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Srinjoy Hazra


Architecture is the will of an epoch, translated into space. - Mies Van der Rohe


About evolveEA... Evolve is not your typical architecture firm that pumps out buildings and construction document sets. They have a different approach to tackling problems. They describe themselves to be a nimble multidisciplinary practice that works at the intersection of sustainability and the built environment. They work at different scales - with individuals, communities and organizations and help them to take strategic action by handing them well planned design solutions. The three major tenets of they base their work upon, are People, Process and Place. Evolve, broadly offers, three kinds of services. Placemaking – They create compelling and provoking landscapes, buildings, experiences, and objects to rethink and explore the relationships of humans to their environment. Through this process they enable communities to create more livable places, optimized systems and balanced economies while keeping in mind ecological, social and economic issues. Building green – EvolveEA also helps third party design teams add value to their building projects by identifying and implementing smart environmental strategies. They aid building owners and operators optimize building performance with attention to user needs and experience. Strategized engagement – They engage organizations and individuals in the design of sustainable systems and processes and help them build the capacity to analyze, plan and execute short- and long-term sustainability efforts. Being an architect in India and on the way to licensure in the United States, the experience at evolveEA and greater focus on Urban Design, has given me much to learn and a renewed zeal to pursue sustainability and designing for harmonious existence through planning.

Projects and Involvement Ecodistricts Ecodistricts are communities that have committed to achieving ambitious environmental sustainability performance goals. Ecodistricts focus on both the hardware, or physical systems of places, as well as the software of social and cultural resiliency. Ecodistrict planning enables communities to create more livable places, systems, and economies by leading with equity and amplifying environmental performance through collective action. A part of the learning curve at the beginning, was getting familirar with the six quality of life areas that were established in the Triboro Ecodistrict as key areas of planning and strategic action. I was a part of the team that designed the ETNA Ecodistrict which was the pilot project to receive an Ecodistrict Certification.

EQUITY FOOD WATER ENERGY AIR MOBILITY


ETNA Ecodistrict

As the third Triboro community to engage in ecodistrict planning, the Borough of Etna is building on the successes and methods of Sharpsburg and Millvale. evolveEA led a year-long Education Series featuring technical analysis, community dinners, speakers, related activities, and education pertaining to the six ecodistrict quality of life areas of Water, Mobility, Air, Energy, Food, And Equity. The Education Series was followed by a year of community planning, where evolveEA engaged residents and experts to co-create an action plan of policies, programs, and catalytic projects that contribute to the achievement of Etna’s EcoDistrict goals. Performance targets for the year 2030 were developed using a data-driven approach, and key indicators were established to measure progress. Through the two year process, evolveEA successfully guided Etna to become the World’s First Certified EcoDistrict. As an Intern on the team during this time, I was involved in the community engagement programs, design process and largely functioned as a graphics producer involving GIS work and 3D modelling for the Ecodistrict community meetings and reports. This experience gave me valuable insight into designing of Ecodistricts, which is extremely important given the challenges we face owing to climate change and sustainability issues.


Bozeman Bridger View Redevelopment Plan

Like many cities that are experiencing growth, Bozeman Montana would like to create an inclusive community that welcomes residents of all income levels. Bozeman’s unique assets, natural beauty, and scarcity of non-public land will continue to attract new residents and drive the market values. evolveEA was selected to lead the design for the Bridger View site redevelopment featuring 63 small homes over the 8-acre site in order to create workforce housing that can become an example for future projects in the region. We envision the Bridger View Redevelopment as a diverse community where people of various income levels, stages of life, and backgrounds can afford to purchase a home. As a design intern, I assisted primarily with the design of individual units, and also with the graphics production relative to the client meetings and design development phase.


Green Infrastructure Plan for Buffalo, NY

Buffalo’s stormwater challenge is to protect its water resources and public health as its aging combined sewer network continues to collect and treat increasing amounts of rain and melting snow. Like many combined systems, combined sewer overflows in Buffalo Sewer’s system cause wastewater to flow into the region’s streams and rivers, and Lake Erie. Green infrastructure is part of Buffalo’s solution to manage runoff, improve waterways, increase resiliency, and enhance quality of life in the city. evolveEA worked with an extensive team of local stakeholders and professional consultants for approximately a year to collect and analyze data for Rain Check 2.0 to identify potential green infrastructure projects to reduce runoff from over 500 acres of impervious surface, fulfilling Buffalo Sewer’s obligations under the federal Long Term Control Plan (LTCP). My takeaway from this project, was learning about integrating green infrastructure planning in dense urban fabric. I provided support with the graphics production that best depict the potential areas of incorporating green infrastructure programs throughout the city.


