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TalOn

Staley High School Kansas City, Missouri Volume 11, Issue 3 December 2018

Special Edition Food Issue

From Screen To Plate Page 8-9

Dishing Out New Eats 6 Getting Chicky With It 13 You Just Got Served 18-19


Inside this issue FUELING THE CAFFEINE GRIND 4-5 Dishing Out New Eats 6 Organic vs. Conventional 7 No Meat, No Problem 8-9 10-11 From Screen To Plate Let’s Taco ‘bout Healthy Eating 12 GetTING Chicky WITH IT 13 14-15 Ain’t No Thing Like A Chicken Wing That’s The Tea 16 Drop iT LIKE IT’S HOT CHOCOLATE 17 18-19 you just got served Good Nutrition is their mission 20 News

News

NEWS

NEWS

Lifestyles & Entertainment

STAFF EDITORIAL

OPINION

TalOn

Staley High School Kansas City, Missouri Volume 11, Issue 3 December 2018

Special Edition Food Issue

From Screen To Plate Page 8-9

LIFESTYLES & ENTERTAINMENT

Dishing Out New Eats 6

Getting Chicky With It 13 You Just Got Served 18-19

On the Cover

With the end of the semester coming, Talon decided to have some fun and make a special edition issue. Not forgetting about the holidays in the issue, the staff recreated famous movie foods, including the spaghetti from Elf. Cover by managing editor, junior Makenzie Hooton.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIFESTYLES & ENTERTAINMENT

SPORTS

Feature


Letter from the editor: Dear Readers,

Welcome to issue three of Talon. This one is a little different, but the staff did an amazing job as always. We are just a couple short weeks away from the end of the semester, finals and the beloved winter break. This time of year is my favorite, with all the good food and family gatherings that happen. But, with that it is also a stressful time of year with finals, and we all deserve to have a little fun. So, Talon decided to make a special edition issue and cover a lighthearted and

delicious topic that we all have a need for -- food. Our past issues this year have been filled with serious stories and the realities of teenage struggles. In this issue, you will find a wide variety of content. From caffeine in the teenage diet, Prostart and their upcoming competitions, to ELL making smoothies to sell to the student body. We also felt that it is important to share our findings of the best chicken tenders, wings and hot chocolate around us. With this lighthearted

issue, it is my hope that the Talon staff grows closer together and gains confidence in themselves and their work with a different type of journalism. Everyone has worked hard and deserves to have some fun. So, with that, Talon brings you the food issue. I encourage all readers to give us feedback and make this an interactive experience and give us their input on local restaurants and others that the staff needs to try. On another note, since our last publication, journalists from Talon, STTV and Legacy

attended Nationals for journalism in Chicago, Illinois. Talon came home with a plaque for being a Pacemaker Finalist, and managing editor junior Makenzie Hooton won first place in newsmagazine layout. Magazine staff member senior Lonyae Coulter earned an Honorable Mention on Themed Photo, as well as four other Legacy journalists who won. Stay tuned, Senior Haylee Roberts Editor-In-Chief

TALON STAFF Editor-In-Chief: Haylee Roberts Managing Editor: Makenzie Hooton Adviser: CheriE Burgett

Staff: Autumn Adams Sara Almansouri Lonyae Coulter Makanani Grace Dylan Holovach

Hailey Milliken Kara Morley Rachael Mueller Kayla Pospisil Alexa Schulte

Lexi Valdez Jack Warner Bryce Windsor

CONTACT US:

Talon is published seven issues during the school year. Talon will accept letters to the editor in CR202 or at cherie.burgett@nkcschools.org. Before the letter is published, we will need to verify the writer’s identity with a photo identification. Letters may not exceed a length of 350 words. We will not publish letters that are libelous, obscene or that may cause a veritable disruption of the education process at Staley High School. Letters must be signed. Anonymous letters will be discarded. Advertisers may contact the adviser at cherie.burgett@nkcschools.org, (816) 321-5330 or at 2800 NE Shoal Creek Parkway, Kansas City, MO, 64156-1313. Opinions expressed in Talon do not express the staff’s endorsement of the products or services.

Talon is a member of NSPA, MIPA and Quill and Scroll. Talon is affiliated with JEA and JEMKC.

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Fueling the Caffeine grind caffeine overtakes students’ diet

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affeine is easy to become addicted to and hard to stop when teenagers have late nights, cramming for finals or doing big projects. It is easy for those teens to become addicted or dependent upon caffeine, which then makes it hard to quit. “Caffeine can make you anxious, and you can experience highs and lows. It is also incredibly addictive if you drink it every day,” said school nurse Jill Scott. “Often times, if you drink one cup of coffee every day, you’ll find after a while you may need two cups to get the same effect as your original one cup of coffee.” Having a caffeine addiction can lead to many types of side effects. Without caffeine, a person can become very grouchy, jittery, experience headaches, fatigue, depressed mood, lack of concentration and flu-like symptoms, because of withdrawal, according to the Alcohol and Drug Foundation. “Caffeine is a stimulant, so it can increase your alertness, but it also has other side effects like increasing your blood pressure, increasing your heart rate. And people who consume a lot of caffeine, it can even give them heart problems and difficulty sleeping,” said Samantha

Fawcett, family medicine doctor at Gashland Clinic. “It can also contribute to anxiety.” Starting to drink caffeine as a teenager builds bad habits, and becoming dependent upon caffeine at a young age isn’t good, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse for Teens. “I drink about 10 cups a week,” said senior Marissa Garza. “It all started when my sister drove me to school, she would have one cup in the mornings, so eventually I started to get a cup too.” Americans drink an average of 3.1 cups of coffee a day, with the average size of cup being nine ounces, according to Harvard University’s study “Coffee by the Numbers.” “Over the past couple of years, there have been a few deaths of people in their teens and 20s from a lot of caffeine consumption,” said Fawcett. “I know, especially for teenagers, it’s hard for them to stay up, study and then have to get up early for school, so some of it is being driven by their

15 mg

160 mg

How much caffeine is in your favorite drinks?

