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2013-2014 Upper School Curriculum Guide


Table of Contents General Information

History

English

Mathematics

US Statement of Philosophy ..................................... 1 US Faculty and Staff .................................................. 2 Requirements for Graduation ................................... 5 Course Load ............................................................... 6 Community Service Requirement ............................. 6 Intersession ............................................................... 6 Academic Records ..................................................... 6 Student Support Services ............................................ 7 Ninth Grade Program ................................................ 8 Advisory Program ...................................................... 8 College Counseling ................................................... 9 Curriculum Planning Guide ................................... 10 Ninth Grade English ................................................ 11 Tenth Grade English ................................................ 12 AP English Lit. & Comp. (Dramatic Lit.) ............... 12 AP English Language & Composition ................... 12 Critical Writing ........................................................ 13 Psychology and Literature ....................................... 13 British Literature I .................................................. 13 Gothic Literature ..................................................... 13 Short Story and Poetry ........................................... 14 American Literature I ............................................. 14 Native American Literature ..................................... 14 Critical Writing II ................................................... 15 Literature and Film .................................................. 15 Modern Dystopian Novel ....................................... 15 African American Literature .................................. 15 Americal Literature II ................................................ 16 Creative Non-Fiction .............................................. 16 British Literature II .................................................. 16 English as a Second Language .................................. 17 Intermediate Academic English (ESL) ...................... 17 Composition and Literature (ESL) .......................... 17 Adv. Composition & Literature (ESL) ..................... 17 Expository Writing I & II (ISP) ................................ 18

Cultural Geography ........................................ Western Civilization ...................................... AP World History ......................................... American History and Government Survey ..... AP United States History ............................... Islamic Studies .............................................. AP European History ................................... AP Comparative Government and Politics ...... Native American History ................................. History and Cinema .................................... ESL U.S. History ............................................ ESL World History .......................................

19 19 20 20 20 21 21 22 22 22 23 23

Algebra I ......................................................... 24 Integrated Geometry ......................................... 25 Geometry B ..................................................... 25 Algebra II ....................................................... 25 Algebra II/Trigonometry .................................. 25 Pre-Calculus ................................................... 25 Advanced Pre-Calculus ...................................... 26 Calculus ............................................................ 26 AP Calculus AB .............................................. 26 AP Calculus AB/BC ........................................ 26 AP Calculus BC .............................................. 26 AP Statistics .................................................... 27 Finance ........................................................... 27 Probability and Statistics ................................. 27

Science

Biology ............................................................. 28 Advanced Biology ............................................ 29 Chemistry ......................................................... 29 AP Environmental Science ................................ 29 AP Advanced Chemistry ............................... 29 Physics .............................................................. 29 Conceptual Physics ........................................... 30 AP Physics ........................................................ 30 Adv. Projects in Science and Engineering I & II ... 30 Bioethics ........................................................... 31 Astronomy and Meteorology ........................... 31 Geology ........................................................... 31 ESL Science I & II ........................................... 32


Table of Contents Global Languages

International Student Program

Arts

Physical Activities & Sports

Chinese (Mandarin) I ........................................... 33 Chinese (Mandarin) II ....................................... 33 Chinese (Mandarin) III ....................................... 34 French I ........................................................... 34 French I I ......................................................... 34 French I II ........................................................ 34 French I V ........................................................ 34 AP French Language and Culture ....................... 35 Spanish I .......................................................... 35 Spanish II .......................................................... 35 Spanish III ........................................................ 36 Spanish IV ....................................................... 36 AP Spanish Language and Culture ....................... 36 Yearbook .............................................................. 37 AP Music Theory ............................................. 37 Ceramics ............................................................ 38 Handbells .......................................................... 38 Instrumental Music .............................................. 38 Modern & Advanced Modern Dance .................. 38 Photography ........................................................ 38 Weaving and Fibers ............................................. 39 Woodworking ...................................................... 39 Stagecraft ............................................................ 39 Arts and Ideas I ..................................................... 39 Chorus ................................................................ 39 Video Production/One Acts .............................. 39 Studio Art I & Advanced Studio Art I .................. 40 Theater I ............................................................. 40 Arts and Ideas II ..................................................... 40 Musical Production .............................................. 41 Play Production ...................................................... 41 Studio Art II & Advanced Studio Art II .............. 41

Electives

Grammar Writing Workshop ............................... 42 Select Seminar on Global Peace & Justice I & II ... 42 Model U.N. ....................................................... 43 Quakerism ........................................................... 43 Newspaper .......................................................... 43 American Culture I ............................................. 43 American Culture II ............................................ 44

Religion/Service

Quakerism .......................................................... 45 Community Service/Stewardship ........................ 45

English as a Second Language (ESL) .................... 46 Intermediate Academic English (ESL) ................. 46 Composition and Literature (ESL) ....................... 47 Adv. Composition and Literature (ESL) .............. 47 U.S. History (ESL) ............................................... 47 World History (ESL) ........................................... 47 Science I (ESL) ..................................................... 48 Science II (ESL) ................................................... 48 Grammar Writing Workshop I ............................. 48 Grammar Writing Workshop II ........................... 48 American Culture I ............................................. 48 American Culture II ............................................ 49 Expository Writing I & II (post-ESL) .................... 18 Modern Dance ................................................. 50 Fit for Life ........................................................... 50 Field Games ....................................................... 51 Yoga ................................................................... 51 Walking for Fitness .............................................. 51 Outdoor Leadership ........................................... 51 Fundamentals of Rock Climbing ...................... 51 Intramural Sports ................................................. 52 Interscholastic Sports .......................................... 52 Baseball – Boys Basketball – Boys and Girls Cross-country Running – Boys and Girls Golf – Boys and Girls Ice Hockey – Boys Lacrosse – Boys and Girls Rock Climbing – Boys and Girls Soccer – Boys and Girls Softball – Girls Tennis – Boys and Girls Track – Boys and Girls Volleyball – Girls Wrestling

Internship Program

Internship Program Overview............................. 53

Pathways Schematics

English ................................................................ 54 History ................................................................ 55 Global Languages ................................................ 56 Science ............................................................... 57 Mathematics ....................................................... 58 ESL ...................................................................... 59


General Information UPPER SCHOOL STATEMENT OF PHILOSOPHY The Sandy Spring Friends Upper School is an independent, college-preparatory high school program under the guidance of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). Our community is designed to support and engage learners from diverse cultures and backgrounds as they partake in challenging educational activities. Faculty and students work to maintain a setting of trust and respect in which all members act with integrity and responsibility. Together we represent a dynamic, interactive community focused on academic, artistic, athletic, social, and spiritual education. The Sandy Spring Friends Upper School provides an academically rigorous, supportive, and accepting community characterized by close relationships among students and faculty. Quaker testimonies guide our policies and procedures, with emphasis on recognition and respect for individuals’ perspectives and differences. Within this environment, students are able to fully explore talents and interests. They become critical thinkers through a demanding academic curriculum, enriched arts program, inclusive athletics, service opportunities, clubs, and after school social gatherings. Student leadership and decision-making are encouraged and valued. The importance of diversity is supported by vibrant international and boarding programs which provide opportunities for students and faculty from a variety of cultures and backgrounds to interact both during and after school hours. Underlying all that we do in the Upper School is a commitment to the Quaker values of simplicity, equality, honesty, respect, peaceful resolution of conflict, and community involvement. When Sandy Spring Friends School students graduate from the Upper School, they move on to higher education and the world at large as confident, responsible, and thoughtful citizens. Graduates understand their interdependence with communities, both local and global, as well as with the natural environment. They are open-minded, experimental, skilled, and curious. They have an understanding of practices in simplicity, tolerance, and non-violence. From the foundation of a strong and caring community, challenging intellectual pursuits, and enriching life activities, Sandy Spring Friends School students are prepared to become fully active, contributing members of the world. Adopted by the Upper School Faculty May 2003

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General Information UPPER SCHOOL FACULTY & STAFF, 2013-2014 ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

Justin Leak Assistant Director of Residential Life B.A. Pennsylvania State University M.A. Lewis and Clark College, OR

Thomas Gibian Head of School B.A. College of Wooster, OH M.B.A. Wharton School, University of PA

Julie Borsetti Residential Staff, Upper School Arts, Community Service B.A. Towson University, MD M.A. University of Portland, OR

David Hickson Assistant Head of School for Academic Innovation B.A. Oberlin College, OH M.Ed. Arcadia University, PA

Elizabeth Channer Residential Staff, Health Center & Athletics Admin Assist. Teaching Certificate, Univ. of the West Indies School of Ed. M.Ed. Western Carolina University, NC

Karen Cumberbatch Head of Upper School B.A. Cornell University, NY M.A. University of California at Los Angeles Ed.Cert. Johns Hopkins University, MD

Aimee Farley Residential Staff, Middle School Social Studies B.S. Illinois State University

Jerome Cole Assistant Head of US for College Counseling B.A. Catholic University, Washington, DC M.A. George Washington Univ., Washington, DC

Megan Hoover Residential Counselor B.A. Elon University, NC M.A. Ed. Catholic University, Washington, DC

Ben McClellan Dean of Students B.A. Hamilton College

Lauren Shiftlett Residential Program Weekend Coordinator B.A. Frostburg State University, PA M.A. Towson University, MD

Frances Lambrecht Registrar B.A. University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Brian Wilkinson Residential Staff, Technology B.S. University of New Hampshire M.S. Johns Hopkins University, MD

Shinae Byhouwer Upper School Administrative Assistant B.A. Wilmington College, OH

Kexin Zhang Residential Staff, Global Languages, Homestay Coordinator B.A. Sun-yet Sen University, China

ADMISSIONS Yasmin McGinnis B.A., College of the Holy Cross M.A., Boston College Director of Enrollment Management

TEACHING FACULTY Julie Borsetti Arts, Community Service B.A. Towson University, MD M.A. University of Portland, OR

Bill Mena Director of International and Boarding Admission B.A. Stony Brook University, NY M.A. Gonzaga University, WA

Scott Carneal English, Department Chair, 10th Grade Dean B.A. Bowdoin College, ME Ed. M. Harvard University, MA

RESIDENTIAL STAFF Ken Fishback Director of the Residential Life B.A. Duke University, NC M.Ed. East Tennessee State University

Aaron Chan History, ESL B.A. University of California at San Diego M.Ed. George Mason University, VA M.Div. Pacific School of Religion, CA

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General Information UPPER SCHOOL FACULTY & STAFF, 2012-2013 Heather Engle Mathematics B.S. University of Massachusetts Ed.M. Temple University, PA Bruce Evans Fine and Performing Arts, Department Chair B.A. Earlham College, IN Laurel Flyer Science B.S., Penn State University, PA M.S. Wilkes University, PA Michele Grimm English, 9th Grade Program B. A. Williams College, MA Gwen Handler Fine and Performing Arts B.F.A. George Washington University, Washington, DC Cathy Harrison French B.A. Smith College, MA M.A. Middlebury College, VT Tom Harrison Science, Department Chair B.A. Bowdoin College, ME M.S. University of Maine

Hannah Kerr ’95 Fine and Performing Arts, 9th Grade Program B.F.A. Virginia Commonwealth University Steff Kerr ’89 Mathematics, Head of the 9th Grade Program B.A. Wesleyan University, CT Kathy Laughlin History, Department Chair B.A. University of Alberta, Canada M.A. McGill University, Canada M.Ed. Loyola University, MD Lisa Lodovici Athletic Conditioning, Trainer B.S. Salisbury University, MD M.S. Towson University, MD Tony McCudden Mathematics B.Ed. University of Melbourne, Australia M.A. College of Notre Dame of Maryland Barry Merritt Mathematics B.S. Florida Southern College Johanna Modak Spanish B.A. Goucher College, MD

David Hickson Assistant Head of School for Academic Innovation, Quakerism B.A. Oberlin College, OH M.ED. Arcadia University, PA

Josh Moffatt ’02 History, 9th Grade Program B.A. Wheaton College, MA M.A.T. University of Maryland

Bob Hoch History B.S. Frostburg University, MD M.A. Hood College, MD

Leah Niepold Spanish, 12th Grade Dean B.A. Hamilton College, NY M.A. Middlebury College, VT