Identifying the problem... The city of Kolkata, consists of small pockets of urban slums that are tucked away amidst the concrete jungle. The people here live in extremely difficult conditions, but it is still their home - and they do not want to be displaced from the areas that they consider their home. The particular pocket of inequality we are looking at, exists at the confluence of the old and new city. The government tried to aid the situation by relocating them and building concrete block housing for them so that they could completely raze the slum to the ground this led to a number of issues and a complete failure. The major problems that got identified were a) Felt like artificial boxes, b) Residents had no hand in building their own home c) High utility bills once the subsidy for 2 months ran out a d) Not enough units to fit any entire community

Evolution of Duttabad

Located at the north east 1930 - Small village extent of the city. with marshy lands and large ponds. Mainly fishermen.

1960 - Master Plan for Bidhan nagar approved. Increased number of dwellings.

1980 - City bypass built leading to development and filling up of ponds cause loss of livelihood.

Goals

affordable resilient homes job skills training sharing of optimized utility costs maintaining community life co-operative housing programs

sharing of resources

awareness and community engagement

Please click HERE for a more immersive experience of this project.


Cluster Analysis

Study Area 1 Staggered Cluster Study Area 2 Alleys perpendicular to main road Study Area 3 Alleys parallel to main road

Resourcefulness

Refurbished solar panel from nearby In case of units far from distributions factory to power small shacks or shops points, water pump used communally in the evenings. to draw from the lake and purify it using indigenous methods before use


Studying Individual Homes

Raised threshold to prevent entry of water.

Name - Ravi Maiti Age - 40 yrs Occupation - Vendor Family - 4 members

Preparation area is separate from the rest of the house.

My research involved visiting individual houses and sketching the 5 primary types appearing in this area.

Skylight in roof to admit light into the interior.

Name - Sushma Biswas Age - 35 yrs Occupation - Store owner Family - 6 members

Shop opening with counter.

For example, this particular unit has the front converted to a shop, while the back quarters are for living.


Studying Individual Homes

Outdoor earthen oven.

Name - Ranajoy Boidya Age - 55 yrs Occupation -Rickshaw puller Storage spaces on the plinth outside.

Sandwiched houses, sharing a common wall, are the most prevalent kind.

Sketch Gallery - People and Character

These sketches have attempted to capture the feel and character of this area, by tapping into the people and their daily activities.


Methodology

1. Community Awareness

3. Involving Women and Children

5. Job Skills Training

2. Engaging Community Elders

4. General Consensus

6. Local Work Force

It takes time and effort in the form of awareness and engagement programs to ensure that the inhabitants are on board with our ideas as well as open to share their ideas with us so that we can incorporate them where possible. Participatory design programs help involve them in the process. Once there is a general consensus there are job skills training programs and the construction process itself in which they actively participate. Partners KMDA and the PMAY or prime ministers initiative for housing for all provide major funding and workforce (contractors and developers) who work with non profits like MAD and CRY to ensure a cohesive team that helps bridge the gap between people who are very different from each other.


Design Criteria This initiative would only be possible by obtaining funding from the PMs Housing for all initiative, which along with the national and state building codes lays down strict criteria for the individual units to be eligible for funding, subsidies and tax credits.

8‘

7‘ Bathroom

Private Open Space

Kitchen

Living/Bedroom 10‘

6.5‘ 7.5‘

16‘

Design Objectives Incremental Typology to be built in phases as per requirement. Every unit has direct access to outdoors. Every unit has natural ventilation. Maximizing outdoor space while maintaining density. Design Criteria per Municipal Code and PMAY Whole unit = 320-350 sqft 1 room = min 103 sqft, mid width 8ft Multiple rooms = One of above, and one with min 90.75 sqft, and 6.9ft min width Min height = 9ft Kitchen = min 48.5 sqft, min width 6ft Bathroom = min 21.5 sqft, mid width 4ft and min height 7.25ft


Unit Design

These are the different Units and community centre that were designed maintaining a simple grid to optimize the cost of construction while following all mentioned criteria.

Phasing up of units as required allows families to start out in small units and obtain the government subsidy and grow into their unit with expansion later on.


