Page 1

Celebrating Achievements The Chairman of Governors’ Prizegiving Address Sir Clive Martin, Headmaster, distinguished guests, parents, members of staff and all students present. Good evening and welcome to St Albans School Prizegiving 2010.This year we have a record number of prizes to present.We have cleared out the local Waterstones and the remainder section of Tesco for those who have chosen cer tain recently published political memoirs. We are an independent fee paying school, providing bur saries where needed. Socrates said that “an education obtained with money is worse than no education at all” – needless to say, we didn’t invite him. We did, however, invite – and it is our pleasure to have with us – Sir Clive Martin OBE DL TD OA, who will be presenting the prizes tonight. We a r e h e r e t o c e l e b r a t e t h e achievements of students at St Albans School. Year on year the exam pass rate seems to go up and there appears every likelihood that soon more than 100% of our students will achieve higher than 100% of available marks. Our Headmaster will give a ‘State of the Nation’ address and the very impressive exam results have been published elsewhere. Whilst here to celebrate excellence and to award prizes to worthy winners, those who are not recipients tonight are no less worthy and well-regarded and all contribute to the success and well-being of the school. Education is always in the news – exam results are constantly queried – too easy, not enough distinguishing features between the good and the very good. This year we have the uncomfortable spectacle of over 100,000 students failing to gain a university place. Academies are the new ‘educational kids on the block’. Indeed yesterday, the first two items on Radio 4’s Today programme featured education items. I want to go off message for a moment. I am against education! It is what has caused my daughter to move home. Last Sunday, my wife and I and a full removal crew took half her belongings to university – thirteen pairs of shoes, a shed full of clothes, posters, cocktail shaker and glasses, pots, pans, pasta bowls, blue tack, hair dryer and toaster – and one book! I miss her already.

Of course I am in favour of education: If an empty mind can be replaced with an open one… If it is to learn what you didn’t even know you didn’t know… So long as students can be given problems to solve and not answers to remember… then education is the finest legacy we can bestow upon our children. Mind you, education hasn’t worked for everybody: Mark Twain said that he never let his schooling interfere with his education and Winston Churchill said something similar when declaring that his education was interrupted by his schooling. Cynically, Albert Einstein said that it was a miracle that curiosity survives formal education. Whilst celebrating the achievements of the students, I wish to take a moment or two to thank those who have made a significant contribution to the achievement of our prize winners: The Headmaster for his vision, drive and determination which has steered this school into the well-deserved prominent position it currently occupies.

Chairman of Governors Stephen Eames

The dedicated team of teachers without whose devotion and hard work this evening would not be so impressive.

education is the finest legacy we can bestow upon our children. All of the above would recognise the significant input of the support staff to include admin, ground staff and bursary, under the guidance of our Bursar Derek Todd. You parents for your decision to place your trust in this school, to assist in the production of educated and worthwhile citizens. To the students here and at home and in clubs and pubs across the region! Last but by no means least, the Governors. We have this year streamlined our governing arrangements and made them, I believe, fitter for purpose. We have a dedicated Board and an Advisory

Council to which have migrated a number of our ex-officio Governors to include the Mayor and the Dean. I wish to make special mention of those who have retired from the Board this year, all of whom have made huge contributions – Geoffrey Dale, David Pepper and David Lindsell. I paid tribute to the hard work and dedication of my predecessor, Ian Jennings, who was absent last year but is present tonight to have his significant contribution recognised. I am ver y pleased that the following Governors are present tonight – Janet Mark, Andy Barnes, Rosemary Phillips, John Barber, Chris McIntyre, Richard Blossom, Richard Munton and Gordon Myland. If I could give them a prize I would. It is now my pleasure to introduce to you your Headmaster, Mr Andrew Grant. Professor Pat Thomson, Director of the Centre for research in Schools and Communities at Nottingham University School of Education, carried out a study of nineteen fictional head teachers. He found that nine are portrayed as evil or authoritarian, a further six are remote figures of power and just one – JK Rowling’s Professor Albus Dumbledore’ is a positive role model – so Welcome to Hogwarts!


