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COMPREHENSIVE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY Annual Report For period January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012

East Central Intergovernmental Association 7600 Commerce Park Dubuque IA 52002 563-556-4166 www.ecia.org

Prepared by the East Central Iowa Economic Development District under Economic Development Grant No. 05-830437503. The preparation of this report was financially aided (50% federal; 50% local) through a Federal grant from the Department of Commerce - Economic Development Adminstration authorized by the Public Works and Economic Development Act of 1965 as amended.


Contents Section 1 - Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy............................................3 Section 2 - Adjustments Including Analysis......................................................................4 Adjustments Including Opportunities...................................................................12 Accomplishments Achieved, Quantifiable Deliverables,

Difficulties Encountered.......................................................................................14

Section 3 - Evaluation.....................................................................................................30 Section 4 - Schedule.......................................................................................................30 2013 Proposed Scope of Work........................................................................................52

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Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy


Section 1 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Organization & Background In 1978, ECIA received designation as an Economic Development District. As such, ECIA prepares a Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (CEDS) to coordinate economic development activities in the region. This makes cities/counties eligible to receive EDA grant/loan funds. Staff provides assistance to local governments, development corporations, chambers of commerce, businesses, and individuals in the ongoing implementation of the CEDS. The East Central Intergovernmental Association (ECIA) is a membership supported organization of local governmental bodies in Cedar, Clinton, Delaware, Dubuque, and Jackson Counties in eastern Iowa. ECIA provides services in the following categories: Community Development, Economic Development, Transportation Planning, Housing Assistance, Employment and Training and Rural Transit Services. Community Development activities include grant writing, grant administration, comprehensive planning, technical advice related to city financial planning, codification of ordinances, building inspections, flood assistance, and the provision of census data and other information related to the operation of city/ county government. E.C.I.A. Business Growth Inc., a non-profit corporation formed in 1982, provides low-interest loans to businesses for expansion that creates new or retains current jobs. The Small Business Administration is the primary funding source. E.C.I.A. Business Growth Inc. has extended loans in excess of $84,038,699. E.C.I.A. Business Growth has either created or retained more than 4,917 jobs. Business Growth Inc. also assists local communities in the administration of Revolving Loan Funds. These funds are loaned to businesses and industries, and the proceeds are returned to the local governments for future loans. To help meet the area's workforce and commercial transportation needs, ECIA provides planning and technical assistance to various transportation organizations. Established in 1978, the Eastern Iowa Regional Housing Authority (EIRHA) operates as a division of ECIA, which provides staff and administrative support. EIRHA has a separate Board of Directors, elected by EIRHA members. In the five-county area, EIRHA provides two programs of housing assistance benefiting low-income families and the elderly. Since its inception in 1982, the Job Training Partnership Act, now known as the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), has been operating to develop job training programs for qualified adults and youth. Under the administration of ECIA, the program provides job training services in Dubuque and Delaware Counties. ECIA staff works with educational institutions and employers to train people for ongoing fulltime employment. Training is provided on the job and through technical training programs. The training programs help people obtain skills that enable them to compete successfully in the job market.

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Section 2 Adjustments Including Analysis of Economic Development Problems and Opportunities East Central Intergovernmental Association (ECIA) is in the fourth year of its five year CEDS cycle (2010ÂŹ2014). The CEDS is being utilized in the region to monitor and evaluate our long term economic goals and strategies and to coordinate the economic development activities in the region. This report is the annual update of the CEDS for the 2012 calendar year. The CEDS document and the process that has been implemented act as tools for developing goals and strategies that will guide the economic growth of the region. Throughout this past year, input for the development of this annual report was received from local community leaders, economic developers, schools and private businesses through public meetings and in person and electronic communication, which have assisted in guiding our vision for the economic future of the region. The 2012 CEDS Annual Report builds on the five-year CEDS and updates the region's progress in the past year for the adopted short- and long- range goals. This report includes the updated Implementation and Evaluation Report that reflects the goals and schedule for goal completion for the region. The CEDS Committee, with input from local representation, updated the tasks, performance measures, schedule, and evaluation indicators for the region. The Implementation and Evaluation Report has been adjusted to indicate projects that have been completed (BOLD type) and projects that have either been updated or added (RED type). The report reflects a great deal of activity in the Sustainability Goal with many projects either under construction or near completion. In addition to the Implementation and Evaluation Report, the Results of the Plan have been updated as well and are included in this document. The Results of the Plan evaluates the overall activity in the job market, which is driven in part by the total economic development activity in the region. The jobs lost and gained in specific businesses for calendar year 2012 for the region have been listed. Employment/Unemployment & Population The chart to the right shows total employment by sector in 2006, 2009, 2010 and 2011. Stability in some sectors is countered by employment reductions and expansions in others, with the greatest gains being made in manufacturing and Annual Private Employment by Industry Sector 2006, 2009, 2010 & 2011 professional and business services. 25000 The greatest losses were seen in the 20000 information sector. In the past year, the region gained 1,458 total jobs, finally surpassing the pre-recession employment levels of 2006 (1).

15000

10000 2006 Employment 2009 Employment

5000

2010 Employment 2011 Employment

0

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Economic activity for the region was stronger than in recent years, with increased levels of job gain and unemployment rates below the national average. As can be seen in the maps below, between 2006, and 2009, unemployment levels rose dramatically across the country and the state of Iowa with slight improvements in 2011. Given poor economic conditions at the national level, the local economy has remained slightly above average. Unemployment rates for the State of Iowa have remained lower than the national average and unemployment rates for the region also came in below the national average during the reporting period. Unemployment rates by county, 2006 annual averages (U S rate = 4 (U.S. 4.6 6 percent)

Unemployment rates by county, 2009 annual averages

Unemployment rates by county, 2011 annual averages

(U S rate = 9 (U.S. 9.3 3 percent)

(U S rate = 8 (U.S. 8.9 9 percent)

14 0% or over 14.0% 12.0% to 13.9%

Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics

14.0% and over

12.0% to 13.9%

12.0% to 13.9%

10.0% to 11.9%

10.0% to 11.9%

8.0% to 9.9%

8.0% to 9.9%

6.0% to 7.9%

6.0% to 7.9%

4.0% to 5.9%

4.0% to 5.9% SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics

3.9% or below SOURCE:

14.0% and over

10.0% to 11.9%

3.9% or lower

Not available

8.0% to 9.9% 6.0% to 7.9% 4.0% to 5.9% SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics Local Area Unemployment Statistics

3.9% or lower

The 2011 weighted average regional unemployment rate was 5.8%, down from 6.3% for 2010 . The 2011 State of Iowa rate is down to 5.9% from 6.3%, but remained substantially below the 2011 U.S. national rate of 8.5% (8). (8)

Iowa’s population continued to grow for the 22nd straight year, constituting its longest period of sustained growth since 1900, according to the U.S. Census Bureau (11). The State’s population has increased every year since 1988. Population growth has not been divided evenly across the state with most of the growth occurring in or near metropolitan counties. Polk County, the state’s largest and home to the capital city of Des Moines, expanded by 15%. Linn County grew more than 10% despite a massive flood in 2008 that ruined thousands of homes and buildings. Johnson County, home to the University of Iowa, gained 18%. Much growth took place in the Des Moines suburbs, including West Des Moines, up 22%; Ankeny, up 68%; and Urbandale, up 36% (10). The recession reinforced a long-term trend of workers moving from rural areas into metropolitan areas to search for work. In a Des Moines Register article dated November 3, 2012, Iowa State University Economist, David Swenson, “The reason the unemployment rates are so low in many of those counties, if not the vast majority, is because the people who could have been unemployed are going someplace else,” (13). Regionalism Regionalism remained a priority this past year. ECIA continued the Prosperity Eastern Iowa initiative. Prosperity Eastern Iowa is a regional economic development organization comprised of representatives from local governments, economic development organizations, colleges, utilities, and other interested parties in three of the five counties in the ECIA region as well as Jones County. In 2012, Prosperity Eastern Iowa developed a long term strategic plan, budget, and dues structure for the future of the organization. Through that process, the mission of Prosperity changed slightly, “Prosperity Eastern Iowa is a partnership of economic development stakeholders that leverage financial and human resources to achieve efficiencies, utilizing our natural, cultural, and physical assets to

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strive for the economic prosperity of the region. The collaboration recognizes that prosperous local economies rest on existing industry and a strong regional workforce which positions the region as an attractive place to work and do business.” Recent funding cuts at the state level have required the group to be more targeted in their efforts, but also more creative in their approach. Prosperity Eastern Iowa has continued to expand the Buyer Supplier initiative. The goal of the program is to encourage companies to shift 5% of their out of region spending back into the region, making regional connections to suppliers. 2012 marks the fifth year of the program; a follow-up study will be conducted to determine whether the program was successful in its goal fo a 5% shift toward regioal purchasing. Buyer Supplier continues to be a partnership across regions and across state boundaries including Northeast Iowa Business Network and three adjacent counties in Illinois. We continue to work with local foods groups to assist with making connections between local producers and their potential markets in the food service and hospitality industries through a partnership with Iowa state University Extension and Southwest Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission. Economic Activity

Iowa Farmland Values 1900-2010 (average value/acre)

Land values in the region and at the state level continued to increase. The average price of an acre is now $6,708. Iowa land values have been a topic of national news coverage with a record-breaking sale in Sioux County of $21,900/acre (14). Based on the ISU Extension land values survey, the Sioux County sale is far higher than the average. Economists in Iowa believe the bio-fuel economy and crop prices are driving the land price increase. As can be seen in the graph to the right, land prices remained relatively steady through the 1970s, rising quickly and then falling during the 1980’s with a steep increase during the 2000’s. Currently, the region is home to one ethanol and one biodiesel plant. This increase in local demand has led to increased crop prices and the ability to add value to crops within the region rather than shipping out raw commodities for manufacturing elsewhere. In the Dubuque area, tourism remained steady, but fared slightly weaker than the state average of 10.3% (12). Tourism dollars in our region increased from $275 million to $302.43 million in the last year, an increase of 8.9% (3). Dubuque received the Outstanding Tourism Community of the Year award in 2011 for its tourism reinvention of the community over the past 12 years. Collaborative partnerships, strategic advertising and great natural amenities continue to lure visitors to the region and garner statewide attention for the quality of tourist venues in the area. The Greater Dubuque Development Corporation, serving the metro area in the ECIA region, is in the first year of its new campaign for economic growth. The campaign, known as “NEXT”, has four main goals:

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1. Create 3,300 net, new jobs to bring our workforce to a record of 60,000* by December of 2012 in the Dubuque County area (7). Job growth will be tracked by utilizing the Iowa Department of Workforce Development’s official, monthly statistics. Current Workforce: 56,300 (*Job numbers are periodically bench-marked by the Iowa Workforce Development and may change the base number.) Annual progress is shown in the chart below.

The regional workforce has seen contraction over the past year with a decrease of approximately 440 workers from 2010 to 2011; the regional workforce is currently 114,030 (8). 2. $700 million in new commercial and residential construction projects in Dubuque County. Greater Dubuque Development tracks construction using the official information that is provided by the City of Dubuque’s Building and Permits Department and Dubuque County Assessor’s office. Current Commercial Construction: $306,596,272 (2007- 2011) (2) Current Residential Construction: $247,592,089 (2007-2011) (2)

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3. Targeted wages for new jobs will be $18+ per hour or an average annual income of $37,440. Dubuque County wage levels will be monitored on a quarterly basis using Iowa Department of Workforce Development data. The current unadjusted wage rate is $17.57.

4. Increase the Dubuque County projected population to 96,000. The official population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau will be used to monitor Dubuque County’s population growth. The current Dubuque County population is 93,653 (11).

The regional population has made gains similar to those of Dubuque County in the past 10 years, but has not returned to its peak population which occurred in 1980. The chart on the following page shows historical population data for the region. The population decreased dramatically, regionwide throughout the 1980s, dropping back to 1960 levels with the 1990 Census. The region’s current population is 199,517 with most population gains made in Dubuque County.

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Total Regional Population 245,000 225,000 205,000 185,000 165,000 145,000 125,000 1900

1910

1920

1930

1940

1950

1960

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010

2011

Challenges Iowa’s looming shortage of skilled workers threatens the State’s economy. The State will have roughly 100,000 vacancies within the next five years according to Iowa Workforce Development. One major employer in the ECIA region, John Deere, told state lawmakers that more than 50% of some segments of their work forces are eligible for retirement within the next five years. It has also been indicated that college and high school educations are not keeping up with the demand in such areas as math and science careers. Businesses were surveyed in 2011 and cited their need for qualified, technically skilled employees as their greatest need in planning expansion. Based on the survey, the majority of employers (87.5%) would hire an employee who has a high school equivalent with a specialized training certificate in their industry and 78% feel that experience can substitute for education. This workforce issue and shortage of employees is very real in the ECIA region. If the local labor pool dries up, it could create a perfect storm of collapsing factors, eroding the region’s economic success. Iowa Workforce Development completed a Workforce Needs Assessment in January 2012. Employers in the region were asked to indicate the number of workers that will be eligible to retire within the next seven years. Based on the responses, the number of retirees appears to be greatest in manufacturing (19.1%) and healthcare and social services (16.3%)(6). The assessment also looked at the methods employers are undertaking to retain retirement aged employees and their plans once retirees have left the workforce including flexible work schedules and increased wages (6). Retirement eligibility by industry and occupation can be seen in the following figures from the IWD report (6).

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measured in 2010, at $2.60/hour in Iowa and $2.97/hour nationally. However, this appears to be largely due to a decline in the earnings of men.

Another workforce issue in Iowa and in the Figure (9) Risen, the Gender Wage Gap Remains 11. While Women’s have Gender Wage Gap Wages in Iowa ECIA region is the gender wage gap. The 2011 “ State of Working in Iowa” report, compiled by the Iowa Policy Project indicated that the wage disparity in Iowa is present, but decreasing. Women continue to be paid less than men in the same jobs, but females in Iowa made greater gains than at the national level. However, this appears to Table 1. Iowa Loses Jobs with High ESI Coverage Rates, Gains Jobs with Low ESI Coverage be due to a decline in the earnings of men Loss of Employer-Sponsored Coverage, Thousands of Jobs rather than an increase in the earnings of 2001-02 numbers 2009-11 numbers Loss of ESI attributable to women. cov. cov.

ESI ESI job less jobs jobs total Jun-01 2002 Jun-01 Jul-11 2009 Source: Jul-11 losses coverage EPI/IPP analysis of Current Population Survey da Nat. Res. & Mining 2.2 78.4% 1.7 2 75.8% 1.5 -0.2 -0.1 -0.2 Construction 70.4 47.5%of wage 33.4is the 63.7 44.0% -3.2The wage -2.2gain from -5.4 attaining Another important indicator worker’s level of 28.0 education. Manufacturing 244.5 72.7% 177.8 69.6%for generations, 143.5 -27.8 post-secondary education has been on the 206.2 rise in Iowa with only-6.4 a slight-34.2 decline Wholesale & Retail Trade 255.8recession. 53.9% In 2010, 137.9 while 241.6 50.5%with 122.0 -7.7degree -8.2 -15.9 following the 2001 a worker a bachelor’s or higher was earning a Transp. & Utilities 57.4 66.9% 38.4 63.5 62.0% 39.4 4.1 -3.1 1.0 median wage of $21.42/hour, a high school graduate was earning only $13.65/hour (see Figure 12). Th Information 37.8 73.0% 27.6 27.4 69.5% 19.0 -7.6 -1.0 -8.6 is a difference of $7.77/hour, other words, earning a0.2 time and4.3a half the Financial Activities 93 65.8% or in 61.2 99.2 a college 66.0% graduate 65.5 was4.1 wages earned by109.1 a high-school Prof. & Bus. Services 57.4% graduate. 62.6 123.9 55.1% 68.3 8.5 -2.8 5.6 Educ. & Health Services 182 59.4% 108.1 216.1 57.1% 123.4 20.3 -5.0 15.3 Figure 12. Education Pays Leisure & Hospitality 132.2 32.5% 43.0 137.8 26.3% (15) 36.2 1.8 -8.5 -6.7 in Iowa35.0% by education, Other Services 57.4 Median 40.1% hourly 23.0wage55.2 19.3 in 2011 -0.9 dollars* -2.8 -3.7 Private, nonfarm jobs 1241.8 1236.6 -8.6 -39.9 -48.5

In Iowa, full-time working women are paid 77 cents for every dollar paid to men, according to the National Partnership for Women & Families. In the 1st Congressional District, the disparity is greater; women earn 72 percent of men’s median pay, amounting to a difference of $12,404 per year .

