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stacey BROWN. [ADVANCED DESIGN PORTFOLIO]


“With every particular architectural product, it is the spontaneous emotional reaction that is of importance to us.“ -Sune Lindstrom _02


table of CONTENTS. 6

Hole of Kimberly Museum

20

Gardiner Museum

32

Design Development

42

Grand Central Hotel

60

Tubma Reservoir Project

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Kimberley Museum Kimberley, South Africa Professor Nancy Sanders Advanced Design A | Spring 2012

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SITE NARRATIVE | The hole of Kimberley, the largest man made hole in the world, is over 1,519 ft wide in width with a depth of over 790 ft. is the result of diamond mining. The working conditions for miners were unhealthy and many lost their lives due to the excavation of this hole that would in the end result in 22 million tons of earth and 14,504,566 carats of diamonds. In choosing the artwork for the museum I chose an African artist; Santu Mofokeng, whose work relates to the social issues of the people and landscape in South Africa. The controversy that resulted after the excavation of the hole and the artwork have a direct correlation to one another and as museum goes transition through the museum and view Mofokeng’s photography they will then have a different understanding to their surroundings. Even though this hole is beautiful and astonishing is was at the cost of many lives and left a permanent scar within the landcape.

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townships and landscapes | Mofokung focuses on the explorations of landscape invested with spiritual significance from part of a wider enquiry into space and belonging and the political meaning of landscape.

CONCEPT model | Photography by: Santu Mofokeng


He also ‘reclaims landscape’, by investigating the meaning of landscape in relation to ownership, power and memory.

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material EXPERIMENTATION | Experiments using air dry sculpting clay molded over wire mesh to explore the representation of site context and potential location of the intervention on the site.


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8

5

3

2

5

2

6

3

5

6

3

6

6

2

2

4

4

7

1

1

GROUND FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

1 2 3 4 5 6

scale: 1’ = 1/16”

entry/lobby gallery space collection storage workshop restroom elevator viewing platform outdoor gathering space

scale: 1’ = 1/16”

cafe outdoor viewing space restroom event space artist living space elevator


FINAL MODEL| scale: 1’ = 1/16”

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^

section of gallery | View within the gallery spaces, as the sun

shines through the perforated skin on the museums exterior diffused light is casted onto the photographs that hang along the wall.

^

section of viewing platform | After walking through the museum and have a better understanding of the significance of this hole and how it has affected the landscape they can then venture to a viewing platform that is lowered into the hole and reflect on what they have seen.

^

section of gallery space and living space| Above the gallery space; on the ground level, is a private living space for the artist and can be also used as an event space when the artist is away.


conceptual diagrams | Diagrams showing different phases of the project as well as how each space relates to one another.

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DESIGN SEQUENCE and details | The progression of the form and the developing of a skin system on its exterior that allows diffused light to protect the photography displayed within the museum.


_18 _00


Gardiner Museum Toronto, Canada

Professor Michael Haflants

Advanced Design A | Spring 2012

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Cornelia Parker “Colder Darker Matter”

Daniel Rozin “Trash Mirror”

John Baptise Debombourg “Volte Face”


El Anatsui “In the world but don’t know the world”

Kaarina Kaikkonen “Like a Bird of Passage”

Aurora Robson “Everything All At Once, Forever”

Sarah Sze “Infinite Line”

| selected ARTWORK _22


A

4

A

5

5

5

6

4

6

4

4

3 3

2

2

B

B

1

B 1

2

2

B

7

2 3

7

A

A

GROUND FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

scale: 1’ = 3/32”

scale: 1’ = 3/32”

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

lobby gallery space patio restroom office space storage

restaurant kitchen gallery space restroom office space storage patio


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A

A

1

2

3

6

3

B

B

B

1

5

4

A

A

THIRD FLOOR

BASEMENT

scale: 1’ = 3/32”

scale: 1’ = 3/32”

1

1 2 3 4 5 6

gallery space

B

electrical room mechanical room restroom classroom kiln room storage


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SECTION AA

scale: 1’ = 3/32”


SECTION BB

scale: 1’ = 3/32�

seperation of space | Nestled in between historic buildngs the Gardnier museum is an L-shaped building designed with the concept of a separation between gallery space and services. The office spaces are located in a separate part of museum and appear to be a separate brick building on its exterior, as apposed to the more contemporary stucco exterior of the museum. This meshing of old and new can be seen throughout the architecuture of Toronto.

