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TalOn

Staley High School Kansas City, Missouri Volume 11, Issue 4 February 2019

How Shutdown Affected Families

Page 8-9

TO TEST OR NOT TO TEST? 6-7

BOP TO THE TOP 12 RISING ABOVE CHALLENGES 16


Inside this issue D.A.R.E. TO DRUG TEST 4 Netflix Originals: Hit or miss? 5 tO TEST, OR NOT TO TEST? 6-7 Sorry, We’re closed 8-9 10-11 Recruiters’ rEQUESTS BOP TO THE TOP 12 Fab or Drab? 13 14-15 Museum OF ILLUSIONS RISING ABOVE CHALLENGES 16 Staff editorial

OPINION

NEWS

NEWS

SPORTS

LIFESTYLES & ENTERTAINMENT

LIFESTYLES & ENTERTAINMENT

FEATURE

Feature

On the Cover

Talon staff wanted students to recognize the impact the recent government shutdown had closer to home. With that, yearbook editor, senior Haley-Anne Mahusay designed the cover to represent the shutdown while maintaining a minimalistic graphic style.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Letter from the editor: Dear Readers,

We made it! First semester is officially behind us, and we are finally halfway done. As we struggle to get back into the routine of school and not being able to sleep all day, the process can be rough. But, now it is time to grind and start second semester off on the right foot. Welcome to issue four of Talon. Coming back from our special edition food issue, we decided to go back to what we know of covering serious stories and reallife struggles. In order to do that, we had to step

out of our comfort zone and cover the government shutdown, but not in a traditional way. In this issue, find out how the government shutdown affects students and their families at a local level. Other than that, you can find a wide variety of content, from random drug testing in schools, to what college recruiters look for in potential athletes, to music and book reviews. So, with that, Talon brings you issue four. Through this, I encourage all readers to give us feedback and make this an interactive experience

and give us their input on what is featured in Talon and what other issues they would like to see covered. Since last issue, for the first time in school history, Talon was awarded an AllAmerican ranking with five marks of distinction in coverage and content, photography, text, visuals and presentation. As our school has rounded out the first decade, there are hardly any “Staley Firsts” left, and it is amazing to be able to be a part of one that so much hard work and dedication went into. I am so proud of what

our staff accomplished, and it has been an honor to be able to be editor for the past two years. Being able to see everyone come together and create something that they are all proud of is indescribable. We hope you enjoy the newest edition of the Talon. Also, don’t forget to check out StaleyNews. com for coverage on FCCLA’s state qualifiers and much more. Stay tuned, Senior Haylee Roberts Editor-In-Chief

TALON STAFF Editor-In-Chief: Haylee Roberts Managing Editor: Makenzie Hooton Adviser: CheriE Burgett

Staff: Autumn Adams Sara Almansouri Lonyae Coulter Makanani Grace Hailey Milliken

Kara Morley Kirea Obie Kayla Pospisil Alexa Schulte Jack Warner

CONTACT US:

Talon is published seven times during the school year. Talon will accept letters to the editor in CR202 or at cherie.burgett@nkcschools.org. Before the letter is published, we will need to verify the writer’s identity with a photo identification. Letters may not exceed a length of 350 words. We will not publish letters that are libelous, obscene or that may cause a veritable disruption of the education process at Staley High School. Letters must be signed. Anonymous letters will be discarded. Advertisers may contact the adviser at cherie.burgett@nkcschools.org, (816) 321-5330 or at 2800 NE Shoal Creek Parkway, Kansas City, MO, 64156-1313. Opinions expressed in Talon do not express the staff’s endorsement of the products or services.

Talon is a member of NSPA, MIPA and Quill and Scroll. Talon is affiliated with JEA and JEMKC.