Aldona Joseph Assistant Librarian B.A. Kenyon College, OH

Lyn Ostov Fine and Performing Arts B.F.A. Maryland Institute of Art M.F.A. Maryland Institute of Art

David Kahn English B.A. Carleton College, MN M. Div. Earlham School of Religion, IN Adam Keller Science B.A. Earlham College, IN M.A. Earlham College, IN

Eduardo Polón Spanish, Global Languages Department Chair B.A. Western Michigan University M.A. University of Maryland Steve Powers Athletic Director B.A. University of Maryland

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General Information UPPER SCHOOL FACULTY & STAFF, 2012-2013 Takisha Reece Science B.S. Farleigh Dickinson University, NJ Paummi Sarrazin Co-Director International Student Program, ESL B.A. Union College, NY M.A.T. School for International Training, VT Bryan Seith Music B.M. Westminster Choir College, NJ Elisa Shapiro Science B.S. University of Maryland M.S. University of Rochester, NY Bim Schauffler Director of the International Program, ESL B.A. University of Delaware M.A. American University, Washington, DC Alyssa Vain-Callahan English B.A. Duke University, NC Ariel Voorhees English, Writing Center B.A. University of Pennsylvania M.A. Middlebury College Bread Loaf School of English, VT Nate Whitman Math, Outdoor Education B.A. University of Richmond, VA M.A. St. John’s College, MD

TECHNOLOGY Rex Riley Technology B.A. University of Maryland M.Ed. University of Virginia Brian Wilkinson Technology B.S. University of New Hampshire M.S. Johns Hopkins University, MD

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES Robin Bruck Learning Specialist B.S. University of Virginia M.Ed. Johns Hopkins University, MD Mary K. Fry Registered Nurse and Nurse Practitioner B.S.N. Pennsylvania State University M.S.N. University of Maryland Megan Hoover Dorm Counselor B.A. Elon University, NC M.A. Ed. Catholic University, Washington, DC Ilene Lees, LCSW-C Upper School Counselor B.A. University of Delaware M.S.W. University of Maryland Gail Willie Registered Nurse B.S.N. University of Maryland

Francis Zell Physical Education B.A. St. Mary’s College, MD Kexin Zhang Mandarin, Homestay Coordinator B.A. Sun Yat-sen University, China

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General Information REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION To be eligible for graduation from Sandy Spring Friends School, a student must meet all of the following requirements in the Upper School: • Successful completion of four (4) years of English, with English taken each semester. • Successful completion of three (3) years of History, including one year of U.S. History. • Successful completion of three (3) years of Mathematics in the Upper School. • Successful completion of three (3) years of Science of which one year must be a biological science and one year a physical science. • Successful completion of three (3) years in any one Global Language during high school. Student placement is made by the Global Languages Department. Permission to advance to the next level of a foreign language is not normally granted to students achieving less that a C- (70%) average, unless proof of additional satisfactory work (e.g. summer school) is submitted for validation. • Successful completion of three (3) years of Arts, including Arts and Ideas I and II are required for graduation. Arts and Ideas to be taken in 11th or 12th grade. •

ESL Program: Initial placement dependent on prior coursework and placement tests.

• Successful completion of at least one (1) year of other courses from the above areas or other electives, in addition to the requirements described above. • Successful completion of one (1) semester of Quakerism or its equivalent for non-ISP students entering in the 10th – 12th grades. For students entering the Upper School in ninth grade, the Quakerism requirement is fulfilled as part of the 9th Grade Program. • Successful completion of at least two (2) physical activities - Physical Education or Athletics - each year, in the Upper School.

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General Information COURSE LOAD • Each student is to carry a minimum load of six scheduling commitments (including academic classes, arts classes, and physical education requirements) each semester. It is strongly recommended that a student take five academic classes each semester. • A student must have approval from the appropriate Department Head in order to take more than one course in the same department during the same semester. • A student must have approval from the Head of the Upper School in order to take six or more courses in the same semester from among the following departments: English, History, Mathematics, French and Spanish, Science. • A student must have approval from the Head of the Upper School, in collaboration with department heads, to take more than two AP courses in the same school year, unless the third AP is in Global Languages or Mathematics. Students are strongly encouraged to limit their AP courses to no more than three.

COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENT Every student at Sandy Spring Friends School is expected to perform a combination of community service to those outside the community and stewardship to the Sandy Spring Friends School community. For students entering in 9th grade, the graduation requirement is at least 50 hours of community service and at least 30 hours of stewardship. Students entering after 9th grade have a reduced requirement. The community service requirement must be completed by the end of the first semester of a student’s senior year. Additional details about community service may be found in the Community Handbook and online. In addition, one service Intersession must be completed prior to graduation.

INTERSESSION Intersession is a one to two-week period in the spring in which the School’s normal routine is interrupted so that all students and faculty can participate in special projects. All Upper School students are required to participate each year. Intersession projects might involve community service, physical activity, arts activity, cultural or informational trips. Costs are not included in the tuition and range from $100 to more than $1,000. Students must participate in at least one Service Intersession during their enrollment.

ACADEMIC RECORDS For students entering Sandy Spring Friends School (SSFS) after 9th grade, course titles and credit earned, but not grades, from their previous school (s) are recorded on their SSFS transcript. An original transcript(s) from their previous school(s) is attached to their SSFS transcript. Copies of all high school transcripts are forwarded to transfer schools, colleges, and universities. Students may earn a maximum of two (2) credits at an accredited educational institution outside SSFS after matriculating at SSFS. An original transcript (s) of courses taken outside SSFS is attached to the student’s SSFS transcript. The cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated based on grades earned in courses taken at SSFS. Grades earned outside SSFS are not calculated into the cumulative GPA. 6


General Information STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES Counselors Informal counseling for a student or his or her family is available through the Upper School Counselor and the Dorm Counselor. A student or group of students can choose to meet with the Counselor or can be referred by a teacher, parents or the Head of Upper School. Parents are asked to contact the counselor as soon as concerns arise. A family will be contacted if their child needs to be referred to an outside professional or if there are concerns for the student’s personal safety. Ilene Lees, Upper School Counselor Megan Hoover, Dorm Counselor Learning Specialist A learning specialist is available to assist both teachers and students in developing strategies to meet the individual learning styles of students. Parents are asked to contact the classroom teacher as soon as concerns arise and then notify the Learning Specialist as needed. The Learning Specialist is available to do a preliminary screening and follow-up conference with parents and faculty. To obtain additional information about a student experiencing learning difficulty, the student may be referred for testing from an outside evaluator after consultation with the parents. When intensive individual instruction is recommended, the learning specialist will work with the parent, tutor, and classroom teacher to coordinate the remediation. Robin Bruck, Upper School Learning Specialist Gail Willie, School Nurse Student Resource Team The Upper School Student Resource Team (SRT) meets weekly and works in an interdisciplinary manner to coordinate academic and socio-emotional resources, supports, and services for students. Parents and faculty may consult with members of SRT. Specific recommendations from this group may include: suggestions for classroom strategies, accommodations, social supports, behavior modification systems, and outside professional support. Members of the SRT: • Karen Cumberbatch, Head of Upper School • J Cole, Assistant Head of the Upper School for College Counseling • Ben McClellan, US Dean of Students • Ilene Lees, Upper School Counselor • Megan Hoover, Dorm Counselor/Asst Director of College Counseling • Robin Bruck, US Learning Specialist • Bev DiTusa, US Learning Specialist • Gail Willie, School Nurse • Steff Kerr, Director of the 9th grade Program • Ken Fishback, Director of the Residential Program • Bim Schauffler, Director of the International Student Program

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General Information ADVISORY Upper School advisors have numerous roles in the lives of their advisees. They are responsible for serving as student advocates, supporting their advisees in school endeavors and helping them to achieve an appropriate balance between academic and extracurricular activities. Specifically, the advisor role includes the following: • Develop an effective mentoring relationship with advisees • Serve as liaison between the school and parents • Review and monitor advisees’ academic and social progress; including assisting students in determining appropriate courses for upcoming semesters • Develop the advisor group as a supportive and positive experience for students • Facilitate advisory group activities developed by the Upper School Advisory Committee. • Facilitate efforts to support advisees having academic or social difficulty • Assist in coordinating efforts to best meet the needs of students, including work with the school counselor, the learning specialist, SRT, and others • Counsel students concerning disciplinary matters • Serve as advocate for students in disciplinary processes

NINTH GRADE PROGRAM Sandy Spring Friends School offers a rich transitional experience for ninth grade students linking the middle school years with the more intensive demands of the upper school program. The program is sensitive to the particular intellectual, social and emotional needs of 13 to 14-year olds as they enter late adolescence. Most of the ninth grade classrooms and the ninth grade office are located in the Ninth Grade Building (Hartshorne). This central location allows the students to maintain closer contact with their teachers, their peers, and their supplies. Other classes are held in Moore Hall and in the Science Center. The academic program encourages integration across the four basic subject areas of English, history, science, and mathematics. In addition, ninth graders participate in a required seminar class that includes study of: Quakerism; interpersonal relationships; leadership & teamwork; diversity appreciation, nutrition and body image; drugs, alcohol and tobacco. The program also includes several experiential elements – pre-school camping trip, field trips, 9th grade play in November (100% participation), community service, team building exercises and Intersession. Every aspect of the program is required and built into the ninth grade schedule. Each experiential element is an important educational growth experience and extends and enriches the core academic program. The ninth grade Intersession in recent years has traveled to the Florida Keys. It is primarily a curriculum-based trip with extensive amounts of community service. Pre-school camping trip: There is a ninth grade camping trip that is a required part of the ninth grade program. This five-day trip occurs in late August. The trip includes hiking, canoeing and whole group activities at Catoctin Quaker Camp. There is no additional fee for this trip. 9th Grade Team Steff Kerr Program Director, Mathematics Hannah Kerr Arts, Dance, Assistant 9th Grade Program Director Kathy Laughlin Upper School History, World Cultural Geography, ESL World History, AP US Government and Politics Takisha Reece Science Michele Grimm English Josh Moffatt History

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General Information COLLEGE COUNSELING In keeping with the words and spirit of the SSFS Mission Statement, the SSFS College Counseling program believes that it is especially important to “cherish the worth and dignity of each individual” during the college selection process, particularly the student, parents, and SSFS faculty and staff. By following a sensible and effective approach to college guidance and by working together, the college application process can be an exciting and rewarding time. For the student, it is one of the most significant steps toward independence and adulthood. However, for both parent and student, it can be a period of great uncertainty, anxiety, and sometimes frustration. To facilitate with the college selection process, the School uses the Family Connection , a web-based program by Naviance, to help students and families investigate, research, track, and plan for the college admission process. College Counseling Program Goals: • To counsel and support all SSFS students as they navigate their way through the college selection process. • To create an environment in which the student, parents, and the School are working together as a team and where the student feels empowered to play the central role in the college application process. • To follow, at all times, the Principles of Good Practice as set forth by the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC). College Counseling Program Staff: Jerome Cole, Assistant Head for College Counseling Frances Lambrecht, Registrar and College Counseling Coordinator

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Curriculum Planning Guide STUDENT NAME: _____________________________

ADVISOR NAME: ____________________

1st Semester 2nd Semester 9TH GRADE English English 9 English 9 History Cultural Geography Cultural Geography Mathematics ________________________ __________________________ Science ________________________ __________________________ Foreign Language ________________________ __________________________ Arts ________________________ __________________________ Electives ________________________ __________________________ P.E./Sports ________________________ __________________________ 10TH GRADE English English 10 English 10 History West.Civ. or AP World History West.Civ. or AP World History Mathematics ________________________ __________________________ Science ________________________ __________________________ Foreign Language ________________________ __________________________ Arts ________________________ __________________________ Electives ________________________ __________________________ P.E./Sports ________________________ __________________________ 11TH GRADE English ________________________ __________________________ History ________________________ __________________________ Mathematics ________________________ __________________________ Science ________________________ __________________________ Foreign Language ________________________ __________________________ Arts ________________________ __________________________ Electives ________________________ __________________________ P.E./Sports ________________________ __________________________ 12TH GRADE English ________________________ __________________________ History ________________________ __________________________ Mathematics ________________________ __________________________ Science ________________________ __________________________ Foreign Language ________________________ __________________________ Arts ________________________ __________________________ Electives ________________________ __________________________ P.E./Sports ________________________ __________________________ 10


English ENGLISH COURSES Ninth Grade English is required of all 9th grade students, and Tenth Grade English is required of all 10th grade students. Courses for juniors and seniors are semester-length courses, except AP courses. English is required during each of the four years of high school.

