, FERNY HILLS D C, QLD 4055, AUSTRALIA VISA & MASTERCARD WELCOME

(03) 9459 9161


A70_basecat.qxd 15-May-19 6:05 PM Page 1

Sales Highlights from recent Auctions. Auctions are held every 6-7 weeks

Realised $35,775 Realised $20,272 Realised $50,681

Realised $107,325

Realised $11,328

Realised $7,155

Realised $3,100 Realised $27,427

Phoenix Auctions Pty Ltd · Auction Rooms: 274A Canterbury Road, Surrey Hills, Victoria. Australia. Postal Address: PO Box 458 Canterbury, Victoria. 3126. Australia. · ABN: 92 132 987 663 P: +61 3 8682 9876 · F: +61 3 8677 2858 · E: phoenix@phoenixauctions.com.au

Profile for Stamp News Australasia

Stamp News Australasia - November 2020  

The Southern Hemisphere's only stamp monthly.

Stamp News Australasia - November 2020  

The Southern Hemisphere's only stamp monthly.