Enduring Educational Values The Headmaster’s Prizegiving Address Chairman, Sir Clive and Lady Martin, had thought of a grouped award before Ladies and Gentlemen, welcome to the – except of course they had – in 1918, Abbey and to our 2010 Prizegiving. when it was called the School Certificate. It, and its big brother, the Higher School I was out cycling a few days ago – Certificate, the Advanced-Baccalaureate something of which, as some of you know, of its day, were abolished in 1951 to make I do quite a bit – when I was hooted at. way for O levels and A levels at a time There’s nothing especially unusual in that, when the advantages of taking individual though it tends to happen more when subjects individually seemed self-evident. there’s a whole intimidating bunch of us And so, periodically, we find ourselves and it tends to be plainly hostile but this remedying the damage wrought by wasn’t at all hostile.What’s more, it came previous improvements by returning out of an apparently complete silence, things to the state they were in before rather than accompanied by the usual they were improved. Certainly it seems sound of an engine at high revs, and a so whenever the state takes control of moment later, a Toyota Prius shimmered education. noiselessly past. Nothing very new in viewing the past I had a few miles ahead of me to ponder through rose-tinted spectacles, of course; the Toyota Prius as a fine metaphor for in 1775, Dr Johnson was lamenting: a common feature of our times – or maybe it’s always been common; it’s just There is now less flogging in our great that I’ve been around long enough now schools than previously, but then less is to notice it. learned there, so that what the boys get at one end they lose at the other. A car so silent and free of pollution that, for safety reasons, the manufacturers However, let’s think about this summer’s have now decided to build in some introduction of the A* at A level. In completely gratuitous pollution in the 2000, the A level standard was made form of fake engine noise is a perfect accessible to a larger number of people paradigm of the law of unintended by dividing the syllabuses up into more consequences. Or to use the acronym easily digestible modules. my sons used to use – I don’t know if The standard wasn’t made easier (see it’s still current – to describe the shirt last year’s Albanian for my illuminating they’d just bought that somehow didn’t metaphor about the relative difficulty of look quite as good once you got it home carrying a hundredweight sack of coal as it did in the shop: SLAGIATT: seemed upstairs either in one go or in several like a good idea at the time. trips, a bucket at a time) but a way was And I was reminded of this when I read found to allow more people to reach last week about Michael Gove’s bright the standard. So many people are now new idea for an English Baccalaureate. reaching it that it has been necessary to lengthen the stairs, increase the size of The idea is that this would be awarded each bucket and reduce the number of to pupils who achieve an A*-C grade trips permitted. If you haven’t followed at GCSE in English, Maths, Science, a that, see me after the lesson. Language and a Humanities subject and basically, it’s a shiny wrapper for a Likewise, university entry. It must have group of qualifications that already exist. seemed like a good idea at the time for Mr Gove hopes this might encourage Tony Blair to encourage as many young schools to encourage their pupils to people as possible to aspire to university take subjects not enough of them are and to pluck the figure of 50% out of taking – like languages. the air as a target. Now we’ve decided we can’t afford enough university places, That, of course, is because for the past we’re making it harder for them to get 20 years Government league tables in and the new minister for Higher have been so successful in providing Education is telling young people to think perverse incentives for schools not to about aspiring to slightly lower education. ask their pupils to do difficult subjects that in 2004, the last Government gave It’s not been an easy year in which to up trying to make anyone over 14 do a be an ambitious 18-year-old, but in Modern Foreign Language. an August in which, nationally, 25% of university applicants remained unplaced Anyway, Mr Gove’s idea seemed such an by the close of Clearing, I’m pleased to obvious one that I was surprised nobody

say that over 90% of our leavers have a good university course awaiting them in October. That’s not to say we had no casualties – everyone did this year – and even our students need to recognise just how fierce the competition is going to be in the years ahead.