Source: Center for Science in the Public Interest

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16 oz. Monster Energy

16 oz. Arizona Green Tea


schedules. But I just warn people about having an addiction to it.” In South Carolina, a 16-year-old boy died from drinking too much caffeine, his death was said to be a caffeineinduced cardiac event. The state is currently trying to pass a law to prevent this from occurring again, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. To cut down on caffeine intake, try caffeine-free teas, exercise to wake up, cut back slowly or make the coffee lighter to gradually reduce the amount of caffeine, according to Villanova University’s study “About Caffeine.” “I started being late in the mornings, so I stopped drinking coffee, and since, I’ve been getting headaches and cravings,” said Garza. “I feel like my work ethic and attention span have decreased since I’ve stopped drinking coffee.” The U.S. spends $40 billion on coffee each year, according to Harvard University’s study “Coffee by the Numbers.” “I’ll probably keep drinking coffee, because there is a huge

235 mg

12 oz. Starbucks Coffee

social aspect to it too, like going out on a coffee date or studying at Starbucks,” said Garza. The best way to cure this kind of addiction is to cut down slowly the amount of caffeine intake, according to the Cleveland Clinic. “If you stop abruptly, you may experience headaches or nausea, because you can be addicted to caffeine, because caffeine is a drug,” said Scott. “You’ll have to slowly drink a little less every day and just eventually just get yourself out of that habit.” Scott recommended drinking tea or a smoothie instead of the caffeine, because it is a healthier way to get more energy. “I worry that people become more and more dependent upon it instead of just choosing healthier lifestyle choices like getting lots of sleep and exercise and eating good food,” said Fawcett. “When they rely on it daily is when I get worried.” Written by Alexa Schulte Graphics by Makenzie Hooton

34 mg

12 oz. Coca-cola

25 mg

16 oz. Starbucks Hot Cocoa NEWS

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Dishing out New EATS Prostart students utilize new skills

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rostart has been making all kinds of new foods lately. They’re trying out new dishes and preparing for upcoming competitions, all while dealing with a lack of hot water in the classroom. “They will be making bronco fajitas which is a chicken fajita that has sliced peppers and onions and pumpkin bars with cream cheese frosting in about two weeks,” said Prostart teacher Rachel Mitchell. The students have labs once or twice a week in class depending on if they have hot water. They were without hot water for about a month and were having to boil water to do their labs. “In Prostart, there are two different levels, the upper and lower level. The lower level of Prostart works on content, while the upper level, varies due to what unit they are on. The class also participates in labs where they can’t talk while cooking,” said Mitchell. It is more than just a class, it is a cocurricular activity. “The students learn from the environment and working with teammates, getting to know who they are working with as a person,” said junior Michaela McCarthy. It brings them all together as a family when they work in teams. “They try to utilize learning new skills and cooking foods they haven’t done before. So, for example, we would do a tomato braise chicken. And with that, it’s more about learning technique of braising, searing it before, and finishing it in a liquid, so they just try to incorporate them throughout the year,” said Mitchell. The students in the Prostart II class began practicing for their upcoming competitions weeks ago. “They are in the middle of working on their menu, so they’ve already had two practices where they’re trying out different recipes for appetizers, entrees and dessert,” said Mitchell. They practiced once a week at the beginning of the year, but closer to end of the semester and beginning of second semester, they practice twice a week. During competition week, they

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practice until 8 or 9 p.m. and do run throughs as if they were at competition at that moment. The first competition for FCCLA is at the end of January, and the first competition for Prostart is Feb. 1 at Johnson County Community College. The state competition will be held Feb. 21 and 22 in Springfield, Missouri. “Last year, they made a pomegranate lime sorbet and mascarpone ice cream,” said McCarthy. They ended up taking sixth place last year at state and fourth place at their Johnson County Community College competition. “This year in Prostart II we aren’t doing as much bookwork as we did last year. We’re working on more complex work such as garnishes, because last year we worked on fruits, vegetables and different types of pastas,” said McCarthy. They wanted their team to be more elevated, and that’s what they’re working toward throughout the rest of the year.