FULL-YEAR ENGLISH COURSES Course Title Course Summary

NINTH GRADE ENGLISH The theme of ninth grade English is “unmasking identity.” Self-discovery through literature inspires students to ask questions of themselves as they read about characters searching for who they are and what they stand for. We explore this theme through the study of different literary genres (novels, short stories, essays, drama and poetry). Group discussions are an important component of this course. We focus on developing strong paragraphs and on the process of writing and revising the 5-paragraph essay, personal narratives, poetry, research papers, and play adaptations. Texts studied in the past have included: • The Bean Trees – Barbara Kingsolver • Brighton Beach Memoirs – Neil Simon • Miriam’s Song – Miriam Mathabane • Romeo and Juliet – William Shakespeare • Water for Elephants – Sara Gruen • A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier – Ishmael Beah • The Picture of Dorian Gray – Oscar Wilde • Great Expectations – Charles Dickens • Selected short stories/essays/poetry

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English Course Title Course Summary

TENTH GRADE ENGLISH - FOUNDATIONS OF WESTERN CULTURE This is a course in World Literature emphasizing the archetypal characters and themes that have preoccupied writers from all cultures and historical periods up to the present. Special emphasis is given to the Bible, Greek drama and philosophy, Medieval literature, and to modern variations on the heroic, allegorical, apocalyptic, and utopian forms of the past. The reading list is chosen to complement the work being done in Western Civilization. Composition instruction is focused on the development of writing skills in exposition, interpretation, and argument. Texts studied in the past have included: • The Bible • The Epic of Gilgamesh • Three tragedies of Sophocles • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight • Hamlet - William Shakespeare • Dandelion Wine – Ray Bradbury • The Odyssey (Fagel’s translation)

Course Title Course Summary

AP ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (DRAMATIC LITERATURE) The class will read many of the great classic and contemporary playwrights; there will be an emphasis on realism and tragedy early in the year, and then we will focus on playwrights who make us laugh. The curriculum may include plays by Tennessee Williams, Peter Shaffer, William Shakespeare, August Wilson, Paula Vogel, Edward Albee, Oscar Wilde, David Mamet, Larry Shue, Eugene Ionesco, Alan Bennett, Wendy Wasserstein, and Thornton Wilder. Students will write many essays, including analytical and personal reaction papers. When appropriate, we will attend professional play productions. Students will also take time to prepare for the Advanced Placement examination in English Literature given in the spring.

Prerequisite: Students who are eligible for this course should be excellent students in English and have an outstanding work ethic. Also, they will need to be recommended by their previous English teacher and the department head. Course Title Course Summary

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION From advertisements to traffic signs, editorials to songs, we are surrounded by arguments. The focus of this course is on those arguments, or “rhetoric,” at work in classic and contemporary Prerequisite: Students texts. Students will learn to recognize the variety of rhetorical modes and persuasive strategies who are eligible for this used in visual and language-based texts, to evaluate the effectiveness of these rhetorical moves, and course should be excelto master and employ those strategies in their own writing. This course’s expectations, pace, and lent students in English subject matter are equivalent to a first-year college composition class, and students will be expectand have an outstanding ed to take the College Board’s AP test in Language and Composition in May. Students considerwork ethic. Also, they ing this course should be prepared for frequent and challenging reading and writing assignments, will need to be recomindependent reading and research projects, and focused work in refining elements of writing such mended by their previous as organization, clarity, style, and mechanics. English teacher and the department head.

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English 1ST SEMESTER ENGLISH COURSES: GRADES 11 AND 12 Course Title Course Summary

CRITICAL WRITING I The purpose of this course is to teach students how to write expository prose, to read and analyze critically, and to think constructively. In addition, expository prose conveys information and explains things to the reader; it is the kind of prose needed for papers and essay examinations throughout high school and beyond. The course emphasizes and develops skills in critical reading and academic writing as preparation for college-level composition. In addition, the course explores the relationship between reading and the writing process, distinguishing between revising and editing, and making appropriate grammar choices. Texts may include: • Crazy for the Storm – Norman • Allestad, Born Round - Frank Bruni • The Catcher in the Rye - J.D. Salinger.

Course Title Course Summary

PSYCHOLOGY AND LITERATURE In this course, students will study excerpts from major psychologists and theorists and apply psychological theories to classic works of literature. Students will begin with a brief study of Sigmund Freud before tackling more modern theorists. Students will study novels, short stories, and a select number of films. Authors may include Sigmund Freud, B.F. Skinner, William Shakespeare, Edgar Allen Poe, and Mary Shelley. The psychological texts in the course are challenging, and students should be prepared to tackle difficult primary source material. The course will include frequent theory quizzes and daily class discussion. Students will also write many essays, including in-class reaction papers, analytical papers, and a research paper.

Course Title Course Summary

BRITISH LITERATURE I Beginning in the 8th century, in term I we will examine the first 1000 years of British literature. From the masterpiece Beowulf through Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales to the prose of Bacon, we will try to arrive at an overview of the beginnings (and middles) of perhaps the greatest national literature in history. Texts may include: • Beowulf – trans. Howell D. Chickering • The Canterbury Tales - Geoffrey Chaucer • Utopia – Thomas More • The Essays – Bacon.

Course Title Course Summary

GOTHIC LITERATURE Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto introduced gothic novels to the world in 1764, and yet various authors and cultures have influenced this genre to become what it is today. We will begin the course by examining the definition and historical context of the gothic, as well as its relationship to Romanticism and horror. In order to examine archetypal gothic elements, students will write many essays, including analytical and personal reflection papers. Texts may include: • Dracula – Bram Stoker • The Mysteries of Udolpho – Ann Radclliffe • Interview with the Vampire – Anne Rice • Short works by Edgar Allen Poe

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English Course Title Course Summary

SHORT STORY AND POETRY This is both a literature and creative writing course. The short story challenges authors to write powerful, evocative, and often shocking prose in a compact format. In this course, we’ll study celebrated and emerging masters of the genre such as Edgar Allan Poe, Guy de Maupassant, Flannery O’Connor, Raymond Carver, Ernest Hemingway, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We’ll also create two short stories to practice the writing techniques that make this genre so arresting. Through a careful examination of writing techniques available to poets, such as tone, word choice, story, rhythm, format, song, and rhyme, we’ll acquaint ourselves with a wide variety of poems and poets. We’ll also practice the techniques that we study, crafting our own poems in a range of forms and subjects.

Course Title Course Summary

AMERICAN LITERATURE I This course is designed to introduce eleventh- and twelfth-graders to major texts of early American Literature. This semester, we’ll study works of fiction and nonfiction from the 16th through the 19th centuries: novels, diaries, short stories, poems, plays, and essays. Major writers will include Bartolomeo de las Casas, Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and Herman Melville. Our double-focus will be reading these texts as literature (searching for meaning and symbol within the text) and as anthropological evidence (searching for clues in the text about American culture). Two prominent themes will be the American Dream and the idea of the American Hero. Students will be evaluated on their preparedness for class, their participation in class discussions, and their performance in large writing assignments or projects. Our several large essays will emphasize the process of writing, from free-writing and organizing to drafting and revising.

Course Title Course Summary

NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE This course will look at texts from a few Native American writers. To think that we can get a clear picture of native traditions, values, and practices based on these few texts would be presumptious, but we will try to get a start. We will look at some origin myths, autobiography, poetry, and essays from the hands (and voices) of Native American writers. Texts may include: • Diné Bahane’, the Navajo creation story, selections • The Way to Rainy Mountain - N. Scott Momaday • Storyteller - Leslie Marmon Silko • Indian Killer - Sherman Alexie • Selected poetry handouts

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English 2ND SEMESTER ENGLISH COURSES: GRADES 11 AND 12 Course Title Course Summary

CRITICAL WRITING II Critical Writing II is a continuation of Critical Writing I. The course teaches students how to write expository prose, to read and analyze critically, and to think constructively. In addition, the course explores the relationship between reading and the writing process, distinguishing between revising and editing, and making appropriate grammar choices. Students will continue to be assigned a variety of formal and informal writing assignments throughout the remainder of the year. Grammar and writing conventions will be highly important; students will also explore the ideas and creativity expressed in various samples of literature. Texts: Into Thin Air - Jon Krakauer The Poisonwood Bible - Barbara Kingsolver Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen.

Course Title Course Summary

LITERATURE AND FILM In this course, students will extend the study of psychological theory to tackle additional works of literature and film. Students will begin with a brief introduction to several elements of film theory before tackling the course literature. Students will also view films from lauded directors such as Alfred Hitchcock. The course will require students to view one film every one or two weeks, and may require viewing during lunch or after school. Authors may include William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, and Paul Auster. The theoretical works in the course are challenging, and students should be prepared to tackle difficult primary source material. Students will write frequent short and longer papers, including extensive viewing notes, film reviews, analytical papers, and a research paper.

Course Title Course Summary

MODERN DYSTOPIAN NOVEL Although George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four may be one of the most well-known dystopian novels, Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games has reignited this popular genre. In this course, students will examine modern visions of the future, paying particular attention to the fears and criticisms of an author’s present society that come out in dystopian novels. Students will write several analytical essays and will complete a creative writing assignment that projects the concerns of the early 21st century onto a future world. Texts may include: • Brave New World - Aldous Huxley • Cloud Atlas - David Mitchell • The Handmaid’s Tale - Margaret Atwood

Course Title Course Summary

AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE From slavery to the Harlem Renaissance, from the Civil Rights Movement to hip hop, African American voices form a complex and crucial thread in U.S. literary history. We will look at African American literature both as a literary tradition in its own right and as a lens through which we can better see African American culture and American culture as a whole. Particular attention will be given to the interrelationship of themes associated with race, culture, and identity. Likely authors to be studied include: Harriet Jacobs, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, Octavia Butler, and August Wilson.

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English Course Title Course Summary

AMERICAN LITERATURE II This course is designed to introduce eleventh- and twelfth-graders to major texts of recent American Literature. This semester, we’ll study works of fiction and nonfiction from the 19th through 21st centuries: novels, short stories, poems, plays, and essays. Major writers will include Willa Cather, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Zora Neale Hurston, and Jhumpa Lahiri. Our double-focus will be reading these texts as literature (searching for meaning and symbol within the text) and as anthropological evidence (searching for clues in the text about American culture). Two prominent themes will be the American Dream and the idea of the American Hero. Students will be evaluated on their preparedness for class, their participation in class discussions, and their performance in large writing assignments or projects. Our several large essays will emphasize the process of writing, from free-writing and organizing to drafting and revising.

Course Title Course Summary

CREATIVE NON-FICTION This will be both a literature and creative non-fiction writing course. We will read autobiographies, letters, diaries, memoirs, journals, fictionalized recall and historical fiction. We will develop an understanding of the historical contexts of particular works and how they help to transform those contexts. Students will write many essays, including analytical and personal reaction papers. Furthermore, there will be an opportunity to write memoir and historical fiction. Texts may include: • An American Childhood – Annie Dillard • Angela’s Ashes – Frank McCourt • Out of Africa – Isak Dinesen • Among Schoolchildren – Tracy Kidder • The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood – Helene Cooper

Course Title Course Summary

BRITISH LITERATURE II Term II will continue with a survey of British literature from the 1700’s up to the present. Most of our time this term will be spent in the 20th century. Texts may include: • Henry IV, Part I – William Shakespeare • Gulliver’s Travels – Jonathan Swift • Hard Times – Charles Dickens • Heart of Darkness – Conrad • Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man – James Joyce • W.B. Yeats - poetry

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English ESL ENGLISH COURSES OFFERED EACH SEMESTER Course Title Course Summary

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE This course is an integrated-skills course focusing on listening, speaking, reading and writing at the novice-high to intermediate-low level. The class emphasizes grammar and vocabulary development as well as writing at the sentence to paragraph level. Students also work extensively on the organization and delivery of basic oral presentations. The class involves short reading and summary exercises and TOEFL/SAT I practice activities. Students attending this course will move on to either Intermediate Academic English, or Composition and Literature depending on their overall proficiency level when they complete the course.