Andrew Grant, Headmaster

As I reflect on this, it’s obvious to me that over the past decade we have been very for tunate indeed to have been working – and your sons and daughters have been equally fortunate, to have been educated – in a sector that has been able to get on with things guided by enduring educational values rather than transient political ones.That means allowing our own curriculum to evolve to take account of the sheer ability of our boys and girls and to encourage them to learn to think for themselves, rather than just jump through hoops. So it is, for example, that Modern Foreign Languages are flourishing here against the trend elsewhere, with over 70 students in the Sixth Form as a whole taking at least one language. Our freedom to be innovative, as with the advanced French sets who have an AS in the bag before they leave the Fifth Form; will finish their A level by the end of the Lower Sixth and will go on to take the Pre-U in the Upper Sixth, is an illustration of our ability to respond flexibly to our students’ needs. And they do need intellectual challenges: of our 137 Upper Sixth Leavers, 60 achieved at least 3 A grades; 34 of them managed 4 or more and 45 students – one third of the year – recorded at least one of the new A* grades, the new threshold qualification for Cambridge. Ten students achieved three or four A*s. So last year, too, we introduced the Extended Project, wor th an AS, but with an A* grade available, which, as its name suggests, encourages a level of independent, deep and reflective study that the modular structure of the A level course can militate against. The aim is to help our very able students to learn the difference between an instrumental approach to learning as a mere means of acquiring certificates through efficiency in taking examinations and genuine scholarship and love of learning and study. The top universities can certainly tell the difference; they’re able to pick and choose and they’re much more interested in the latter than the former.


To the same end, this year we have revised the timetable to give longer lessons, providing more continuity and greater opportunity for reflection and, for the first time, have built into the weekly schedule extension classes for the Sixth Form. The recent national revisions to GCSE specifications are moving mainstream GCSEs into the modular territory A level has occupied for the past ten years and frankly we can do without the distraction of that and the timeconsuming controlled assessments that come with it. When the median performance of our Fifth Form GCSE students is the equivalent of 9 A*s, what they will thrive on is greater challenge in coherent courses rather than being asked to jump a series of low hurdles, so, where it is in the best interests of our pupils, we shall be moving in an increasing number of subjects to the International GCSE. English has led the way with IGCSE Literature and an improvement in results that has more than vindicated the decision. When I came to this School, Governors Awards went to the ten or fifteen boys who got A grades throughout all 8 of their GCSEs. This year, 63 boys – half the year group – did that in ten GCSEs apiece; twenty nine students got A* in all ten or more of their GCSEs and ten of them had 11 or 12. As you know, that is a performance that ranks us among the very highest – performing schools in the country for the third year in succession and given how well the Fourth Form did in their early entries in Maths and French, there seems little reason to expect the trend to dip. But an equally important aspect of what this School offers goes on outside the classroom or the lab, isn’t graded, doesn’t lead to a certificate and doesn’t show up in league tables, and is important for precisely that reason. One of the points on which I part company with the philosophy of the International Baccalaureate, excellent qualification though it be, is that it assumes a monopoly of virtue over the entire school experience and makes voluntary activity a compulsory requirement of the course. That’s an oxymoron if ever I heard one. We can be especially proud of our sporting and cultural achievements and above all, perhaps, of our pupils’ community work, through the Partnership Scheme; the CCF, Community Link and the Charity Committee, precisely because they don’t

have to do it. If the £35,000 that the CCF raised for orphanages and schools in Mwanza, Tanzania and the plastering and painting skills they learned for the project were recognised in some kind of certificate, it would, to my mind render that splendid expedition marginally less admirable. No-one, of course, can live two lives, but were our students, and indeed their parents, able to experience simultaneously what life would have been like in a different kind of school, I think they would be astonished at how diverse, rich and full are the opportunities for personal development here. These are the soft skills we hear so much about and which, if employers are to be believed, are in shor t supply among current graduates and school leavers. Nurturing those skills has a long and distinguished history in HMC schools. Only last week, I read this in the Times Educational Supplement; it may surprise you: The public school boy in the past has, no doubt, been too often in some ways an ignoramus; examinations have been a terror to him and he has frequently been able to disguise the uncertainty of his spelling only by the obscurity of his handwriting. But on the other hand, he has learned how to hold his own in life, how to face difficulties and how, when in a tight place, to muddle through somehow by sheer pluck and resolution.