Iowa ranked last in a recent study byEPI American Coverage rates from Elise Gould, Briefing Paper Express #228 (Table 3). http://www.epi.org/publications/entry/bp283/  that looked at the economic impact of female-owned Job numbers from Economic Policy Institute analysis of Current Employment Statistics survey data. businesses. Among the reasons: Iowa lacks mentors for In this tumultuous decade — spanning two recessions — Iowa’s nonfarm job base has been essentially and entrepreneurs in general, and the state’s flat (losing about 2,500women, jobs). Discounting a small growth in government employment, the private nonfarm job base has lost about double that (5,200 jobs). But, asconcentrated Table 1 underscores, the loss of good largest industries are highly in malejobs has been much more pronounced. We have lost just under 50,000 jobs with health coverage — (17) dominated areas such as finance, manufacturing andtofarming . Iowa’s program forrates minority and some of this total attributable simple job losses, but mostmain attributable to declining of coverage in the jobs that remain. These numbers, in turn, understate the the decline this in ESIfiscal on health women owned businesses (Targeted Small Business program) received noimpact newoffunding year coverage — since each covered job provides health insurance to the employee and family members. but has about $180,000 available from previous yearsof. jobs offering health coverage fell by 48,500, the number of Iowans Accordingly, while the number losing job-based coverage since 2001 is Regardless of gender, Iowa’s wages overall fall 88 double that — over 10 96,000 as of 2009.of cents behind the national average (median)

Table 2. Iowa Median Wages have Fallen from 2000 50th Percentile Wages by State by Year (2010 dollars)** 1980 UNITED STATES

1990

2000

2010

EPI/IPP analysis of rank Current Population Survey da $14.59 $14.65   Source: $15.49 $16.00 in 2010 *There were not enough cases of less-than-high school educated workers for inclusio

regional national Wages2000, with $16.00 (9). Iowa has lost ground since Minnesota $14.65 $15.09 $18.17 $17.54 1 11 Although Iowa was in the median wage falling $.04 cents to $15.02 Wisconsin $15.15 $13.94 $15.49 $16.32 2 17 12  worst ravages $16.36 $16.03 $16.51 $16.21 3 19 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars (9)spared . Thisthe ranks Iowa Illinois $13.84 $13.40 $15.77 $15.14 4 32 of the recession, its wage Missouri Iowa $14.25 $13.35 $15.06 $15.02 5 33 profile headingright into the 33rd in the nation while regionally, falling Kansas $13.70 $13.41 $14.73 $14.97 6 34 downturn was already in the middle, beating Kansas, Nebraska Indiana Indiana $14.44 $13.42 $15.14 $14.91 7 38 weak. At the median Nebraska $13.10 $12.36 $13.46 $14.81 8 40 and South Dakota and lagging behind Missouri, wage (half of all workers South Dakota $11.66 $10.94 $13.71 $14.21 9 47 earn(9)more, half earn less), Source: EPI analysis of Current Population Survey data. Minnesota, Illinois and Wisconsin . Reaching Iowa ranks fifth in the ** Using CPI-U-RS. Note: wage levels down from 10 years earlier are shown in red. the Greater Dubuque Development goalregion, of $16+ immediate and rd a median wage ($15.02) about a dollar less than the national median (Table 2). 33 nationally, per hour that was previously discussed willwith assist Iowa was one of 10 states to see the real value of its median wage actually fall since 2000, with much of the region and state with providing wages closer to the national average. An increase in average wages 10    will allow the region to more effectively compete for labor in the national marketplace.

 

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Transportation/Air Quality In July 2010, ECIA assumed management of the city of Dubuque’s transit system and has since replaced the entire fleet with clean diesel vehicles to address the potential air quality concerns. Throughout 2012, ECIA staff have worked with the City of Dubuque and IBM to complete teh Smarter Travel Study which gathers travel data through smartphone and cell tower feeds to determine real time travel patterns in the community. The goal of this project is to use travel patterns to guide a complete re alignment of the fixed routes to reduce vehicle miles traveled. ECIA received funding from the Iowa DOT to begin the first pilot reoutes of the restructuring which began in October of 2012; this project is titled “SmartTransit”. Within this project there are two strategies that, when integrated, will create a “forward-reaching” transit model for small urban systems across the United States and will reduce our overall emissions of Oxides of Nitrogen (NOX) by 23.08%, Particulate Matter (PM) by 89.62%, Hydrocarbons (HC) by 86.92% and Carbon Monoxide (CO) by 48.46% saving $15,276,042 (EPA: Diesel Emissions Quantifier) and improving health by saving $546,000 in medical expenses (EPA: Diesel Emissions Quantifier) over the duration (10 years) of the project and will assist us in maintaining the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for ozone and carbon monoxide. The subject of air quality directly impacts business expansion and production capabilities, and with the Dubuque Area being near the threshold for non-attainment, DMATS, Greater Dubuque Development Corporation and multiple private businesses and other partners in the region are forming an Air Quality task force. Natural Disasters The ECIA region is still recovering and rebuilding from past flooding. Total damage in Iowa reached into the billions of dollars with over 25,000 properties damaged in Iowa and over 400 properties destroyed. Communities in the ECIA region are still working with federal and state agencies in demolishing and rebuilding homes. All of the region was effected but Cedar and Delaware Counties were among the areas hit the hardest. ECIA is the lead Council of Governments in Iowa to administer the emergency grant funds. While recovering from the devastating floods of 2008, another round of flooding struck the region in May of 2010 and July of 2011. The following disaster declarations have impacted the region in the past 5 years (4): 2007: Severe Winter Storm Disaster Declaration FEMA-1688-DR - Cedar, Clinton and Jackson Counties 2008: Severe Winter Storm Disaster Declaration FEMA-1737-DR - Cedar and Clinton Counties Severe Tornados and Flooding FEMA-1763-DR - Cedar, Clinton, Delaware, Dubuque and Jackson Counties 2010: Severe Storms, Flooding and Tornadoes FEMA-1930-DR - Delaware, Dubuque and Jackson Counties 2011: Severe Storms and Flooding FEMA-4018-DR - Dubuque and Jackson Counties

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The high heat of summer 2012 brought drought and associated devastation to the region. CRop damage and total loss occurred in all five counties to varying degrees. The following USDA disaster declarations have impacted the region in 2012 (16): 2012: Frost and Freeze USDA S3264, 04-06-2012 Cedar, Clinton, Delaware, Dubuque and Jackson 2012: Drought, Wind, High Winds, Wildfire, Excessive heat USDA S3305, 07-17-2012 Dubuque 2012 Drought, Wind, High Winds, Wildfire, Excessive heat USDA S3310, 07-24-2012 Cedar, Clinton, Delaware, Dubuque, Jackson 2012 Drought, Wind, High Winds, Wildfire, Excessive heat USDA S3311, 07-24-2012 Clinton, 2012 Drought Secretarial Designations Dubuque, Jackson The map to the right shows secretarial drought designations with counties and contiguous counties being eligible for fast track assistance.

A. ADJUSTMENTS TO THE STRATEGY INCLUDING OPPORTUNITIES

Alaska

1:58,102,399

Hawaii

1:19,740,053

Secretarial Drought Designations as of July 31, 2012

Northeast Iowa Community College (NICC) Economic Development Division completed a business survey in early 2011 which shed some light on the true educational attainment and occupational needs of businesses in the county. The breakdown of respondents by industry was: 18.6% manufacturing; 20.9% finance and insurance; and 16.3% healthcare and social services. 23.3% of survey respondents employ between 200-499 full-time positions. Some specific concerns expressed by businesses were relating to the looming baby boom generation retirements including the following: “As more of our seasoned workforce begins to near retirement, our incoming employees lack even the basic skill sets; we continue to upgrade the level of technology on our manufacturing floor, but without these basic skill sets we cannot begin to train employees to replace the more technical positions we have.� This is not surprising considering that surveyed businesses cited their need for qualified, technically skilled employees as their greatest need in planning expansion. Based on the survey, the majority of employers (87.5%) would hire an employee who has a high school equivalent with a specialized training certificate in their industry and 78% feel that experience can substitute for education. State Boundary

County Boundary Tribal Lands

Primary Designation

USDA Farm Service Agency Production, Emergencies and Compliance Division Washington, D.C. July 31, 2012

Contiguous Designation

1:23,211,262

Puerto Rico

1:5,592,808

While the region has a large number of college graduates (18,000) due to the high number of four-year educational institutions, many of the employers have expressed a willingness and desire to employ individuals with basic skills that do not require a four-year degree such as workplace computing, project management, analyzing data and information, communicating with supervisors or subordinates, developing and working in teams, and interacting with computers. There is a large demand from the business community for specialized training in a variety of areas and the niche for our regional efforts will lie in addressing these issues while reengaging the unemployed and underemployed residents in the community.

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Iowa Workforce Development(IWD) completed a 2011 Regional Workforce Needs Assessment. This tool provides employer information regarding both their current level of employment and their current and expected job vacancies. The survey provides excellent data for the region regarding the demand for, asked and the skillsthe required of workers inand theexperience region. Some of the results are shown below; Employers were about education/training requirements of prospective workers for their 68.8% reported job vacancies. The results for current job vacancies are shown below in 7 and Figure of available jobs require no more than a high school education and 52.4% ofFigure the jobs require no 8. experience. Figure 7 Figure 8

Education Required - Current Vacancies Education Required

Percent

No Educational Requirement High School Education/GED Vocational/Technical Training Associate Degree Undergraduate Degree Postgraduate/Professional Degree

19.7% 46.6% 13.1% 6.1% 10.3% 4.2%

Experience Required - Current Vacancies

Experience Required No Experience Required Less than 1 Year 1-2 Years 3-5 Years More than 5 Years

Percent 49.7% 13.9% 24.3% 8.9% 3.2%

Employers were asked their perceptions on the degree to which job applicants possessed soft, basic and In addressing challenges, ECIAasked through its Prosperity continues occupational skills.the In workforce addition, employers were if applicants, whoEastern may or Iowa may initiative not possess the to receive funding to enhance interactive web site the 14-25 year oldsubstance population, necessary skillsgrant for the job vacancy, wereitsbeing disqualified duetargeting to the results of controlled testing www. accessmyfuture.com. This provides on in high demand or background checks. The results forwebsite all employers areinformation shown below Figure 9. careers in the region

as well as to resources job seeker tips, andthe entrepreneurship. Career TestbyDrive is an and We can begin analyze for anyinternships, workforce gaps by comparing inventory of skills needed employers opportunity for students in high school to explore their career options before investing education, those skills held by the population of workers as presented in a Laborshed analysis. This gap is then time, and money training training for that and profession. Students whocan signbeupformalized for the program be matched with analyzed and theinto necessary education programs throughwill a Skillshed study. experienced professionals in the career area they choose. The student will spend time shadowing that Figure 9

professional or in an Exploring Program, learning the ins-and-outs Perception of Applicants

of the career. Strongly

Strongly

Perceptionsproject, of Job Applicants Neutral Disagree ThroughEmployer’s the DubuqueWorks recently funded by EDA technicalAgree assistance dollars, ECIA and Agree Disagree other partner staff have developed a program called “Opportunity Dubuque.” This model program pairs In general, applicants fulfill all necessary requirements for the job. 17.4% 37.1% 31.2% 11.5% 2.8% unemployed or underemployed individuals with scholarships or other assistance toward high demand In general, applicants possess the basic skills required for the job. 27.0% 41.8% 23.0% 6.8% 1.4% career training. Private sector partners take part in interviewing the scholarship candidates and many In general, applicants possess the soft skills required for the job. 11.4% 37.6% 35.8% 12.8% 2.4% of the recipients go on to accept internships or full-time positions with these private sector partners. In general, applicants possess the occupational skills required for the job. 13.0% 33.7% 15.5% 4.0% Dubuque’s current focus is CNC career training. A similar program has 33.8% been launched in Manchester There is often a problem filling this position because applicants are 2.4% 6.0% 26.2% 21.3% 44.1% and is focused on training for welding positions. disqualified due to controlled substance testing. There is References: often a problem filling this position because applicants are 4.4% 9.9% disqualified for failure to Statistics. pass a background check. (1) Bureau of Labor Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. 2006, 2009, 2010. Excel file.

26.7%

23.9%

35.1%

(2) Greater Dubuque Development Corporation. Next Prospectus. 2012. PDF.

Figures(3)10, 11 and 12 break soft and occupational employers reported were lacking by Dubuque Area Convention anddown Visitors basic, Bureau. Dubuque Increases Tourism Impactskills to Statethat of Iowa and Receives Award. 2011. WEB. applicants to fill open positions. (4) Federal Emergency Management Agency. Iowa Disaster History. 2011. Web. 31 Oct. 2011. (5) Iowa Department of Economic Development. County Wage Thresholds July 2010. 2010. Excel file. Figure 10

(6) Iowa Workforce Development, Labor Market and Workforce Information Division. Workforce Needs Assessment. 2011. PDF file. Basic Skills Lacked by Applicants

(7) Iowa Workforce Development. Monthly Labor Force Summary. 2011. PDF file. (8) Iowa Workforce Information Network. County Laborforce Data. 2010, 2011. Excel file. (9) O’Connor, Noga, Colin Gordon, and Peter Fisher. The Iowa Policy Project: The State of Working in Iowa 2011. 2011. file. skills developed Basic skills are PDf those during the elementary and middle part (10) Schulte, Grant. “Iowa Population Shifts from Rural to Urban”. USA Today. 17 Feb. 2011. Web. 50.1% Written Communication of an individual’s education. These skills (11) US Census Bureau. Population Estimates. 2010. Excel file. include literacy, numeracy (the ability to (12) US Travel Association Research Department. The Economic Impact of Travel on Iowa Counties. 2012. PDF file. do arithmetic and reason with numbers), (13) Eller, Donelle. “Iowa’s Shrinking Jobless Rate is Deceiving.” Des Moines Register 3 November 2012. Online. basic computer skills and organization. (14) Piller, Dan. “New Record Farm Sale: 21,900.” Des Moines Register 25 October 2012. Online. 37.6% Mathematics Nearly one-tenth (8.2%) of employers (15) Eileen Mozinski Schmidt. “Iowa women’s wages at 77% of men’s.” Dubuque Telegraph Herald. 12 October 2012. Web. surveyed feel that applicants lack basic (16) United States Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency. State and County Level Disaster Declarations. 2012. Excel file. skills needed for the job. (17) No author. “Iowa ranks last in women’s firms.” Des Moines Register. 9 August 2012. Web.

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B. Accomplishments Achieved, Quantifiable Deliverables, Difficulties Encountered Based on approved scope of work for January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 LOCAL GOVERNMENT MEETINGS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GROUP MEETINGS ECIA staff regularly attends meetings of local governments and local economic development groups to provide information and facilitate program implementation. 1. ECIA participates and sits on the Board of the Greater Dubuque Development Corporation and regularly attends their meetings at least quarterly. As of June 2012, the Executive Director became a board member of the Dubuque Area Chamber of Commerce. a. Accomplishments - GDDC has quarterly Board of Directors meetings and the ECIA Executive Director attended all four meetings this past year. The Executive Director attends the Chamber Board meetings monthly. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - ECIA attended all GDDC Board meetings this past year and also participated in their appointed DubuqueWorks committee addressing the employment needs in the region. ECIA was asked to join the Dubuque Area Chamber Board of Directors to provide them with various perspectives related to government, business, workforce and economic development. ECIA attended all of the meetings to date this year. Additionally, through participating in the GDDC board meetings, ECIA has been asked to participate in their workforce recruitment efforts and their sustainability programs. ECIA staff continue to participate in a subgroup of DubuqueWorks called Project HOPE which has focused its efforts on planning and developing a re-engagement pilot project. These meetings are held monthly and ECIA staff consistently attend. An EDA technical assistance grant was awarded to assist in hiring a consultant to research and develop a business plan for the re-engagement center and to connect to local businesses to participate and provide for continued financial stability. Through the Project Hope meetings, the partnerships formed and the EDA technical assistance funding, a re-engagement (Success Center) was opened in September, 2012 and funding has been provided by NICC and the Dubuque Community School District to sustain the initiative in the long term. GDDC and ECIA staff have developed a rural subcommittee focusing on rural economic development and are meeting monthly to discuss projects, company needs, loans, etc. Meetings began in October, 2011 and are scheduled throughout 2012. ECIA staff and the GDDC and the City have partnered to do 3-D modeling for the GDDC available sites and buildings in the region. This is a two year contract and work began July 1, 2011. c. Difficulties - There were no difficulties with attending and participating in the GDDC meetings. The 3-D modeling continues to be time consuming and excellent front head on photos are required to make a good product. 2. ECIA staff regularly hosts and participates in City Clerk meetings in Delaware and Dubuque Counties and hosts two meetings a year of the regional city clerks. a. Accomplishments - ECIA staff attended 7 City Clerk meetings this past year in Delaware County and 4 meetings of the Dubuque County City Clerks. ECIA coordinated the meetings. ECIA hosted two region wide clerks meetings at our offices this past year and organized the speakers and the agendas. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - At the monthly Delaware and Dubuque County Clerks meetings five to ten clerks attend each month. Information sharing and problem solving has been their main focus and these lunches have been great networking opportunities to share their experiences. The regional clerks meetings held twice per year had overwhelming participation this past year with over 25 clerks from the region attending each meeting. c. Difficulties - There were no major difficulties with this activity this past year. 3. ECIA staff regularly attends and acts as the secretary for the Jackson County Mayors. Meetings are held bimonthly in Jackson County with no meetings during the summer months. a. Accomplishments - ECIA attended all five of the meetings this past year for the Jackson County Mayors and acted as the secretary for these meetings. The meetings focus on information sharing and emergency

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management issues. A major action this year was revitalizing the Crime Stoppers Program and dealing the Retro-Reflectivity (sign) requirements. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - On the average 6 to 8 mayors and staff show up to these meetings. c. Difficulties - There were no difficulties with this activity this past year. ECIA staff regularly participates in the RC&D meetings. Meetings are held monthly in Jackson County. a. Accomplishments - ECIA attended nine RC&D meetings this past year b. Quantifiable Deliverables - ECIA is working collaboratively with the RC&D on a rural sewer project and continues to regularly attend the RC&D monthly meetings. c. Difficulties – The RC&D is struggling to continue operations due to federal funding cuts in 2011. Without funding from the Counties and others, the RC&D will cease to operate. ECIA staff participates in the Tri-State Alliance regional partnership. The entity focuses on furthering economic development and transportation in the region of Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin. a. Accomplishments –Staff participates in bi-monthly phone conferences with Tri-State Alliance members. ECIA hosted the annual summit in May 2012 with Secretary Ray LaHood as the keynote speaker for the event. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – Staff participates in bi-monthly phone conferences and hosted the annual event, facilitating a federal official touring the priority projects in Dubuque. c. Difficulties – there were no difficulties encountered. ECIA will be holding monthly Prosperity Eastern Iowa meetings with local economic developers. a. Accomplishments –Staff facilitates Prosperity Eastern Iowa meetings and maintains their marketing materials and website. Staff also coordinates the three major PEI initiatives – Buyer Supplier, Petal Project, and Accessmyfuture.com. b. Quantifiable Deliverables –Staff facilitated six Prosperity Eastern Iowa meetings and additional sessions for strategic planning. c. Difficulties –Funding will likely be a challenge in coming years. ECIA ED staff to meet with GDDC staff on a monthly basis to discuss local and regional ED projects related to retention and expansion of local businesses. a. Accomplishments – ECIA ED staff and GDDC staff have a standing meeting scheduled for the third Thursday of every month. During the meetings staff discussed retention and expansion of local businesses, which ultimately led to direct assistance, in the form of two loans, to a regional business. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – ECIA ED staff and GDDC staff met 9 times in 2012. c. Difficulties – There has been no difficulties with this project. ECIA staff participates and sits on the Enterprise Zone Committee for the city of Dubuque. The committee meets as needed to review and approve economic development related proposals seeking enterprise zone benefits in the city of Dubuque. a. Accomplishments –Staff participated in 4 enterprise zone meetings in this past year. Workforce housing and redevelopment continued to be an area with many contract approvals but there were also two additional contracts for business expansion including benefits to Heartland Financial for its build out of the Roshek Building and Rousselot expansion on Kerper Boulevard. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – At least 156 new rental units and 10 condo units will be produced in the downtown Dubuque area as a result of the enterprise zone benefit. c. Difficulties –there were no difficulties encountered. ECIA staff participates and sits on the Green Jobs Training program oversight Committee and ECIA Business Growth, Inc. was the lead applicant for the grant program. This is a partnership with Northeast Iowa Community College, Iowa Workforce Development, Four Mounds, and the City of Dubuque to provide green job training and opportunities to job seekers in the region. a. Accomplishments –The Green Jobs program ended in 2011. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – No deliverables to report. c. Difficulties – No difficulties to report.