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Staff Editorial

D.A.R.E. TO DRUG TEST Schools should leave drug testing to parents

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tudents are under school control for roughly 35 out of 168 hours of the week, and what students do in their free time is their own business. Drug testing in schools has recently become a hot topic for debate among a local public school district -- Smithville, Mo. However, drug testing of students by school staff should not be allowed at public schools because they are taxpayer funded. Now, at private schools, that is a different story. Since families pay for students to attend private school, they essentially pay a private business and must follow the rules of said business. There are currently no federal laws that pertain to drug testing in school, but two U.S. Supreme Court cases, Vernonia v. Acton and Board of Education of Independent School District No. 92 of Pottawatomie County v. Earls,

gave schools permission to randomly test student athletes and those who participate in competitive extracurricular activities. While administrators are responsible for giving students a safe and healthy school environment, that is where their jurisdiction ends. It is unnecessary for them to physically have access to students’ bodies. Students may be participating in illegal activity, but if it is not on school grounds or during school hours, why should the school be involved? Although these activities should not be occurring in the first place, the actions of students outside of school should not affect their access to education, assuming they are not under the influence at school. It is the parents’ responsibility to handle problems outside of

school. Analysis of random drug testing has brought to light more cons than pros, some of which are: huge expense to the school, cheating is possible and harsh punishment for positive tests that could have harmful effects, according to Center on Addiction and Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. Schools may think they are helping students by testing them. If a test does return as positive for drug use, there is no saying how a school will handle each situation. Students may not be able to access classes or compete in activities, and in then in turn, turn back to drugs and other illegal substances from which the school was originally trying to get them away. While the intentions may be good, this could be detrimental to the school atmosphere and in turn, bring more backlash on

the school than if they did not drug test. Instead of converting to a cover-up method of handling substance abuse, schools should revert back to the use of preventative programs and keep them prominent throughout a student’s school career, versus just teaching the harmful effects in elementary school. School should be the priority for students. Professional and personal life should be kept separate, and the school needs to respect that line as well. Currently, the North Kansas City School District’s drug testing policy is based off of reasonable suspicion, and the district is not considering adopting a new policy, according to superintendant Daniel Clemens, Ph.D.

Will the threat of drug testing deter students from doing drugs?

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Frankie Enna, 11

David Pileggi, 11

LeeAnthony Sorey, 12

Todd Warner, Coach

“For some yes, and for some no. it just depends on how often the kid does the drugs.”

“I don’t necessarily think that it’ll make a lot of kids stop doing drugs. It’ll make some kids maybe more scared to do them, because they know they have the possibility of getting caught.”

“I feel like some kids will stop doing drugs, But teens our age will figure out a way to make the drug test think that they are not doing, like ways around the test.”

“there’s probably some hard-core people that would go ahead and take the chance, But I do think that during season, that the chance of being randomly tested would overall reduce the use of drugs.”

VOLUME 11

TALON

STAFF EDITORIAL


Netflix

Browse

Kids

DVD

Search

Staley News

Continue Watching

My List

Netflix Originals: Hit or Miss? Warner FindS Big Hits, lots of misses

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eople are accustomed to seeing the phrase “Netflix Original,” because it is plastered all over Netflix. It is shown as a category, shown on the little title pictures for shows and even as the show is beginning. With recent success with Netflix’s original series, one can only expect this advertising to increase -which it will. Netflix CEO Reed Hastings has said they are ready to pay top dollar to keep running

nonoriginal series and movies, but they are also ready to keep their members, “ecstatic with our incredible original content.” But are Netflix Originals keeping subscribers ecstatic with this content? Sometimes. Netflix originals are sometimes loved. For instance, “Bird Box,” “Stanger Things” and “Ozark” were some original content that were widely popular. “Bird Box” broke the internet with floods of memes. However, there are about

700 “Netflix Original” series. So, the impressive onslaught of series and movies becomes less impressive when you realize how much content Netflix has actually pumped out. This is why watching anything that as the phrase “Netflix Original” plastered on it is a complete shot in the dark. Sure, at times, you may stumble across a “Bird Box” or “American Vandal.” But you will also find a copious amount of shows like