economic austerity, he is going to struggle to provide the resources to make his independent-style reforms work as well as we can and do. Some of those resources are material and maintained schools have done pretty well under the previous government, so I’m very pleased to be able to announce that in terms of material resources, St Albans School is about to make a very big investment indeed. The contract to construct the planned sports hall and swimming pool is, at long last, currently out to tender with a view to making a start early next term, given a fair wind. The funding is in place and the cost of construction will not impact on fees. It will be a massive project and require us to put up with some shor t-term inconvenience, but as well as providing state-of-the-ar t and much needed facilities for sport and physical education, it will allow us in due course to redevelop the gym so that catering can be moved out of the Hall and to redevelop the Hall as a proper auditorium and centre for the Performing Arts.That will, in turn, unlock a number of other possibilities to improve accommodation on the main campus, all of which will enhance the whole experience of being at this School.

I am grateful to what are now several generations of governors who have laboured hard to bring this about with the generous gift of their time and expertise and to the Bursar, Derek Todd and his team, who now have a major civil That isn’t, as you might suppose, the engineering project to manage which I’m preamble to yet another ar ticle on sure is just what they always wanted. David Cameron and Nick Clegg’s school But in truth, however fine a school’s careers. As I said, I did read it in the Times physical facilities, the most important Educational Supplement last week, but resource of all, of course, is inspirational it was from the first-ever edition of 6 teachers. September 1910. So let’s wish the TES a Happy Hundredth Birthday. We are fortunate indeed to be able to attract some of the most gifted people in Still, I know of few of our alumni who our profession to join us, and, while some have fallen victim to the current dearth will move on to well-deserved promotion of graduate employment and, in truth in other HMC schools, as they have done there’s little surprise in that. this year, a good school also needs to be It’s very flattering, of course, that almost able to retain good people. every initiative the new Secretary of Let me then close by thanking, in State for Education has taken in his particular, two senior colleagues who first few weeks in office has been retired this year, Senior Master, Peter modelled on established practice in Wade Wright and Head of Chemistry, the independent sector and we are Lesley Stanbury, for having given to St very pleased that in scrapping Contact Albans School so substantial a proportion Point; suspending the introduction of the of their distinguished careers, and finally Independent Safeguarding Authority, and let me pay tribute to all my colleagues allowing all schools to adopt the IGCSE, for their inspirational work in helping Michael Gove has shown that he really our students towards the outstanding has been listening to what we in HMC achievements on which we are gathered have been telling him, but at a time of to congratulate them tonight.


Results in Public Examinations

ST ALBANS SCHOOL Abbey Gateway, St Albans, Hertfordshire AL3 4HB Telephone: 01727 855521 Fax: 01727 843447 www.st-albans.herts.sch.uk At St Albans School, all Upper Sixth Pupils have taken at least three A levels and one AS level. Some of these pupils have also taken A and AS levels in the Lower Sixth. All Lower Sixth students are expected to study four subjects at AS level, with at least three being continued to A2 level in the Upper Sixth. In addition, all Sixth Formers take an AS General Studies course. All pupils take Mathematics GCSE in the Fourth Form. Most other GCSE subjects are taken in the Fifth Form. Although we are proud of the examination successes of our pupils, we believe that examination statistics are only one criterion of educational success. We therefore advise that they be interpreted with caution.