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10. ECIA staff participates in the City of Dubuque’s Project Hope meetings. The group is focused on defining poverty in the Dubuque area and finding solutions to the barriers that people experience in finding and maintaining long term employment a. Accomplishments – ECIA staff continues to meet monthly with the Project Hope group, focusing on the needs of people with the greatest barriers and developing programs and partnerships to assist those individuals. We have begun partnering with the City of Dubuque Housing Services department and their Project Self Sufficiency program to further determine the needs and services of the targeted population. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – 12 monthly meetings have been hosted by the Community Foundation of Greater Dubuque with ECIA staff in attendance. c. Difficulties – There has been no difficulties with this project. 11. ECIA staff with the partnership of the City of Dubuque, the Community Foundation of Greater Dubuque, NICC, Dubuque Community School District, and GDDC, formed a working committee that meets monthly to research, define and establish a re-engagement program for disengaged youth and adults in the area. a. Accomplishments – The partnership continues to meet monthly and have formerly recognized themselves as Opportunity Dubuque. Funding for scholarships has been secured this year through Greater Dubuque Development’s DubuqueWorks program and through NICC’s gap tuition assistance program, and ECIA’s employment and training program. The program is very successful and popular with area employers. A full-time re-engagement coach was hired by the Dubuque Community School District for the fall 2012. The coach is working closely with Project Hope and the Opportunity Dubuque program. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – Thirty-six students received training in CNC or welding through the Opportunity Dubuque program in 2012. One-hundred percent of the students enrolled in the Intro to Modern Manufacturing intro course achieved their NCRC credentials at a minimum of a bronze certificate in 2012. Employers participating in Opportunity Dubuque increased from seven in the pilot project to twelve in 2012. Additionally, 81 candidates attended orientation for Opportunity Dubuque in October 2012. c. Difficulties – We continue to search for funding to increase the scholarships. Funding through the Workforce Investment Act has decreased providing for limitations on the scholarships we can fund using those program dollars especially since the majority of the participants meet the income or eligibility requirements of the program. 12. Complete the annual CEDS report for 2012 and submit by 12/31/2012. a. Accomplishments – Staff performed outreach to member communities for data gathering. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – Staff completed the annual CEDS report for 2012. c. Difficulties – Most available economic data is from 2010 or lags substantially, making real time analysis difficult. TRAINING AND CONFERENCES Attend and participate in meetings of national, state, and local organizations affecting regional strategy policies and programs. 1. ECIA staff will continue to participate in the annual trip of the Clinton and the Dubuque communities to meet with federal officials concerning local needs. Trips are scheduled for April and May, 2012. a. Accomplishments - ECIA staff attended trips with Clinton and Dubuque to Washington, D.C. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - One staff member went with the City of Dubuque to Washington, D.C. in May, 2012. One staff person attended with the City of Clinton. c. Difficulties - Other than the costs starting to creep up for participating in the events, there were no difficulties encountered. 2. ECIA staff will attend the Iowa League of Cities meeting. a. Accomplishments - Staff attended the Iowa League of Cities Meeting b. Quantifiable Deliverables - Staff attended one Iowa League meeting in September, 2012 and a budget workshop in November.

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c. Difficulties - No difficulties were encountered. These are good meetings for staff to network with our member cities and to get updates on city related issues. ECIA staff will attend Iowa DNR meetings in Des Moines. a. Accomplishments - ECIA staff attended the quarterly IDNR meetings b. Quantifiable Deliverables - ECIA staff attended four meetings of the IDNR this year. c. Difficulties - The meetings are useful to attend but they are in Des Moines so it requires three hours of travel each way for staff. It is time consuming. ECIA staff will attend regional meeting hosted by the EDA. a. Accomplishments - Staff did not attend a specific meeting hosted by the EDA this year but did attend the NADO Executive Directors training in June, 2012 and the EDA breakout session and also attended National NADO in October 2012 and attended the CEDS breakout session b. Quantifiable Deliverables - The NADO Executive Directors session and the National NADO meeting meetings were very useful with valuable information regarding CEDS measurable outcomes and deliverables and how to incorporate that data and information into the document and make the document more useful to regional partners and members. c. Difficulties - No difficulties were encountered. These meetings are a great opportunity to network with EDA staff and other EDA recipients. ECIA staff will attend two national meetings - either NADO, NARC, or the IEDC meetings. a. Accomplishments - Two staff attended the NADO meeting this year and two staff attended the IEDC meeting. The ECIA Executive Director was also invited to participate in the NADO White House summit with 14 other directors from around the US to discuss economic development initiatives with key White House staff members and cabinet staff. The Assistant Director was invited to present smart growth case studies from Clinton, Maquoketa and Dubuque at eth New Partners for Smart Growth Conference in February. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - Two staff people attended the NADO meeting in Las Vegas, NV this past year and two ECIA staff members attended the IEDC in Houston, Texas. Both meetings were very valuable training tools and staff brought back valuable resources. ECIA was honored for its Petal Project at IEDC and received an award and ECIA was honored for its partnership in the Sustainable Dubuque Smart Travel Initiative and received and innovation award for our contribution. c. Difficulties - There were no difficulties encountered with this task. Due to cost, it is generally too expensive to send more than one to two staff to each meeting. ECIA staff will attend training to become familiar with “green” and sustainable business practices that can be introduced to Buyer Supplier companies and member governments. a. Accomplishments - Staff attended two sustainable housing conferences. Staff also attended the New partners for Smart Growth Conference which highlighted smart growth planning and form based code projects in a variety of communities across the country. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - Staff networked with presenters, co-presenters, and conference attendees and have developed open lines of communication with statewide and national sustainability resources. c. Difficulties - There were no difficulties encountered with this task.

INFORMATION DISSEMINATION Disseminate census, economic, statistical and program information by telephone, e-mail, letter, newsletter, personal contact, and training programs. Maintain a database for use in program development and implementation. 1. ECIA staff prepares two full newsletters each year and two “news alerts” which are disseminated to over 800 individuals and/or entities in the region. a. Accomplishments - To be more “green” ECIA began distributing the newsletters electronically rather than by traditional mail. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - Two ECIA news alerts were distributed which is a shorter version of the full newsletter. Two full newsletters were also distributed. Our mailing list is over 800 people and businesses.

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c. Difficulties – No difficulties encountered with this task. 2. ECIA staff maintains the websites for ECIA, Prosperity Eastern Iowa, the Regional Transit Authority, the Eastern Iowa Regional Housing Authority/Corporation, the Eastern Iowa Regional Utility Service Systems, Dubuque Metropolitan Transportation Study, ECIA Business Growth, Buyers Supplier Connection, Petal Project and Accessmyfuture.com. The Petal Project is a new website that staff developed and will continue to develop and maintain as part of our regional economic development activities. a. Accomplishments – Staff completed an overhaul of the ECIA and Eastern Iowa Regional Housing Authority websites and developed a new website for ECIA Business Growth. ECIA staff have continued to develop content for all of the websites including the employee intranet in order to improve information within the agency and with member governments. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - We began tracking hits to all agency websites using google analytics which allows us to see where the hits are generated as well as monitor times of high and low traffic. The ECIA website currently receives an over 1,600 page views/month. c. Difficulties – No difficulties encountered with this task. 3. ECIA staff responds to approximately 150-200 requests for information each year pertaining to grant applications, TIF districts, enterprise zone, etc. a. Accomplishments - Staff provided general information and answered general technical assistance questions from various communities in the region. ECIA staff is a member of the Dubuque Enterprise Zone Commission and participated in meetings, as needed, regarding new projects this year. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - Staff responded to 200+ technical assistance/general information questions from communities in the region with topics varying from code enforcement, budgeting, zoning, land use, transportation, etc. Four projects were approved through the Dubuque Enterprise Zone Commission in which ECIA staff is a member. c. Difficulties – No major difficulties this year. 4. ECIA staff participates in local, regional and national meetings discussing programs, projects and successes in our region related to economic and community development. ECIA staff will present during at least one national meeting in the upcoming year. a. Accomplishments – ECIA’s Executive Director was a key note speaker at the Dubuque Area Chamber of Commerce’s Forecast luncheon. She presented on the economic conditions and impacts of the federal programs on the regional economy. ECIA’s Executive Director participated in the National Association of Development Official’s Washington D.C. policy forum and presented information related to transportation, workforce and the regional economy to departmental staff from EPA, Transportation, and Economic Development. ECIA’s Regional Economic Development & Sustainability Coordinator presented at the International Economic Development Council’s Annual Conference in Houston, Texas. Her presentation focused on the Petal Project green business certification program, which also received an Excellence in Economic Development award at the conference. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – Staff participated in three events this past year. c. Difficulties – There were no difficulties experienced. GRANT/LOAN APPLICATIONS Assist local governments in the preparation of grant/loan applications for funding of projects of local and regional concern. 1. ECIA staff regularly prepare grant applications and loan applications for CDBG projects such as water, sewer, child care centers, etc. a. Accomplishments - ECIA worked with five communities to submit CDBG applications for water/sewer projects. ECIA submitted nine CDBG housing applications for down payment assistance and homeowner rehab. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - ECIA received funding for two CDBG applications in 2012. They were submitted in 2011. Zero housing program applications were funded by IDED. ECIA submitted nine CDBG housing applications for down payment assistance and homeowner rehab.

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c. Difficulties - There were no unusual difficulties encountered. As usual with the CDBG program for housing, community facility and public works, funding is always limited compared to the number of applications. ECIA staff regularly prepares applications for Enterprise Zone and other State economic development programs. a. Accomplishments - Staff worked with the City of Farley in the preparation of two applications to the City and the Iowa Economic Development Authority (IEDA) b. Quantifiable Deliverables – EIMCo, Inc. received $420,000 in TIF rebates for a 10-year period from the City and $158,000 of Investment Tax Credits and Sales Tax Refunds from IEDA. Behnke Enterprises, Inc. received $120,000 in TIF rebates for a 10-year period from the City and $25,650 of Investment Tax Credits and Sales Tax Refunds and a $200,000 half forgivable/half zero interest loan from IEDA c. Difficulties – ECIA staff worked with both businesses to demonstrate and document that they have no in-state competitors ECIA staff regularly prepare federal grant program applications for programs such as State of Good Repair, Clean Fuels, Bus Livability, EPA Brownsfield, TIGGER and TIGER. ECIA staff will continue to pursue these grant programs annually for communities in the region. a. Accomplishments – For the City of Dubuque, ECIA completed one Federal grant application focusing on the intermodal transit facility, which included transit administrative offices and bus storage, parking, and Intelligent Transportation System development plus a Federal grant for disaster recover in the Bee Branch area. Additionally, ECIA staff completed one Federal grant application for the city of Clinton for assistance to finish Liberty Square, and completed one Federal grant application for the city of Dyersville for disaster recovery for their sewer system. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – Four grant applications were approved and $4.9 million in funding brought into the region. c. Difficulties – Very tedious grant applications and highly competitive. ECIA staff prepare Community Attraction and Tourism grant applications for communities. We anticipate 2 applications per year for this funding. a. Accomplishments – ECIA staff completed a CAT grant for the city of Manchester for their Whitewater Park project. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – ECIA submitted one application for the CAT program. c. Difficulties – Assisting the community in identifying other sources of funding for the project. ECIA staff prepare grant and loan applications for the flood recovery and disaster mitigation efforts in the region. ECIA will continue this work through 2012. a. Accomplishments – ECIA closed out the state Jumpstart Funding Assistance contract. Hazard Mitigation Grant Program applications and Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) for Acquisitions have been applied for and awarded. Residential properties were demolished through the FEMA Public Assistance Demolition and CDBG Programs. A single family new construction grant was received. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – Three Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) buyout applications, four HMGP siren and five HMGP emergency generator applications and and three buyout projects including 52 residential properties and one commercial property. All three buyout applications and two siren and one emergency generator application were awarded. Acquisitions are in progress. The single family new construction grant was received which provides 25% down payment assistance to 49 new residential structures within the region. c. Difficulties –Floods of 2010 and 2011; red tape and paperwork related to federal and state funding sources.

DATA CENTER Collect data and program information on economic development trends and conditions including finance, labor, business development, industrial development, and the agricultural economy. 1. ECIA maintains data for grants and reports which is used in applications.

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a. Accomplishments - ECIA regularly collects data in its transportation department for its mapping and model and that information is readily available for staff to utilize in grant and loan related applications. Data is collected as needed utilizing the internet as a resource. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - The grant and loan applications prepared for IDED, and CDBG all utilize statistical data which ECIA maintains. c. Difficulties - There were no difficulties experienced. The process for maintaining the data for the Data Center is much different now as it was in the past as the internet is the quickest and most reliable resource. The internet make the process much more streamlined and available. 2. ECIA maintains the Location One Information System for the region to track the available sites and buildings through the Prosperity Eastern Iowa web site. This is updated on an ongoing basis. a. Accomplishments – Prosperity Eastern Iowa members are responsible for updating their community’s buildings and sites, with ECIA staff have providing technical assistance and updating of region wide statistics, data, and community information. b. Quantifiable Deliverables –All communities in the Prosperity Eastern Iowa region have accurate transportation and demographic data in their profiles. ECIA staff have also assisted communities with developing site video tours to be linked to the LOIS website. c. Difficulties – Some required information in LOIS is not accessible to local economic development professionals. DEVELOPMENT STUDIES Assist local governments and economic development entities in preparing Community Builder Plans and strategic plans in the region. 1. ECIA staff will prepare strategic plans for development groups, chambers or cities in the upcoming year. a. Accomplishments - ECIA was not asked to prepare any Strategic Plans. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – No plans were prepared this year c. Difficulties – We have seen a shifting demand from strategic planning to fundraising planning and will begin to provide those services packaged with grant writing. EASTERN IOWA RURAL UTILITIES, INC. Provide technical assistance to local governments and coordinate with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Iowa Department of Economic Development (IDED) in the efforts to administer the 28E organization that provides water and sewer services to cities and rural residents. 1. ECIA will continue to work with counties in the region in the design and application plans for funding for unsewered communities in the region. a. Accomplishments - 1) The Leisure Lake project was bid and construction contract awarded. Construction is in progress, 2) Fairview wastewater system was completed and placed in operation. A project to expand the system to the north and add 14 customers had funding secured, construction bid and contract awarded. Work is to begin in winter 2012-13. 3) Continue to work with one City (Morley) and engineer on wastewater system development and securing of funding. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – 1) Received additional funding required to implement Leisure Lake wastewater project with construction in progress. 2) completed construction in Fairview with an expansion of system in progress. c. Difficulties - The time between submitting an application to USDA, along with the attendant paperwork, and funding can take years. In the case of Leisure Lake this resulted in the loss of one grant (CDBG) and the potential loss of another (WIRB). This causes hardship for staff and homeowners. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