Course Title Course Summary

INTERMEDIATE ACADEMIC ENGLISH (ESL) This course is an integrated-skills course focusing on listening, speaking, reading and writing at the intermediate-mid to intermediate-high level. The class emphasizes complex grammar and higher-level vocabulary development as well as writing at the paragraph level. This class also introduces basic essay formats and composition strategies. Students also work extensively on the organization and delivery of formal oral presentations. The class also involves reading, note taking and summary exercises as well as TOEFL/SAT I practice activities. The class is for students that have a good command of basic English skills, but need further work on grammar and complex sentence structures as well as the reading and composition skills introduced in English as a Second Language.

Course Title Course Summary

COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE (ESL) This course is an integrated-skills course designed to prepare high-intermediate to advanced level ESL students either for mainstream academic courses at Sandy Spring Friends School, or, in the case of seniors, for mainstream academic courses at American colleges and universities. The class focuses on paragraph development skills and formal composition with a focus on the writing process. The students will also be exposed to both contemporary literature and exposé. The course seeks to develop students’ ability to read, analyze and share, both in writing and orally, their perceptions of the works read. Students mastering this course may be eligible to enroll in non-ESL English and History courses.

Course Title Course Summary

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE (ESL) This course is an integrated-skills course designed to prepare advanced level ESL students either for mainstream academic courses at Sandy Spring Friends School, or, in the case of seniors, for mainstream academic courses at American colleges and universities. The class continues the development of formal composition with a focus on the writing process. The students will also be exposed both to contemporary American literature and exposé. The course seeks to develop students’ ability to read, analyze and share, both in writing and orally, their perceptions of the works read. Students who successfully complete this course will enroll in non-ESL English and History courses.

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English INTERNATIONAL (POST-ESL) COURSES Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: Completion of Composition and Literature (teacher recommendation required) or Advanced Composition and Literature

Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: Completion of Composition and Literature (teacher recommendation required) or Advanced Composition and Literature

EXPOSITORY WRITING I This writing course is designed to develop analytical and writing skills and is reserved for students who have completed Composition and Literature (teacher recommendation required) or Advanced Composition and Literature. Students read and analyze complex texts. They also focus on deepening their writing processes. They learn various methods for exploring ideas in the prewriting step, and they continue to develop deep revision skills and careful attention to editing. Students will write often in various forms, from analytical to narrative. Additionally, students will improve their grammar and vocabulary. Texts may include: • The Lottery - Shirley Jackson • The Most Dangerous Game - Richard Connell • The Giver - Lois Lowry • Crazy for the Storm - Norman Ollestad • Brighton Beach Memoirs - Neil Simon

EXPOSITORY WRITING II This writing course is a continuation of Expository Writing I in that the course is designed to develop analytical and writing skills and is reserved for students who have completed Composition and Literature (teacher recommendation is required) or Advanced Composition and Literature. Students do not need to take Expository Writing I to enroll in this course. Students will continue to be assigned a variety of writing assignments, both formally and informally, throughout the year. Subsequently, students will continue to analyze and synthesize what they have read, focusing on language and literary devices in order to cultivate a stockpile of ideas to use in their own writing. Texts may include: • Of Mice and Men - John Steinbeck • Lord of the Flies - William Golding • The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini.

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History HISTORY COURSES Ninth grade students are required to take Cultural Geography, and 10th grade students are required to take Western Civilization or AP World History. All students must take American History, or AP American History, for graduation. Juniors and seniors may choose from a range of additional semester and year-long courses. Upper level elective courses are not necessarily offered every year.

FULL-YEAR HISTORY COURSES: GRADES 9 and 10 Course Title Course Summary

CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY World Cultural Geography will cover the fundamental skills and tools of geography and apply them to the study of the regions of the world. Students will learn to find and identify locations on maps, understand and identify components of culture and study history to understand the cause of today’s current events. Each unit will focus on a specific region and explore its physical and cultural geography. Students will acquire the skills to effectively analyze resources, conduct research and communicate ideas and information through written and oral arguments.

Course Title Course Summary

WESTERN CIVILIZATION All sophomores, except students selected to take AP World History, take Western Civilization, a full year course designed to acquaint them with the most important concepts, characters and cultural events from early Mesopotamian societies to Italian Renaissance and the Reformation. Emphasis is put on acquiring appropriate vocabulary, perfecting essay writing and getting a good grasp of each geographic area. Each student composes a myth using Jung’s Path of the Hero as a thematic guideline.

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History Course Title Course Summary

AP WORLD HISTORY This is a full-year course designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement examination in May. AP World History emphasizes the evolution of global processes and contacts, in interaction Prerequisite: An A aver- with different types of human societies. The course builds on an understanding of cultural, instiage in Cultural Geogra- tutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, focuses primarily on the past phy and current history thousand years of the global experience. This course highlights the nature of change and continuteacher recommendaity in international frameworks, their causes and consequences. The student uses critical-thinking tion. In addition, before skills to demonstrate an understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, developments, and turning students are approved for points in world history. The course emphasizes and develops close reading, writing, and research the course, there will be skills that are necessary for success in the class. This class is only open to sophomores and replaces a review of the student’s the Western Civilization requirement. English grades, a review of the student’s overall course load, and approval by the History Department Head.

FULL YEAR HISTORY COURSES: GRADES 11 and 12 Course Title Course Summary

AMERICAN HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT SURVEY This is a full year course that fulfills the graduation requirement. It traces the history and government of the United States from Columbus to the first Gulf War and the development of the American Government system from its English origins to present day governmental problems. Social, cultural and political history will all be discussed in the course. This course is designed to prepare students for the U.S. History Achievement test. Not open to students who have credit for AP U.S. History.

Course Title Course Summary

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY This is a full-year course designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement examination given in May and fulfills the graduation requirement. It traces the history and government of Prerequisite: An A averthe United States from Columbus to the present and the development of the American Governage in Western Civiliment system from its English origins to present day governmental problems. Social, cultural and zation or B average in political history will be discussed in this course. Students who are eligible for this course should AP World History and be excellent students in history, have an outstanding work ethic, do well on standardized tests or current history teacher be recommended by their previous history teacher. Students unable to keep up with the workload recommendation. In may be moved into the regular class. Not open to students who have credit for U.S. History and addition, before students Government. are approved for the course, there will be a review of the student’s English grades, a review of the student’s overall course load, and approval by the History Department Head.

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History Course Title Course Summary

ISLAMIC STUDIES - Politics and Religion of the Middle East This full-year course will survey the strategically important region of the Middle East in the context of history, religion, culture, geography, politics, and contemporary issues. We will begin with a brief examination of Middle East history, from pre-Islamic Arabia, through the rise and spread of Islam, and the glories of the scientific and philosophical achievements of the Golden Age. The course will then focus on the region since the discovery of oil, and the role that has played in contemporary history. Issues such as pan-nationalism, the Arab-Israeli conflict, 9/11 and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, religious extremism, the politics and economics of oil, U.S. foreign policy, and issues of democratization and human rights, particularly in light of the Arab Spring, will be studied. Arabic language will also be infused into the course where relevant and necessary, and outside speakers and field trips will be included. Finally, there is the possibility of intersession or summer travel to the Middle East associated with the course.

FULL YEAR HISTORY COURSES: GRADE 12 Course Title Course Summary

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY This is a full-year course designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement examination in May. The study of European history since 1450 introduces students to cultural, economic, politiPrerequisite: An A cal, and social developments that played a fundamental role in shaping the world in which they average in prior history live. Without this knowledge, we would lack the context for understanding the development of course or B average in a contemporary institutions, the roles of continuity and change in present-day society and politics, prior AP History course and the evolution of current forms of artistic expressions and intellectual discourse. and current history In addition to providing a basic narrative of events and movements, the goals of AP European teacher recommendaHistory are to develop (a) an understanding of some of the principal themes in modern European tion. In addition, before History, (b) an ability to analyze historical evidence and historical interpretation, and (c) an abilstudents are approved ity to express historical understanding in writing. for the course, there will be a review of the student’s English grades, a review of the student’s overall course load, and approval by the History Department Head.

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History Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: An A average in prior history course or B average in a prior AP History course and current history teacher recommendation. In addition, before students are approved for the course, there will be a review of the student’s English grades, a review of the student’s overall course load, and approval by the History Department Head.

AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS This is a full-year course designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement examination in May. The AP course in Comparative Government and Politics aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes. In addition to covering the major concepts that are used to organize and interpret what we know about political phenomena and relationships, the course will cover specific countries and their governments. Beginning with the United States, six other countries form the core of the AP Comparative Government and Politics course. China, Great Britain, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia are all regularly covered in college-level introductory comparative politics courses. The inclusion of Iran adds a political system from a very important region of the world and one that is subject to distinctive political and cultural dynamics. By using these seven core countries, the course can move the discussion of concepts from abstract definition to concrete examples, noting that not all concepts will be equally useful in all country settings.

1st SEMESTER HISTORY COURSES: GRADES 11 and 12 Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: Successful completion of American History

NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY This is a one-semester course that will examine the history and culture of the Native American people of North America and South America. It will cover the pre-Columbian period up to the present day. Students must have completed American History before taking this course. The class will follow the Five Hundred Nations concept and geographic clusters. Traditions, creation myths, gender roles, art and language groups will be among the cultural topics covered. Tribal interactions, interaction with the European settlers, western movement, removal and reservation systems will be among the historical topics covered. There will be a standard print text and the traditional classroom lecture and discussion. A research project will be required. The class is designed as a history elective for seniors.

2nd SEMESTER HISTORY COURSES: GRADES 11 and 12 Course Title Course Summary

HISTORY AND CINEMA This course will examine the complex and often troubling relationship between American history and film. Students must have completed American History before taking this course. Movies are also powerful “shapers” of the way we imagine history by their portrayal of historical events – do they always tell the truth? Movies such as Amistad, Aguirre, Wrath of God, Last of the Mohicans, Citizen Kane, Birth of a Nation, Thirteen Days and We Were Soldiers will be examined in order to attempt to frame a way of approaching such movies and the difficult questions they raise, such as race, gender issues, stereotypes and war.

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History ESL HISTORY COURSES OFFERED EACH SEMESTER Course Title Course Summary

ESL U.S. HISTORY This course focuses on both the content of U.S. History from the Colonial period through the Second World War and the English language structures and functions related to the study of history. Special emphasis is placed on the history of the United States as it relates to the cultures of students represented in the class. In addition to the various periods of American history covered, students will develop reading strategies as well as basic research, note-taking, and writing skills necessary for work in subsequent non-ESL history classes.

Course Title Course Summary

ESL WORLD HISTORY This course focuses on both the content of world history including the study of European, Middle Eastern and Asian civilizations and the English language structures and functions related to the study of history. In addition to the various great civilizations covered, students will develop vocabulary and reading strategies as well as basic research, note-taking and writing skills necessary for work in subsequent non-ESL history classes.

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Mathematics MATHEMATICS COURSES Students are required to take three years of mathematics while in the Upper School. We strongly encourage, but do not require, a fourth year of mathematics. A student’s math sequence will build on the courses taken prior to 9th grade (and as determined by placement testing, the recommendation of the middle school mathematics teacher, and prerequisites indicated below), following the sequence of Algebra I, Geometry or Algebra/Geometry, and Algebra II. After Algebra II, students may choose an elective path.

FULL-YEAR MATHEMATICS COURSES Course Title Course Summary

ALGEBRA I The primary goal of Algebra I is to master the linear function: graphing lines and solving linear equations. In reaching this goal the students acquire skills in simplifying Prerequisite: Mastery of operations algebraic expressions, using formulas, and problem solving. The students are given a with decimals, fractions, percents, foundation for more advanced work in mathematics by learning how to perform basic and signed numbers. Successful operations on polynomials and doing some elementary probability and statistics. completion of a pre-Algebra course Required: A scientific calculator required; TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is recomwhich covers formulas for perimeter, mended. area and volume, units of measurement, the concept of a variable, order of operations, scientific notation, solving simple equations and proportions, graphing in the coordinate plane and problem solving skills.

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Mathematics Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I and permission of the Mathematics Department.

Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: A grade of B or higher in Algebra I and permission of the Mathematics Department.