Block Design The drawings here show the redesigned blocks in site with the first floor plan to depict the interaction with the outdoors. Care has been taken to try and preserve the morphology of the urban fabric - preserving the natural pathways and trying to maintain the general figure ground map. The marked areas show how the particular would probably be used by the people based on my knowledge of their habits and culture.

A tree shade to enjoy a quiet read.

A park bench to sneak in an afternoon siesta


What these sketches are attempting to convey, is that however formalized architecture might be, and however one might try to have control over exactly how each space will be used, these people, by virtue of their culture, will grow into a place once they accept it and will use these spaces in very interesting ways. There is an innate organic flavour to all their activities and in their general way of life that is simply beyond the generic grid forms.


SO HOW DOES THE PHASING WORK ON SITE?


Most places in India, have a very high density of people. The slums, even more so. Since there are no plot lines demarcating individual property, and the land is free to be claimed to build informal housing (the government fails to interfere at this minute level), there is a lack of equity. Thus striking a balance between top down and bottom up transformation, allows this to avoid the tragedy of the commons where no one regulates how much land one can use up and gives everyone an equitable share and the chance to grow. This makes it possible to increase the number of units from 237 to 247 with 57 expandable units thus making the maximum built capacity 304.

The buildings are arranged in an extroverted fashion around the open spaces allowing them to be used in a communal fashion. Interconnected and communal organisation of the residential spaces make them fluid and open to access.


Using the spaces Tranquility The outdoor green spaces provided to almost all the units can be a place of recluse to enjoy a quiet read or a moment of retrospection, with a beverage. Age no bar.


Using the spaces The ghat and the lake... The community here revers and worships water and is used in various sacred activities every morning. Thus the people themselves take up the onus of cleaning and maintaining the water body as far as possible. Some help provided from the government or non profit inititatives would go a long way in preserving this seat of commoning.


Using the spaces Heart I would like to end on this note as it reminds me of the late 90s when these slums were not considered “unsafe” or “dirty” and me and my cousins would often join the kids there in any of the open spaces in a hearty game of cricket. Hopefully I will be able to work further on this project and bring it to fruition, to help revive these scenes so that the lively community here continues to thrive as heartily as it used to back then.


About the studio... This two semester research-based-design studio is focused on the bottom-up transformation of cities and explores how designers and planners can tap into the selforganizing behavior of cities in order to empower citizens to claim their right to the city. The fi rst semester, taught by Stefan Gruber, will focus on collective case study research and the development of an individual design thesis proposal. The second semester, taught by Jonathan Kline, will support students in developing their individual projects culminating in an exhibition at CMU. This year-long studio is houses final year students from the Master of Urban Design, Bachelor of Architecture and Master of Architecture programs. It is an opportunity to pursue a year long thesis within a structured research context exploring urban commoning. The commons are emerging as a key concept beyond the binaries of public and private space for tackling the challenges of the contemporary city: • • • •

How to build urban resilience in the face of dwindling resources? How to tackle growing inequity in the face of polarizing politics? How to articulate common interests despite increasing social individualization? How to find agency as architects given the scope of these challenges?

Here commons are understood as a set of practices dealing with the production and self-management of collective resources and spaces beyond contemporary forms of domination, such as class, gender or race. The studio’s research will continue a collaboration with ARCH+ and ifa, contributing to the traveling exhibition An Atlas of Commoning, on display at CMU’s Miller ICA from June 29. through September 23. In September the studio participated in Designing for a Commons Transition, an international symposium on commoning that will be held on campus. In October the studio travelED to Vienna, Austria for field work and primary research on cooperative housing and other citizen-led initiatives that contribute to making Vienna the most livable city in the world. Rights on Carpet (Manual Herz) : With architect-activist Teddy Cruz+Fonna Forman


Designing for a Commons Transition - an International Symposium

The exposure to a variety of programs helped us synthesize the information we gleaned from them and from the US-UK based secondary case studies and VIenna based primary case studies, to draw posters. These posters portrayed a complete picture of the project we studied. The following pages exhibit my work on the Congo Street Initiative by BCWorkshop in Dallas, Texas and the Wildgarten housing project by ABP in Vienna, Austria. Karl Marx Hof - A glimpse from Vienna


Synthesis of the Commons : Congo Street Initiative

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CONGO STREET

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1. Disrupt the systemic inequality threatening the residents of Congo Street. 2. Improve the livelihood and housing conditions of the residents without displacing any resident in the process. 3. Maintain the social fabric of the community. 4. Enhance the quality and energy efficiency of the housing while maintaining affordability. 5. Improve the street in a manner that is consistent with its history, culture, and character. 6. Create trustworthy relationships with the families in order to serve and empower them. 7. Create a viable model than can be reproduced.