Prepping his appetizer dish of scallops wrapped in bacon with pomegranate sauce Nov. 15, is senior Cam Tate who is in his first year on the competition team. The Prostart competition team was practicing and perfecting their recipes that they will later use at state competition in the spring. “I love my teammates very much, and they are extremely supportive whenever I’m learning something new or coming up with ideas with them so that we can get first place at state this year,” said Tate. Photo by Alexa Schulte

Written by Lonyae Coulter Photo By ALEXA Schulte

In culinary team practice Nov. 15, junior Michaela McCarthy and senior Joey Daniels practice the entree portion of their competition by preparing the ingredients. This was Daniels’ first year on the team. “We are in the test phase of competition right now,” said McCarthy. Photo by Alexa Schulte


Organic vs. conventional Finding The andand the the downs of eating Finding theupsups downs of oeating naturally

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eople who shop at grocery stores are likely aware of the revered organic food industry and probably have varied thoughts on the subject. Whether they think organic food is healthier, more economically friendly, better tasting or a fad, most can agree that organic food is more expensive. Granted, if being healthy comes with a price, people would likely pay that price. However, are these costly goods doing anyone any good? “I think the benefits are you aren’t eating preservatives or pesticides, and you’re just keeping harmful chemicals out of your body,” said senior Alexis Theohardis. Consumer Reports published a 2015 study related to the price of organic food. When they compared 100 product pairings, organic and conventional, side by side, they found that on average, organic foods are 47 percent more expensive than conventional food. For example, organic zucchini was 303 percent more expensive than conventional zucchini. For

many people, these statistics, will not change their stance on organic foods if they truly think that buying organic is better. “I am willing to pay the higher price just because I think it’s worth it in the end,” said Theohardis. The organic foods industry, a multibillion dollar industry, is the fastest growing within the food industry. As of 2012, National Public Radio reported that it was worth $29 billion. But recent studies are showing that these high-priced goods are practically the same as conventional food when it comes to nutrition. In a 2012 study by a Stanford team, they reported little significant difference between organic and conventional food. However, there is a 47 percent price difference between organic and conventional foods. Crystal Smith-Spangler, of Stanford University School of Medicine, told NPR that there is a definite lack of evidence for organic foods. At the same time, many organic buyers only care about one

thing: pesticides. However, when researchers at the University of Oxford analyzed 71 peer-reviewed studies, they discovered that some organic products are worse for the environment than conventionally grown food. When the Soil Association asked consumers why they choose organic, 95 percent said it was in attempts to avoid pesticides. “Most research shown on organic farms is that they should use pesticide to keep insects out of their product, because insects can cause disease in the crop,” said third generation conventional farmer, in Atchison, Kansas, Craig Sholz. Craig said the United States could not survive without conventional farming, because there are too many people to feed. There is a small amount of evidence proving or disproving that organic is healthier. Further research will prove whether more money means more nutrition. Written by Jack Warner photos by Lexi Valdez and Makanani Grace

WHat do you think about organic foods?

Spanish teacher Anna Maki-Birchler

“My philosophy is to fuel your body with ‘life’ food, filled with the earth’s power and energy. The closest you can get to this is organic food,” said Maki-Birchler.

Haley Sheldon, 11

“I hear that they are better for you, but personally, eating an organic apple and a nonorganic has never caused a difference to me,” said junior Haley Sheldon.

ELL teacher, Travis Mauzey

“Eating more locally and eating stuff that is grown without chemicals, I don’t do a great job of it, but it’s always on the forefront of my mind,” said Mauzey. NEWS

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No meat, no problem Students choose vegan, vegetarian DIETS

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eing vegan and vegetarian are becoming increasingly popular. Demand for vegan and vegetarian food increased by 987 percent in 2017, according to international delivery service Just Eat. But, some people don’t know the difference between the two. Vegetarians are people who don’t consume meat, poultry, seafood or fish. “I didn’t like how the meat industry is treating the animals and how much they just breed animals to kill them for meat,” said freshman vegetarian Emily Colling. Colling said her diet in the morning usually consists of eggs with an apple. “Sometimes, I have hard-boiled eggs at school, some peanuts, fruit and cheese. When I get home, it’s usually veggie burger or veggie burrito mix,” said Colling. She said it is sometimes difficult, especially with there not being many vegetarian options offered at school. “I don’t regret it, but there are a lot of times where I’m like, ‘I just want a hotdog,’” said Colling. Veganism is a plant-based diet with no animal products. GrubHub reported users chose vegan food 19 percent more in 2017 than in 2016. Family MD physician Dana

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Granberg said there are many health benefits to cutting out animal products and meat. “Vegetarians and vegans tend to be more cardiac healthy and in general, looking over the best labs

“They live a healthy lifestyle, but you have to be careful not to overload on carbs. Moderation in everything is important.” -- dANA gRANDBERG, Ph.d. are those who eat less meat,” said Granberg. Sophomore Madalynn Palmer is vegan. She doesn’t eat meat, fish, eggs or dairy products. She chose to become vegan about two years ago, because her friend was vegan. “One day, I did a little researching and found out what happens in animal factories. It’s so sad,” said Palmer. Palmer said she tried out being vegan for a week and liked it.

“It went really well, so I just kept it going. It was really easy,” said Palmer Palmer’s diet is mostly fruits and vegetables. “In the morning, I eat an orange and banana and granola bar. In lunch, a bag of pretzels and a piece of fruit,” said Palmer. For dinner, she eats her mom’s vegan meals made for her specifically. Palmer gets protein from tofu, beans and nuts. “Sometimes, it is hard, because friends and family want to go out to nice restaurants, and most don’t have vegan options,” said Palmer. Palmer said she never regrets her decision. “When I think about it, I’m eating a dead animal, and that sounds gross in my head mind now,” said Palmer. Granberg explained that despite meat being a really easy way to get protein and iron, lots of patients do very well with the diet. “They live a healthy lifestyle, but you have to be careful not to overload on carbs. Moderation in everything is important,”said Granberg. Written by Kara Morley Graphics by rachael mueller


Vegetarians dont eat:

Vegans also dont eat:

Why students decided on their diet

Kennedy Kooi, 12

Logan Dorman, 9

Senior Kennedy Kooi is a pescatarian and enjoys it because she’s felt so much healthier. A pescatarian is a person who doesn’t eat meat, but eats fish. “I decided to become a pescatarian in July of this year, because I wanted to stop eating meat and dairy products, because I don’t agree with a lot of the ways the animals are treated,” said Kooi.