“Insatiable,” which received a 12 percent on rotten tomatoes, where Debby Ryan turns to beauty pageants to get revenge on her bullies. As a rule of thumb, always know what you are getting yourself into when starting a “Netflix Original” show or movie, because you will likely be blown away or completely confused. It seems like Netflix shoots for quantity over quality with their original content. Written by Jack Warner Graphics by Haley Anne Mahusay

Netflix Originals

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Types of testing

General Ways To detect drug usage A

nother way to be tested for drugs IS with a blood test. Someone gets their blood drawn, and gets it tested. it gives an accurate measure of the physiologically active drug present in a person at the time the sample is drawn, but the detection period is extremely short.

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ne of the ways someone can be drug tested is by urine test, it detects and measures use of a particular drug within the previous few days. the individual urinates into a cup or container, and the HEALTHCARE WORKER takes it in for testing.

Source: Drug & Alcohol Testing Industry Association

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very simple method of testing an individual for drug use is an oral fluid test. The inner cheek is swabbed for saliva and tested. It is used more to show current use and detect specific substances.

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he least invasive form of drug testing is the hair test. It provides a longer testing window, and rather than confirming current impairment, it can detect past usage. For this, a hair sample is cut and tested.


To test Or not to test? Local School District explores RANDOM DRUG TESTING option

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s random drug testing enough of a deterrent to prevent students from using drugs? The Smithville School District thinks it could be. On July 18, a presentation at a Smithville Board of Education meeting proposed the idea of allowing student drug testing within the district. At the meeting, Tomo Drug Testing employee John Throckmorton spoke about the testing and how it was introduced into other schools. According to Throckmorton, the number of school districts in Missouri that practice the random drug tests is between 180-200, and the tests are to prevent, not punish. Other districts have rules that require parents to sign before the student can be tested. “I don’t see a problem with random drug testing. I know some schools around here already do it, and I think it’s a great thing for students to practice abstinence,” said junior Brendan Bretz. Gini Fite, Smithville’s Athletic Trainer, presented to the board Jan. 16, discussing topics like the data collected to push this idea such as surveys, Smithville-specific data, facts about marijuana and

more. As of right now, the committee working on the issue is only looking at implementing the policy at Smithville High School. The drug tests are supposed to deter drug use and give kids an excuse for saying no to drugs in peer pressure situations, said Fite. Aside from statistics

in the case of Board of Education of Independent School District No. 92 of Pottawatomie County v. Earls, gave authority to public schools to test students that are in extracurricular or cocurricular activities or park on campus. “Students already sign an agreement saying they won’t participate in use of

“Students already sign an agreement saying they won’t participate in use of illegal substances, so to me this is just a check for that.” -- Gini Fite, Smithville Athletic Trainer on tobacco and drug use within Smithville Mo., depicting the rise in infractions from the 16-17 school year to the 17-18 school year, the presentation provided the reasoning and logistics behind the random drug tests. “I do think that it is an invasion of privacy, because what happens outside of school isn’t their business,” said sophomore Alec Shelby. Drug testing some students is legal. The U.S. Supreme Court,

illegal substances, so to me this is just a check for that,” said Fite. Fite said if testing is implemented, students who test positively would not be punished, but the district will be trying to prevent further use. Smithville School District is working with outside agencies to pay for the random drug tests. “Hypothetically, if a student tested positive, education and assistance will be provided. There would be a time amount a student would be held from

competition; however, they would still be expected to practice and be involved,” said Fite. As of now, the school district encourages people who are wanting to help to get involved with the Smithville CIA, support Smithville Tobacco 21, sign up for SSD emails, talk to their children about drug use and go to Community Education Sessions. As far as the North Kansas City School District goes, superintendent Dan Clemens, Ph.D., said he does not have plans to enforce random drug testing to student athletes. He said the NKC School District would not do something to the students they aren’t willing to do to the adults. He suggested that if student athletes were to be tested, the staff should be too. “Our district policy is reasonable suspicion. If we belive that you might be under the influence of alcohol or something, we could test,” said Clemens. For Smithville, only time will tell if these policies get put into place. Written by Jack Warner Graphics by Autumn Adams