As the form shifts, outdoor patio spaces are formed which can be used as a reception area or extended seating for the restaurant located on an upper level of the museum.

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gallery spaces | As you transition through the museum a main concrete wall orients the museum goer through out each space and around each corner the environment of each gallery space is different to accommodate for the art work. Some works require a specific type of space such as the Volte Face piece that requires a large window with a lot of exposure to sunlight. To the left are various gallery spaces display the works of Aurora Robson, Kaarina Kaikkonen, and El Anatsui as they would in the museum.

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SITE PLAN SCALE: 1”= 40’


DESIGN DEVELOPMENT Project: Gardiner Museum Professor John Mckenna Summer 2012

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DRY WALL

2X4 CONCRETE

INSULATION

SHEATHING BOARD

FURRING LATH

BASE COAT WATER RESISTANT BARRIER

FINISH COAT-STUCCO

CORNER DETAIL |


20’

14’

26’

30’

FOOTING SIZE: H 3’ X W 5’

| STRUCTURE _34


COMPANY: PRODUCT: FCM CURB MOUNTED SKYLIGHT The FCM skylight is constructed of an insulated glass lens, combined with a durable metal frame that mounts directly to a site-built curb. The smooth, low-profile of the FCM skylight does not obstruct your roof line Comes with white laminated glass - White laminated safety glass provides diffused daylight and energy efficiency

GLAZING FLASHING ROOF MEMBRANE CANT STRIP INSTALLATION METAL DECK STEEL BEAM

ROOF DETAIL |


COMPANY: BUILDING TONNAGE: 130 TONS COOLING TOWER: MODEL: TQ8401 TONNAGE: 101-198 TONS DIMENSIONS: 6’-6” X 12’-10” X 10’-2” AIR HANDLER: M SERIES CLIMATE CHANGER W BOILER: MODEL: TGBWF173A95AVA CHILLER: WATER CHILLED SERIES R CHILLER

| HVAC _36


INTERIOR FINISH-MARBLE

METAL DECK WITH CONCRETE INFILL INSULATION WATER BARRIER BRACING CONNECTION POINT

STEEL TUBE

INTERIOR FINISH-DRY WALL

ENTRANCE DETAIL-CURTAIN WALL HEAD |


DOOR HEADER AND TRANSOM BAR

INTERIOR FINISH CONCRETE SLAB INSULATION

BOTTOM RAIL AND GROUND CONNECTION

WATER BARRIER

GRAVEL SAND SOIL

| ENTRANCE DETAIL _38


COMPONENTS OF FIRE SUPPRESSION |

DRY PIPE SYSTEM: Water is not present in the piping until the system operates. The piping is filled with air below the water supply pressure. When one or more of the automatic sprinklers is exposed, for a sufficient time, to a temperature at or above the temperature rating, it opens, allowing the air in the piping to vent from that sprinkler. Each sprinkler operates individually. As the air pressure in the piping drops, the pressure differential across the dry pipe valve changes, allowing water to enter the piping system. Water flow from sprinklers, needed to control the fire, is delayed until the air is vented from the sprinklers.

SPRINKLER HEAD

FIRE HOSE AND VALVE CABINET: TWO LOCATED ON EACH FLOOR, ONE BY EACH RISER AT THE FIRE EXIT

CHECK VALVE ALARM VALVE

SHUTOFF VALVE

METER SIAMESE STANDPIPE


| PLUMBING

SEWAGE

WATER FOUNTAIN

TANKLESS WATER HEATER

HOT WATER COLD WATER

URINAL GREY WATER WATER CLOSET LAVATORY

STACK VENT

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Grand Central Hotel Tampa, FL Professor Daniel Powers Advanced Design B | Fall 2012

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SITE plan |


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| FINAL MODEL details _48


GRAND CENTRAL HOTEL scale 1:20

The Grand Central Hotel’s main architectural feature is the large vierendeel truss system that cantilevers over the garage and extends six floors. Within the hotel there is a retail space separated from the hotel itself however there is a restaurant that retail shoppers as well as hotel guests can access. Among the many other features of the hotel is the roof top pool and spa, the garden on top of the garage, as well as the exercise room.