“I don’t have any diet restrictions. I eat a lot of healthy foods and make sure I get enough greens and meats. I make sure my body gets correct nutrients it needs,” said freshman Logan Dorman. “I have tried vegetarian, vegan, the keto, and I’ve tried the paleo. They weren’t for me.”

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From screen to plate Famous Movie Foods Made In Real Life Written by Sara Almansouri Photos by Sara AlmansourI graphics by Rachael Mueller

Krabby Patty

Buddy’s spaghetti

Ingredients: Hamburger Bun with Sesame Seeds All Beef Hamburger Patty Cheddar Cheese Red Onion Medium Dill Pickle Large Tomato Leaves of Romaine Lettuce Mustard Ketchup

Ingredients: Spaghetti Noodles Syrup Sprinkles Mini-Marshmallows M&Ms Chocolate Syrup Chocolate Fudge Pop-Tarts

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rabby Patty’s has always been a favorite for “SpongeBob” fans. Wanting to know the secret recipe for the Krabby Patty was a childhood must. Although I couldn’t eat this since I’m vegetarian, I blessed my sister to try it. She was slightly disappointed when she tried it. The presentation of the Krabby Patty didn’t look very special; it just looked like a normal burger. The Krabby Patty has a hamburger bun with sesame seeds, beef hamburger patty, cheddar cheese, red onion, medium dill pickle, large tomato, lettuce, mustard and ketchup. It was very hard to bite into because there were two patties, and it was just big. There were too many ingredients for the Krabby Patty. She said she could really taste the burgers, which overpowered the other ingredients. Krabby Patties are pleasant for SpongeBob and his crew, but for people who don’t live in a pineapple or under the sea, I think it would be safe to stick to your regular burger.

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ome believe that at the North Pole, many elves like to eat sugar. For example, Buddy from Elf ate spaghetti. Elf food must be jolly to eat. In the spaghetti, there is syrup, sprinkles, minimarshmallows, M&Ms, chocolate syrup and chocolate fudge Pop-Tarts. The presentation of the dish was not appetizing. I wasn’t very excited to eat it. It was a nice one-time thing. Something that made it really gross was the chocolate syrup and the fact that there was sugar I could taste. I’m sure this is delicious to elves in the North Pole, but for those of us raised on human food, I do not recommend.


What Movie Food have you always wanted to try? Pie and Ice Cream from “Pinocchio” Alejandro Perdomo, 9

Remy’s ratatouille Ingredients: Tomato sauce Garlic cloves Thyme Olive oil Chili flakes Eggplant Yellow squash Zucchini Red bell pepper Potatoes Salt and black pepper Oil spray Béchamel sauce ( Unsalted butter, all purpose flour, Milk, Nutmeg)

Buddy’s Spaghetti from “elf” Madison Moore, 10

Beignets from “Princess and the Frog” Thalia Phillips, 11

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ats making food was something not a lot of people wanted to see, but at least the food turned out to be flavorable. It was the hardest to make with many steps, so I am doubting a rat could do it all. In the Ratatouille, there was tomato sauce, garlic, thyme, olive oil, chili flakes, eggplant, yellow squash, zucchini, red bell pepper, potatoes, salt and black pepper, oil spray, and for the béchamel sauce, unsalted butter, all-purpose flour, milk and nutmeg. The presentation of the Ratatouille looked very lovely. The veggies and tomato sauce were a good idea. The texture was tender. I recommend this if you are trying to eat healthy or attract rat cooks to your kitchen.

Po-tay-toes from “Lord of The Rings” Cole Lauffer, 12

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Lets taco ‘bout healthy eating

Staff Editorial

What would make fast food restaurants better?

Meghan McElwee, 11 “If they had those little fruit cups you get at Sunfresh. I love those a lot, but I never get them because they’re expensive, and I don’t like going to the store,” said McElwee.

Frankie Circello, 12 “I’m an athlete myself, and I always have to eat on the go, but I don’t want to eat McDonald’s. So, I’m saying if McDonald’s had healthier options, I would eat those,” said Circello.

Lilly Utz, 9 “There is a lot of salads, but they’re not the healthiest, so I would definitely utilize that more and more sub sandwiches that are on the healthier side instead of burgers,” said Utz.