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Provide technical assistance to local governments, development corporations, chambers of commerce, businesses, and individuals, in the ongoing implementation of the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. ECIA has traditionally provided technical assistance to local governments via a Manager of Government Relations and has extended this to economic technical assistance. The association provides technical expertise in financing and deal packaging. 1. ECIA will assist with Tax Increment Financing in the region. a. Accomplishments - ECIA offered assistance with implementing Tax Increment Financing to the region. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - No community utilized the service this year. c. Difficulties - No difficulties were encountered. 2. ECIA will assist in writing ordinances and in developing zoning plans. a. Accomplishments – Ordinances: For communities staff prepared individual ordinances, updated codes of ordinances, and updated the ECIA model code of ordinances; Plans: Staff developed a regional comprehensive plan entitled the Dubuque County Regional Smart Plan and a plan to implement goals and objectives of this Smart Plan. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – Ordinances: Staff completed five individual ordinances and one code of ordinances for communities and updated the ECIA model code, Five city code updates in progress; Smart Plan: One county and seven communities involved and one regional plan developed c. Difficulties – Ordinances: Tedious work, finding time to work on a city code consecutive times, city clerk hard to get a hold of because they have other jobs; Smart Plan: Some participating communities need to adopt the plan 3. ECIA will assist with RISE applications for roadways in to business parks. a. Accomplishments – Two applications were approved by the DOT. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - Dubuque Regional Airport: Grading has begun for the new terminal and the new entrance road. East 7th Street, Grant approved, construction to begin in May 2013. c. Difficulties – No unusual difficulties occurred. 4. ECIA will assist communities in preparing Urban Revitalization plans and Urban Renewal Plans. a. Accomplishments - ECIA offered Urban Revitalization planning to the region. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – No community utilized the service this year. c. Difficulties - No difficulties occurred. 5. ECIA will assist with EPA, IDNR and IDED Brownfield grant applications a. Accomplishments – ECIA staff attended an EPA/IEDA brownfield grant training conference in Iowa City and discussed opportunities for the region. ECIA staff attended a session at the New Partners for Smart Growth conference that discussed creative ways of using brownfield funds for community facilities. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – Staff attended one brownfield grant training conference and one brownfield session at a national conference. c. Difficulties – Lack of time to discuss opportunities with the region or conduct a pre assessment of possible brownfield properties. 6. ECIA staff will continue to assist small communities under 500 population with utility billing and accounting services. a. Accomplishments – There are currently 13 communities with billing systems set up. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – To date, 13 communities are set up and trained on the billing program. c. Difficulties – The inability to incorporate the utility bill calculation into the QuickBooks software has limited our ability to improve the functionality of the program. 7. ECIA staff through the Prosperity Eastern Iowa entity will continue to provide expertise in web page design and developing and submitting responses to leads and inquiries in the region. a. Accomplishments - Staff worked with Prosperity Eastern Iowa members to improve economic development websites. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - Staff helped county/city economic developers with project proposals for three leads. c. Difficulties - Some of the smaller communities do not have high quality maps of their industrial parks

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and other available sites and buildings which makes them less competitive. Staff continue to work with individual communities to improve the quality of their materials, including web presence, but it is very time consuming. PROSPERITY EASTERN IOWA COLLABORATIVE MARKETING Administer and conduct the activities identified by the Prosperity Eastern Iowa Economic Development Partnership to further business retention and expansion in ECIA’s three of ECIA’s Counties, Dubuque, Delaware, Jackson and then Jones County. Key projects and activities that will be conducted include: 1. ECIA implemented the local industry business retention and expansion program known as InfoAction. a. Accomplishments - Each economic developer is responsible for their own retention program and calling on local businesses. As a group, the economic developers decided that ECIA staff should focus on marketing the regional entity and not be concerned about the business retention program. Each economic developer will continue their retention efforts locally and will use PEI as a networking vehicle to discuss their successes, issues or obstacles in making those important business retention calls. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - Each economic developer in the region is making annual calls on their businesses and many are using the State sponsored Sychronist software. This is no longer a focus or priority for ECIA staff as part of the PEI ongoing activities. c. Difficulties - No difficulties have been encountered. It was a mutual decision that this is no longer a priority for ECIA staff but remains a very important priority and task for the economic developers individually in the region. 2. Continual update of the regional websites: Prosperity Eastern Iowa, Accessmyfuture.com, Petal Project and Buyer Supplier. a. Accomplishments - The regional marketing website was recently updated with new branding and demographic data. AccessMyFuture.com continues to be updated by staff and partner organizations. The Buyer Supplier website is receiving a facelift and improvements to usability, data gathering, and RFP posting have been made. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – Four websites have been maintained by staff, with updating completed as needed. c. Difficulties - None at this time. 3. Continue to seek partners and raise funds for the Prosperity efforts. a. Accomplishments - Staff continues to research funding sources for Prosperity Eastern Iowa efforts and have been successful at receiving funds from the Iowa Economic Development Authority, Dubuque Racing Association, Dubuque Metropolitan Area Solid Waste Agency, as well as recruiting new partners for the Buyer Supplier program which increases membership income. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - Staff received grant funds from the Iowa Economic Development Authority, Dubuque Racing Association, Dubuque Metropolitan Area Solid Waste Agency, and membership fees from the Northeast Iowa Business Network for inclusion in the Buyer Supplier program. c. Difficulties - Budgets are tight for local economic development groups and at the state level which makes the grant process more competitive and maintaining membership and local match a concern. 4. Continue to partner with the State of Iowa on the export conference and program. a. Accomplishments – Prosperity Eastern Iowa partnered with the U.S. Department of Commerce, Iowa Small Business Development Centers, Small Business Administration, Iowa Economic Development Authority, and CIRAS to host a success exporting conference in Dubuque on March 29, 2012. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – Just over one-hundred individuals registered for the conference. Forty percent of participants noted that the conference exceeded their expectations, and eighty-three percent indicated that they would attend the conference again. c. Difficulties – Recruiting participants was a challenge at first. Traditional marketing efforts (press releases, emails, etc.) didn’t seem to be effective. Registrations significantly increased after PEI members personally called businesses to encourage them to participate.

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5. Continue to pursue partnerships to expand Buyer Supplier into other parts of Iowa; into Wisconsin; and into Illinois. a. Accomplishments – In 2012 Buyer Supplier expanded into Jo Daviess, Carroll, and parts of Whiteside County in Illinois. The partnership with Northeast Iowa Business Network continued. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – Buyer Supplier expanded from eleven counties in Iowa to include thirteen counties in Iowa and Illinois. c. Difficulties – Many surrounding cities/counties/economic development groups are interested in Buyer Supplier but cannot afford the annual membership dues. 6. Continue to promote and seek businesses to participate in the Petal Project sustainability program and green business program that can be incorporated into their daily business practices. a. Accomplishments - The Petal Project has assisted sixteen businesses in the community with improving and “greening” their daily business practices. The program is partnering with local chambers of commerce to send out monthly green tips. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - Sixteen businesses in the community are either in the process of or have completed the Petal project green business certification. c. Difficulties - No issues at this time. 7. Continue to focus on recruitment and retention of the younger workforce in the region. a. Accomplishments - Starting to develop a career match program that will provide students with job shadowing opportunities. b. Quantifiable Deliverables - The program will launch by the end of 2012. c. Difficulties –None at this time. 8. Continue to expand the partnership and work with Iowa State Extension office in developing a partnership for local and regional foods and incorporate into the Buyer Supplier program. a. Accomplishments – Southwestern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission, Atten Babler Risk Management, TCEDA, and ECIA partnered to complete a Local Food Prospectus for the Tri-State Region. The report focused on exploring the feasibility of scaling up wholesale fruit and vegtable production in the Tri-State region to compete with other produce regions such as California, Canada, and Mexico. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – One local foods report was completed and the findings were shared with local producers and aggregators. c. Difficulties – It continues to be challenging to connect with local producers and aggregators. 9. Continue to partner with the Northeast Iowa Business Network in the expansion and promotion of the Buyer Supplier program in their region. a. Accomplishments – The Buyer Supplier partnership with Northeast Iowa Business Network continued in 2012. Monthly e-blasts were sent to participating businesses and marketing efforts continued. b. Quantifiable Deliverables – Over 100 new businesses registered for the program in 2012. Additionally, the website generated hits from 1,977 unique visitors, who on average spent three minutes and thirty-seven seconds on the website. c. Difficulties – Businesses continue to use the website, but most do not post RFPs. Plans are in place to add new, more user friendly features to the website to simply the RFP posting process.

C. Community and Private Sector Participation and ECIA Governing Board Community input is critical to the CEDS planning process. An outline of the process follows: • A survey is conducted with member cities and counties within ECIA's five-county region to determine their priorities and economic development plans for the upcoming year. Responses are then compiled and prioritized by the CEDS Planning Committee. • ECIA staff meets with the region's Economic Development leaders to receive their input. ED Roundtable discussions through Prosperity Eastern Iowa occur every other month with Executive Committee meetings monthly. The group meets every other month and discusses projects, strategies, and shares resources. They also review and discuss the CEDS priorities as well as progress in meeting the priorities.

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• ECIA publishes notices in the five-county region in the official county newspapers regarding the CEDS planning process indicating a comment period to receive comments from the public. The planning committee then meets to receive and discuss the community input. • Comments are received from the ECIA Council. • The CEDS document is approved by the CEDS Committee, the Executive Committee, and the ECIA Council. • The CEDS document is reviewed by the Committee on an annual basis and information is provided to the EDA in the form of an annual report. The prioritized goals and objectives are a reflection of the efforts of the CEDS Committee as well as input received from the citizens of the region identifying the economic goals for the next five years. The committee recommended and the ECIA Council concurred that the four goals identified are all of highest priority, therefore are all ranked at the same level. These goals are linked to improving the limitations within the region as well as building and expanding upon our opportunities. The CEDS Planning Committee is comprised of representatives from various segments of the region. The committee represents all major interest groups providing viewpoints that give a well-balanced perspective for the region. The trends, opportunities, and limitations affecting the economic growth of the region have been identified and related to the trends of the national and global market. The mission/ vision and goals of ECIA have been adopted and used as the vision for the CEDS process. The mission/ vision is used as the foundation to build upon when developing goals and strategies for the region. The committee composition, the community input, and the process for the analysis and formulation of this document have remained the same and can be found on the following pages.

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ECIA STRATEGY & PLANNING COMMITTEE (CEDS) ROSTER JANUARY, 2012

1. PRIVATE SECTOR REPRESENTATIVES (At least 51%) Any senior management official or executive holding a key decision-making position, with respect to any for-profit enterprise. Name Roger Stewart Rod Tokheim Donna Boss Norlan Hinke Steve Hoeger Wayne Breckon Tori Richter Lou Egging Scott Frost

Company Maquoketa State Bank Mercy Medical Center Private Farm, Agriculture Clinton National Bank Henderson Manufacturing Dubuque Bank & Trust American Trust & Savings The Egging Company American Trust & Savings

Position Executive V.P./Credit Review Vice-President President & Owner Senior Vice President President & Owner Vice-President Vice-President President Vice-President

2. REPRESENTATIVES OF OTHER ECONOMIC INTERESTS (No more than 49%) Persons who provide additional representation of the main economic interests of the region. These may include, but are not limited to: public officials, community leaders, representatives of workforce development boards, institutions of higher education, minority and labor groups, and private individuals. Name Donna Sweeney Rick Dickinson Don Thiltgen Milt Kramer Bill Rediger Ron Axtell Jim Vermazen Tim Cottle

Area of Interest Local Government, Women Econ Development, Business Local Government Local Government Low-Income, Minority, Senior Citizen IA Workforce Dev. & NICC Workforce Development Higher Education

CALCULATIONS Private Sector Representatives (at least 51%) Representatives of Other Economic Interests (no more than 49%) Total Committee Membership

Position City Clerk, Holy Cross Executive Director & COO Mayor, DeWitt Mayor, Manchester Chairperson EIRHA/EIRHC Regional Manager RWIB Board Member Associate Director Number 9 8 17

Percent 53% 47% 100%

APPLICABLE REGULATIONS: 13 CFR Part 303.6(a): The Planning Organization must appoint a Strategy Committee. The Strategy Committee must represent the main economic interests of the Region and must include Private Sector Representatives [as defined above] as a majority of its membership. In addition, the Planning Organization should ensure that the Strategy Committee includes public officials, community leaders, representatives of workforce development boards, institutions of higher education, minority and labor groups, and private individuals.

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CEDS Planning Committee Work Program Work Item/Task Establish Goals

Responsible Party CEDS Planning Committee ECIA Council

Timetable Annually, by June 30

Establish Priorities

CEDS Planning Committee ECIA Council

Annually, by June 30

Collect Data ECIA Staff

Ongoing, annually complete by October 30

Receive Community Input ECIA Staff

Ongoing, annually receive comments by October 15

Analyze Information/Comments

ECIA Staff

Annually, by November 30

Identify Strategies

CEDS Planning Committee

Annually, by December 15

Prepare Implementation Plans

ECIA Staff

Annually, by December 15

Identify Opportunities and Limitations CEDS Planning Committee

Annually, by December 15

Report Progress

ECIA Staff

Annually, by December 15

Prepare Annual Report

ECIA Staff

Annually, by December 15

Prepare Five-Year CEDS

ECIA Staff, in cooperation with CEDS Planning Committee and ECIA Council

The ECIA Council is the jurisdiction giving the official approval of the CEDS document. The ECIA Executive Director is ultimately responsible for reporting on the progress of the program and its results. *As adopted by the ECIA Council, July 2003 Updated October 2008

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ECIA EDD GOVERNING BOARD MEMBERSHIP ROSTER 1. GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES (51-65%) Elected officials and/or employees of a general purpose unit of state, local or Indian tribal government who have been appointed to represent the government. Name Government Position Shirley Kepford City of Tipton Mayor Betty Ellerhoff Cedar Co. Bd of Supervisors Supervisor Matt Muckler City of West Branch City Administrator John Staszewski Clinton Co Bd of Supervisors Supervisor Don Thiltgen City of DeWitt Mayor Milt Kramer City of Manchester Mayor Linda Gaul City of Earlville City Clerk Shirley Helmrichs Delaware Co Bd Supervisors Supervisor Jeff Madlom Delaware Co Bd Supervisors Supervisor Daryl Klein Dubuque Co Bd Supervisors Supervisor Ray Stephan City of Peosta City Council Donna Sweeney City of Holy Cross City Clerk Mike Van Milligen City of Dubuque City Manager Larry Koos Jackson Co Bd Supervisors Supervisor Paul Konrardy City of LaMotte Mayor Amy Moore City of Maquoketa City Council Peggy Kedley City of Lowden City Clerk 2. NON-GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES (35-49%) A. Private Sector Representatives: Any senior management official or executive holding a key decision-making position, with respect to any for-profit enterprise. (At least one required) Name Company / Enterprise Position Brett Nagel Community Savings Bank Vice President Scott Frost American Trust & Savings Vice President Norlan Hinke Clinton National Bank Vice President Wayne Breckon Dubuque Bank & Trust Vice President Roger Stewart Maquoketa State Bank Vice President Bill Rediger Eastern Iowa Developmnt Co President Rod Tokheim Mercy Medical Center Vice President Steve Ames Clinton Regional Developmnt President & CEO B. Stakeholder Organization Representatives: Executive directors of chambers of commerce, or representatives of institutions of post-secondary education, workforce development groups or labor groups. (At least one required) Name Organization Position Donna Boss Delaware County Chamber Board Chair Roy Buol University of Dubuque Director Facilities Mgmt (Executive) Jim Vermazen Reg. Workforce Development Board Member (Executive) Board, Region 1 Elise Bergan Edgewood Chamber Director Tim Cottle EICC-Clinton Comm College Associate Director

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3. AT-LARGE REPRESENTATIVES (0-14%) Other individuals who represent the principal economic interests of the region. (No minimum required) Name Chris Nosbisch Mark Vulich Brian Wagner

Area of Interest City of Tipton City of Clinton City of Maquoketa

Background City Administrator Mayor City Manager

Alternates

Wayne Deerberg, Supervisor, Cedar County Board of Supervisors Peggy Kedley, Lowden City Clerk Steve Lindner, City Administrator, City of DeWitt Timothy Vick, City Manager, City of Manchester Dave Heiar, Economic Development Director, City of Dubuque Judy Carr, Deputy City Clerk, City of Maquoketa Steven Flynn, Owner, Flynn Construction, Jackson County Board of Supervisors Mike Hein, President, Liberty Bank Orville Randolph, Mayor, City of Bennett

CALCULATIONS 1. Government Representatives (51-65%)

Number 17

Percent 52%

2. Non- Government Representatives (35-49%)

13

39%

3

9%

33

100%

A. Private Sector Representatives (at least 1)

8

B. Stakeholder Organization Representatives (at least 1)

5

3. At-Large Representatives (0-14%) Total Board Membership APPLICABLE REGULATIONS 13 CFR Part 304.2(c):

The District Organization must demonstrate that its governing body is broadly representative of the principal economic interest of the Region, and, unless otherwise prohibited by applicable State or local law, must include at least one (1) Private Sector Representative and one (1) or more of the following: Executive Directors of Chambers of Commerce, or representatives of institutions of post- secondary education, workforce development groups or labor groups, all of which must comprise in the aggregate a minimum of thirty-five (35) percent of the District Organization’s governing body. The governing body shall also have at least a simple majority of its membership who are elected officials and/or employees of a general purpose unit of State, local or Indian tribal government who have been appointed to represent the government. Upon the District Organization’s showing of its inability to locate a Private Sector Representative to serve on its governing body following extensive due diligence, the Assistant Secretary may waive the Private Sector Representative requirement. The Assistant Secretary shall not delegate the authority to grant a waiver under this paragraph.