A

A

B

B

A

GROUND FLOOR

B

A

B

A

SECOND FLOOR

B

B

A

THIRD FLOOR

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A

B

A

B

B

A

B A

B

A

B

B

B

A A

FIFTH FLOOR

MAIN LOBBY FLOOR

ENLARGED ROOM PLANS A

FOURTH FLOOR

TYPICAL ROOM PLAN


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DRAFT model | Within this phase I began to incorporate the vierendeel truss into the structure of the hotel and design how it will effect the orientation and layout of the rooms on each floor, how the skin system will be constructed, as well as incorporating outdoor spaces on upper levels of the hotel.


A

B

A

B

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

A

B

B

A

A

TYPICAL ROOM PLAN

UPPER LEVEL ROOM PLAN

POOL LEVEL

ROOF PLAN

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hotel LOBBY | Located in the hotel lobby are seating areas for guests to gather, look out, and gaze at the view of the river in the distance. Also located in the lobby is a bar lounge for guests to check in and then enjoy a beverage or meet up with other hotel guests.


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NORTH-SOUTH SECTION

EAST-WEST SECTION


EAST ELEVATION

Sections showing as the shift in the structure occurs three guest lounges are created. Within each lounge guests can enjoy a beverage from the bar and gaze out the windows viewing the river in the distance.

WEST ELEVATION

Also, the retail space and hotel can be distinguished in section because the skin system only extends along the sides of the hotel and the retail space consists of large open spaces with glass windows.

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TUBMA RESERVOIR PROJECT Team Members : Angie Cano-Flores Cristine Pena Stacey Brown

Rayong, Thailand Professor Jan Wampler Advanced Design C | Spring 2013

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bringing community interaction into the public domain | Our project seeks to rehabilitate and reestablish a sense of community in the public domain. Due to political unrest in Thailand’s recent history, public space has taken a more subdued role in the urban fabric and community gathering has been relegated to smaller-scaled spaces. We aim to reintegrate places for gathering at multiple scales along a series of nodes.


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CONCEPTUAL SITE plan _64


silk and bamboo CULTIVATION | A sustainable community will be created through community involvement by incorporating a silk and bamboo farm within the community. Through the use of bamboo and mulberry trees; for silk production, community members can make bamboo screens and textile products to sell at the market which will create jobs and revenue for a sustainable community. Through the cultivation of silk and bamboo, community members are also able to personalize their homes with local goods and perform maintenance on their own homes. While also providing shade, open air ventilation, and enhancing the landscape. Moreover, community members can develop a craft or trade that will help them continue to thrive on their own.


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BOSTON space between model | Plexi model showing the relationship of the open space such as; parks, major and minor roads and their inter connectivity of pedestrian paths.

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| LJUBLJANA space between model Plexi model showing the relationship of the open space such as the bridges that cross the river, major plazas throughout the city, and the pedestrian paths that connect them.


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ILLUSTRATIVE plan |


building use | building use consists of mainly mix use and commercial retail.

circulation | circulation is separated into one major road with auxiliary roads. Vehicular roads terminate after main park space and become small pedestrian pathways

public space | public space is distributed through out the community through one major green-way and smaller plaza spaces that are interconnected by pedestrian paths

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shrine

transportation hub

greenway

main cultural center

silk farm


BLOCK model | scale= 1:2000

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^

TUBMA space between | Model displaying how the public plazas are connected by small pathways that wind through the community.

^

|PLAZA view The water feature in this plaza is the outlet of the canal that runs underneath the temple. Water gently trickles down the carved articulated ground that also creates seating at the waters edge.


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^

building use | The building use of our community is mostly mixed use and residential which is a characteristic of Thai living, which is mostly live work. Most of the buildings have commercial uses on the ground floor with residences on the upper levels. In the center of our community is the main cultural center that consists of a community center, museums, cafes, as well as a large park for large public gatherings. These gatherings could also occur within the amphitheater located along the boardwalk. Along the waterfront is mostly commercial use as it is the location of the floating market place. It is a place where people within the community can come and sell their wares, such as the silk and bamboo products that they have made from the agriculture with in the community.