NEWS

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e r ’ e w , y Sorr

d e s o l C shutdown affects local families

government

uation.” finitely is in this sit occur h the longest de ug e shutdown should ro th th er nt eth we st wh ju s gh ou ate St Th d ty of ite rie va Un A he story, g discussed. wn in American hi the only thing bein ’t ll.” isn wa e “th government shutdo e of th unds the issue wn may happen in speculation surro er wall that and another shutdo when 22 c. De d is to create a bord n rte tio sta ten wn in do p’s ut States. sh um e Tr Th . re near futu ion to on into the United off illegal immigrati ump made the decis s tional Tr rd na ld a wa na h Do ug t ro in en th ga id Pres an attempt to aminer shows in Ex t n en to m ng rn hi ve as t go W or e e pp Th in 2019 su partially close th a border wall. rcent of Americans pe ild 42 bu at to m th ed ll fro ed po se ne ea g the fundin Jan. 25, but is an 8 percent incr came to a an end on reas Trump’s wall, which a re This 35-day event cla de just last year. Whe d an ain shut down ag tion to s na e ise th om of pr t p en rc um Tr 54 pe y of the nc ion ge sit er national em stands in oppo 9 s of nd se fu ea ll cr wa de a er if bord wall with . ar in ye d t ate las oc m all fro ’t t en en ar perc three weeks. “Personally, I don’t e th to g in Accord think the wall will try , st Po n to ng hi Was benefit us as a coun junior id sa r,” ve oe ats Trump requested wh al blunt, $5 billion in feder Hailey Peck. “To be is the w n ne e tio th ua r sit fo is g in th fund I think ever, er g rd in wall along the bo most ridiculous th d y an an o m xic so between Me and there are the United States. ling this.” nd ha of r methods that he ot out Trump’s sh The political cla e heated debates ab wn arose from ar e do er ut th sh e le th hi W to d s a whole group of e issues that lea office, there stand nate Democrats. Th in Se gy d ate an ects p str um Tr n betwee the money with the drastic eff ns who are dealing t willing to allocate no ize al er re cit we fed ts 00 ra of 0,0 oc lt m 80 su De was a re estimated and the shutdown the shutdown. An of ck he g yc in pa en no op th for Trump’s plan, re wi on ing left that he did not plan employees were be ent of those this. Trump stated e funds, and he ent closure. 53 perc th m d rn ive ve ce go re e he th g til rin un t du en to their work m d rn t en ve pu att go the ll required to sti utdown could be re sh r we s he ee ot oy an pl at th em further stated if lawmakers ing paid. s after it reopened as usual without be in place three week uproar across the s caused quite the ha is e. Th cid de ilians alike. ot r nn fo still ca eral workers and civ stified in calling ju fed g ly on ite am fin de try is un p co ah “I think Trum attempt to try and id sophomore Aaliy s assembled in an sa ,” ion wn un r do ut bo sh La t en cally the American at a governm if someone is in th e shutdown, specifi th ve t lie ba be m “I co l. o filed a ul -H ll Aramjoo y right to ca ent Employees wh ration of Governm then they have ever r, de Fe we po of ion it k sit in po d I th en it’s necessary, an for a shutdown wh

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ies that do il m fa of y t en pl e ar re “The h. I’m fortunate, go through that thoug as well, and because my mom works coming in e m co in e t ra pa se a d ha we during this.” -- senior Sydney Horton