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More Healthy options on the go could Benefit Teens Looking down North Oak Trafficway, there is a McDonald’s, Wendy’s, Taco Bell, Sonic and so many other fast food places, but there are few healthy food alternatives. Stereotypical teens are associated with a lazy and unhealthy diet, but if healthy food was made easier to obtain, teens would be more willing to eat healthier. We are busy people. Whether it be school, work or extracurricular activities, teens are on the go and usually just try to find food that is quickest. Which, in the end, is worse for the body since it is higher in saturated fat, salt, sugar and served in larger portions. Eating an excessive amount of junk can make a person feel sluggish, and when constantly on the go, that is not what is needed. Healthy eating involves taking control of what types and how much food you eat and drink, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A

diet consisting of healthy meals and snacks will boost your intake of nutrients, helping out in the long run. However, eating well doesn’t mean obsessing over food. A good diet allows junk food and fast food occasionally. Having access to healthy food drive-thrus could help out the country’s obesity problem. Fresh fruit cups, salads, organic whole foods, pressed juice and protein bars are all healthy alternatives to fries, onion rings, chips and soda. Whether it be at school or sit-down restaurants or even at fast-food joints, healthy, organic foods should be made more readily available to those on the go who still need the nutrients to give them energy throughout the day. Cartoon by Rachael Mueller

Healthy Food Drive-Thru


The Best Fast Food Chicken in America 8771 North Ambassador Drive, Kansas City, Mo. 64155 / 100 MO-291, Liberty, Mo. 64068

R a i s ing Ca

Popular Chicken Chains Are Put to the test

welcoming vibe. The employees greet customers with a smile, and the managers go out and talk to customers. Chick-fil-A is often too crowded and loud to enjoy a meal inside. Finally, arguably two of Cane’s most signature features, are their sauce and bread. This “secret sauce” is perfect for the chicken as well as the fries, and the toast makes for an amazing combination. The Texas Toast is soft and warm, but not soggy, making it ideal. The bread from Slim Chicken’s looks like it could’ve been made in any household toaster, resembling Wonder bread. When going to Raising Cane’s, expect the best service, chicken and overall experience possible. Raising Cane’s has worked hard to get its chain to the top, and it deserves all of the attention it gets. written by jack warner

SLIM CHICKENS, FAT FLAVOR 126 Stewart Road, Liberty, MO 64068

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ome people prefer Raising Canes, and others prefer Chick-fil-A, but those with a real taste for quality chicken know that Slim Chickens is clearly the leading choice when choosing a restaurant that serves the finest meals. The size of the chicken tenders is perfect, making it an effortless experience to enjoy. Each piece is the perfect size, not too little, but not too big. Sometimes, chicken strips at Chick-fil-A are chewy and hard to take apart, but the chicken served at Slim Chickens falls right apart. The quality of the chicken was most impressive. It always has just the right texture, with no slime or grease like at nearby restaurant, Raising Cane’s. The overwhelming grease at Cane’s is enough to make me feel sick after eating it. The golden breading on each of the tenders at Slim Chickens

chickens slim

s e’ n

Getting Chicky With It Getting

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hen it comes to the chicken sector of fast food, there are several options -- but only one prevails. The best fast-food chicken is Raising Cane’s. Whether we are talking about the chicken, the sauce, tea, bread or the service, Cane’s is on top. Cane’s has mastered chicken fingers. There is a fine line in the chicken finger business when it comes to moisture and flakiness, Cane’s has created chicken fingers that have a crispy outside, but an easy-to-pull-apart, inside. This is something competitors often fail to execute. Chick-fil-A’s and Slim Chickens recipes result in a texture of lesser quality when compared to Cane’s. Besides the chicken itself, Raising Cane’s restaurants always have a very warm and

has just the right amount of crunch and doesn’t fall off when a bite is taken. The fries served are what truly makes the experience. French fries at some restaurants seem to be soggy or burnt, but never here. The perfect amount of fries are served, steaming hot, simply delicious. They’re cooked perfect, never burnt. For sides, besides the fries, they do offer mac and cheese, coleslaw and more. The signature sauce, called “Slim’s Sauce,” is a unique, flavorful sauce that goes along perfect with the chicken. It’s a little bit tangy and has a little bit of a kick to it. The atmosphere really adds to the experience. They bring the warm food right to the table, straight from the kitchen. The perfect combination of everything put together for a good price makes Slim Chickens a great place that serves incredible chicken. written by KAYLA POSPISIL

the chicken that gives back 6501 NorthWest Barry Road., Kansas City, MO 64154 / 110 Conistor STreet, Liberty, MO 64068

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fil-a kic

hick-fil-A is a popular restaurant, widely known for amazing food and service, and they deserve it. Remarkably, the breading is perfectly golden brown and a harmonious blend of soft and crunchy. The waffle fries are a fan favorite, rightfully so. Chick-fil-A has perfected the fryto-salt ratio, with or without dipping sauce. The chicken with their Polynesian Sauce makes for the perfect combo of sweet and savory and is equally amazing with the waffle fries. Chick-fil-A is known for being a Christian corporation and makes it a point to close every Sunday, despite the money they’re losing out on. Instrumental Christian music plays through the restaurant and in the bathrooms. The chain has a reputation of “overly” nice employees and

incredibly fast service. Chick-fil-A also donates food to local communities and has different volunteer and scholarship opportunities. According to their website, almost 46,700 Chickfil-A members have received $61 million in scholarships since 1973. Chick-fil-A has healthy and unhealthy options alike, all equally tasty. Their “unhealthy” options are still relatively nutritious. Chick-fil-A promises daily handmade, cage-free food and no fillers or artificial preservatives in their chicken. Walking into their fast-food joint feels like a sit-down restaurant. Food is brought to the table, and the trash is taken away. One would have to be lacking taste buds to not see Chick-fil-A’s superiority in every category. The company is very honorable and overall unmatched. written by MAKANANI GRACE

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Ain’t No Thing Like A Chicken Wing Wing Shops Battle For top Spot Written by Kayla Pospisil Photos by Makenzie Hooton

Wings Cafe: Winner winner Chicken Dinner

516 Northwest Englewood Road, Kansas City, Mo. 64118

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ings Cafe is a perfect sized hole in the wall that offers many options for sauces and types of wings, especially the traditional mild buffalo, which is what I ordered when we stopped here. The service was very quick: order at the counter and the wings are brought out to the table. The wings, in a size small, had the perfect amount of sauce smothered on them and had an impressive flavor, a perfect smoky buffalo. It has just the right amount of spiciness. The wings come in both shapes, some in the unique “wing style” like at the Hideout, and some “chicken leg” drumstick style, which are easier to eat. The combination of the two shapes of wings makes things messy when eating. They came with just the right amount of chicken on each wing, and they fall right off of the bone. It costs $8.50 for six wings, making it one of the two least expensive wing places we tried.