INTEGRATED GEOMETRY This course will continue to develop students’ algebra skills while also exposing them to the fundamental concepts of geometry. Students will expand their understanding of the following algebraic concepts: linear and quadratic functions, systems of equations, inequalities, exponents and exponential functions, polynomial functions and factoring, and rational functions. In addition to strengthening students’ algebraic background, they will also study the following geometric concepts: ratio and proportion, similar and congruent triangles, right triangles, area and volume, parallel lines, polygons, circles, and constructions. Required: A TI-84 Plus graphing calculator. GEOMETRY B Students will study the following topics: perpendicular and parallel lines and planes, angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles, geometric solids and coordinate geometry in two and three dimensions. Students will review finding area, surface area, volume and the Pythagorean Theorem. The relationships of congruence and similarity will be studied extensively. Students will be required to write formal deductive proofs of geometric theorems. Algebra will be integrated into the homework problems as a preparation for Algebra II and Pre-Calculus. Required: A scientific calculator required; TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is recommended.

Course Title Course Summary

ALGEBRA II Algebra II continues and solidifies the topics introduced in Algebra I. In addition, the following topics will be studied: direct and inverse variation, linear equations and Prerequisite: A passing grade in systems, quadratics, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and rational functions, and Geometry A or B, and permission of matrices. the Mathematics Department. Required: TI-84 Plus graphing calculator. Course Title Course Summary

ALGEBRA II/TRIGONOMETRY The Algebra II/Trigonometry course will cover all the topics of the Algebra II course as well as several areas of Trigonometry, including right triangle trigonometry, laws Prerequisite: A grade of A- or higher of sines and cosines, graphing, and periodic motion. This course is intended to be a in Algebra I or a grade of B or higher rigorous and comprehensive study of Algebra II and its related topics. in Advanced Algebra I, a grade of B Required: TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. or higher in Geometry B, and permission of the Mathematics Department. Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: A grade of B- or better in Algebra II/Trigonometry or a grade of B or better in Algebra II and permission of the Mathematics Department.

PRE-CALCULUS This course includes the study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their use as mathematical models. Transformation of functions is a major focus of this course. Other topics include writing proofs for trigonometric identities and complex numbers. If time permits, additional topics such as sequences and series, probability and matrices will be studied. Required: TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required.

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Mathematics Course Title Course Summary

ADVANCED PRE-CALCULUS This course includes the study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their graphs. Other topics include the study of trigonoPrerequisite: A grade of A- or better in metric identities, vectors, polar coordinates, sequences, series, and limits. This course Algebra II/Trigonometry and permis- is intended to be a rigorous and comprehensive study of Pre-calculus and prepare sion of the Mathematics Department. students for Advanced Placement Calculus. Required: TI-84 Plus graphing calculator is required. Course Title Course Summary

CALCULUS This is a one year, non-AP calculus course that covers approximately 70% of an AP AB curriculum. The course focuses on applications of the first and second derivatives Prerequisite: B- grade in Pre-Calculus with applications in biology, social sciences and economics using a graphical apor C in Advanced Pre-Calculus and proach. A one semester college textbook has been chosen for this two-semester high teacher recommendation. school course. Students will review the fundamentals of functions and their graphs in the first quarter; methods of differentiation in the second quarter; curve sketching using derivatives and differentiation of transcendental functions in the third quarter; integral calculus in the fourth quarter. Required: TI-84 calculator Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: A grade of A- or better in Pre-Calculus or a grade of B or better in Advanced Pre-Calculus and permission of the Mathematics Department. Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: A grade of B+ or better in Advanced Pre-Calculus and permission of the Mathematics Department.

AP CALCULUS AB This course follows the Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB syllabus: a study of limits, differentiation and integration of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, and their application to maxima-minima problems, related rates, and calculating areas and volumes. Students completing this course will be expected to take the AP Calculus AB examination. Required: TI-84 Plus graphing calculator.

CALCULUS AB/BC (AP CALCULUS BC) This course follows the Advanced Placement Calculus BC syllabus: a study of limits, differentiation and integration of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, and their application to maxima-minima problems, related rates, calculating areas and volumes, techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and their applications. This course covers the same concepts as the AP Calculus AB and the semester Calculus BC courses, but in a single school year. Students completing this course will be expected to take the AP Calculus BC examination.

Course Title Course Summary

AP CALCULUS BC This course builds upon the material learned in AP Calculus AB. The students will learn the remaining material in the AP Calculus BC curriculum, which includes Prerequisite: A grade of B or better in techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, infinite series, and AP Calculus AB and permission of the calculus of parametric, polar, and vector functions. Additional topics may include the Mathematics Department. surfaces in three dimensions, partial differentiation, and multiple integrals. Students completing this course will be expected to take the AP Calculus BC examination.

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Mathematics Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: A grade of B+ or better in Finance or Probability and Statistics OR a grade of B- or better in Pre-Calculus. A grade of C or better in the student’s most recent English course and permission of the Mathematics Department. Additionally, ISP students who sign up for AP Statistics must be in mainstream English and must have the recommendation of the ISP program head.

STATISTICS (AP) This course is a non-Calculus-based introductory course in statistics. Students planning collegiate studies in the physical or social sciences should consider taking this course. The course focuses on four conceptual themes: exploring data, planning a study, anticipating patterns, and inference. Students will also be introduced to selected topics in discrete mathematics. Students who take this course will be expected to take the Advanced Placement Statistics examination. Required: TI-84 Plus graphing calculator.

1ST SEMESTER MATHEMATICS COURSES Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II or Algebra II/Trigonometry

FINANCE This course is an introduction to financial planning and management. Topics include savings and investment, loans and mortgages, taxes, insurance, and credit management with emphasis on practical applications. Financial decision making will be highlighted via projects exploring the concepts introduced in class.

2ND SEMESTER MATHEMATICS COURSES Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II or Algebra II/Trigonometry

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS This course is an introduction to the concepts and methods of statistics and probability. Topics include data analysis, the Normal model, sampling, experimental design, the Law of Large Numbers, probability rules, and probability models. Students will be encouraged to improve their abilities to problem solve and think independently as well as make connections to real world experiences.

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Science SCIENCE COURSES Three years of science are required for graduation, at least one year of which must be a physical science and one year a biological science. A fourth year of science is recommended, particularly for students considering selective colleges and/or a college major in science, engineering, medicine, or related fields. Many science courses have mathematics prerequisites, and some have science prerequisites as well.

FULL-YEAR SCIENCE COURSES Course Title Course Summary

BIOLOGY This course covers learning and the brain, neuro-anatomy, methods of biology, chemistry of life, cell structure and processes, energetics, genetics, DNA science, molecular biology, botany, evolution, organism diversity and ecological relationships. Students develop observational and analytical skills through regular inquiry. Students use biotechnology and other modern methods to investigate problems in Biology. Students have the opportunity to conduct several long-term projects or research studies throughout the year. This course meets the biological science requirement.

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Science Course Title Course Summary

ADVANCED BIOLOGY: Anatomy and Physiology The Advanced Biology course is an investigation into the anatomy and physiology of the human body, with an emphasis on homeostasis. Students conduct a variety of laboratory investigations into the organization of the human body, the cell and Prerequisites: Successful completion of both Biology and Chemistry or molecular basis of life, and the structure and function of each of the body systems. the permission of the Science Depart- Laboratory work includes a few dissections, including the sheep brain, the pig heart, ment. the cow eye, and either a cat or fetal pig. This course meets the biological science requirement. Course Title Course Summary

CHEMISTRY Chemistry includes studies of the atom, elements, compounds, and theories explaining their behavior. After studying the foundational aspects of Chemistry, investigaPrerequisite: A grade of B in Algebra I tion of various topics of Chemistry is undertaken, such as Kinetics, Equilibrium and or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II. Acids and Bases. Laboratory work is an integral part of the course. This course meets the physical science requirement. Course Title Course Summary

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE This Junior/Senior level course is designed to be the equivalent of a one-semester introductory college course in environmental science. The goals of this course are to Prerequisites: Successful completion of provide students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required both Biology and Chemistry, a grade to understand the interrelationships of the natural world; to identify and analyze of B+ in the most recently completed both natural and human-made environmental problems; and to examine alternative science course, or permission of the solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. This rigorous course involves classScience Department. room instruction as well as laboratory and field investigation and an independent project. This course meets the biological science requirement. Course Title Course Summary

AP CHEMISTRY (ADVANCED CHEMISTRY) This course is an advanced level Chemistry course with the purpose of preparing students for taking the AP Chemistry examination. As such, the course is fast-paced Prerequisites: Successful completion of and challenging, covering material covered in the first year Chemistry course (but Chemistry with at least a grade of B+, in greater depth, and with more mathematical sophistication), as well as material completion of or concurrent enrollnot covered in the first year. In addition to regular class days and labs, there are four ment in Pre-Calculus, or permission required AP Lab Saturdays during the year, where the class meets for three hours of the instructor. during the day and does experiments. The course will be offered if there is sufficient demand. This course meets the physical science requirement. Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite/co-requisite: Pre-Calculus.

PHYSICS This conceptually and mathematically rigorous course focuses on the fundamentals of classical mechanics, electromagnetism, optics, and light. Students will study motion, forces, projectile motion, energy, and momentum in the fall term. The spring term focuses on rotational motion, gravitation, electricity and magnetism, light and optics. Physics is an appropriate course for those with strong problem solving skills and a comfort with trigonometry, formulating algebraic expressions and solving for unknowns. The class also involves precision writing of explanations of physical phenomena. Laboratory activities, demonstrations, word problems, and short essay writing are integral parts of the class. Before taking this class students must either know basic trigonometry, or be willing to do the extra work to learn it in the first few weeks of school. This course meets the physical science requirement. 29


Science Course Title Course Summary

CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS This course focuses on physical science in a broad sense by undertaking a series of projects in basic physics (e.g. rockets and propulsion systems) and engineering (structures and bridge building). The curriculum is heavily oriented toward a series of labs or projects supplemented by lecture, discussion, and reference work. The goal of the class is to provide students with a firm conceptual foundation in scientific processes and content and is a preparation for any higher-level classes in the Science Department. Conceptual Physics is not open to students who have received credit for Physics. This course meets the physical science requirement.

Course Title Course Summary

AP PHYSICS This conceptually and mathematically rigorous course focuses on the fundamentals of classical mechanics, and as a one-year course, will prepare students for the AP Physics C Mechanics test. Students will study motion, forces, projectile motion, energy, momentum, rotational motion, gravitation and oscillation and waves. AP Physics is an appropriate course for those students with strong problem solving skills and at least concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus AB or higher. The class also involves precision writing of explanations of physical phenomena. Laboratory activities, demonstrations, word problems, and short essay writing are integral parts of the class. This course meets the physical science requirement.

Prerequisite/co-requisite: AP Calculus AB.

Course Title Course Summary

ADVANCED PROJECTS IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING I This interdisciplinary class aims to teach the skills necessary for future entry in STEM competitions or internships. Students will learn about project management while Prerequisites: Students who enroll in completing four quarter long projects exploring different aspects of STEM mostly Advanced Projects in Science and focused on Engineering. Sample project topics may include a drafting project, a Engineering I must have successfully programming or robotics project, a mechanical design project and an electrical design completed or be co-enrolled in Biol- project. The class will introduce students to concepts of system level project design ogy, Chemistry, and a course in Phys- and teach them the skills required to manage a project including time management, ics (Conceptual Physics, Physics, or budgeting and task delegation. The class will also teach specific skills useful in these AP Physics), with a grade of at least B projects such as CAD, Intro Level Programming, and presentation design. Grading in the most recent course and/or the will be based on successfully meeting class and project requirements, on successfully approval of the Science Department. completing those projects. Students will be encouraged to enter a local competition such as Odyssey of the Mind. Course Title Course Summary

ADVANCED PROJECTS IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING II This is a largely self-directed and interdisciplinary class aimed at teaching students the skills necessary to successfully complete a project for a national science fair or compePrerequisites: Students who enroll in tition, while giving them time and access to work on said project. Students will focus Advanced Projects in Science and on one self-determined project with the aim of entering it into a nationally recogEngineering II must have successfully nized competition or conference. The class will reinforce the concepts of system level completed or be co-enrolled in Biol- project design and project management; including time management, budgeting and ogy, Chemistry, and a course in Phys- task delegation. The class will focus on communicating ideas through written and ics (Conceptual Physics, Physics, or oral presentations and reports. The class will be aimed at upperclassmen interested in AP Physics) with a grade of at least B completing projects. Grading will be based on successfully meeting class and project in the most recent course, or have the requirements, on successfully completing the chosen project, and on competing in a approval of the Science Department local, state or national competition.