Summary of Statistics Results in Public Examinations 5th Form - GCSE

2008

2009

2010

Candidature

137

115

123

Percentage grades A* – C

100

100

100

81

88

82

Percentage of candidates gaining grades A* – C in at least 5 subjects

100

100

100

Percentage of candidates gaining A* – C in English

100

100

99

Percentage of candidates gaining A* – C in Mathematics

100

100

100

Candidature

114

126

137

Percentage pass rate

100

100

100

87

91

89

Average UCAS points per entry, including AS

107.9

110.9

112.9

Average UCAS points per candidate, including AS

427.0

452.9

456.9

Percentage grades A* and A

U6 - A Level

Percentage of grades A and B at A level

All examination results are provisional, depending on inquiries on results and remarks.


A

11

44

3

38

13

53

12

53

4

36

4

83

5

56

17

68

13

78

5

100

7

75

13

58

A*

0

0

0

0

6

17

4

13

1

7

1

17

0

0

6

18

5

22

0

0

2

17

2

8

Subject

Ancient History

Cumulative %

Art

Cumulative %

Biology

Cumulative %

Chemistry

Cumulative %

Drama

Cumulative %

DT Pr Des Gr

Cumulative %

DT Pr Des RM

Cumulative %

Economics

Cumulative %

English Literature

Cumulative %

French

Cumulative %

General Studies

Cumulative %

Geography

Cumulative %

88

8

92

2

100

0

100

5

97

10

78

2

100

1

71

5

73

6

92

14

100

5

76

8

B

100

3

100

1

100

0

100

0

100

1

100

2

100

0

100

4

97

7

97

2

100

0

92

4

C

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

1

100

1

100

0

100

2

D

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

E

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

U

26

12

5

23

34

9

6

14

30

36

8

25

Total

110.8

116.7

120.0

120.0

116.5

106.7

120.0

102.9

107.3

111.7

107.5

102.4

UCAS ave

25 214 63.5

87 18.4

Totals Cumulative %

1

30

8

63

15

73

8

25

0

80

7

78

32

100

6

79

16

100

1

76

11

67

2

A

0

0

3

1

31

15

0

0

25

1

45

9

30

20

14

1

32

11

0

0

12

2

0

0

A*

Cumulative %

Spanish

Cumulative %

RS

Cumulative %

Physics

Cumulative %

P.E.

Cumulative %

Music

Cumulative %

Further Maths

Cumulative %

Mathematics

Cumulative %

Latin

Cumulative %

History

Cumulative %

Greek (Classical)