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Buffalo Wild Wings: Basic, But Worth It

8441 Northwest Prairie View Road, Kansas City, Mo. 64153

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erving wings with a near perfect flavor, Buffalo Wild Wings has many sizes and styles of wings that are available for order. It is a large chain bar and grill right off of Barry Road. I ordered snack-sized mild traditional wings. The wings took a while to come out after ordering, but it was definitely worth it. The price was a little high for the number of wings that come with the order, $7.58 for five. The flavor was impressive, a little bit spicy and very flavorful. The wings were really easy to eat, and although they were was still messy, the restaurant provided packaged wipes for the end of the meal. At times, the chicken was a bit chewy and hard to take apart, and the skin too. There was almost too much sauce that it overpowered the chicken wing itself. For those looking for a casual sports bar that has numerous flavors available for wings, Buffalo Wild Wings may be the perfect place to go. Just be ready to get a bit messy.

The Hideout Bar & Grill: A Hidden Gem

6948 North Oak Trafficway, Gladstone, Mo. 64118

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he chicken wings at the Hideout, a bar and grill off of North Oak in Gladstone, were interesting, with a little too much pepper and seasoning. It’s a casual restaurant that serves their chicken as whole wings, not drumsticks. According to the menu, the wings are charred and sauced, but it’s quite the opposite: there wasn’t much taste to the wings. The wings were very dry, with too little sauce on them. They had a lot of pepper and seasoning on the wings, making the taste very spicy, almost overwhelming. However, the quality of the chicken was perfect. The wing shape made it a bit hard to eat and made things quite messy. But, the style of the wings was very unique, and it’s clear that they were cooked to order, which may be why the service takes a while. The price is fairly reasonable, costing $1.75 for each wing, and there was a lot of chicken on each, so it was worth the price, although the strong spicy flavor of the wings wasn’t my favorite. The Hideout was a pleasant casual restaurant with quality service that made for a good dining experience.

WingStop: Disappointed, But not surprised

4313 Chouteau Trafficway, Kansas City, Mo. 64117

W

ingStop put us on quite a scavenger hunt when trying to find it. It is part of a small strip mall and is a much smaller space than expected. WingStop has more of a fast-food atmosphere than the other three stops. It is open until 10 p.m. during the week, and there were a lot of customers when we were there, which was during the dinner rush. We ordered at the front as soon as we got there, and I ordered the small size traditional wings in the mild flavor. The service is slow, and we ended up waiting about 15 minutes before getting our food. The price is pretty high, but the wings also come with fries and a drink. The small order comes with six wings, each of them overly doused in mild sauce. But, the sauce is very greasy and oily, and little of it actually sticks to the chicken wing. The food came out a bit cold, which made it not so enjoyable to eat. The drumsticks are small, and there isn’t much meat on each wing. There seems to be more skin than actual meat. As for pricing, WingStop is the most expensive. It was $11.04 for six drumsticks. Although WingStop is a well-known fast food joint that has several options for chicken wings, I do not recommend it if you are looking for unique, quality wings. LIFESTYLES & ENTERTAINMENT

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That’s A the Tea 1

Student reviews Local Tea Places

Good tea and good vibes

Gocha Tea & Beverages 6595 North Oak Trafficway, Gladstone, Mo. 64118

strong smell of cigarette smoke immediately hit me when I walked through the doors. However, the inside of GoCha was spotless clean. Decor was clearly done well with everything matching in a shiny and contemporary look. The aesthetic was very pleasing with bits of yellow accents and matching lights. Korean music was playing, and Asian candy and sodas were displayed. The iced house milk tea was $3.75. There was a convenient scale of sweetness to tailor your order. Service was almost immediate, and presentation was simple with a sticker of their logo on the cup. The milk tea was delicious and velvety. GoCha was my favorite out of the three places because it had the best tasting tea and the vibes and appearance were charming.

Written by Kara Morley Graphics and Photos by Makenzie Hooton

2

A Modern experience

Dragonfly tea zone 215 NorthEast Englewood Road Suite D, Kansas City, Mo. 64118

The benefits of Teas White Tea

Green tea can lower cholesterol and prevent the increase of blood pressure.

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Headrush Roasters

7108 North Oak Trafficway, Kansas City, Mo. 64118

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D

ragonfly Tea Zone had many menu items to choose from in addition to tea, such as rolled ice cream, smoothies, fresh juice and crepes. The strawberry iced Boba tea was $4. Service was quick, and the employees were friendly. The tea was fresh and not overly sweet. There were lots of bursting Boba that made the drink exceptional. The ambiance was very bright and modern. Seating was comfortable, and there was an artsy chalkboard menu. Dragonfly was clean and smelled good. It felt as though I had left Kansas City and entered a buzzing city.