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Governing Board Members Name

Affiliation

Public Private Minority Female County Official X Cedar X X Cedar X X Cedar X X Cedar X Cedar X Cedar X Cedar X Cedar

Matt Muckler Peggy Kedley (8) Shirley Kepford Betty Ellerhoff Chris Nosbisch Mike Hein (5) Wayne Deerberg (6) Orville Randolph (9)

Local Government Local Government Local Government Local Government Local Government Business, Industry Local Government Local Government

Don Thiltgen Steve Lindner (1) John Staszewski Tim Cottle Mark Vulich Rod Tokheim Peggy Sellnau

Local Government Local Government Local Government Education Local Government Business Local Government

X X X

Linda Gaul Jeff Madlom Milt Kramer Timothy Vick (2) Shirley Helmrichs Donna Boss Elise Bergan

Local Government Local Government Local Government Local Government Local Government, Women Ag, Business, Women Economic Development

X X X X X

Daryl Klein Ray Stephan Donna Sweeney Bill Rediger Wayne Breckon Michael Van Milligen Dave Heiar (3)

Local Government Local Government Local Government, Women Housing, Low Income Business/Commerce Local Government Local Government

X X X

Paul Konrardy Amy Moore Larry Koos Steve Flynn (4) Brian Wagner Roger Stewart Judy Carr (7)

Local Government Local Government Local Government Local Government Local Government Business/Commerce Local Government

X X X X X

Roy Buol Jim Vermazen

Local Government Emp & Trng, Business

X

(1) Alternate for Thiltgen (2) Alternate for Kramer (3) Alternate for Van Milligen (4) Alternate for Koos (5) Alternate for Cedar Co. (6) Alternate for Ellerhoff (7) Alternate for Wagner (8) Alternate for Cedar Co. (9) Alternate for Cedar Co.

X X

X X

X

X X

X X

X X

X X

X X X

X

X

X

X

X

Appt. Date 2011 2010 2008 2011 2012 2007 2009 2012

Clinton Clinton Clinton Clinton Clinton Clinton Clinton

2000 2002 2009 2012 2012 2009 2012

Delaware Delaware Delaware Delaware Delaware Delaware Delaware

2005 2009 1999 2005 1999 2002 2009

Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque

2011 1988 1994 2012 2012 1994 1986

Jackson Jackson Jackson Jackson Jackson Jackson Jackson

2008 2012 2005 2007 1997 1998 2007

Dubuque 2005 Delaware 1994

Note Vacancies: 2 Cedar, 1 Jackson

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Section 3 Evaluation As indicated in the attached implementation charts, the activities in the region supporting the goals and objectives have been numerous. The job growth for the region has been positive, surpassing other areas in the State of Iowa. A key to the success of the region and to the progress of these many activities is partnerships. Private and public partnerships have been developed to implement many of the projects, especially the larger scale projects. Without these partnerships, the region would not experience such success. ECIA has acted as a liaison in these public/private partnerships and has worked behind the scenes on grant applications, general technical assistance, and in many cases, provided financing through our loan programs. The charts attached depict the success of the region and the effectiveness of implementing the CEDS goals and objectives.

Section 4 Schedule Including Implementation/Plan of Action See Spreadsheets Based on the analysis and the goals/objectives established, an implementation schedule of activities was developed as well as an evaluation tool for each activity. The implementation schedule is evaluated annually through the CEDS annual reporting process. The activities on the following pages are categorized within each of the goals and are listed by county within the region, and resources are identified. The CEDS committee annually reviews the CEDS process to determine the effectiveness of the implementation plan, reporting process, and the evaluation plan. In the following Implementation and Evaluation Report, notice that the projects in BOLD type have been completed over the past year, and projects that have either been added or adjusted are noted in RED type. Based on the progress of the activities, assumptions can be made for the economic future of the region. This 2012 Annual Report reflects a great deal of activity in the Improvement of Basic Public Works goal with many projects completed, under construction, or near completion during calendar year 2012.

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REPORT ON 2012 GRANT ACTIVITIES

Prioritized Goals and Objectives* as reported in the 2009-2014 CEDS Increase/Expand the Economic Segments in the Region • Prepare and plan for the expansion and creation of industrial parks • Encourage the location and expansion of manufacturing industries • Encourage the expansion of the tourism/recreation and service industries • Encourage the location and expansion of technology related industries • Encourage the location of wind, solar, and alternative fuel industries • Encourage the creation and expansion of industries that promote the use of agricultural products • Encourage small and minority owned business startups • Encourage entrepreneurship • Encourage the retention and expansion of existing employers • Encourage the location and expansion of current telephony technology and broadband technology systems • Promote the improvement of highway, rail, airport, and river transportation • Improve infrastructure and maximize existing resources • Promote and encourage companies in the region to buy and supply regionally • Encourage partnerships and marketing as a region, not individually Create a Skilled, Highly Educated, Permanent, Full-Time Workforce for Business and Industry • Maintain and create new partnerships in the region • Connect business and industry with employment and training programs • Collaborate regionally to address employers’ workforce needs • Promote programs to encourage high school and college age students to explore career paths in the region • such as utilizing the career readiness program and/or the career based website, accessmyfuture.com • Encourage employers to utilize local and regional websites for posting open positions within their company such as accessdubuquejobs.com • Encourage the creation of “green” jobs in the region Facilitate the Improvement and Maintenance of the Housing Stock and Housing Supply in the Region • Encourage the construction of affordable housing development • Encourage the reuse and redevelopment of vacant existing properties in the region converting to housing stock • Encourage homeownership opportunities • Encourage regional rental collaboration for multiple housing unit listings Promote Improvement of Basic Public Works Facilities and Community Services which Improve the Public’s Health, Safety, and Living Conditions • Disseminate information on available funding resources • Encourage partnerships in the region • Encourage the use of EIRUSS for small communities and unincorporated areas in the region • Encourage the use of sustainable and green concepts in the development of water, sewer, housing and community facility projects Promote and encourage sustainability throughout the region • Collaborate regionally to create ECO-EI building on the Sustainable Dubuque program • Create a regional economy with opportunities for new green markets, jobs, products, and services • Encourage energy conservation • Encourage recycling • Encourage community design and reuse which contributes to identity, heritage and sense of place • Encourage environmental integrity through healthy air, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and minimizing health risks

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SECTION 6: IMPLEMENTATION/PLAN OF ACTION/ACCOMPLISHMENTS ACHIEVED CEDS Goal: Increase/Expand the Economic Segments in the Region Difficulties Encountered: State and Federal funding; community support; weather; competitive markets; land owners; rising construction costs Funding Sources: Private, Local, State and Federal funds; grants Task to be Implemented Encourage entrepreneurship

Encourage location and expansion of technology related industry

Lead Organization and Implementation Plan AccessMyFuture.com - Interactive "garage" for resources on starting a business SBA - A virtual one stop shop for entrepreneurs Clinton - Develop a 100-acre business technology park, located adjacent to Mill Creek Parkway

Encourage the expansion of the Cedar County – Organize a county-wide tourism organization tourism/recreation and service industry Clinton County - Clinton County Conservation Board - Construct Mississippi River Eco Tourism Center

Dubuque - Class A Baseball Stadium Dubuque - Grand River Center - Convention Expansion Bellevue - Construct new Bellevue Family Aquatic Center Dubuque - Develop a 30-acre retail site at old Farmland Foods location

Expected Results Resource for prospective entrepreneurs Increased access to resources Business and Technology Park

Performance Measures and Evaluation Indicators Design completed

Schedule 2009-2012

funding secured; website design in progress technology park ready for occupancy; marketing program implemented; 25 acres of business park developed; 100 acres available but only 10 platted; new 20,000 sq ft building constructed in 2011 for an accounting firm; continue to seek funding for expansion Promotion of tourism in Cedar County Organization in place and staff hired; number of additional tourists and attractions Expanded educational facility; Cost: $2,500,000; 2009-$1,200,000 raised; Construction enhanced tourism destination for complete, funds still needed to complete educational displays, area and to purchase furnishings, kitchen equipment and more

2012-2013 2007-2015

Another venue of entertainment Expanded facility Increased recreational opportunities in the community Construct a 250,000 square-foot shopping center with several outlets

2012-2016 2012-2017 2009-2013

Cost: $20,000,000 Cost: $24,732,105 timeline identified; land purchased; enhanced recreational opportunities, new tourists to the area Number of stores at location; Bee Branch improvements have been completed

Ongoing 2006-2012

2012-2016

West Branch - Community Center

Gymnasium, fitness rooms, Considering various sites; Waiting on funding weightlifting and cardiovascular equipment, racquetball court, locker rooms, elevated track, meeting rooms, kitchen, council chambers, and a future pool

2012-2020

Dyersville - Swimming Pool Expansion Dyersville - Social Center Building Dyersville - All Star Ballpark Heaven

Improved swimming pool Improved social center Phase One: 12 baseball and softball fields, concession stands, indoor state of the art training center, conference center (possibly a public/private partnership with indoor pool and theatre room). Improved communication services

2010-2013 2010-2013 2011-2014

Encourage the location and expansion Tipton, Farley, and Dyersville – investigate and encourage companies of current telephone technology and to provide up-to-date digital communications to local businesses, broadband technology systems industry and residential consumers Extend fiber optic cable to DBQ Industrial Center West

Fiber optic connection for industrial park 32

Waiting on funding; Shovel-ready Project complete City has rezoned land and provided TIF funding; city is seeking EDA funding for sewer expansion; business is in the process of securing private sector funding for project

Status of the services, type of new or improved service, cost to Ongoing consumers, number of households affected; service has improved over previous year, consumer satisfaction rates Fiber optic present in the park; Fiber optic connections, number of Ongoing new businesses in park using connection


Dubuque, Delaware, Jackson, Cedar, and Clinton - Connect Iowa Encourage the location and expansion DeWitt - Locate business to Crossroads Business Park of manufacturing industries

Assess the level of broadband access, adoption, and use Employees retained; reuse infrastructure

Completed the Connect Iowa assessment in Delaware County 2011-2012 and started it in Dubuque and the City of DeWitt New business in the business park; Guardian Industries completed Ongoing phase II of a $45 million expansion in 2011; Custom-Pak completed a new 250,000 sq building in Spring 2012

Encourage the retention and expansion Clinton - Create 1,250 jobs and generate $130 million in new private To attract jobs that pay 20 percent af existing employers sector improvements more than the current median wage

Number of jobs created and revenue; expected completion in 2017

Improve infrastructure and maximize existing resources

Cost: $200 million; Complete Streets construction including 2009-2016 infrastructure are complete ($5.6 million TIGER funding); CARADCO building completed rehab ($8.9 million CDBG; $4.5 million low interest loans); HMD eligible for historic tax credits; seeking funding for additional buildings in district Local banks collaborated to create low-interest loan pool; $149 Ongoing million invested since 2008 with an increase of an additional increase of 1,120 employees since 2008. The fund was recapitalized in 2010 with an additional $2.5 million; no data available for 2011 and 2012 $574,700 grant from US Dept of Energy; Awarded $1.6 million Ongoing from ICAAP; Created $200,000 RLF for an Energy Efficiency loan fund

Dubuque - Millwork District Revitalization Strategy

The preservation and sustainability of the Millwork District by providing commercial, housing, and employment opportunities

Dubuque - Dubuque Main Street - Downtown development

Downtown economic growth

Dubuque - Energy efficiency and conservation and IBM "Smart City"

Energy efficiency upgrades in the commercial sector; energy audits of municipal buildings; RLF for energy efficiency retrofit to landlords or poperty owners; RLF for municipal buildings for energy efficient retrofits

Dubuque - Phase II Historic Federal Building Renovation Improved building Clinton - Demolish dilapidated houses; construct sanitary/storm sewers, Improved neighborhood and pave Camanche/Liberty Avenue (Liberty Square) transportation

Cost: $6 million 2011-2016 Number of houses demolished; sewer installed; roadway paved; 2006-2014 number of businesses expanded or relocated; jobs created or retained; continue to seek funding to demolish structures and offset costs; Camanche Avenue received TIGER grant for 4.7 million

West Branch - Lift station

Design work in progress; need to secure funding (likely a GO bond) Study completed and areas identified; initial repairs complete; need to secure funding for remaining repairs

2010-2013

Researching options Cost: $13 million; Broke ground Spring 2012 Number of acres in the industrial parks; acres purchased and parks developed; existing business moved to Durant industrial park; new business also in park - Norfolk Iron and Metal

Ongoing 2012-2013 2009-2013

Construct a new lift station

West Branch - I&I

Prepare and plan for the expansion and creation of industrial parks

2006-2017

Reduce the amount of stormwater entering the wastewater system by repairing and replacing wastewater mains West Branch - Waste Water Treatment Facility Improvements Reduce ammonia levels Clarke College - Construct new science building New science building Mechanicsville – Develop a 20-acre park in the northeast section of the One new park in the county for city industrial growth and three expanded parks for industrial growth Durant – Develop an industrial park

New industrial and commercial development

33

2011-2013

2003-2010


West Branch – Continue development of industrial park on I-80 Tipton - Develop a 75-acre site Tipton – Construct a road in the industrial park and upgrade street in the Northwest Industrial Park Durant - Expand West 2nd Avenue to the south of Highway 927

New industrial and commercial development New commercial development

Sites available; utilities ran to the site; possible road construction

New or existing business relocating; site identified; one site available; certified shovel-ready site Improved access to the industrial parks Number of new roads built and access to parks

Ongoing 2003-2012 2009-2013

Improved access to the Industrial Park South Clinton – Construct northern leg of the Mill Creek Expressway New industrial and commercial development Clinton - Construct road (19th Avenue N. expansion) for access to Lyons Improved access to business and Business and Technology Park; seek funding for infrastucture and rail technology park; another major road for park development to border the City; access to rail for new and expanding companies

RISE grant applications funded; access to park; streets under construction Conducting needs assessment; seeking funds; property acquisition completed Phase I & II complete; phase III partially funded; still seeking $2 million; construction tentatively scheduled for 2014

Clinton – Continue development of Manufacturing Meadows III

Number of acres in the industrial parks available; number of acres Ongoing available for industrial/commercial development in the industrial parks; Continue to evaluate ways to create inventory; Comp Plan in planning stages Phase 1 completed; awarded RISE grant; number of new Ongoing prospects for the industrial parks; Accommodate both rail and nonrail industries; 2012 city approved building spur track into park; City of Low Moor has pledged to provide water service to the industrial park New infrastructure and port authority designation; number of 2005-2017 barge terminals established; port authority established; number of new prospects

New industrial and commercial development

Clinton – Develop Lincolnway Rail Port Industrial Park to accommodate New industrial and commercial industries requiring 50 acres or more development

Camanche and Clinton - Evaluate the creation of a port authority and Improved access to region to attract foreign trade zone; to regulate water, rail and air transportation and and retain industry a foreign trade zone to allow for duty-free importation of raw goods and materials Clinton - Valley Bluff Development - Continue development of the New commercial development commercial area north of U.S. 30 and east of Mill Creek Parkway City of Manchester/Manchester Enterprise – Construct an industrial speculative building Edgewood – Provide utilities within the industrial park

Spec building to attract new business New utilities in the industrial park

Manchester – Burrington Road Sanitary Sewer Extension

Sanitary sewer extension to serve additional industrial park area, a planned redimix plant, and an existing truck stop Less congestion in surrounding areas

Dubuque County – Construct IA32 (Southwest Arterial) from Seippel Road to Hwy 61/151

Farley – Extend streets, sewer and water; plat and survey in the industrial park

Facilities improved in the industrial park

34

2009-2013 2013-2018 2012-2014

Area is currently being developed; Wild Rose Casino since 2008 and Hampton Inn opened in 2012; new prospects continue to be developed

Ongoing

Spec building constructed in 2011; building sold in 2012

2009-2013

Water and sewer is in the industrial park; Still need electric and 2009-2013 natural gas Number of utilities extended beyond the industrial parks; number 2009-2013 of new utilities, length of utilities extended beyond Manchester industrial parks Final engineering and land acquisition started in 2009; $2.9 2003-2013 million in ARRA funds committed; Project location study and environmental assessment complete; Construction of two bridges underway; $17 million in the state of Iowa 5 year program for US 20 interchange Number of new improvements, plat and survey completed; 2009-2013 improved facilities in the industrial park


Dyersville – Acquire and develop commercial property for a new commercial park; (12th Ave SW/332nd Ave Street Expansion)

New commercial park in Dyersville

Land has been acquired thru City and DEDC partnership. 20 acres sold to FarmTek for facility expansion and 100 additional jobs. Remaining 30 acres will need to be developed with water, sewer, gas and electrical. 12th Ave SW was completed in 2012 for access to the park. phase I complete; 25 acres still available; utilities are in place in phase 1; seeking funding to expand infrastructure to the west 100 acres of the park (phase II & III) Number of acres available in the industrial park; Industrial park developed and number of acres available and number of prospects East Peosta Industrial Park open with two tenants; three parcels available; utilities ran to site Annexation complete; land is not developed

2003-2014

Dyersville – Expand 20 West Industrial Park (Phase II)

Expanded Industrial park in Dyersville

New Vienna – Purchase land for the purpose of developing an industrial park

New industrial park in New Vienna

Peosta - Purchase land for the purpose of developing an industrial park Dubuque - Annexation of 195 acres on its northwest corner near Asbury Plaza Dubuque - Industrial Center West - Encourage new and existing businesses to locate to expanded industrial park

New industrial park in Peosta

Cost of this phase: $5 million; Grading, streets, water, sewer extensions

Ongoing

Dubuque - Industrial Center South - New park along both sides of Seippel Road near Highway 20.

More land for commercial development; new business locations for existing and new companies

Grading underway. Funding needed for construction of US 20 interchange.