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Science 1ST SEMESTER SCIENCE COURSES Course Title Course Summary

BIOETHICS This semester-long course explores a wide range of topics related to ethical issues in medical sciences and technology. Topics may include cloning, genetic screening, organ transplantation, new reproductive technologies, The Human Genome Project, gene therapy, fetal tissue transplantation, AIDS, euthanasia, health care issues and environmental issues. Students have input into which particular topics are considered. Course curricula may include case studies, debate, panel discussions, writing position papers, role-play, journal writing and student led seminars. This science elective is open to students in grades 11-12.

Course Title Course Summary

ASTRONOMY AND METEOROLOGY This course is the first semester of a year-long sequence. It is recommended that students take the two semesters in the same year, but the courses may be taken out of sequence over two years. Students will study the Earth’s place in the Universe and Solar System, including Cosmology, Stellar Astronomy, Planetary Astronomy, Season, Earth’s Atmosphere, and Weather. Astronomy and Meteorology and Geology together meet the Physical Science requirement.

Prerequisites: Must have completed

one full year of Upper School science, and either completed or be concurrently enrolled in Geometry.

2ND SEMESTER SCIENCE COURSES Course Title Course Summary Prerequisites: Must have completed one full year of Upper School science, and either completion of or concurrently enrolled in Geometry; Astronomy and Meteorology is recommended but not needed to take Geology.

GEOLOGY This course follows Astronomy and Meteorology. It is recommended that students take the two semesters in the same year, but Astronomy and Meteorology does not need to be completed to enroll in Geology. Students will study the Geology of the Earth as a system, including: plate tectonics, geologic age, rock and mineral identification, and erosional forces. Astronomy and Meteorology and Geology together meet the Physical Science requirement.

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Science 1ST SEMESTER ESL SCIENCE COURSE Course Title Course Summary

ESL SCIENCE I This course focuses on both the content of physical and biological sciences and the English language structures and functions related to the study of science. Science concepts and relationships serve as a vehicle for students to learn the language of observation, identification, description, definition, and experimental investigation. Through scientific inquiry, students learn the language of classification, comparison, measurement, inference, and hypothesizing necessary for work in subsequent nonESL science classes. ESL Science I and ESL Science II together meet the biological science requirement.

2ND SEMESTER ESL SCIENCE COURSE Course Title Course Summary

ESL SCIENCE II This course is a continuation of ESL Science I. ESL Science I and ESL Science II together meet the biological science requirement.

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Global Languages GLOBAL LANGUAGE COURSES Students are required to take at least three years (levels) of the same global language throughout high school for graduation. Where applicable, typically students enter the language sequence in 9th grade at the level indicated by middle school instruction, placement testing and interviews, as well as the recommendation of the middle school teacher. Students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory proficiency (C- or better) in order to advance to the next level course. The global language requirement is waived for ESL students. All global language courses are year-long courses.

CHINESE (MANDARIN) Course Title Course Summary

CHINESE (MANDARIN) I: Foundations 1 The first year course provides an introduction to the basics of grammar and vocabulary with an emphasis on developing proficiency in speaking and listening as well as reading and writing and basic facts about China. Pronunciation and communication skills on daily topics are emphasized. Activities include: simple conversations, short compositions, games, interviews, oral presentations and skits. Students develop cultural awareness through authentic materials, including video and audio recordings, as well as websites, magazines and newspapers.

Course Title Course Summary

CHINESE (MANDARIN) II: Foundations 2 The second year continues to expand upon grammatical concepts, build vocabulary and develop communicative skills via approaches similar to those used in the first year. The student should develop greater competence in listening and speaking skills through increased exposure to and involvement in everyday situations in the language. Additionally, students acquire increased proficiency in reading by the study of uncomplicated texts. They also work on developing writing skills in the language by completion of various writing (and occasionally translation) assignments. 33


Global Languages Course Title Course Summary

CHINESE (MANDARIN) III: Intermediate 1 More able to handle non-complex situations and familiar topics, the third year Chinese (Mandarin) student delves deeper into learning more communicative structures and vocabulary expressions, including compound phrases for both oral and written communication. Students explore more non-complex listening and reading texts such as short articles and news stories. Pronunciation accuracy, grammar accuracy, character writing skills and practical writing tasks will be increasingly emphasized. More fluent expression is encouraged through presentation, discussion, and assigned composition topics. Students continue to make comparisons with the language and culture studied.

FRENCH Course Title Course Summary

FRENCH I: Foundations of Syntax The first year course provides an introduction to the basics of grammar and vocabulary with an emphasis on developing proficiency in speaking and listening as well as reading and writing. Activities include: simple conversations, compositions, games, interviews, oral presentations and skits. Students develop cultural awareness through authentic materials, including video and audio recordings, as well as websites, magazines and newspapers.

Course Title Course Summary

FRENCH II: Intermediate Proficiency The second level continues to expand upon grammatical concepts, build vocabulary and develop communicative skills via approaches similar to those used at the first level. The student should develop greater competence in listening and speaking skills through increased exposure to and involvement in everyday situations in the language. Additionally, students acquire increased proficiency in reading by the study of uncomplicated, but challenging texts. They also work on developing writing skills in the language by completion of various writing (and occasionally translation) assignments.

Course Title Course Summary

FRENCH III: Advanced Grammatical Concepts Level III combines a review of essential grammatical structures, especially verb tenses, with an introduction to the finer points of the language. Reading matter is more sophisticated and may include short stories, novellas, essays, and articles. These provide the basis for class discussion and conversation in the target language. More fluent expression is encouraged through discussion, debate, assigned composition topics, and comparison of resulting texts.

Course Title Course Summary

FRENCH IV: History & Literature This comprehensive course addresses the needs of those students who may or may not plan to pursue Advanced Placement programs by means of a literary systematic approach to history, philosophies, social behavior and political thought. Students are encouraged to explore, enjoy and discuss many works considered to be masterpieces of world literature in their original language. Literary genres presented include poetry, short stories, drama and essays. Selections are complemented with comprehension and grammar exercises, pertinent vocabulary, presentations, film studies and composition activities. 34


Global Languages Course Title Course Summary

AP FRENCH LANGUAGE & CULTURE The basis of this course is preparation for the College Board’s national standard Advanced Placement exam taken in May each year, which students are expected to take. This curriculum incorporates a thematic framework built around meaningful contexts by way of authentic reading and listening activities aligned with the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century – Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities – that promotes Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational modes of communication in both speaking and writing, as well as an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives.

SPANISH Course Title Course Summary

SPANISH I: Foundations of Syntax The first year course provides an introduction to the basics of grammar and vocabulary with an emphasis on developing proficiency in speaking and listening as well as reading and writing. Activities include: simple conversations, compositions, games, interviews, oral presentations and skits. Students develop cultural awareness through authentic materials, including video and audio recordings, as well as websites, magazines and newspapers.

Course Title Course Summary

SPANISH II: Intermediate Proficiency The second level continues to expand upon grammatical concepts, build vocabulary and develop communicative skills via approaches similar to those used at the first level. The student should develop greater competence in listening and speaking skills through increased exposure to and involvement in everyday situations in the language. Additionally, students acquire increased proficiency in reading by the study of uncomplicated, but challenging texts. They also work on developing writing skills in the language by completion of various writing (and occasionally translation) assignments.

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Global Languages Course Title Course Summary

SPANISH III: Advanced Grammatical Concepts Level III combines a review of essential grammatical structures, especially verb tenses, with an introduction to the finer points of the language. Reading matter is more sophisticated and may include short stories, novellas, essays, and articles. These provide the basis for class discussion and conversation in the target language. More fluent expression is encouraged through discussion, debate, assigned composition topics, and comparison of resulting texts.

Course Title Course Summary

SPANISH IV: History & Literature This comprehensive course addresses the needs of those students who may or may not plan to pursue Advanced Placement programs by means of a literary approach to history, geography, social behavior and culture. Students study specific regions of the Spanish speaking world in depth, analyzing historical influences and authentic texts. Literary genres presented include newspaper articles, poetry, short stories, drama and essays. Selections are complemented with comprehension and grammar exercises, pertinent vocabulary, presentations, and composition activities.

Course Title Course Summary

AP SPANISH LANGUAGE & CULTURE The basis of this course is preparation for the College Board’s national standard Advanced Placement exam taken in May each year, which students are expected to take. This curriculum incorporates a thematic framework built around meaningful contexts by way of authentic reading and listening activities aligned with the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century – Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities – that promotes Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational modes of communication in both speaking and writing, as well as an awareness and appreciation of cultural products, practices, and perspectives.

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Arts ARTS COURSES Students are required to take three years (six semesters) of arts for graduation, including Arts and Ideas I and II. Students are encouraged to take arts courses in both performing arts & studio arts. Students may take the same art course in multiple years to gain additional mastery. The graduation requirement for students entering the school in their junior or senior year shall be determined based on the arts credits that transfer from their previous school. Any junior or senior entering the school with no transferable arts credit will be required to take a minimum of two arts credits (4 semesters including Arts & Ideas I & II) for juniors and Arts & Ideas I & II for seniors.

FULL-YEAR ARTS COURSES Course Title Course Summary

YEARBOOK Students will learn the basics of page layout and design and apply these skills in the creation of the school’s yearbook. Along with the Jostens Year Tech plug-ins, we will be using Photoshop to digitally enhance electronic photos and images that will be placed on the pages. We will cover design, typography, and layout skills, as well as digital photography and optimizing high-resolution images for print publication. Students must have the maturity to work independently and responsibly.

Course Title Course Summary

MUSIC THEORY (AP) This course will introduce the students to the craft of harmonic music writing and analysis on a rigorous, individualized level. While the primary goal is to cover instructional material in preparation for the AP Music Theory examination given in May, there are no prerequisites for enrollment; beginners as well as accomplished music students alike are welcome to take this course. Taking the AP examination will be optional and students will work at their own pace and progress as mastery of material is accomplished.

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Arts ARTS COURSES OFFERED EACH SEMESTER Course Title Course Summary

CERAMICS This studio course provides an introduction to the potter’s wheel; wedging, centering, opening, throwing, shaping, recentering, trimming, drying, and glazing. Handbuilding and decorating will also be covered.

Course Title Course Summary

HANDBELLS Handbell ringing is the ideal medium to develop excellent music reading and performance skills, regardless of past experience. Any student may enroll, as classroom rehearsal experience is all that is necessary for success in this course as we work towards several public performances throughout the year.

Course Title Course Summary

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC (Orchestra) Any student with a good playing proficiency on an instrument is encouraged to enroll in Instrumental Music. Whether the interest is jazz, rock, or classical, this class will give students the opportunity to work in small ensembles each day in preparation for several performance opportunities throughout the year.

Course Title Course Summary

MODERN DANCE (mixed levels) No dance experience is necessary for this co-ed performing arts course. Technique study will draw from various sources including Graham, Cunningham, Limon, and Hawkins. Composition will be solo work or appropriate level. Improvisation elements will be experimental with an emphasis on fun. Participation will require evening and weekend rehearsals as the performance dates approach.

Course Title Course Summary

ADVANCED MODERN DANCE This class will offer students an opportunity to continue dance studies at the next level. Students with an established knowledge of technique will explore more difficult Modern Dance styles, such as Horton and Dunham. There will be a greater emphasis on principles of alignment, transitions, and expression. Class material will also include studying the current Modern Dance scene, level II partnering and choreography. The class will aim to model a dance company and perform repertoire. Participation will require evening and weekend rehearsals as the performance dates approach.

Prerequisite: Modern Dance I and II or consent of instructor.

Course Title Course Summary

PHOTOGRAPHY This course offers students the experience to learn photography skills from the dark room to the digital lab. Working with film and digital media, students will learn the fundamentals of photography including film development, photo composition, and dark room techniques. As the course progresses we will shift our focus to digital development, photo editing, image management, and the use of professional level software tools. The expectation is that students will learn how to design and produce materials for a range of applications. Each student will build a portfolio of their work over the term culminating in a art show at the end of the course.