Green Tea

3

too little, too late

White tea can help keep skin acne free and reduce chances of getting sick.

LIFESTYLES & ENTERTAINMENT

eadrush Roasters Coffee and Tea was a little brown building with a drivethru. It was more of a traditional coffee shop, but tea drinks were offered as well. The iced berry blast tea was $2.99. Presentation was just a plain, clear cup. The tea was bitter and had a dull flavor. The inside had dim lighting and quirky, mismatching decor and wall colors. After almost 15 minutes of waiting, I still did not have my drink, but they did make it up to me by apologizing and giving me a free drink coupon. Then, an iced caramel latte was ordered, and that was really satisfactory. Otherwise, the service and ambiance were not impressive. Source: The Tea Spot

Black Tea

Black tea has anitviral and anti-bacterial properties and can reduce stress levels.

Oolong Tea

Oolong tea has the full range of polyphenol antioxidants and weight-loss properties.


Drop it like it’s hot chocolate

T

he taste and quality of Panera never fails to disappoint. The standard hot chocolate at this restaurant is fancy within itself and is easily the most impressive out of the five. The flavor of cookie dough marshmallows is addictive, and the creaminess is obvious. The downfall? The significantly heftier price. Panera would be ranked as my favorite if it weren’t for the bigger price tag, but you get what you pay for. Photos by Makanani grace, written by hailey milliken

ingredients: whole milk (6 cups) heavy cream (2 cups) pinch of salt chocolate chips (12 oz) vanilla extract (1tsp) toppings

instructions: 1 Stir milk and heavy cream in a large pot.

I

8642 North Dixson Avenue / Kansas City, Mo.

own

T

f a place sounds like it should not be serving hot chocolate, then it probably shouldn’t. Subway hot chocolate wasn’t really a disappointment but more of just an expected outcome. It tasted like pure hot water and unsweetened cocoa powder. The light brown liquid burned my tongue and kept a bad taste in my mouth before I tried the next drink available. The price was low enough but still not as low as QuikTrip. I would’ve rather not spent any money on this beverage at all.

6145 nw Barry Road / Kansas City, Mo.

your

cost: $2.00 Size: small, 12 ounces

he best way to describe gas station hot chocolate is that it tastes the way you would imagine: very scalding, very watery and very cookie-cutter. If you are looking for a typical Swiss Miss tasting hot chocolate, then QuikTrip is the place to be. I have to praise the store for having such a large cup size for such a low price. Out of all five locations we visited, this was most definitely the best bang for your buck. Overall, QT offers a familiar and affordable hot chocolate.

6145 Nw Barry Road / Kansas City, Mo.

420 Ne Barry Road / Kansas City, Mo.

make

eat fresh, drink less

quik and easy

cost: $1.65 Size: small, 16 ounces

Size: small, 12 ounces

H

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pa

cost: $4.90

ot chocolate from the Friendly Bean tasted like the best possible treat on a cold winter day. The outstanding taste made the few extra cents worth it. The drink had layers of flavor and subtle undertones of vanilla to make it stand out. The atmosphere of the coffee shop was small, cute and comforting. The Friendly Bean easily had the best price, size and flavor combination out of all the hot chocolates.

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cocoa as it should be

cost: $2.10 Size: small, 12 ounces

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cLASH OF Competing brands Gets Settled

2 Heat milk and cream

mixture over medium heat until hot, not boiling. Remove from heat. Add a

3 pinch of salt.

4 Whisk in chocolate chips until melted. Stir in vanilla extract.

5 Add toppings. Enjoy! Photos by haley anne mahusay

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You just Got Served Athletes Compare PreCompetition Meals

Written by Hailey Milliken Photos by Makanani gRACE Graphics by Autumn Adams

Boys Wrestling

F Keagan Kooi, 10

R

Football

elying heavily on food, football has a tradition of eating a carb-packed meal together before games. “The food makes sure that we are not hungry or getting tired during the game for sure. I think most importantly, the meal isn’t something that will upset our stomachs but instead makes us feel ready to go play,” said sophomore Keagan Kooi. He said the team will usually eat things like pasta and chicken to fill them up and keep them energized before going into competition. Carbohydrates are an important source of energy for the physically challenging sport of football. According to the Mayo Clinic, carbs should account for about 45 to 65 percent of their daily caloric intake in order to play at their best.

or a day full of wrestling, some wrestlers enjoy a certain drink over a hefty meal. “Gatorade and small snacks are what I like to eat before games to give me that extra boost,” said junior Myles Howard. With valuable electrolytes, Gatorade is a big part of a lot of athletes’ lives during the season. The NCAA even said sports drinks are designed to rehydrate, provide energy and replenish the body’s electrolytes, especially sodium, which is lost through sweating. On top of all that, drinks like Gatorade also contain carbs which is a valuable source of energy. During a long period of exercising, it’s important to replace what was lost while sweating and, according to Penn State University, Gatorade does just that.

Myles Howard, 11

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SPORTS

Lexi Hatfield, 9

Girls Wrestling

A

fter weighing in, freshman Alexis Hatfield has an array of foods to hold her over through a dual or tournament. “Bagels are a good thing to start off with in the morning for me, but then I’ll probably snack on apples and celery later during the tournament,” said Hatfield. She said that these foods will lead her to a good performance throughout the day. A benefit from the foods she eats is the energy and stabilization of blood sugar that is gained from apples. Additionally, celery can help joint pain and be used as a defense against exhaustion, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.