Cumulative %

Govt & Politics

Cumulative %

German

Subject

88.8

120

75

2

67

11

85

11

100

3

50

1

100

4

94

11

100

0

100

7

100

0

94

3

100

1

B

97.7

42

100

1

93

8

92

3

100

0

75

1

100

0

100

4

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

1

100

0

C

99.6

9

100

0

100

2

96

2

100

0

100

1

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

D

100

2

100

0

100

0

100

2

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

E

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

U

474

4

30

48

11

4

20

67

7

34

1

17

3

Total

113.6

100.0

98.7

113.3

114.5

95.0

125.0

120.3

122.9

122.4

120.0

116.5

113.3

UCAS ave

U6 A Level Results


L6 AS Level Results Subject

A

B

C

D

Anc History

17

6

3

1

Cumulative %

63

85

96

100

E

U

Total

UCAS ave

0

0

27

54.4

100

100 9

53.3

47

47.4

45

42.9

11

44.5

5

58.0

4

60.0

6

48.3

41

53.7

28

49.3

21

55.7

38

58.7

9

46.7

23

52.2

5

60.0

38

54.5

8

60.0

85

55.6

16

58.1

7

48.6

8

52.5

49

53.3

21

53.8

10

59.0

556

52.8

Art

5

2

2

0

0

0

Cumulative %

56

78

100

100

100

100

Biology

13

15

14

4

1

0

Cumulative %

28

60

89

98

100

100

Chemistry

12

11

12

4

3

3

Cumulative %

27

51

78

87

93

100

Drama

0

5

6

0

0

0

Cumulative %

0

45

100

100

100

100

DT Electronics

4

1

0

0

0

0

Cumulative %

80

100

100

100

100

100

DT Pr Des Gr

4

0

0

0

0

0

Cumulative %

100

100

100

100

100

100

DT Pr Des RM

2

1

3

0

0

0

Cumulative %

33

50

100

100

100

100

Economics

22

13

5

1

0

0

Cumulative %

54

85

98

100

100

100

English

12

7

4

5

0

0

Cumulative %

43

68

82

100

100

100

French

15

4

1

1

0

0

Cumulative %

71

90

95

100

100

100

Geography

33

5

0

0

0

0

Cumulative %

87

100

100

100

100

100

German

3

3

1

1

1

0

Cumulative %

33

67

78

89

100

100

Gov & Pol

11

6

6

0

0

0

Cumulative %

48

74

100

100

100

100

Greek

5

0

0

0

0

0

Cumulative %

100

100

100

100

100

100

History

23

10

4

1

0

0

Cumulative %

61

87

97

100

100

100

Latin

8

0

0

0

0

0

Cumulative %

100

100

100

100

100

100

Mathematics

59

17

7

2

0

0

Cumulative %

69

89

98

100

100

100

F.Maths

14

1

1

0

0

0

Cumulative %

88

94

100

100

100

100

Music

2

2

3

0

0

0

Cumulative %

29

57

100

100

100

100

P.E.

4

3

0

1

0

0

Cumulative %

50

88

88

100

100

100

Physics

29

13

4

2

0

1

Cumulative %

59

86

94

98

98

100

RS

11

7

3

0

0

0

Cumulative %

52

86

100

100

100

100

Spanish

9

1

0

0

0

0

Cumulative %

90

100

100

100

100

100

Totals

313

132

79

23

5

4

Cumulative %

56.3

80.0

94.2

98.4

99.3

100.0


6

75

14

61

5

38

41

33

76

62

51

54

31

44

10

27

Cumulative %

DT Graphics

Cumulative %

DT Resistant Mats

Cumulative %

English

Cumulative %

English Literature*

Cumulative %

French

Cumulative %

Geography

Cumulative %

German

Cumulative %

54

10

83

28

78

22

85

28

69

44

100

8

96

8

100

2

63

22

100

0

83

36

A*

27

90

1

100

81

68

French

Cumulative %

Greek (Modern)

Cumulative %

Mathematics

Cumulative %

98

36

100

0

100

3

A

* IGCSE

Subject

4th Form

10

100

Cumulative %

DT Electronics

1

Chinese

Cumulative %

53

Cumulative %

4

64

Chemistry

48

12

84

30

78

10

A

100

3

100

0

100

0

B

78

9

97

10

91

13

97

15

96

33

100

0

100

1

100

0

100

15

100

0

95

15

84

11

98

16

100

4

B

100

0

100

0

100

0

C

100

8

100

2

99

7

100

4

99

4

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

6

100

5

100

3

100

0

C

100

0

100

0

100

0

D

100

0

100

0

100

1

100

0

100

1

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

D

100

0

100

0

100

0

E

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

E

100

0

100

0

100

0

F

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

F

100

0

100

0

100

0

G

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

G

100

0

100

0

100

0

U

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

U

100

100

99

100

99

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

120

1

30

100

100

100

Total % A-C

37

71

94

123

123

13

23

8

41

1

121

31

121

18

Total % A-C

51.8

Cumulative %

Cumulative %

Totals

Cumulative %

Add. Mathematics

62.9

151

47

42

A*

690

Totals

Subject

80

4

0

0

0

0

100

39

61

74

9

1

29

4

56

48

59

72

86

18

57

43

0

0

100

5

A*

Cumulative %

Spanish

Cumulative %

Add Science

Cumulative %

Science

Cumulative %

RS

Cumulative %

Physics

Cumulative %

PE

Cumulative %

Music

Cumulative %

Add Mathematics

Cumulative %

Mathematics

Cumulative %

Latin

Cumulative %

History

Cumulative %

Greek (Modern)