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Arts Course Title Course Summary

WEAVING AND FIBERS This course will explore the use of the four harness floor loom. Students will warp a loom and weave a sampler, which will expose them to a variety of weaves. Next they will plan and measure a project of their choice. This class will also explore various fibers, colors, textures and weaving patterns. Students can weave as many projects as time will allow. Students are encouraged to enter their finished projects at the Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival in May.

Course Title Course Summary

WOODWORKING This class is designed to give students the opportunity to develop good basic woodworking skills and to enjoy the pleasures of creating projects primarily made out of wood. Students will learn to identify and use various traditional hand tools and power tools. Each student will design and construct projects utilizing woodworking techniques covered in the course. No prior woodworking experience is necessary.

Course Title Course Summary

STAGECRAFT Students will develop technical theatre knowledge relating to lighting, sets, sound and costumes through hands-on experience. All students will be required to actively participate in the preparation and running crews of school performances.

1ST SEMESTER ARTS COURSES Course Title Course Summary

ARTS AND IDEAS I This one-half credit, semester course will explore the development of the arts from the fall of Rome to the dawn of the 19th century. Primary focus will center on the artistic trends and styles of western culture in this survey course. Significant study will also be devoted, however, to the parallels and contrasts found in the arts of various other world cultures including: Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Americas. Successful completion of both Arts and Ideas I and II is required for graduation. This academic course is recommended for Juniors and Seniors only.

Course Title Course Summary

CHORUS Any student may take Chorus. Students are expected to participate in performances. However, they need not be accomplished singers, they just need to attend and try their best. The chorus performs at school assemblies, Friends House and other places at various times during the semester, including the holidays.

Course Title Course Summary

VIDEO PRODUCTION/ONE ACTS This course will give students the opportunity to study acting techniques and compare elements of video and theatrical productions. Students will learn about and develop basic acting techniques through monologue work, scene study and improvisation exercises. Students will also work with a student run crew to create and direct a one act play or an original video production. This is a one-semester course.

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Arts Course Title Course Summary

STUDIO ART I This course will focus on helping students to develop a hands-on understanding of the visual language and to experience the processes of making art. It starts with academic observational drawing and moves through various mediums to conceptual multi-media work based on contemporary art. The assignments are individualized after the in-class observational drawing project. This allows each student to explore aspects of visual art at his or her own pace. The course includes in-class projects, homework, journal, and an at-home semester project in lieu of exam. All students 9th through 12th grade and all levels of ability are welcome.

Course Title Course Summary

ADVANCED STUDIO ART I This is a fall semester course with three levels of visual language and technical skills for serious art students. It covers basic design, visual language, drawing, painting and personal exploration. This course can be taken twice. It is an accelerated version of Studio Art I. Advance Studio Art was created for students who are serious about developing seeing with all their senses and expressing ideas, feelings and experiences using physical material. It will give each student the space and time to explore the uses of visual language and the technical skills needed to create a portfolio for art colleges and liberal arts colleges with quality visual arts departments. This course will be offered every other year. Studio Art I or II is suggested as a pre-requisite.

Course Title Course Summary

THEATRE I This course is offered first semester only and gives students the opportunity to develop acting, public speaking, and general communication skills through theatre games and exercises. A “process centered� curriculum will be used to help students develop internal and external resources, create theatre through artistic collaboration, relate theatre to its social context, and form aesthetic judgments. Students will learn a sequential approach to analyzing and performing scripted text. Pantomime, improvisation, audition monologues, scene study, and short one-acts are some of the fun drama activities that will be used to build confidence and facilitate self-exploration and expression. No previous acting experience is required to take this course. It is strongly recommended for students who are considering a theatre major in college and/or students who wish to take the Play Production or Musical Production class second semester.

2ND SEMESTER ARTS COURSES Course Title Course Summary Prerequisite: Arts and Ideas I

ARTS AND IDEAS II This one-half credit, semester course will explore the development of the arts from the 19th century to the present. Primary focus will center on the artistic trends and styles of western culture in this survey course. Significant study will also be devoted, however, to the parallels and contrast found in the arts of various other world cultures including: Asia, Africa, the Middle East and the Americas. Successful completion of both Arts and Ideas I and II is required for graduation. This academic course is recommended for Juniors and Seniors only.

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Arts Course Title Course Summary

PLAY PRODUCTION This course will give students the opportunity to experience the process of developing and producing a theatrical performance. The main focus of this course will be the rehearsal process and performance of the Upper School play. Students will also learn about and develop acting Prerequisite: Only students who have previous- techniques through monologue work, scene study, and improvisation exercises as preparation for the production rehearsal process. Only students who have previously taken Drama-Video Prod./ ly taken Drama-Video Prod./One Acts may sign One Acts may sign up for this course, unless otherwise approved by the teacher. Participation will up for this course, unless require evening and weekend rehearsals as the performance dates approach. otherwise approved by the teacher. Course Title Course Summary

MUSICAL PRODUCTION The annual Sandy Spring musical is a full-length, staged production that culminates several months of musical and dramatic rehearsal. While students have the opportunity to audition for lead roles, the work selected each year clearly focuses on the chorus as the primary dramatic force. No audition is required for participation in the chorus. All are welcome and encouraged to participate. Participation will require evening and weekend rehearsals as the performance dates approach.

Course Title Course Summary

STUDIO ART II This course will continue to build upon skills and ideas developed in the Studio Art I course. Students will be encouraged to express themselves through the visual language, create original solutions to projects and to invent projects that help to deepen each student’s abilities and interests. The course includes in-class projects, homework, journal and an at-home semester project in lieu of exam. Prerequisite: Studio Art I course or consent of instructor.

Prerequisite: Studio Art I course or consent of instructor. Course Title Course Summary

ADVANCED STUDIO ART II This is a spring semester course with three levels of visual language and technical skills for serious art students. It covers printmaking, paper constructions and personal exploration. This course is a continuation of Advance Studio Art I and can be taken twice. It is an accelerated version of Studio Art II. Advance Studio Art was created for students who are serious about developing seeing with all their senses and expressing ideas, feelings and experiences using physical material. It will give each student the space and time to explore the uses of visual language and the technical skills needed to create a portfolio for art colleges and liberal arts colleges with quality visual arts departments. This course will be offered every other year. Studio Art I or II is suggested as a pre-requisite.

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Electives ELECTIVES Elective courses are those courses which do not fit neatly into a particular academic department, but may be taken for graduation credit. These courses, or any other upper level course in a department, may be used to fulfill the “elective credit� requirement for graduation.

ELECTIVE COURSES OFFERED EACH SEMESTER Course Title Course Summary

GRAMMAR WRITING WORKSHOP In this semester-long ESL course, students work with their instructor to design an independent study program focusing primarily on improving their writing skills and increasing their use of English grammar. Students also have the option of using this course for TOEFL/SAT I preparation on a limited basis. Students will keep logs of their work and progress, and write several selfevaluations throughout the course. This class is open to all international students and is a concurrent requirement to support the transition of all international students entering non-ESL English or History courses for the first time.

Course Title Course Summary

SELECT SEMINAR ON GLOBAL PEACE AND JUSTICE The Select Seminar on Global Peace and Justice will provide a small, college-like setting for the inspired teaching and learning of historic and contemporary approaches to peaceful social change, conflict resolution and justice initiatives. The Seminar will provide an academically enriched cross-curricular approach to teach students the role of Quaker faith and practice, as well as other compatible beliefs, in efforts and movements around the world to promote global peace and justice in the pursuit of a more sustainable future. Students in this seminar will not only learn of historical and contemporary actions taken by Quakers and others, but they will be expected to pursue leadership opportunities and plan and participate in their own community service related initiatives to support the pursuit of global peace and justice. Five themes that will recur throughout the course are: applied Quakerism, inter-cultural communication, globalization in education, critical thinking, reading, writing and speaking, and experiential learning.

Prerequisite: Students must apply to this program. Acceptance into the program is not guaranteed.

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Electives Course Title Course Summary

MODEL U.N. The course focuses on preparation for participation in a Model United Nations conference. The conference includes a simulation of the United Nations and related organizations. Students prepare for the conference by researching issues and countries, writing and editing position papers, Prerequisite: The class is open to 10th, 11th, and attending mandatory lunch meetings, and practicing speeches and debates. This is a two semester 12th graders. 9th graders course. Students must sign up for both semesters. Mandatory Model U.N. meetings will take may be admitted if they place weekly during designated lunch periods. This class is graded on a Pass/Fail grading scale. participated in Middle Full attendance at the conference and completion of a position paper is mandatory to pass this School MUM and with class. This class will be capped at 20 students. Each student must submit an application to be adthe recommendation of mitted into the class. All students enrolled in the course are required to attend and participate the MS Moderator. fully in the conference – which requires additional expenses (generally $600-$700). Scholarships may be available.

1ST SEMESTER ELECTIVE COURSES Course Title Course Summary

QUAKERISM Required for students new to Sandy Spring Friends School in 10th, 11th and 12th grade during the first semester. Open as an elective for 10th, 11th and 12th grade returning students. See description under Religion/Service.

Course Title Course Summary

AMERICAN CULTURE I This semester-long course is open to all students. The course is designed to help international students to better acculturate to life in the United States. It will help American students to better understand the nature of the American character and how Americans are perceived by other cultures around the world. The class seeks to help students understand what core American values are, where they come from and how they are realized here at Sandy Spring Friends School and in contemporary American society. Students will explore American culture through assigned readings, film, class discussion, surveys, presentations and several papers. This course, along with American Culture II, is a requirement for all new international students. Both courses are highly recommended for American students interested in pursuing the study of foreign languages and travel and/or study abroad.

Course Title Course Summary

NEWSPAPER I Students new to this course will learn the fundamentals of journalism and contemporary media. All students will work on articles, take photographs, and design pages for the student newspaper, The Gnus. The Gnus is a student forum, and students interested in telling the stories of their community and making a difference at Sandy Spring Friends School are encouraged to join. All levels of experience are welcome.

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Electives 2ND SEMESTER ELECTIVE COURSES Course Title Course Summary

AMERICAN CULTURE II This semester-long course is open to all students. The course is designed to help international students better acculturate to life in the United States and at Sandy Spring Friends School. It offers American students an opportunity to better understand the nature of their character and how they are perceived by other cultures around the world. American Culture II focuses on the assimilation of different groups into American culture and how both Americans and immigrant groups have been affected. It will then explore skills and strategies that individuals can use to smooth the path across cultures. Through exercises and activities similar to those used in American Culture I, this course will focus on learning what acculturation means, how the process of acculturation works and what strategies can be employed to make crossing cultures a positive, productive and enriching experience. American Culture II, along with American Culture I, is a requirement for all new international students. Both courses are highly recommended for American students interested in pursuing the study of foreign languages and future travel and/or study abroad.

Course Title Course Summary

NEWSPAPER II See description under NEWSPAPER I.

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Religion/Service RELIGION/SERVICE

Course Title Course Summary

QUAKERISM Quakerism is a one-semester course required of students who enter SSFS Upper School after the 9th grade. It is also an elective course open to all Upper School students. This course introduces students to the special history, traditions, practices, and beliefs of Quakers, as a foundation for participation in the life of the SSFS community. The course also explores a range of human religious beliefs and traditions in an accepting and exploratory way, and the class assists students in exploring their own religious traditions and beliefs. Quakerism provides students an opportunity to learn more about the religious traditions and beliefs of others, and it helps students understand religion as a historically, culturally, and psychologically significant aspect of human life. This course is not an attempt to convert students to (or from) any particular religious belief or organization, including The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers). There are no prerequisites for this class.

Course Title Course Summary

COMMUNITY SERVICE/STEWARDSHIP REQUIREMENT The purpose of the community service program at Sandy Spring Friends School is to respond to the needs of others and to thereby enrich the school community and the lives of its members. Every Upper School student is expected to perform a combination of community service to those outside the school community and stewardship to the Sandy Spring Friends School community. The graduation requirement is a minimum of 50 hours of community service, 30 hours of stewardship plus completion of a community service intersession involving at least 20 hours of service. This 100 hour requirement is pro-rated for students entering the Upper School after the freshman year. Those entering as a sophomore are required to complete 40 hours of community service and 22.5 hours of stewardship in addition to their community service intersession. Those entering as a junior are required to complete 25 hours of community service and 15 hours of stewardship in addition to their community service intersession. Seniors are not permitted to begin their second semester classes if they have not completed the community service requirement. Stewardship hours may not be used to fulfill the community service requirement. However, any community service that goes beyond 50 hours may be applied to the stewardship requirement.