2011-2013

Jackson County – Identify potential industrial/commercial areas along U.S. 61 highway corridor Preston – Develop existing industrial park and attract an industry to the park

Study growth patterns – prevent sprawl Expanded industrial park with a new business

2009-2013

Manchester – Development of a new industrial park by a private investor; located at the corner of Iowa Highway 13 and U.S. 20

More land for commercial development; new business locations for existing and new companies

Study completed and areas identified; commercial and industrial areas identified; property rezoned Number of acres in the industrial park and number of businesses located in the park; new and expanded industrial park and new businesses located in the park; Plastics Unlimited expansion complete; proposed TM Woodworks relocation Zoning changes; run water and sewer to area

Maquoketa – Promote citywide status as an industrial enterprise zone

Maintain current status

Number of enterprise zone opportunities; number of businesses using Enterprise Zone benefits Cost: $40 million; implement master plan; State RISE grant submitted and approved. Grading in progress. Cost: $3.2 million; creation of community coalition; presentations to legislative committees; correspondence to Congressional delegations; platform funded as part of State of Good Repair grant for intermodal facility Project included in IDOT's 5 year plan; construction planned for 2015; City roads will need to be built and extended to support the interchange; funding needed for city portion of project

Ongoing

Promote the improvement of highway, Dubuque - Dubuque Regional Airport to expand facilities rail, airport, and river transportation Dubuque - Ride the Rail, Passenger Train Service (Amtrak) from Chicago to Dubuque

Dyersville - Highway 20 West Interchange

More land for commercial development More land for commercial development; new business locations for existing and new companies

New terminal, parking lot and access road. A consolidated effort to achieve funding; creation of a state-wide rail program in Iowa; advocate for additional financial resources Increased safety

35

2012-2016

Ongoing

2006-2012 2006

2009-2013

Ongoing

2007-2025 2009-2013

2012-2016


Dubuque - Intermodal Facility

Create a transit hub

Dubuque - 9th & 11th Street Conversion

Convert one-way to two-way streets

Cost- $10.5 million of which $8 million is from Sate of Good 2013-2015 Repair Grant. The project will create an efficient transit system by connecting to other modes of transportation and other services provided in the region. Create a Transit Oriented Development in partnership with Historic Millwork District

Cost - $1.7 million. This project will help in circulating the traffic in efficient way and help the transit system to function well in the intermodal facility Dubuque - Elm Street conversion Convert one-way to two-way and Cost - $600,000. this project received Transportation community eliminated elm street extension and System Preservation (TCSP) funds. This project will help to improve circulation of traffic in and around Historic Millwork District (HMD). ECIA Transportation and Planning - Complete projects in approved Fulfilling planning requirements and Creating work elements for staff to fulfill FHWA and DOT RPA 2011/2012 TIP needs for the area planning requirements and future needs for all modes of transportation ECIA Transportation and Planning - Complete projects in approved Fulfilling planning requirements and Creating work elements for staff to fulfill FHWA and DOT DMATS 2011/2012 TIP needs for the area planning requirements and future needs for all modes of transportation ECIA Long Range Transportation Plan - DMATS LRTP 2010-2040 List of transportation federal aid Help cities and counties to program their five year budgets with projects within DMATS area projects that are federal aid eligible and have a positive impact within their region; Create a timeline for future projects helping communities to start planning and programming for implementation ECIA Transportation and Planning in partnership with city of Dubuque, Visualization for future projects Converting projects into 3D Greater Dubuque Development Corp, and DOT helping to get better public input Smarter Travel - ECIA Transportation and Planning in partnership with Web portal for transit providers Collecting gps and gis data and route schedules within the region city of Dubuque and IBM Dubuque County and Holy Cross – Coordinate with the State on Improved access to the region Securing funds for the improvements, completion of the planning improving Highway 52 from Sageville to Luxemburg study; status of the project in the State plan Dubuque County – Complete the reconstruction of the Great River Improved access to the region, Partial reconstruction completed; Status of the reconstruction, Road improved safety on the road improved safety and access Support the construction of U.S. 30 as a four-lane highway from Cedar Improved access to the region Securing of funds for the four-lane; in the State five year plan; Rapids to Clinton Economic Impact Study complete Support study to expand U.S. 30 to four-lanes through Cedar, Clinton Improved access to the region Feasibility study complete; some funding secured; status of the and Linn Counties to Chicago project in the State plan Highway 20 improvements from Peosta to Seipple Road Improved access and control of DOT priority. Study complete; waiting on funding Highway 20 corridor Dubuque County – Work with City of Dubuque and State of Iowa to Improved access to the region Funds secured for AE and architectural phase – 2002; secure funds widen Julien Dubuque Bridge to four-lanes for construction. Status of the project in the State plan; status of Federal funds for construction Dubuque County – Coordinate with the City of Dubuque and the State Improved traffic flow and safety On DOT's list of priority projects; DOT requesting federal funds; on a study of Highway 20 from Swiss Valley to Peosta results of the study, status of the project in the State plan Dubuque County - Highway 20 East, Galena Bypass Improved access Cost: $250,000,000; need to secure funding Bellevue - Millcreek bridge project New bridge Cost: $8,200,000; need to secure funding Clinton - 54th Avenue road improvement project Improved street Cost: $1,800,000; need to secure funding Camanche - Washington Blvd - street and storm sewer improvement Improved street; improved storm Cost: $4,500,000; need to secure funding project sewer 36

2013-2015

2013-2015

2011-2012

2011-2013

2010-2040

Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing 2012-2014 2009-2013 2009-2013 2009-2013 Ongoing

2009-2013 Ongoing 2009-2015 2009-2015 2009-2015


Dyersville - 7th Street SW bridge replacement Dyersville - Beltline bridge replacement Dyersville - 12th Avenue SW Bridge replacement Dyersville - US 20 Interchange for 320th Avenue into Industrial Park

Cost: $1,200,000; need to secure funding Cost: $1,200,000; need to secure funding Cost: $1,200,000; need to secure funding Cost: $20,000,000; need to secure funding

2012-2015 2012-2015 2012-2015 2012-2015

Dyersville - US 20 Overpass for 332nd Avenue (X49 to ethanol plant) New overpass

Cost: $3,000,000; need to secure funding

2012-2015

Dyersville- 12th Ave SW Extension Maquoketa - Washington Street reconstruction Maquoketa - Main Street Downtown mill/overlay, ADA ramps Delaware Dubuque Jackson County Regional Transit Authority Update fleet of buses and maintenance equipment Cedar Valley Park Paving; Paving of 255th Street from the entrance to the park to the upper grounds Tipton - Highway 38 Street Improvements; Reconstruction of five blocks of Highway 38 (Cedar Street). Curb and gutter and Pavement to be replaced in PCC. West Branch - College Street Improvements

2012-2015 2012-2014 2012-2014 2012-2015

Improved street

Cost: $ 800,000; Immediate Need RISE Cost: $150,000; in progress Cost: $270,000; in progress Costs: Maintenance equipment - $200,000; 6 light duty buses $420,000 Need to secure funding; Shovel-ready

Improved street

Shovel-ready; need to secure funding

Ongoing

Improved street; new bridge; new sewer and water; new sidewalks Extended Industrial Drive; improvements to 300th Avenue Improved street Improved street Total street and utility reconstruction

Shovel-ready; need to secure funding

2011-2013

Shovel-ready; need to secure funding

2012-2015

Shovel-ready; need to secure funding; will complete in Fall Complete Shovel-ready; need to secure funding

2012 2010-2012 2012-2013

Clinton County Secondary Roads - Y-60 Rehab and Resurfacing Asbury - Seippel Road Reconstruction Cacade - Monroe Bridge Repair Dubuque - Foye, Merchant, and Gold Street Reconstruction Dubuque - Louise Lane Bridge Construction Dubuque County - Mud Lake Rd Extentsion Widening, Subdrain and Dubuque County - Asbury Road Pavement Rehabitation Dubuque County - Farley Road Widening and Subdrain Dubuque County - Massey Station Road Widening, subdrain and Paving Dubuque - Reconstruction of 7th Street 

Improved road Improved road Improved bridge Reconstructed streets New bridge Improved road Improved road New widened road New widened road

Shovel-ready; need to secure funding In progress Shovel-ready; need to secure funding Shovel-ready; need to secure funding Shovel-ready; need to secure funding In progress In progress In progress Shovel-ready; need to secure funding

2012-2015 2011-2012 2012-2015 Ongoing Ongoing 2012-2014 2012-2013 2011-2013 Ongoing

Connector between downtown, Historic Cost: $4,500,000; RISE grant awarded for 50% of a portion of Millwork District and Port of Dubuque the project funded

2012-2015

Miles - Resurfacing Streets Lamotte - Pine/Ash Street Reconstruction Saint Donatus - Highway 52 reconstruction RPA 8 - Resurfacing and Pavement rehabing projects

Improved streets Improved street Improved road Improve safety and efficiency of the system

2012-2014 2012-2014 2012-2015 2013-2014

RPA 8 - Replacing Bridges

Improve safety and efficiency of the system

DeWitt - Extension of Industrial Drive DeWitt - 11th Street Improvments Camanche - 9th Street Safety Improvements DeWitt - 6th Avenue 5th Street to Union Pacific

New bridge New bridge New bridge New interchange

New road for Interchange access Improved street Street improvements Improved fleet; improved service

37

Shovel-ready; need to secure funding Total cost: $322,000; Shovel-ready; need to secure funding DOT may list this on their five year program; need to secure $11.6 million will be used to bring the road system to standards of which $9 million will be RPA 8 Surface Transportation Program (STP) funds. $1.7 million will be used to replace bridges thaht are below standards of which $1.4 million will be funds from highway bridge program (HBP).

Ongoing

2013-2014


DMATS - Resurfacing and Pavement rehabing projects

Improve safety and efficiency of the system

DMATS - Replacing Bridges

Improve safety and efficiency of the system

Promote and encourage companies in Buyer Supplier - Encourage regional companies to shift 5% of their out- Businesses connected with each other the region to buy and supply of-region spending back into the region. to offer purchasing opportunities regionally within the region, increasing the growth and wealth of our regional economy. Develop a Quick Quote feature on Buyer Supplier

$4.8 million will be used to bring the road system to standards of 2013-2014 which $3.7 million will be DMATS Surface Transportation Program (STP) funds. $3.5 million will be used to replace bridges thaht are below 2013-2014 standards of which $500,000 will be funds from highway bridge program (HBP). Website complete; Marketing plan developed; Over 1300 Ongoing companies participating

Connect businesses in a timely manner Funding secured; developing the tool to facilitate local purchasing

38

2012-2013


CEDS Goal: Create a Skilled, Highly Educated, Permanent, Full-Time Workforce for Business and Industry Difficulties Encountered: Securing funding, local match, assessing/developing skills Funding Sources: Private, Local, State and Federal funds Task to be Implemented Collaborate regionally to address employers' workforce needs

Lead Organization and Implementation Plan Effective operation of WIA Adult Program; Assist low-income adults obtain employment or better employment

Expected Results Clients will increase their earnings

Performance Measures and Evaluation Indicators Schedule Clients will secure employment at a level that will allow self- Ongoing sufficiency; Number of clients obtaining employment (60.4% in 2011); average six months earnings $10,736 in 2011

Dubuque - Dubuque Works, connecting workforce development efforts Existing workforce strategies Successfully filling job orders, making presentations on in the area; IowaWORKS - Meet with businesses individually and in analyzed and revitalized, Labor Shed, Skill Shed and Benefits Survey information to groups to determine and help address workforce need workforce gaps identified business groups and addressed, stronger workforce solutions for companies that choose to make the Greater Dubuque area their home; Businesses will find and secure the skilled workers they need to maintain or grow their business

Ongoing

Dyersville Economic Development Corporation (DEDC)/Northeast Iowa Dual enrollment opportunities Number of students completing tech programs; Adequate Community College (NICC)-Work with matching area high school in tech trades; Increase in applicant pool for skilled trade positions students with available jobs skilled labor pool

Ongoing

NICC/Beckman - Encourage High School Students to attend College Courses West Dubuque School District - Expand Elementary School Facility Effective operation of WIA Dislocated Worker Program; Assist workers laid off from area businesses to obtain re-employment

Ongoing

Number of students completing the program and attend college Increase ITBS results Connect business and industry with employment and Affected workers will secure new jobs at comparable training programs wages; number of workers obtaining re-employment (86.3% in 2011); average six months earnings $16,272 in 2011) Delaware and Dubuque Counties – Facilitate industry requested for Collaboration among service Partner on short-term certificate programs to address joint training of multiple employers for specific assistance and providers providing for current regional workforce needs in advanced educational programs; Represent industry and actively participate in educational programs manufacturing and welding; obtain information from local workforce development activities and programs businesses and economic development groups to assess workforce needs Maintain and create new partnerships in the region Greater Dubuque Development Corporation; Dubuque Area Chamber Strategic work plan/action Number of participants from the community; complete plan of Commerce; Develop a strategic work plan for the Dubuque area to plan for the future; focused that can be implemented address impending workforce shortage approach to workforce development Clinton County - Develop a program aimed at building relationships New marketing region; Clinton County Board of Supervisors support; school visits between schools and businesses and creating interest among students Clinton County students living conducted; Workforce Coordinator hired for area job opportunities; Clinton and Cedar County to form new and working in Clinton marketing region County after high school or college 39

Increase high skilled workforce Increase learning skills Retain affected workers in local labor market

Ongoing Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing


Dubuque County – Provide loans and grants to companies investing in the community and creating new full-time employment opportunities; Provide job creation grant and loan programs Xavier School/West Dubuque School District - Encourage Early Learning Activities Project Hope - Community Foundation of Greater Dubuque, Dubuque Community Schools, Northeast Iowa Community College, ECIA, city of Dubuque, city of Dubuque Housing, Greater Dubuque Development Corp. - Meet regularly to discuss re-engaging the dropout youth and the unemployed and under employed Promote programs to encourage high school and Effective operation of WIA Youth Program; Assist low-income or atcollege age students to explore career paths in the risk youth obtain employment or improve their employment potential region such as utilizing the career readiness program and/or the career based website, accessmyfuture.com Delaware and Dubuque Counties – Coordinate with high schools and NICC in the school to work program to train individuals Delaware County – Assist potential employers, develop and distribute to area guidance counselors a labor tool guide

New full-time employment opportunities, new loans and grants Increase reading/writing skills Re-engaged youth into school and employment and trained workforce for business and industry

Ongoing

Ongoing

Number of partnerships formed with local industry; number Ongoing of youth re-engaged in school; number of adults trained and working; EDA technical assistance planning grant funded in August 2011

Clients will increase their Clients will secure employment or engage in activities earnings of their potential to leading to employment; number of clients obtaining earn in the future employment (87.5% in 2011); High school diploma/GED attainment (86.7% in 2011); average six month earnings change ($4,823 in 2011)

Trained workforce for business and industry Labor tool guide outlining skills and needs of existing industries Clinton County – Utilize 260E & F programs to encourage and support Trained workforce for new and expanded businesses; Utilize the community colleges for a business and industry trained labor pool AccessMyFuture.com - Career test drive component to website Trained workforce for business and industry

40

Number of new full-time opportunities; number of new grants and loans; New employers with new full-time opportunities and skill level of workforce Number of students attend the program/ITBS results

Number of employees trained through program; skill level of workforce Labor tool guide completed, number distributed, number of employers participating; employers and counselors using skill guide Number of businesses utilizing benefits from program and number of trained employees; skill level of workforce, employers utilizing program Number of high school age students participating in hands on job experience by shadowing a person in a job they are interested in

Ongoing

Ongoing Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing


CEDS Goal: Facilitate the Improvement and Maintenance of the Housing Stock and Housing Supply in the Region Difficulties Encountered: Lack of grant funding, community awareness, qualifying buyers, weather Funding Sources: Private, Local, State and Federal funds; grants Task to be Implemented Encourage homeownership opportunities

Lead Organization and Implementation Plan Expected Results Durant, Mechanicsville, Tipton – Annex land to accommodate new Additional housing within the housing development, add streets and improvements as needed to communities accommodate subdivision development, increase and provide utilities for subdivision development Lowden – Ongoing construction for re-sale of spec houses and Additional housing in the community apartments Lowden – Continue supporting a TIF Housing Development on 7 acres of land Lowden - Provide owner-occupied rehabilitation assistance to seven (7) households

Performance Measures and Evaluation Indicators Schedule Number of units developed, number of acres annexed, Ongoing dollar value of improvements to the communities, number of lots developed; community growth, increased property values Number of spec houses developed, number sold; lowden Ongoing development completed; housing constructed and occupied Number of acres developed using TIF Ongoing

Additional rehabilitated homes in the community

Applied for funding in 2011

Manchester, Ryan – Encourage private development to accommodate new housing development for median income, add streets and improvements as needed to accommodate subdivision development, increase and provide utilities for subdivision development Cascade, Holy Cross, Farley Worthington, Epworth, Zwingle, Peosta – Annex land to accommodate new housing development including low and median income hosuing, add streets and improvements as needed to accommodate subdivision development, increase and provide utilities for subdivision development Epworth – Promote Urban Revitilization/tax incentive plan for new subdivision development

Additional housing within the communities

Number of units developed, number of acres annexed, Ongoing dollar value of improvements to the communities, number of lots developed; community growth, increased property values; In Manchester, seven projects complete, two in progress Number of units developed, number of acres annexed, Ongoing doller value of improvements to the communities, number of lots developed; community growth, increased property values