Cumulative %

Greek (Classical)

Subject

93.8

74

87

35

A

82.4

407

100

1

50

1

0

0

100

0

84

28

64

6

86

8

93

32

91

40

95

2

93

28

100

1

100

0

A

99.6

14

99

11

B

96.0

181

100

0

100

1

100

2

100

0

95

13

73

1

100

2

100

6

98

9

100

1

99

4

100

0

100

0

B

100

1

100

1

C

99.8

51

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

6

100

3

100

0

100

0

100

2

100

0

100

1

100

0

100

0

C

100

0

100

0

D

100

2

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

D

100

0

100

0

E

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

E

100

0

100

0

F

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

F

100

0

100

0

G

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

G

100

0

100

0

U

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

100

0

U

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

100

240

89

100

100

Total % A-C

1331 100

5

2

2

39

121

11

14

86

123

21

76

1

5

Total % A-C

and

Drama

3

Cumulative %

10

60

Biology

Cumulative %

72

Cumulative %

Business Studies

4

22

Art

A*

Subject

5th 4th Form GCSE Results


Academic Matters: Commentary on Examination Results A Levels In this, the first year of the new A* grade at A level, the cohort achieved a record number of points per candidate and points per entry at A level. The overall percentage of grades A* - B was 89% and 64% of all grades were at A* or A. The average number of A-level passes was 4. 60 of the 137 students achieved at least 3 A grades; 34 managed 4 or more and 45 students – one third of the year – recorded at least one A* grade. There is not space here to list all those who qualified for Governors’ Awards, but special congratulations are due to Sam Abbott, James Clegg, Josh Cooper, Graham Davis, Lewis Farrimond, James McConnell, Amul Patel and Alex Wernick, on each achieving 3 A* grades and, for really exceptional achievements, Calum Pontin, bound for Oriel College, Oxford to read Civil Engineering, who secured four, as did David Phillips, also adding two “S” grades in the Cambridge STEP examination en route for the Maths Tripos at Queens’ College Cambridge.

GCSE This year’s cohort achieved an outstanding result of 82% of A* and A grades, with 52% at A*. This is the third consecutive year in which the proportion of A grades has exceeded 80%. The average score per entry is significantly higher than an A grade. Mathematics is taken early. In 2010 100% of our Fourth Form students obtained grades A* to C in Mathematics. Grades A* and A were achieved by 98% of these students, with a record 68% achieving A*. The year group set records for high achievement. 63 boys – more than half the year group - achieved A* or A throughout all their exams and an unprecedented 29 students achieved 10 A* grades or more. Of these, the top performers were: Jonathan Baker, Joe Chalkley, Andrew Ball,, Michael Hollins, Jonathan Inglis, Christopher Milsted, Sanesh Mistry, Philip Ruis, Christopher Schon and Alex Shavick, all of whom had nothing lower than A* in their 11 GCSEs, whilst the highest scorers of all were Arran Bhatiani, Harry Hopla and George Tasker, who each achieved 12 A* grades.

After St Albans At the time of writing, we have received news of the following outstanding achievements by Old Albanians at university this year: Edwin Baynes (2007) has been awarded First Class Honours in Geography from Durham and is continuing to study for MSc in Physical Geography. Tim Bazalgette (2007) has been awarded First Class Honours in Linguistics at Magdalen College, Cambridge. Luke Howard (2007) at the same College, has been awarded a starred First in Geography. David McLeod (2009) has been elected into a Senior Exhibition at Emanuel College, Cambridge. Lucy Shipley (2005) passed her Masters in Archaeology at Southampton and is to do a PhD. Ed Pisano (2005) has won an Oxford Athletics Half Blue in the 800m in the Varsity match against Cambridge.

Highlights Academic Insert Autumn 10  

Exam results and academic information

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