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International Student Program INTERNATIONAL STUDENT PROGRAM Students who come to Sandy Spring Friends School from overseas are part of the International Student Program (ISP). The ISP includes academic and non-academic requirements, including meetings, trips, and other special activities. Students who are developing proficiency in English as non-native speakers are enrolled in English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) courses, based on current proficiency. Students must demonstrate proficiency at each level in order to advance to the next level of ESL class or to be allowed to take “mainstream� classes in that academic department.

ESL ENGLISH COURSES OFFERED EACH SEMESTER

Course Title Course Summary

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE This course is an integrated-skills course focusing on listening, speaking, reading and writing at the novice-high to intermediate-low level. The class emphasizes grammar and vocabulary development as well as writing at the sentence to paragraph level. Students also work extensively on the organization and delivery of basic oral presentations. The class involves short reading and summary exercises and TOEFL/SAT I practice activities. Students attending this course will move on to either Intermediate Academic English, or Composition and Literature depending on their overall proficiency level when they complete the course.

Course Title Course Summary

INTERMEDIATE ACADEMIC ENGLISH (ESL) This course is an integrated-skills course focusing on listening, speaking, reading and writing at the intermediate-mid to intermediate-high level. The class emphasizes complex grammar and higherlevel vocabulary development as well as writing at the paragraph level. This class also introduces basic essay formats and composition strategies. Students also work extensively on the organization and delivery of formal oral presentations. The class also involves reading, note taking and summary exercises as well as TOEFL/SAT I practice activities. The class is for students that have a good command of basic English skills, but need further work on grammar and complex sentence structures as well as the reading and composition skills introduced in English as a Second Language.

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International Student Program Course Title Course Summary

COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE (ESL) This course is an integrated-skills course designed to prepare high-intermediate to advanced level ESL students either for mainstream academic courses at Sandy Spring Friends School, or, in the case of seniors, for mainstream academic courses at American colleges and universities. The class focuses on paragraph development skills and formal composition with a focus on the writing process. The students will also be exposed to both contemporary literature and exposé. The course seeks to develop students’ ability to read, analyze and share, both in writing and orally, their perceptions of the works read. Students mastering this course are eligible to enroll in non-ESL English and History courses.

Course Title Course Summary

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE (ESL) This course is an integrated-skills course designed to prepare advanced level ESL students either for mainstream academic courses at Sandy Spring Friends School, or, in the case of seniors, for mainstream academic courses at American colleges and universities. The class continues the development of formal composition with a focus on the writing process. The students will also be exposed both to contemporary American literature and exposé. The course seeks to develop students’ ability to read, analyze and share, both in writing and orally, their perceptions of the works read. Students who successfully complete this course will enroll in non-ESL English and History courses.

ESL HISTORY COURSES OFFERED EACH SEMESTER Course Title Course Summary

ESL U.S. HISTORY This course focuses on both the content of U.S. History from the colonial period through the Second World War and the English language structures and functions related to the study of history. Special emphasis is placed on the history of the United States as it relates to the cultures of students represented in the class. In addition to the various periods of American history covered, students will develop reading strategies as well as basic research, note taking, and writing skills necessary for work in subsequent non-ESL history classes.

Course Title Course Summary

ESL WORLD HISTORY This course focuses on both the content of world history including the study of European, Middle Eastern and Asian civilizations and the English language structures and functions related to the study of history. In addition to the various great civilizations covered, students will develop vocabulary and reading strategies as well as basic research, note taking and writing skills necessary for work in subsequent non-ESL history classes.

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International Student Program 1ST SEMESTER ESL SCIENCE COURSE Course Title Course Summary

ESL SCIENCE I This course focuses on both the content of physical and biological sciences and the English language structures and functions related to the study of science. Science concepts and relationships serve as a vehicle for students to learn the language of observation, identification, description, definition, and experimental investigation. Through scientific inquiry, students learn the language of classification, comparison, measurement, inference, and hypothesizing necessary for work in subsequent non-ESL science classes.

2ND SEMESTER ESL SCIENCE COURSE Course Title Course Summary

ESL SCIENCE II This course is a continuation of ESL Science I.

ESL COURSES (Required) Course Title Course Summary

GRAMMAR WRITING WORKSHOP In this semester-long ESL course, students work with their instructor to design an independent study program focusing primarily on improving their writing skills and increasing their use of English grammar. Students also have the option of using this course for TOEFL/SAT I preparation on a limited basis. Students will keep logs of their work and progress, and write several selfevaluations throughout the course. This class is open to all international students and is a concurrent requirement to support the transition of all international students entering non-ESL English or History courses for the first time.

Course Title Course Summary

AMERICAN CULTURE I This semester-long course is open to all students. The course is designed to help international students to better acculturate to life in the United States. It will help American students to better understand the nature of the American character and how Americans are perceived by other cultures around the world. The class seeks to help students understand what core American values are, where they come from and how they are realized here at Sandy Spring Friends School and in contemporary American society. Students will explore American culture through assigned readings, film, class discussion, surveys, presentations and several papers. This course, along with American Culture II, is a requirement for all new international students. Both courses are highly recommended for American students interested in pursuing the study of foreign languages and travel and/or study abroad.

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International Student Program Course Title Course Summary

AMERICAN CULTURE II This semester-long course is open to all students. The course is designed to help international students better acculturate to life in the United States and at Sandy Spring Friends School. It offers American students an opportunity to better understand the nature of their character and how they are perceived by other cultures around the world. American Culture II focuses on the assimilation of different groups into American culture and how both Americans and immigrant groups have been affected. It will then explore skills and strategies that individuals can use to smooth the path across cultures. Through exercises and activities similar to those used in American Culture I, this course will focus on learning what acculturation means, how the process of acculturation works and what strategies can be employed to make crossing cultures a positive, productive and enriching experience. American Culture II, along with American Culture I, is a requirement for all new international students. Both courses are highly recommended for American students interested in pursuing the study of foreign languages and future travel and/or study abroad.

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Physical Activities/Sports PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES Each Upper School student is required to complete two units of physical activity per year. This requirement can be met through participation on an interscholastic sports team, or by taking a Physical Education class offered during the school day or after school. Interscholastic sports teams require after-school commitments, in addition to some evening and weekend commitments for games, tournaments, and/or practices.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSES Course Title Course Summary

MODERN DANCE This arts course may be taken for physical education credit. However, it cannot count for both an arts course and a physical activity at the same time. See full description under Arts courses offered each semester.

Course Title Course Summary

FIT FOR LIFE During this course, students participate in a wide variety of recreational games and learn sport specific skills while understanding the importance of lifelong fitness. The goal for students is to value and appreciate many sports as well as the latest trends in fitness and exercise. Sports and activities covered could include team sports, base games, racket sports, plyometrics and agility, and weight training.

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Physical Activities/Sports Course Title Course Summary

FIELD GAMES Students will learn the rules and skills of Frazzlerham and other Morley Games, created by one of the school’s founders and played by all during the early history of the school. Other games such as ultimate frisbee, dodgeball, 4-square, and others will be played according to the interests and skills of the class.

Course Title Course Summary

YOGA Yoga is a system for achieving radiant health. Yoga practice promotes flexibility and strength and provides support for the serious athlete and dancer to help prevent injuries. Yoga postures reduce stress in the mind and body and can improve one’s mental attitude. Yoga also provides a noncompetitive outlet for physical activity.

Course Title Course Summary

WALKING FOR FITNESS Do you like walking or are you looking for a non-competitive sport? If so, join the SSFS walking activity. We will explore the woods on our campus and surrounding areas, as well as suburban walking paths in the Olney area. The course will include discussions on the benefits of walking and warm-up/warm-down exercises. All you need is a pair of comfortable shoes – sneakers, walking shoes or light track shoes are fine – and a sense of adventure.

Course Title Course Summary

OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP Outdoor Leadership is open to all students in the Upper School. The course is offered during each of the sport seasons: fall, winter, and spring. The class meets three times a week after school. The midweek meetings are generally on campus and Fridays are generally spent traveling off campus. Each section of the course culminates in a two night overnight expedition in the mid-Atlantic.

Prerequisite: Students must complete an application for this course.

Course Title Course Summary

Outdoor Leadership teaches students wilderness living skills and practical leadership for surviving in the wilderness. Each section of the class teaches a different technical skill set while emphasizing a core leadership and wilderness living skill set. Students may enroll in multiple sections of outdoor leadership during an academic year. Outdoor Leadership is limited to twelve (12) students per section. Each student must complete an application and be admitted to the course. FUNDAMENTALS OF ROCK CLIMBING Fundamentals of Rock Climbing is a semester length rock climbing class that is offered during the school day. Students will learn knot tying, how to properly use a safety harness, and proper belay technique. Significant time will be spent practicing movement and developing sport specific strength. Students will learn proper spotting technique and how to boulder (unroped climbing). The latter third of the course will be spent teaching advanced technical skill sets like anchor building, how to lead climb, and how to place traditional protection. Fundamentals of Rock Climbing is limited to twelve (12) students.

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Physical Activities/Sports INTERMURAL SPORTS Intramural sports are offered three times a week as an after-school activity in which skills are emphasized through a tactical games approach method. Students are actively participating in specific sport game play to gain experience and an appreciation for that sport.

FALL WINTER SPRING

Kickball Morley Games Co-ed Basketball

INTERSCHOLASTIC SPORTS (Varsity only unless noted)

Interscholastic teams practice daily, after school, with meets scheduled for weekdays and occasional weekends, sometimes including holiday weekends or vacation days. The interscholastic program emphasizes participation; while varsity placement is not guaranteed, a student wishing to participate in a sport will have a team to join.

FALL

Girls Soccer (V) Girls Volleyball Girls Cross-country Running Girls Tennis

Boys Soccer (V, JV) Boys Cross-country Running

WINTER

Girls Basketball (V) Boys Basketball (V, JV) Rock Climbing Team Boys Ice Hockey (V) Wrestling

SPRING

Girls Track and Field Boys Track and Field Girls Lacrosse Boys Lacrosse Girls Softball Boys Baseball Golf Boys Tennis Junior varsity teams may be added or dropped each year depending on the number of participants in each sport.

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Internship Program SSFS Internships can be taken in any of three terms: Fall (September-January), Spring (February-May), and Summer (JuneAugust). Student interns will begin their workplace assignment at the beginning of the desired timeframe. Interns will be expected to complete a minimum of 60 hours during a semester to receive 0.5 credits. Although students may begin their Internship during any term, interns might want to remain with the mentor for several terms yielding combinations of academic year and summer work time. These arrangements can be made on an individual basis if the mentor and the student agree to continue the internship beyond the semester. Students can earn a maximum of 2 Internship credits (4 semesters). Students cannot receive Community Service credit and Internship credit at the same time. An internship is a career-focused experience in research, business, industry, education, government, medicine, or social service that allows the student the opportunity to explore and clarify career choices in a particular field of interest while working with a mentor at a worksite for a defined period of time. Internships can be paid or unpaid. Learning on the job can be uniquely beneficial. It requires the intern to use verbal, critical thinking, questioning and writing skills as well as meeting general workplace expectations. No matter what happens – success, failure, or adjustment – the student gains experience and acquires personal information to set lifetime goals. Students interested in pursuing internship opportunities should reference the Internship Program Description on the School’s website and talk with the Internship Coordinator, Bruce Evans. Prerequisite: Open to rising Juniors and Seniors only. (Note: students who have completed the 10th grade can participate in an internship during the summer before the start of the Junior year). Completion of the internship application and approval by the Internship Committee.

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Pathways Schematics: English

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Pathways Schematics: History

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Pathways Schematics: Global Languages

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Pathways Schematics: Science

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Pathways Schematics: Mathematics

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Pathways Schematics: ESL

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SSFS Upper School Curriculum Guide: 2013-2014