Asbury - Expansion of housing subdivisions

Additional housing within the communities

Additional housing within the communities

LaMotte, Miles – Annex land to accommodate new housing Additional housing within the development of all income ranges; add streets and improvements communities as needed to accommodate subdivision development; increase and provide utilities for subdivision development; encourage spec housing; Miles under construction Maquoketa – Promote city status Rural Housing Enterprise zone and city wide urban revitilization

Number of acres developed using tax incentives or Ongoing urban revitilization; success of securing funding sources, residents, and timeline for constructing homes Number of acres developed; number of homes Ongoing constructed/occupied; possible 230 units; number of homes constructed and occupied; continued expansion and new roads Number of units developed, number of acres annexed, Ongoing dollar value of improvements to the communities, number of lots developed; community growth, increased property values

Increased number of housing units, Number of units produced using enterprise zone or city public awareness wide urban revitilization; success of securing funding sources, residents, and new construction

41

Ongoing

Ongoing


Camanche, DeWitt, Lost Nation, Wheatland – Annex land to accommodate new housing development, add streets and improvements as needed to accommodate subdivision development, increase and provide utilities for subdivision development DeWitt, Manchester, Worthington, Preston, Dyersville - Work with existing tennants to purchase their unit

Additional housing within the communities

Additional low- to moderateincome homeowners in the communities Lost Nation - Rehabilitate existing home and sell to individuals Increased number of affordable at or below 80% county median income guideline units

Dyersville – Provide homeownership assistance for first time homebuyers

Increased number of first time home buyers

DeWitt - Provide homeownership assistance to one household

Additional homeowner in the community Additional homeowners and/or rehabilitated homes in the community Additional homeowners and/or rehabilitated homes in the community Up to 400 condominiums Increase number and available options for purchase INSIDE City limits Increased number of rental units

DeWitt - Provide homeownership assistance to 6 households

Manchester - Provide homeownership assistance to 7 households

Encourage the construction of affordable housing developments

Bellevue - Up to 400 upscale condominiums Dyersville – Encourage Developers by providing incentives for opening new developments Maquoketa – Coordinate with developers to construct rental housing DeWitt - Residential Housing Development with D&N Investment Partnership

Miles - Hansen Subdivision Encourage the reuse and redevelopment of vacant Dubuque - Provide energy efficiency upgrades in commercial existing properties in the region converting to sector, energy audits of municipal buildings, RLFs for energy housing stock efficiency for landlords, property owners, and municipal buildings

Rental properties rehabilitated

Clinton - Provide assistance to 13 owner occupied households

13 homeowner occupied units rehabilitated within the city 10 homeowner occupied units rehabilitated 42

Number of public housing units sold; five homes sold to date

Ongoing

Number of affordable rehabilitated homes secured 2009-2011 and number of units sold; one home purchased and rehabilitated - sold on Land Contract to first time home buyer Number of households assisted, total dollars used to Ongoing assist households; success of the program, households assisted Applied for funding in 2011 Ongoing Applied for funding in 2009; Number of households assisted, total dollars used to assist households; success of the program Applied for funding in 2009; Number of households assisted, total dollars used to assist households; success of the program Land for project annexed; 20 units constructed Number of new households, increase in City tax revenue

2010-2012

2010-2013

2009-2013 Ongoing

Number of new rental units, occupancy of rental units; Ongoing increased rental units in the community, greater valuation

The 34-lot subdivision with 19 Number of new houses for less than $210,000. family lots and 15 condominium units on 15.4 acres on the city's west side is targeting lower cost new housing. Development of new subdivision of Shovel-ready; need funding 15 new lots Self-sustaining source of funds for Funds awarded energy efficient retrofits

Dubuque – Provide long term low interest loans for rental property rehabilitation

Camanche - Provide assistance to owner occupied households

Number of units developed, number of acres annexed, Ongoing dollar value of improvements to the communities, number of lots developed; community growth, increased property values

2012-2022

2010-2013 Ongoing

Number of properties per year, number of renters Ongoing affected, dollars disbursed; success of the program each year and the number of renters affected Applied for funding in 2011 2011-2013 Funds applied for in 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011; 2012

Ongoing


Clinton - Rehabilitate vacant property in City for student housing

Develop student housing

Partially done with Ashford Community College rehab of 2009-2013 best western hotel Maquoketa - Provide assistance to at least 12 owner occupied At least 14 homeowner occupied Applying again for this year for 14; grant in progress 2008-2012 households units rehabilitated Preston - Provide assistance to owner occupied households Seven homeowner occupied units Ongoing pursuit of funds Ongoing rehabilitated Mechanicsville - Provide assistance to 8 owner occupied Eight owner occupied households Applied for funding in 2009 2010-2015 households rehabilitated Stanwood - Provide assistance to 6 owner occupied households Six owner occupied households Applied for funding in 2009 and 2013 2010-2013 rehabilitated West Branch - Provide assistance to 7 owner occupied households Seven owner occupied households Applied for funding in 2009 2010-2015 rehabilitated Tipton - Provide assistance to 9 owner occupied households Nine owner occupied households Applied for funding in 2009 2010-2015 rehabilitated Epworth - Provide assistance to 10 owner occupied households Ten owner occupied households Applied for funding in 2009 and 2011 2010-2015 rehabilitated City of Dubuque - Portside Plaza $63 million mixed use condos, Funding; construction timeline; owners; tenants; Flexsteel 2009-2013 office and retail in Port of home office started in Port of Dubuque Dubuque City of Dubuque/ Millwork District $200 million in residential and Cost: $200 million; Plan adopted by city council; securing 2009-2013 commercial development in 29 historic tax credits in progress; Applying for new market vacant buildings tax credits and Iowa Finance Authority funding; 72 units of workforce housing under construction in the CARADCO building Wheatland - Provide assistance to owner occupied households homeowner occupied units Seeking funding Ongoing rehabilitated within the city Edgewood - Provide assistance to owner occupied households 13 homeowner occupied units Seeking funding Ongoing rehabilitated within the city Hopkinton - Provide assistance to owner occupied households 13 homeowner occupied units Seeking funding Ongoing rehabilitated within the city Dundee - Provide assistance to owner occupied households 13 homeowner occupied units Seeking funding Ongoing rehabilitated within the city Greeley - Provide assistance to owner occupied households 13 homeowner occupied units Seeking funding Ongoing rehabilitated within the city Lost Nation - Provide assistance to owner occupied households 13 homeowner occupied units Seeking funding Ongoing rehabilitated within the city ECIA, EIRHA, local contractors, regional cities - ECIA region - 25% Collaboration with internal and 27 units complete; extension to 2012; 8 units remaining 2009-2013 downpayment housing assistance to LMI buyers in region - New external partners; increased Production (NP2) - 2008 State flood funds to construct 41 units in number of housing units ECIA five county region ECIA, EIRHA, local contractors, regional cities - ECIA region Collaboration with internal and complete 2009-2012 25% downpayment housing assistance to LMI buyers in region external partners; increased - New Production (NP3) - 2008 State flood funds to construct 54 number of housing units units in city of Dubuque ECIA, EIRHA, local contractors, regional cities - ECIA region - 25% Collaboration with internal and Funds secured; construction in progress 2009-2013 downpayment housing assistance to LMI buyers in region - New external partners; increased Production (NP4) - 2008 State flood funds to construct 54-77 units number of housing units in ECIA five county region 43


CEDS Goal: Promote Improvement of Basic Public Works Facilities and Community Services Which Improve the Public's Health, Safety, and Living Conditions

Difficulties Encountered: Lack of adequate state, federal and grant funding Funding Sources: Private, Local, State (CDBG, RISE, SRF) and Federal (DOT, USDA, EDA) funds; grants Task to be Implemented Lead Organization and Implementation Plan Disseminate information on available funding Lowden resources Clinton Clinton Camanche

Expected Results Water system improvements

Performance Measures and Evaluation Indicators Schedule Applied for funding in 2005 and 2006; not yet funded Ongoing

Wastewater treatment facility Combined sewer system separation Wastewater regionalization project

Cost: $50,000,000 Cost: $75,000,000 Project complete; Camanche is now connected to existing Clinton system Project complete; Low Moor is now connected to existing Clinton system Construction is in progress Funds secured; work in progress; applying for additional funds in November 2012 Project is under construction Cost: $55,000,000; Project complete Cost: $65,000,000 Cost: $1,500,000

2009-2012 Ongoing 2012

Cost: $4,000,000

2012-2014

Cost: $974,500

2011-2013

Project complete Cost: $500,000

2010-2012 2009-2015 Ongoing

Low Moor

Wastewater regionalization project

Grand Mound Stanwood

Wastewater system improvements Water system improvements

Bennett Dubuque Dubuque Dyersville

Manchester Sunbury

Wastewater treatment facility improvements Bee Branch drainage basin master plan Water polution control plant upgrade Sewer and water extension to DOT facility on Hwy 136 Double the capacity of the sewer system to mitigate raw sewage going into nearby rivers Sewer and water extension and improved water quality Water system treatment improvements Wastewater system

Manchester City of Clinton

Community Childcare of Manchester childcare building Reroofing of Hightower Place (ASAC-owner property)

Funding secured - project in progress Seeking funding

Encourage the use of EIRUSS for small Petersburg communities and unincorporated areas in the region Leisure Lake Elvira Lake Delhi

New wastewater system

Encourage partnerships in the region

New water tower

Not funded; applied for funding in 2005, 2007, 2008 and 2009 Funds secured; work in progress Seeking funding Preliminary engineering report completed; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding

New lift station and alarm system

Shovel-ready; seeking funding

2010-2013

New wastewater treatment facility New sanitary sewer main

Shovel-ready; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding

2010-2013 2010-2013

New water main

Shovel-ready; seeking funding

2010-2013

Dyersville - Wastewater treatment facility upgrade Dyersville - 12th Ave SE Utility Extension Project

Durant - Water Tower Replacement; construction of a new 350,000 gallon water tower Durant - Replace Yankee Avenue Lift Station; replace the lift station including the alarm system Durant - Upgrade Wastewater Treatment Facility Tipton - Cedar Street (Highway 38) Sanitary Sewer Main Replacement Tipton - Cedar Street (Highway 38) Water Main Replacement

New wastewater system New wastewater system New wastewater system

44

Ongoing Ongoing 2005-2014 2009-2012 2009-2011 2008-2014 Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing 2009-2013 Ongoing 2009-2013 2010-2013


West Branch - North First Street Water System Improvements

Replace two blocks of 2 inch water main with 4 inch water main and update outdated piping serving approximately 15 homes; increased fire protection Camanche/Clinton Regional Wastewater Connection Connection of Camanche's wastewater collection system to Clinton's new wastewater treatment facility Welton - wastewater treatment facility improvements Improvements at WWTF to meet new limits Asbury - Asbury Road Water Looping; In order to improve the Improved water system reliability, quality, and redundancy in the City of Asbury's water system it is essential to extend the 12" existing transmission main to the east City limits to eliminate multiple dead-ends in the system and provide public water system

Shovel-ready; seeking funding

2010-2013

Project complete

2010-2013

Shovel-ready; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding

2010-2013 2010-2013

Asbury - West Annexation Sewer Extension Project

Extended sanitary sewer main to newly annexed property. New sanitary sewer manholes New water main Improved facility New retaining walls New sanitary sewer and water main serving the Dubuque Regional Airport expanded terminal

Shovel-ready; seeking funding

2010-2013

Shovel-ready; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding

2010-2013 2010-2013 Ongoing 2010-2013 2010-2013

Upgraded Sewer System New water main New sewer and water extension to development north of City Improved wastewater treatment plant New disinfection process New water main and improved street

Shovel-ready; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding

2010-2013 2010-2013 2010-2013

Shovel-ready; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding

2010-2013 2010-2013 2010-2013

New mill/overlay; new water mains; new sanitary sewer mains Improved wastewater system New water system New water main New water main New water main New water main New storm water levee system

Shovel-ready; seeking funding

2010-2014

Cascade - 09' Manhole Replacement Project Cascade - Delong Avenue Water Main Looping Project DeWitt - New police station Dubuque - Garfield, Heeb, and Cooper Retaining Walls Dubuque - Utillity Expansion to Dubuque Regional Airport

Miles - Upgrade Sewer System Miles - Water Main replacement Phase 2 and 3 Bellevue - Sewer and water extension Earlville - Wastewater treatment plant upgrade Farley - Wastewater Treatment Disinfection Farley - First Street Water Main Replacement and Reconstruction Maquoketa - Downtown Overlay, Water-Sewer Replacement Spragueville - Wastewater System Upgrades Preston - Water Project Preston - Water Main Project Phase I Preston - Water Main Project Phase II Preston - Water Main Project Phase III Preston - Water Main Project Phase IV Sabula - Storm water project Sabula - Wastewater Treatment project Lamotte - 2nd Well Springbrook - Storm water project Springbrook - Water project Monmouth - Wastewater Treatment project Tipton - New Volunteer Fire Station

New wastewater treatment facility New additional well New storm water system Improved water system New wastewater treatment facility New Volunteer Fire Station to replace current station; Newer fire engines 45

Project needs Cost: $425,000; Study completed Cost: $180,000; Study completed Cost: $290,000; Study completed Cost: $303,000; Study completed Cost: $247,000; Study completed Construction complete; (work remains due to City & funding) Proceeding with engineering selection and design Cost: $350,000

Analyze capacity needs Completed

2009-2012 2012-2015 2012-2015 2012-2015 2012-2015 2010-2013 2010-2015 2010-2013 2010-2015 2010-2015 2010-2015 2010-2012


West Branch - Library Addition West Branch - Town Hall Renovation DeWitt - Library Expansion Clinton - Public Library Dubuque Community School District - Sageville Elementary Improvements - Senior High Media Center Loras College - Campus Improvements

NICC - Campus Improvements

University of Dubuque - Campus Improvements

Delaware County Emergency Management - Emergency Services Facility

Bellevue Community School - Renovation 1848 Elementary Dubuque County - Julien Care Faculity upgrade West Branch - Lift Station

Additional space to existing library New modern WPA municipal building Expanded library Improved public library Sageville - New elevator; new classrooms and office. Senior - New media center Improved campus halls; additional coaches offices; increased teaching and research space; new retail space; improved housing stock - Cox Street Improvements Improved campus buildings; new hybrid car fleet; rural broadband; upgraded college IT backbone; improved energy efficiencies-Peosta/Calmar; new recreation/wellness center

Shovel-ready; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding seeking funding Shovel-ready; seeking funding

2010-2015 2010-2015 2013-2014 2010-2015 2010-2013

Shovel-ready; seeking funding; Federal DOT grant funded for Cox Street improvements on campus completed in 2012 2010-2015 seeking funding; multi-phase project; phase 1 and 2 complete

2010-2015 New student housing; new performing arts center; Shovel-ready; seeking funding; Performing arts center new parking ramp; new under construction and will be complete in 2012 administration/educational building; Van Vliet renovation; student dining renovation; new student union; new campus day care center 2010-2013 New facilities to house sandbag supply, Shovel-ready; seeking funding emergency shelter trailer, communications trailer, generators and other disaster related supplies Ongoing Improved building Shovel-ready; seeking funding Ongoing Upgraded existing fire detection and new County is selling building sprinkler system Ongoing New lift station and 14" force main Design work in progress; need to secure funding (likely 2010-2013 a GO bond)

46


CEDS Goal: Promote and Encourage Sustainability throughout the Region Difficulties Encountered: State and Federal funding; community support; weather; competitive markets; land owners; rising construction costs Funding Sources: Private, Local, State and Federal funds; grants

Task to be Implemented Collaborate regionally to create ECO-EI building on the Sustainable Dubuque program

Lead Organization and Implementation Plan Expected Results Petal Project - Prosperity Eastern Iowa. Green business certification Companies will learn program to encourage encourage environmental practices in the business sustainability practices communtiy Encourage sustainable and energy conserving measures in all housing rehabilitation and construction activities All communities Encourage community design and reuse which Delmar – Explore ways for expanding recreational/historic trail system A variety of recreational contributes to identity, heritage and sense of place from park along historic highway; construct sidewalks from depot to old activities in Delmar jailhouse; add recreational equipment to the park; develop a camp ground, athletic field, establish bike paths DeWitt and Wheatland – Develop a multi-purpose recreational trail Recreational activities for the communities Dubuque County - Heritage Trail Improvements Improved connectivity between small communities and recreational trail access

Performance Measures and Evaluation Indicators Schedule Program in place; 14 businesses participating; Loras certified Ongoing in 2011 Ongoing

Work with funding entities and contractors Funding sources identified, matching funds secured, timeline for project finalized, work complete; park improved, sidewalks installed, athletic field constructed, etc

2009-2013

Funds secured for the project; recreational trails under 2009-2013 construction Funding source for improvement planning has been identified 2011-2015 with an estimated cost of $12,500; Cost of suggested improvements remains TBD.