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NEWS


that requiring ump. They claimed lawsuit against Tr al and leg “il is to still work unpaid employees t on their ou g in iss m s er of work unethical.” On top was lost ey on ant amount of m paycheck, a signific . cts ra nt vernment co from numerous go 0 million per ne, an estimated $1 alo ty Ci as In Kans nies holding pa en away from com week was being tak Public Radio l na tio according to Na , cts ra nt co al er fed people in a shutdown affected Station KCUR. The r very own cluding those in ou variety of places, in school. her father, an rton has dealt with Senior Sydney Ho ing left without ent for the IRS, be internal revenue ag . rnment closure pay during the gove al with ily hasn’t had to de fam y m , “Thankfully le to use our utdown. We were ab the worst of the sh pressure e so we didn’t have th money in savings, y the pa to g in ‘How are we go ent?’” of thinking about ym pa r ca e th y pa will we do go at mortgage?’ or ‘How th es are plenty of famili y mom m e said Horton. “There us ca be te, gh. I’m fortuna ou th at th h ug co ro th income ming we had a separate works as well, and y to not have to l we were very luck in during this. I fee er position.” be put into a tight , Horton’s father ment being opened rn ve With the go st one of 12,000 y again. He was ju is receiving his salar g the effect of ein who would be se Missouri residents e in the oval ad m ’t en tiations ar this. Though if nego s could stop workers’ paycheck office soon, many e challenges will have to face th try un co e th d an , again once again. written by Hailey Milliken ms & Makenzie Hooton Graphics by Autumn Ada

e l b u o r t f o s e im t In es decided shutdown, many business During the government several those in need. There were to lend a helping hand to workers. sist furloughed federal as p hel to s fer of d an deals government ite a few options that Kansas City alone had qu sure. vantage of during the clo employees could take ad

e and Jax fish hous fered oyster bar of f their free lunch of eek restaurant w menu

in free tenderlo ries at burger and f t jj’s Restauran e

d fre Ride KC Offere rides

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NKC Free or r lunch

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Recruiters’ Requests

College athletic recruiters Share Traits of ideal Prospects

Written by Sara Almansouri

At the Wrestle for a Cure tournament Jan. 26 at Olathe North High School, freshman Jacob Windsor wrestles his opponent from Wichita South High School. Windsor won his match by pin in the second period. “It was an adrenaline rush from when I put him on his back, because he kind of just gave up, and it was the last period,” said Windsor. Photo by Sara Almansouri

Ending the match, senior Corbin Peters pins his opponent from Olathe North at Olathe North High School Jan. 26. Peters won the match, helping the team to a fourth place team finish. “That was a very tough match, but I ended up pulling through and being on top,” said Peters. Photo by Sara Almansouri

Taking the ball up the court, junior Nia Daniels plays at home Jan. 31 against Truman High School. Varsity girls won 69-49, as of Feb. 1 the girls had a record of 8-7. “I was happy that our team was working together to accomplish a goal and smack them,” said Daniels. Photo by Shilo Hatala

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During a basketball game at home Jan. 27 against Grandview High School, junior Kuyu Gazo looks for a pass down the court. Varsity lost 30-47 during the Coaches vs. Cancer fundraiser night. “Good defense leads to good offense,” said Gazo. Photo by Sara Almansouri


- Size and body type - Play speed and position quickness to show that athletes can move at a certain pace during drills - Athletic ability - Strength - Competitiveness - Supportive character - Personality

- Amount of effort put in - Athletic ability - Personality - Work ethic - Academically fit

- Athletic talent - Character - Academically fit - Personality - Desire to succeed

- Character, how athletes respond to criticism and how coachable athletes are - Technical skill and speed of play - Teammate interaction -Work ethic

- Academically fit - Strong work ethic - Amount of play time - Strong drive and love for tennis in general

- Academically fit - Attendance record - Athletic abilities - Multi-sport athlete - Ability to interact with others

- Volleyball skills and talent - Ability to do well in school - Higher than average GPA - Time management skills - Teammate interaction

- Athletic and academically fit - Well rounded, multi-sport athlete - General athletic ability - Natural athletic talent - Outside activity involvement throughout the community

- Grades and test scores - Velocity and ability to throw a ball - Ability to strike someone out - Teammate interaction - Work ethic in training

- Overall talent - Academically fit - Technical skills - Time management - Teammate interaction - Commitment to the team and the sport