INITIATIVE

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CONGO STREET INITIATIVE Planned by: bcWorkshop Dallas, Texas, USA, 2008-2012 Congo Street Initiative is a one of a kind renovation/ construction of five owner occupied homes slated for demolition and construction of a sixth, operating as a holding house, providing temporary housing for the residents whose homes are being rebuilt. This allows for the residents to not be displaced from their community during the process. Sponsored by buildingcommunityWorkshop, this project entailed a collaborative, community-based approach that involved existing homeowners, architecture and engineering students, and volunteers in the design and construction of the six LEED-certified houses and reengineering of Dallas’ first public green street. Part of the success of the project has been to turn a forgotten street into something positive, which has spurred additional development by other groups. 12 rental units on the south side of the street and 24 units of senior housing behind Congo Street were completed in 2012.

Posters : Drawings and diagrams by Srinjoy Hazra are based on fieldwork, secondary sources, and materials that have been redrawn, modified and rearranged for simplicity. The condensed and edited dialogs are based on interviews with stakeholders and from secondary sources : 1. “Congo Street Initiative,” bcWORKSHOP, January 11, 2013, http://www.bcworkshop.org/bcW/congo-street-initiative/ 2. “Congo Street Initiative,” Community Catalyst, The Real Estate Council Online, http://www.recouncil.com/page.aspx?pid=272 A research project by the Master of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon Univeristy. Photo : © buildingcommunityWorkshop (2012)

An Atlas of Commoning : Orte des Gemenschaffens An ifa exhibition in collaboration with ARCH+, ifa (Institut fur Auslandsbeziehungen) is Germany's oldest intermediary organisation for international cultural relations, having celebrated its centenary in 2017. ifa is supported by the Federal Foreign Office of the Federal Republic of Germany, the state of Baden-Wuttemberg adn its capital Stuttgart. www. ifa.de/ed ARCH+ is Germany's leading publication for discourse in the fields of architecture, urbanism, and related disciplines. www. archplus.net Graphics Design : Heimann + Schwantes, Berlin © 2018 Institut fur Auslandsbeziehungen e.V. (ifa), Stuttgart, Germany; authors; artists

Excerpts from https://www.rudybruneraward.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/04-Congo-Street-Initiative. pdf, accessed on October 10, 2019.


CONGO STREET INITIATIVE BY BCWORKSHOP, DALLAS, TEXAS AmeriCorps VISTA volunteers

Jubilee Park and Community Center Corporation

TREC volunteers

65+ SMU and UTA students Patriot Solar Power LLC donates Solar Panels

commissioned bcWorskhop to design for the community

Local residents and volunteers

Brent Brown

Human and social capital

Design Founds BCWORKSHOP with 2 gifts totaling $35,000.

Congo Street Initiative

Economic capital

CITI $10,000

City of Dallas $396,130 Meadows Foundation $142,000

Private Individuals and Businesses $90,927

Real Estate Council $78,000 The rest of us five houses were rebuilt and reconstructed one at a time by BCWorkshop and volunteers from the entire community. After we were done, we were retrofitted with solar panels to offset the utility costs for the residents.

4523 Congo St (2009)

Subcontractors

ONCOR Alternative Energy Rebate $29,215

Sue Pope Foundation $70,535

4525 Congo St (2009)

6 LEED Gold or Platinum certified (1 new & 5 refurbished) homes followed by the street being revamped as Dallas’ first Green Street with permeable paving and bio swales.

Contractors

bcWorkshop

electrical, mechanical, plumbing, insulation, roofing, security, storage, windows.

I was the first house to be built. The residents of the street stay in me while their houses are being rebuilt with the help of volunteers and locals. I am the only new construction here.

4533 Congo St (2010)

4537 Holding House (2008)

I was rebuilt into Dallas’ first “Green Street” with stormwater management, retention and bio-filtration, with reduced street width, limiting the use of impervious concrete and improving pedestrian safety.

4539 Congo St (2009)

4529 Congo St (2009)

We ran a community design and engagement program for the first six months before starting construction. Having the people “own” the project by being involved in rebuilding it comes before ownership of the actual house.