Asbury - Develop a trail to direct pedestrians and bicyclists around Asbury Road

Safe alternative route for pedestrians and bicyclists

Funding applied for; trail location identified and a portion of 2009-2013 funding secured; sidewalk is complete, bicycle lane in future

Dyersville – Develop a park and trail comprehensive plan

Comp Plan identifying needs, locations, strategies 11 acres of new parks with recreational facilities Increased recreational opportunities in the community

Comp plan completion; partial plan completet for Westside 2009-2013 Park to link with Heritage Trail Number of acres acquired and developed; enhanced 2009-2013 recreational opportunities, new tourists to the area Acres identified, timeline identified, acres purchased; timeline Ongoing for park development, recreation plan in place

Bellevue – Develop 11 acres of park land LaMotte – Explore purchasing land for park development

Maquoketa - Pedestrian/bike trail and bridge along S Main to new Walmart Participate in the MRT board activities and encourage participation by MPO and RPA in the region Tipton - New Bike/Pedestrial Trail System Camanche - Walkway Delaware Co. Conservation Dept. - BF Park - campground addition Maquoketa - Walkway project

Cost: $430,000 Construction Development of national trail in region New Bike/Pedestrian Trail System New walkway Restored park facilities New walk/bike trail from the City's southern-most existing sidewalk system to the new Wal-Mart on S Main; new small walk/bike bridge over Prairie Creek

2010-2013

Securing funds; development of the trail; status of the project, Ongoing status of funding Community visioning program identified plan; Shovel-ready 2010-2011 Shovel-ready; need to secure funding Shovel-ready; need to secure funding Shovel-ready; need to secure funding

2010-2015 2010-2013

2010-2013 47


Jackson County Conservation - Copper Creek Trail Addition

New 1.9 mile trail that will Funding secured from Jackson County RLF. Trail connect the existing 1 mile constructed and open. Copper creek Trail to the 3.7 mile Jackson County recreational Trail

Dubuque County - City of Benard - Installion of Sidewalks Maquoketa - ADA Sidewalk Project Maquoketa Comm. School District - Heating and Cooling Upgrades

Spragueville - Trail from Preston to Spragueville

Improved sidewalks to the Shovel-ready; need to secure funding school New compliant curb cuts in Shovel-ready; need to secure funding the City New energy efficient Shovel-ready; need to secure funding windows; upgraded heating, new cooling system New trail Applying for Iowa DOT funding Encourage community design that results in sustainable design and land use with "smart growth" components

Dubuque County Comprehensive Plan

2010-2012 2010-2011 2010-2015

2010-2015 2010-2011 Ongoing

Funding secured; work in progress

Encourage community design that results in sustainable design and land use with "smart growth" components Delaware County Comprehensive Plan

Ongoing

Funding secured; work in progress

Encourage community design that results in sustainable design and land use with "smart growth" components City of Clinton Comprehensive Plan

Ongoing

Funding secured; work in progress

City of Bellevue - Bellevue Riverview Trail: Phase II City of Camanche - 2012 Washington Boulevard/ MRT City of Manchester - West Marion Street Trail City of Manchester - Riverfront Trail Extension

Improve recreational activity Improve recreational activity Improve recreational activity Improve recreational activity Improve recreational activity Improve recreational activity Improve recreational activity

City of Cascade - 1ST Ave Trail Project City of Camanche - 9th St Trail Project City of Clinton - Liberty-Lincolnway Mississippiriver Trail Connection

$250,000 got secured through RPA 8 Enhancemcement grant $237,600 got secured through RPA 8 Enhancement grant $155,124 got secured through RPA 8 Enhancement grant $151,409 got secured through RPA 8 Enhancement grant $190,718 got secured through RPA 8 Enhancement grant $160,010 got secured through RPA 8 Enhancement grant $79,024 got secured through RPA 8 Enhancement grant

Smart Planning - Dubuque county

Create a smart one singal comprehansive plans thaht helps in addressing comprehansive plan for cities sprawl, strong urban core etc. and county in Dubuque county

Smart Zoning - Dubuque county

Create a smart zoning code for cities and county in Dubuque county

48

one singal zoning ordiqance thaht is designed to help implement form based zoning.

2013-2015 2013-2015 2013-2015 2013-2015 2012-2014 2012-2014 2012-2014 2012

2013-2014


Encourage energy conservation

Dubuque - IBM, Smart City pilot program for sustainability (AY McDonald Revamp how water, energy also a partner) and tranportation systems operate; reduce carbon footprint ECIA - Petal Project Educate businesses about cost effective, energy conservation measures Encourage environmental integrity through healthy Dyersville – Develop a recreational trail within City Recreational trail along the air, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and Maquoketa River North Fork minimizing health risks ECIA Transportation and Planning - Complete and implement Jule/RTA Projecting potential changes transit study for the area into the future

Cost: $2.5 million; Water meter replacement underway

2010-2013

Assist over 20 businesses with implementing sustainable practices that benefit the environment and their bottom line. Track progress by monitoring energy savings. Design work complete; applied for REAP-not funded; trail completion date, trail identified in comp plan, trail useage

Ongoing

Ongoing

Creating projects to facilitate future changes in the area for Ongoing all modes of transportation by taking into consideration safety and security of the area; primary input for TIP; Shopping Route implemented in October 2011; Applied for funds for evening college route and mid-town loop (20122013) Create a list of projects for Monitor increase in children walking and biking to school; 2009-2010 the area and prioritize them Funding secured from Iowa DOT based on their impact

Clinton/ECIA - Create plan to design Safe Routes to School to encourage children to walk or bike to school

Delaware County/ECIA - Create plan to design Safe Routes to School to encourage children to walk or bike to school

Create a list of projects for Applied for Iowa DOT grant the area and prioritize them based on their impact

2010-2011

Jackson County/ECIA - Create plan to design Safe Routes to School to Create a list of projects for Applied for Iowa DOT grant encourage children to walk or bike to school the area and prioritize them based on their impact

2010-2011

West Branch - Develop 14 sections of new trails

Five projects consisting of 14 Conceptual plan; searching for funding sections and more than 6 miles of new pathways

2011-2013

DeWitt - Silver Creek Trail Phase III

Shovel-ready; need to secure funding

2012-2013

Completion of renovation within budget, facility usage

2011-2012

Revised ordinances

Ongoing

Fuel Consumption and Water Usage

2012

Dubuque - Green Dubuque - reduce emissions by 50 percent by 2030

Trail extension -east from Well #7 to 5th Street Reuse and repurpose of abandoned public kindergarten building Reduced maintenance costs, improved quality of streams, reduced erosion Reduced maintenance costs with less fuel and water usage Reduced emissions

Greenhouse gas emissions study complete

Ongoing

Dubuque - DMATS - Jeldwen - EPA emissions reduction project

VMT reduction

Dyersville - Develop social center and senior meal program center

Dyersville-Develop sustainable stormwater management practices

Dyersville-WWTP Phase II project - Recycle existing Wastewater/Increase Land Applied Solids

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2011-2012


Removal of damaged properties and mitigatefuture flood damage City of Dubuque - Acquire flood-damaged properties

Funding secured - project in progress

Ongoing

Funding secured - project in progress

Ongoing

Funding secured - project in progress

Ongoing

Funding secured - project in progress

Ongoing

Funding secured - project in progress

Ongoing

Funding secured - project in progress

Ongoing

Funding secured - project in progress

Ongoing

Funding secured - project in progress

Ongoing 2013

Removal of damaged properties and mitigatefuture flood damage Dubuque County - Acquire flood-damaged properties Removal of damaged properties and mitigatefuture flood damage City of Durango - Acquire flood-damaged properties Removal of damaged properties and mitigatefuture flood damage City of Sageville - Acquire flood-damaged properties Removal of damaged properties and mitigatefuture flood damage City of Dyersville - Acquire flood-damaged properties Removal of damaged properties and mitigatefuture flood damage City of Manchester - Acquire flood-damaged properties Removal of damaged properties and mitigatefuture flood damage City of Hopkinton - Acquire flood-damaged properties Removal of damaged properties and mitigatefuture flood damage Cedar County - Acquire flood-damaged properties create a safe walking route for kids to walk with adult supervision

Dubuque School District - walking school bus

50

Monitor increase in children walking and biking to school, Funding secured fron Iowa DOT


Section 7: PERFORMANCE MEASURES/QUANTIFIABLE DELIVERABLES/EVALUATION County

City

Name of Employer

Business/Industry Type

Cedar

Tipton

Stuefen Manufacturing

Clinton

Camanche

Clinton County Mississippi River Eco Tourism Center Tourism

Existing

DeWitt Clinton Dyersville Manchester Manchester Manchester Farley Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque

Black Cat Blades Ltd. Clinton Data Dimensions Digga North America LLC Exide Technologies Walmart LaBudde Group East Iowa Machine Co. A.Y. McDonald Manufacturing Co. Heartland Financial Andersen Corp., (formally Eagle Window & Door)

Manufacturing Business process outsourcing Manufacturing Manufacturing Retail Manufacturing food products Manufacturing Manufacturing Finance Manufacturing

New Existing New Existing Existing New Existing Existing Existing Existing

Dubuque Farley Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque Dubuque Maquoketa Bellevue

Durrant EIMCo Camoplast Klauer Behnke Enterprises John Deere Dubuque Works Quad/Graphics Flexsteel Green Industrial Giese Manufacturing Company, Inc Rousselot Theisen Supply Inc. HUSCO Baymont Inn & Suites

Architecture/engineering Manufacturing Manufacturing Sheet metal producer Manufacturing Manufacturing Commercial printing Manufacturing Industrial Services Manufacturing Food Grade Retail Manufacturing Hotel

Existing Existing Existing Existing Existing Existing Existing Existing Existing Existing Existing Existing Existing New

Delaware

Dubuque

Jackson

Manufacturing

Existing or New Business/Industry New

Jobs Created or Gained 6

10 40 30 45 80 10 11 31 103 15

51

Reason for Gain or Loss

50 10 17 10 10 8 65

Dollars Invested

Expansion

$67,280

Expansion

$220,000

Expansion Increased business Expansion Expansion Expansion Expansion Expansion New markets Increased business Merger

$3.6 million

Bankruptcy Future growth Increased business Increased business Increased business Increased business Declining sales Increased business Increased business Expansion Increased business Increased business Increased business Expansion

23 13 25 125

607

Subtotals

Jobs Lost

$2.2 million $4 million $600,000 $3.9 million $2.6 million $2.3 million

$3.9 million $2.5 million $5.7 million $1.6 million $44 million $12 million $9.5 million $2 Million $16 Million $2.5 million $4 million


Schedule - 2013 Proposed Scope of Work

EDA planning funds will support the implementation of an Economic Planning program designed to create and

retain jobs throughout the region. A five-year Economic Development Strategy was adopted in 2009 for the region and runs through 2014. This is the fourth year of our five-year CEDS for 2010-2014. We will begin working with the CEDS Strategy Committee on the initial steps to prepare the CEDS for 2013. In addition, we will be performing the following activities: LOCAL GOVERNMENT MEETINGS AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GROUP MEETINGS ECIA staff regularly attends meetings of local governments and local economic development groups to provide information and facilitate program implementation. 1. ECIA participates and sits on the Board of the Greater Dubuque Development Corporation and attends their regular board meetings at least quarterly. 2. ECIA staff regularly hosts and participates in City Clerk meetings in Delaware and Dubuque Counties and hosts two meetings a year of the regional city clerks. 3. ECIA staff regularly attends and acts as the secretary for the Jackson County Mayors. Meetings are held monthly in Jackson County. 4. ECIA staff participates in the Tri-State Alliance regional partnership. The entity focuses on furthering economic development and transportation in the tri-state region of Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin. The TriState Alliance meets quarterly in person and monthly by teleconference. 5. ECIA holds monthly Prosperity Eastern Iowa meetings with local economic developers. 6. ECIA ED staff to meet with GDDC staff on a monthly basis to discuss local and regional ED projects related to retention and expansion of local businesses. 7. ECIA staff participates and sits on the Enterprise Zone Committee for the City of Dubuque. The committee meets as needed to review and approve economic development related proposals seeking enterprise zone benefits in the City of Dubuque. 8. ECIA staff participates and sits on the Green Jobs Training program oversight Committee and ECIA Business Growth, Inc. was the lead applicant for the grant program. This is a partnership with Northeast Iowa Community College, Iowa Workforce Development, Four Mounds, and the City of Dubuque to provide green job training and opportunities to job seekers in the region. 9. ECIA staff participates in the City of Dubuque’s Project Hope meetings. The group is focused on defining poverty in the Dubuque area and finding solutions to the barriers that people experience in finding and maintaining long term employment. The group meets monthly. 10. ECIA staff with the partnership of the City of Dubuque, the Community Foundation of Greater Dubuque, NICC, Dubuque Community School District, and GDDC, formed a working committee that meets monthly to research, define and establish a re-engagement program for disengaged youth and adults in the Dubuque area – Opportunity Dubuque. 11. Complete the annual CEDS report for 2013 and submit by 12/31/2013. TRAINING AND CONFERENCES Attend and participate in meetings of national, state, and local organizations affecting regional strategy policies and programs. 1. ECIA staff will continue to participate in the annual trip of the Clinton and the Dubuque communities to meet with federal officials concerning local needs. Trips are scheduled for February and May, 2013. 2. ECIA staff will attend the Iowa League of Cities meeting. 3. ECIA staff will attend Iowa DNR meetings in Des Moines. 4. ECIA staff will attend regional meeting hosted by the EDA. 5. ECIA staff will attend two national meetings - either NADO, NARC, or the IEDC meetings.

52 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy

Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy

Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy


6. ECIA staff will attend training to become familiar with “green� and sustainable business practices that can be introduced to Buyer Supplier companies and member governments. INFORMATION DISSEMINATION Disseminate census, economic, statistical and program information by telephone, e-mail, letter, newsletter, personal contact, and training programs. Maintain a database for use in program development and implementation. 1. ECIA staff prepares six newsletters each year that is emailed out to over 800 individuals and/or entities in the region and archived on our website. 2. ECIA staff maintains the websites for ECIA, Prosperity Eastern Iowa, the Regional Transit Authority, and the Eastern Iowa Regional Housing Authority/Corporation and the Eastern Iowa Regional Utility Service Systems, Buyers Supplier Connection, Petal Project, Dubuque Metropolitan Transportation Study, and Accessmyfuture. com. 3. ECIA staff responds to approximately 150-200 requests for information each year pertaining to grant applications, TIF districts, enterprise zone, etc. 4. ECIA staff participates in local, regional and national meetings discussing programs, projects and successes in our region related to economic and community development. ECIA staff will present during at least one national and/or regional meeting in the upcoming year. GRANT/LOAN APPLICATIONS Assist local governments in the preparation of grant/loan applications for funding of projects of local and regional concern. 1. ECIA staff regularly prepare grant applications and loan applications for CDBG projects such as water, sewer, child care centers, etc. 2. ECIA staff regularly prepare applications for Enterprise Zone and other State economic development programs. 3. ECIA staff regularly prepare federal grant program applications for programs such as State of Good Repair, Clean Fuels, Bus Livability, EPA Brownsfield, TIGGER and TIGER. ECIA staff will continue to pursue these grant programs annually for communities in the region. 4. ECIA staff prepare Community Attraction and Tourism grant applications for communities. We anticipate 1 applications per year for this funding. 5. ECIA staff will prepare grant and loan applications for flood recovery programs in the region. ECIA will continue this work through 2013. DATA CENTER Collect data and program information on economic development trends and conditions including finance, labor, business development, industrial development, and the agricultural economy. 1. ECIA maintains data for grants and reports which is used in applications. 2. ECIA maintains the Location One Information System for the region to track the available sites and buildings through the Prosperity Eastern Iowa web site. This is updated on an ongoing basis. DEVELOPMENT STUDIES Assist local governments and economic development entities in preparing Community Builder Plans. 1. ECIA staff will prepare strategic plans for development groups, chambers or cities in the upcoming year.

53 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy

Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy

Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy


EASTERN IOWA RURAL UTILITIES, INC. Provide technical assistance to local governments and coordinate with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Iowa Department of Economic Development (IDED) in the efforts to administer the 28E organization that provides water and sewer services to cities and rural residents. 1. ECIA will continue work with counties in the region in the design and application plans for funding for unsewered communities in the region. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE Provide technical assistance to local governments, development corporations, chambers of commerce, businesses, and individuals, in the ongoing implementation of the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. ECIA has traditionally provided technical assistance to local governments via a Manager of Government Relations and has extended this to economic development technical assistance. The association will provide technical expertise in financing and deal packaging. 1. ECIA will assist with Tax Increment Financing in the region. 2. ECIA will assist in writing ordinances and in developing zoning plans. 3. ECIA will assist with RISE applications for roadways in to business parks. 4. ECIA will assist communities in preparing Urban Revitalization plans and Urban Renewal Plans. 5. ECIA will assist with EPA, IDNR and IDED Brownfield grant applications. 6. ECIA staff will continue to assist small communities under 500 population with utility billing and accounting services. 7. ECIA staff through the Prosperity Eastern Iowa entity will continue to provide expertise in web page design and development and submission of proposals, leads and inquiries in the region. PROSPERITY EASTERN IOWA COLLABORATIVE MARKETING Administer and conduct the activities identified by the Prosperity Eastern Iowa Economic Development Partnership to further business retention and expansion in ECIA’s three of ECIA’s Counties, Dubuque, Delaware, Jackson and then Jones County. Key projects and activities that will be conducted include: 1. ECIA implemented the local industry business retention and expansion program and regional compiling of this data 2. Continue updating the regional websites: Buyer Supplier; Prosperity Eastern Iowa; Accessmyfuture.com; and Petal-project.com. 3. Continue to seek partners and raise funds for the Prosperity efforts. 4. Continue to partner with the State of Iowa on the export conference and program. 5. Continue to pursue partnerships to expand Buyer Supplier into other parts of Iowa; Wisconsin; and Illinois. 6. Continue to promote and seek businesses to participate in the Petal Project sustainability program and green business program that can be incorporated into their daily business practices. 7. Continue to focus on recruitment and retention of the younger workforce in the region. 8. Continue to expand the partnership and work with Iowa State Extension office in developing a partnership for local and regional foods and incorporate into the Buyer Supplier program. 9. Continue to partner with the Northeast Iowa Business Network in the expansion and promotion of the Buyer Supplier program in their region.

54 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy

Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy

Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy


Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy 2012