Source: University of Missouri-Kansas City, Rockhurst University, University of Central Missouri and Drury University

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bop to the top

Reviews of top albums of 2018

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his project, Hoodie SZN, is A Boogie’s second studio album and was released in December. It has been on the Billboard Rap album chart for five weeks, and it was on top for two weeks. The album has some notable features, too. A Boogie partnered with Offset, Tyga, Juice WRLD, Young Thug and more. People who are fans of A Boogie can expect typical, but quality tracks off of the 20-song album. There is an enjoyable mix of up-tempo and slower, more emotional songs. The best song from this album is Startender, featuring Offset and Tyga. It is the most energetic song off of the album. However, the other heartfelt tracks ultimately make the album worth the listen. A Boogie didn’t really take a break on any of the songs; all of them are quality. Written by Jack Warner

8/10

A

10/10

seven-member Korean boy group, BTS’s, :LOVE YOURSELF ‘Answer’” turned out to be a fantastic surprise. Turn away any preconceived notions about foreign music when you go to listen to this absolutely dynamic album. With a total of 26 songs, it is the culmination of years of hard work that can be felt on each track. The numerous songs offer quality variation and pretty much any genre possibly desired. This release presented a continuous narrative of selflove and spread good vibes throughout it. The language barrier is made pretty much nonexistent with the clear emotion conveyed in every song. Artistry and originality are the two words that best describe this album. Written by Hailey Milliken

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his soundtrack to Sony Animation’s December movie, “SpiderMan: Into the Spider-Verse,” has been on the Billboard soundtrack chart for six weeks and No. 1 for four weeks. The project contains 13 songs and features an impressive list of artists. Some notable artists are Post Malone, Sway Lee, Juice WRLD, Lil Wayne, Ski Mask the Slump God and more. The album also contains some lesser known artists such as DUCKWRTH, Blackway and Beau Young Prince. All the songs would seemingly go well with the plot of almost any superhero movie, with lyrics talking about jumping off of buildings (like Spiderman does). However, the best song goes to Post Malone and Sway Lee on Sunflower. Hear songs from favorite artists and even find some new artists. It was neat to hear artists who otherwise would not work with each other collaborate, like Ski Mask the Slump God and Jacquees. Written by Jack Warner

E 10/10

asily one of the most anticipated releases of 2018 was “Sweetener.” This was Grande’s fourth studio album, and she promised it would be a game changer. Safe to say, this album was just that. The eclectic album is enhanced by Grande’s powerhouse vocals and the wonderful instrumental production behind it. The album is somehow exciting and empowering while offering an R&B, melancholy feel to it as well. Pharrell Williams, Nicki Minaj and Missy Elliot feature on tracks from the album to help make it the masterpiece it is today. This release is timeless and will continue to be appreciated in the years to come. Written by Hailey Milliken

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LIFESTYLES & ENTERTAINMENT

7/10


Fab or Drab? pOSPISIL Picks Pleasing and Poor Reads 1.

Delirium By Lauren Oliver

9.5/10

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auren Oliver’s “Delirium” has quickly become one of my personal favorite dystopian love stories of all time. It’s one of those books that had me crying one minute and laughing the next. Oliver expressed the main character Lena’s emotions in such a way that when I was reading, they felt so real, as if I was experiencing them myself. The most interesting part of the book was watching Lena develop and watching her true character unfold as she transforms from a simple, do-good citizen to an independent individual who begins to question her surroundings. The way the author portrays love as a disease is such an unusual concept, but it is told in such an unbelievably beautiful way. The ending had me crying, of course, as such a heartbreaking end to an amazing love story. As soon as I finished reading “Delirium,” I immediately went searching for the sequel.

3.