It has had a trickle up effect - encouraging different approaches to housing, community engagement, reuse and sustainability. How can this scale up from here?

We dont want to move out of the community while our homes are being rebuilt. We want to be a part of the process. Taking local people into the workforce, not only helps us but enthuses the community as well.


Synthesis of the Commons : Wildgarten

WWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWW W W WWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWW W WWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWW WWWWWWWWWWWWW WW W Collaborative Urbanism in Emil - Behring - Weg, Vienna

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“The project offers a powerful tool that activates the residential programm in such a way that it becomes the promotor of an urban space. Combining a grid structure, plot patterns and social equipment with the productive specificity of housing agencies, private developers and communal initiatives the project delivers a convincing strategy that operates as a set of actions on various levels. The taking of final decisions is the outcome of a well structured process which does not reduce the project to mere questions of type, use, building and physical context. In addition, the social work is an integral part of the construction work, offering platforms for exchange and development, ranging from private micro-initiatives to larger collective enterprises such as ambitious concepts of social housing.”

WILDGARTEN

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WILDGARTEN Planned by: arenas basabe palacios Emil-Behring-Weg, Vienna, Austria, 2009 ‘Wildgarten’: an innovative process of democratic planning, began in 2009 with the winner project of the international Europan 10 Vienna, made by the office of Arenas Basabe Palacios. For the planning development, they formed a multidisciplinary team with the local partners Mascha and Seethaler and a group of experts in mobility, sociology, participation, landscape and energy. Each expert, contributed with their knowledge that coalesced to form the master plan for the suburban area of EmilBehring-Weg, Meidling, approved by the city of Vienna in September 2015. Since Urbanism is about more than technicians, involvement of institutions, developers and citizenship was ensured so that everyone’s interests, necessities and capabilities were accounted for. However, the reality of the situation came forth once the execution started through the developer (ARE) whose interests were not aligned with that of designers.

Posters : Drawings and diagrams by Srinjoy Hazra are based on fieldwork, secondary sources, and materials that have been redrawn, modified and rearranged for simplicity. The condensed and edited dialogs are based on interviews with stakeholders and from secondary sources : 1. https://arenasbasabepalacios.com/en/2015/09/25/ wildgarten/ 2. https://issuu.com/arenas.basabe.palacios/docs/wildgarten 3. Discussion with Eva-Maria Kehrer, Caritas, Wien. Conducted by MUD studio, batch of Spring 2020. A research project by the Master of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon Univeristy. Photo : © arenas basabe palacios (2009)

An Atlas of Commoning : Orte des Gemenschaffens An ifa exhibition in collaboration with ARCH+, ifa (Institut fur Auslandsbeziehungen) is Germany's oldest intermediary organisation for international cultural relations, having celebrated its centenary in 2017. ifa is supported by the Federal Foreign Office of the Federal Republic of Germany, the state of Baden-Wuttemberg adn its capital Stuttgart. www.ifa.de/ed ARCH+ is Germany's leading publication for discourse in the fields of architecture, urbanism, and related disciplines. www.archplus.net Graphics Design : Heimann + Schwantes, Berlin © 2018 Institut fur Auslandsbeziehungen e.V. (ifa), Stuttgart, Germany; authors; artists

Excerpts from http://archiv.europan.at/Europan10/indexb08e.html?idcatside=105, accessed on November 20th, 2019.


WILDGARTEN VIENNA, AUSTRIA PHASING UP OF UNITS AROUND OPEN SPACES BASED ON DEMAND

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Our catalog of Quality Goals included nieghbourhoods with shops, endowments and parking within three minutes of walking. It is primarily a pedestrian zone with vehicular entry only in emergencies.

It is a constant state of negotiation with the developers even though they are our clients. As a non profit, Caritas embodies an entirely different set of ideologies from the developers. We are working to bridge the differences between the developers wishes and the initial ideas of commoning by ABP.

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However, when the project came to be realised, there were certain aspects of it which became points of conflict with the designers, planners, the non profit managing it on one side and the developer on the opposite side. ABP (architects) and Caritas (non profit) were oriented towards preserving the initial ideas such as shared ownership of open spaces. Whereas ARE (developer) were more focused on maximising their profits by building more units as they were very much in demand. We can clearly see how the priorities changed from green open spaces to built form. They also opposed the idea of free usage of the neighbourhood centre and asked for at least operational costs from the users. The ARE are not interested in the ideals of commoning and the tensions between the sides are clearly palpable.