Girls Basketball

B Rodney Williams, 10

Boys Basketball

B

efore a match, junior Rodney Williams prefers quality over quantity. “I don’t need anything big, but lots of water and protein bars are important for me to have enough energy to play,” said Williams. Protein and hydration are two main ingredients to a healthy and successful athlete. Body maintenance, repair and growth of lean muscle are just a few things that depend on protein, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Most importantly, water is the fuel for any athletic performance. The American Fitness Professionals and Associates said performance can be compromised by even light changes in hydration status.

efore the game, junior Nia Daniels prefers to keep it light. “I’m really weird, and I try not to eat before the game, like three hours ahead or so. I don’t want to eat too much and not perform well during the game,” said Daniels. When she is in the mood for food, she likes healthy snacks to energize her. She said she chooses citrusy foods and other fruits over actual meals. Daniels relies specifically on Cuties clementines for a good game. Oranges and orange juice provide a sustainable amount of carbohydrates and water, but they can also lower the risk for fatigue and dehydration after intense exercise, according to Colorado State University.

Nia Daniels, 11

Makenna Williams, 9

B

Girls Swim

efore diving in, swimmers depend on meals full of protein to have a successful race. “My old coach used to tell us that every meal needs to include fruits, vegetables, carbs and some type of protein. Protein helps us gain muscle, and those carbs will be our fuel during our races,” said freshman Makenna Williams. On top of that, she avoids sugar and coffee before races to allow herself to compete at the best of her ability. The side effects of sugar on an athlete can be especially harmful before competition. A study, “Effects of Caffeine on Athletic Performance and on the Human Body,” from Rice University shows that caffeine can lead to higher levels of dehydration and cramping in the athlete’s body.

A Day In The Life The Daily Diet of a Wrestler Dinner Breakfast lunch Mom’s spaghetti -Fat free yogurt - Little bowl of and meatballs with oats fruit - comfort food - Water Taylor Thomas, 11

Breakfast - Small granola bar - Nothing if he is cutting weight

lunch - Salad - Hot school lunch

Dinner - Chicken breast or other protein and vegetables Mason Sipes, 11 SPORTS

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Good Nutrition is Their Mission ELL serves Healthy Smoothies

A

s a part of a health initiative, the English Language Learning department makes smoothies for the student body. Their goal was to get healthy snacks to students instead of junk food from the vending machines. “The smoothies are something that will maybe hold their hunger a little bit better than just a bag of chips or a granola bar,” said ELL teacher Travis Mauzey. The smoothies can be purchased at the concession stand right across from the gym two times a week for $4. They are now open during Falcon Time Mondays and Wednesdays, but next semester they hope to be open three to four days a week. “Most smoothies, especially from smoothie eateries, there is a bunch of sugars in there and chemicals, and this one you could just taste that it was very healthy, green and ecofriendly,” said senior Alyssa Bannister. The ELL students have grown a lot of their own fruits and vegetables to use in their smoothies. In the past, they used a tower garden they keep in the classroom where they can grow some fruits and vegetables throughout the year, and they have a garden past the tennis courts where they grow fruits and vegetables. “We’ve grown a lot of the kale, spinach and strawberries. Currently, since we moved rooms, and we don’t have our tower garden, we’ve had to buy a little bit more than we planned on,” said Mauzey. “But

hopefully moving forward next year, we will be able to use more of the produce we’ve grown.” The ELL students started making smoothies toward the end of the school year last year, and it was very successful, so they carried it into this year. “Some of the money goes back into the program, so we can purchase supplies and things that we need like the blenders and cups,” said Mauzey. “We’ve talked about creating a scholarship for an ELL student, and we’ve also talked about giving some of the money away that we’ve profited to a charity of the kids’ choice.” The group is also planning on getting stainless steel mason mugs for students to purchase, and if a student purchases one, they’ll receive a discount on smoothies by bringing that mug. “We learn leadership, teamwork, communication and just all the essentials you’d need to run a business,” said senior Mario Andrade. The goal is for the ELL students get to gain skills from working their smoothie business, like communication and teamwork, by having a rotation every two weeks of three jobs for the students to work the blender, the middle man and the cashier. “I really enjoy helping everyone, and seeing others want to serve the people at Staley giving them a better healthier choice than vending machines,” said junior Fatima Almansouri.

At the concession stand, junior Hashim Abu prepares smoothies with ELL teacher Travis Mauzey Nov. 16. Abu manages the money raised and paperwork for the smoothie production. “It’s definitely made me more organized,” said Abu. Photo by Autumn Adams

Written by Alexa Schulte At the concession stand, senior Toan Vo prepares smoothies Nov. 16. Vo said he likes growing the fresh produce used for the smoothies. “When I go outside, I just want to go to the garden,” said Vo. Photo by Autumn Adams

FEATURE

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VOLUME 11

ISSUE 3

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Staley High School Talon, Volume 11, Issue 3, December 2018  

Talon is a student-produced magazine created and published by the journalism students of Staley High School in Kansas City, Mo. Volume 11, I...

Staley High School Talon, Volume 11, Issue 3, December 2018  

Talon is a student-produced magazine created and published by the journalism students of Staley High School in Kansas City, Mo. Volume 11, I...

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