When We Collided By EMORY LORD

8.5/10

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mery Lord’s “When We Collided” is a brutally honest portrayal of two quirky teenagers, both struggling within, who meet one summer. The two characters, Jonah and Vivi, are both written as complex individuals, and the author manages to perfectly capture the two -- their thoughts and personalities. Lord writes the budding love story with such raw emotion that it’s a tear-jerking read. Jonah, the male character, is coping with the loss of his father, while Vivi, the female character, continues to struggle with bipolar disorder that she has suffered with for years. Both are such dark concepts, hard to cope with, but the writer incorporates these concepts flawlessly. As the book goes on, these two characters form an undeniable bond, and the author writes this journey as realistically as it could be told. Important topics such as depression and bipolar disorder were dealt with many times throughout the book. Watching how the two learn to save each other, and more importantly, find themselves, makes it such an effortlessly beautiful read.

The Book of Ivy By Amy engel

2.

8/10

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ne of the most interesting, hard to put down novels that I’ve read is “The Book of Ivy,” by Amy Engel. I finished in a matter of days. There wasn’t much constant action throughout the book, more like drawn-out suspense that kept things interesting. Instantly, when I began reading, I was hooked. The book is set in the eerie near future, where the United States is divided, and the main character Ivy finds herself stuck in the middle. She is given the mission of a lifetime -- to murder her fiancé from an arranged marriage, the president’s son Bishop. One of my favorite parts of the story was the evolution of the relationship between Ivy and Bishop. All her life, Ivy has been taught to think a certain way, and we are there as she begins to abandon her traditional values and changes the way she views the world and her so called “enemy.” I enjoyed how the book was paced. There was no forced romance between the two characters, and all aspects of the novel are realistic, honest and intriguing.

4.

Tell me three things By Julie Buxbaum

6/10

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was slightly disappointed after reading “Tell Me Three Things” by Julie Buxbaum. I had high hopes, because of how popular it has been among the reading community. I did enjoy the cute, underlying themes that were included in the book, but it felt too familiar. Although the author clearly worked with an interesting concept with the back and forth of anonymous emails from Jessie’s secret classmate, I still felt that it was very unoriginal. Jessie, the main character, is an everyday teenage girl who experiences love and tragedy, as she grieves the death of her mother. However, I never really felt connected to her or any other characters. I kept hoping that as I read, I would become more intrigued with the mystery involving Jessie and her anonymous computer pal, but it seemed to be stuck. I just wanted to skip ahead and get it over with. I loved the new girl aspect of the book and seeing how Jessie adapted to her new life with her new stepmom and siblings, but I just wish that the novel had not been such a predictable realistic fiction read. Written by Kayla Pospisil Photos by Kayla Pospisil

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New museum tricks minds

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he Kansas City Museum of Illusions is only one of two in the United States, and it opened in October. “The original illusions museum started in Croatia and was then moved over to the states by a couple of people,” said museum attendant Alejandro Yslas. “The first one opened in New York, and then we opened the Kansas City one in the same week.” Since opening, the museum has become very popular with couples, groups and families, according to Yslas. “When we first started, there was a pretty long line, and some people were waiting 45 minutes to an hour just in line to get into the museum,” said Yslas. “That was around the first week or two of the museums being opened.” The museum features a number of illusion exhibits like its infinity room, a room full of mirrors and its Vortex Tunnel, which you may need some Advil after going through. The three most popular amongst Instagram users are the Ames room, which grows and shrinks people by making them stand in different corners against an angled wall, the anti-gravity room which creates the illusion of conquering gravity, and the head-on-a-platter that serves up heads on a table. “The museum is designed to be difficult to understand, and not everything is immediately seen. There are some things you have to look at for a few minutes to see,” said resident magician of Union Station Victor Leyon. “There are also a lot of different layers to the museum. Some of the exhibits can only be seen two dimensional.” Most of the exhibits have photo stations that will create illusions in photos. “I had been there before, but I enjoyed it both times, and the second time, I was able to experience some

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illusions better than I did the first time,” said junior Don Morgan. “I also really enjoyed the magician. He was entertaining and very good.” The museum plans on having a permanent home inside Union Station with exhibits changing every few months. The museum’s hours are Monday to Sunday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. An adult ticket is $15, a student ticket is $12, and a child is $10. Written by Alexa Schulte Graphics by Makenzie Hooton

Information Where: 30 w. pershing rd. #620, Kansas City, MO 64108

Prices: $12 for students $15 for adults $10 for Children $40 for the family pack hours: 10 a.m. - 9 p.m.