^

circulation | The aim of our project is to create a walkable community. There is one major road which is indicated in red on the image to the left which runs through the entire community. There are auxiliary roads that branch off connecting to other parts of the community. However there is a road that leads to parking underneath the main park area for those who commute to the community to enjoy the walkable nature of the community.

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FINAL MODEL| scale= 1:1000 The density through out the community varies depending on building use. A higher density area is located in the cities’ cultural center where buildings such as museums, cafes, library, and community center are located. Along the community edge is the marketplace; at a lower density, sitting on the water with boardwalks that wind throughout the shops. Located beyond the main road are interconnected plaza spaces; connected by small pedestrian pathways, for commuinity celebrations and gatherings.


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transportation hub and amphitheater | scale: 1’ = 1/16� The transportation hub and amphitheater sit on opposite sides of the main road entering the community. As visitors and community members exit they can sit along side the road on shaded benches while waiting for their next mode of transportation. The amphitheater, located along the hillside filled with mulberry trees, is a shaded space where community members can relax and gather for celebrations.


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public NODES | These nodes consist of intimate pockets of space in residential areas, courtyards, neighborhood plazas, and a network of dense and lively plazas located in the center of the community culminating at the waterfront, which integrates a self-sustaining community for silk and bamboo craftsmen. These spaces are unified using a mixture of meandering paths and water features, which stem from the major natural green space, to encourage way-finding, playfulness, and discovery.


BLOCK MODEL| scale = 1:2000

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JUNK model | scale = 1:2000

The initial project scheme demonstrating the distribution of various building uses. Red demonstrates residential use, white is commercial and retail, and the gold casings represent the incorporation of mulberry tress and the existing rubber trees through out the community.


^

| SECTIONS

scale: 1’ = 1/16� West-facing section of market and silk-farm border and south facing section of single and multi-famile housing.

^

| WALKABILITY DIAGRAM Diagram of the distance and time from one point to another based on walking a 20 minute mile.

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FACADE STUDIES | Facades were designed through a play of proportion, roof lines, and materiality. The different screen types, structural elements, and roof shapes alter the scale of a path’s in-between space for a rich experience on the street level.

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^

CROSS SECTIONS| scale: 1’ = 1/32� Cross sections through the city demonstrating density, ventilation, and adjacency of buildings.

^

| WATER FEATURE view Basin-like water features navigate the river into plazas within the city center. These features then trickle into the plazas to be the focal points of smaller gathering spaces within each plaza.


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SILK FARM LIVING| scale: 1’ = 1/32�

Low to high density housing for silk farm workers located around a central plaza space where community members can gather. Adjacent to the plaza is a market place for workers to sell there products. Housing within the community has pitched roofs to allow water to run off quickly while others have water collection systems to guide water underneath the house so it can drain into the reservoir at the base of the community. Also, because of the cultivation of bamboo within the community, the facade of each house is different because community members can personalize their homes by making their own bamboo screens.

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^

MARKET PLACE | Market place with shops on both levels ,bamboo screens, and butterfly roofs for open air ventilation and a higher pitched roof to allow water to drain quickly into a water collection system during monsoon season. Also in the center are sidewalk cafes and market vendors selling their goods.

^

MAIN ENTRANCE ROAD | The initial design for the main entry road into the community lined with low and mid rise mixed use buildings on opposite sides of the road.

^

| cityscape SECTIONS

scale: 1’ = 1/32�

Sections showing the adjacency of buildings through out the community as well as the elevated semi-public courtyard on various levels that facilitate gathering spaces and allow natural ventilation.


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stacey alexandria BROWN. University of South Florida School of Architecure and Community Design address: 10511 Palm Cove Ave| Tampa, FL 33647 email: sabrown3@mail.usf.edu telephone: (904) 233-1832 http://www.linkedin.com/pub/stacey-alexandria-brown/48/5a4/512

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stacey BROWN.

Advanced Design Portfolio [2012-2013] USF SACD  
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