Tricky Photos

In downtown Kansas City Jan. 25, sophomore Makanani Grace, junior Makenzie Hooton and senior Alexa Schulte check out a new attraction at Union Station, the Museum of Illusions. The museum opened Oct. 19 and was full of exhibits meant to mess with visitors’ minds, such as the Spinning Hypnosis Wheel, the Head-On-APlatter, the Chair Illusion and many others. “I thought the museum was very interesting, especially the infinity room, but I definitely needed some Advil after going through the spinny Vortex Tunnel,” said Shulte. Photos by Makanani Grace & Makenzie Hooton

FEATURE

TALON

VOLUME 11

ISSUE 4

15


Rising Above Challenges Despite Struggles, Student remains successful

W

hen senior Paris TaylorMahone was 4 years old, her dad Charles Mahone was convicted of second-degree murder. Being so young at the time, TaylorMahone didn’t know what was going on. All she knew was that she saw her dad on the news and knew it was something bad. As time went by, Taylor-Mahone had many questions, but she didn’t want to ask. “I didn’t know what to ask,” said Taylor-Mahone. “My dad wasn’t around, and I only knew that he was in jail.” When Taylor-Mahone was in middle school, she said she was told why he was in jail. “My cousin ended up telling me that the story I had been hearing wasn’t really the story,” said Taylor-Mahone. Since all these stories were being told to her, she decided to do her own research and find out exactly why he was in jail. “As I got older, I asked my dad why he was in jail,” said Taylor-Mahone. “I felt betrayed, lied to, and even shut a lot of people out in my teenage years.”

Growing up, it didn’t hit her much. Even without her father around, she had other supportive family members, like her mom and grandma. “When I was younger, I used to dance, and there was a father-daughter dance, and my dad wasn’t able to be there. So, my stepdad stepped in and filled the broken pieces,” said Taylor-Mahone. She said it has been different since her mom remarried when she was 7 years old, because her stepdad stepped in as her father figure, which was beneficial to the household to fill the void of her biological father not physically being there. “It does get tough sometimes,” said Taylor-Mahone. “I wish my dad was there for my first day of kindergarten, my 16th birthday and my cheer competitions.” With birthdays going by and only hearing his voice on the phone to wish her a happy birthday, she missed him being there in person. “When I go to visitation to see my dad, those are the times we get to catch up, eat burgers or hot wings and take a

photo with him,” said Taylor-Mahone. She takes a photo with him every time she goes to visit him, and she talks to him on the phone every Thursday and holidays when he she can. “My dad being in jail definitely doesn’t hold me back. It pushed me to do better things,” said Taylor-Mahone. Despite this struggle, Taylor-Mahone is a high-achieving student and an athlete. She is an active member in the National Honor Society, Fellowship of Christian Athletes and is on the cheer team. “It’s not a bad thing anymore; it actually helps me, because I’ve realized it made me a stronger person,” said Taylor-Mahone. Charles Mahone has eight years left on his sentence, but Taylor-Mahone said the prison that he is at will be shutting down. If he moves to the prison across the street, that time might be lowered to four years. “Once he gets out, I plan to take him shopping and out to eat,” said TaylorMahone. Written by Lonyae Coulter & aMELIA cROW Photo by Amelia Crow

FEATURE

TALON

VOLUME 11

ISSUE 4

16

Profile for Staley News, Staley High School

Staley High School Talon, Volume 11, Issue 4, February 2019  

Talon is a student-produced magazine created and published by the journalism students of Staley High School in Kansas City, Mo.

Staley High School Talon, Volume 11, Issue 4, February 2019  

Talon is a student-produced magazine created and published by the journalism students of Staley High School in Kansas City, Mo.

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