WILDGARTEN, conceived for the Europan 2009 competition by Arenas Basabe Palacios, was based on the idea of dynamic extroverted plans in which the open spaces dominated the built forms, maintaining a certain ratio of green-to-built spaces. It was planned as a mixed use development with rental, ownership and subsidized (both cohousing and social) typologies with a shared neighbourhood centre for all and shared ownership of all open spaces.

There can be no ‘allmende’. We, developers, own the land. We can, at best, give the co housings authority of their own open spaces if they agree to maintain it well and keep it open to the public. Some our clients prefer their privacy. We have to cater to different needs.

Subsidized Social Housing

Our catalog of Quality Goals, among other things, included nieghbourhoods with shops, endowments and parking within 3 minutes of walking. It is primarily a pedestrian zone with vehicular entry only in emergencies.

There should be no fence in the garden there. These spaces are meant to be free and open to the public so that kids can run and play as they please. This is a place for the Commons to foster in the shared open spaces!

Private Ownership

We need to make decent profit. Our interests are less aligned with the ideals and aims of commoning. With increased density, there is hardly any scope left to facilitate participatory design and similar techniques.

I wouldn’t mind having a fence around my garden or yard. It would keep my kids from running out. It might not be safe. It would also help keep my dog in the yard, since there are no dog walks where he can play.


FEELING UNWELCOME TO NEW DEVELOPMENT

PEOPLE GETTING PUSHED OUT

HOMELESSNESS

RISING

Image courtesy of Maya Dukmasova

NEGATIVE PERCEPTIONS OF OUTSIDERS

PAST EXPERIENCE WITH DEVELOPERS

GENERATIONS OF FAILED URBAN RENEWAL

Image courtesy of Camilo José Vergara

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NEGATIVE STEREOTYPES

LACK OF TRUST

DISENFRANCISEMENT

EVICTION

Images courtesy of ABC/NBC/FOX

ABSENTEE LANDLORDS SLUMLORDS

Image courtesy of Louisa Marie Summer

POOR HOUSING CONDITIONS

Image courtesy of Rick Wood

LEGAL DISPUTES

STIGMATIZATION OF URBAN BLIGHT

UNAFFO HOU

Image courtesy of The Atlantic

DIMINISHED QUALITY OF LIFE

COMPLICATIONS WITH DISABILITY

LIMITED E MOB

Image courtesy of CIEH

Image courtesy of Yves Marchand

POOR BUILT ENVIRONMENT

CONCEN POV

BIASED PERCEPTIONS

MEDIA-DRIVEN NARRATIVES

Image courtesy of Lucas Jackson / Reuters

GENTRIF

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Image courtesy of Metro Times

NORMALIZED PERCEPTION

NEIGHBORHO SEEN AS

POOR QUALITY OF HEALTH

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NEW RESIDENTS LACK COMMUNITY REVERENCE

G RENTS

SENSE OF LOSS OF COMMUNITY

DECAY OF CULTURAL TRADITIONS

LARGE DEATH QUANTITIES

Image courtesy of Amy Stone

OOD CHANGES NEGATIVE

Image courtesy of Deborah Svoboda / KQED

LACK OF COMMUNICATION

Image courtesy of Jahi Chikwendiu / The Washington Post

LACK OF COMMUNITY

FICATION

Image courtesy of Marion Post-Wolcott

HIGHER CRIME RATES

SINGLE PARENTING

Image courtesy of Patrick Semansky / AP

Image courtesy of Randy Simes / UrbanCincy

NTRATED VERTY

DEFICIENT EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

Image courtesy of Chris Saulit

MASS INCARCERATION

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ORDABLE USING

LACK OF OPPORTUNITY

Image courtesy of Iris Schneider / LA Times

ECONOMIC BILITY

H COST LIVING

GANG ACTIVITY BECOMES A CULTURE

LACK OF SKILLS TRAINING

Image courtesy of John Marino

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LACK OF WELLPAYING JOBS

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DRUG ADDICTION

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MULTIPLE LOW-WAGE JOBS NECESSARY

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LIMITED ABILITY TO BUILD EQUITY

TEEN PREGNANCY

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DEPRESSION

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LACK TO TIME SPENT WITH CHILDREN

HOPELESSNESS


RE_CON is a broad housing initiative that seeks to address issues of concentrated poverty, gentrification, and urban blight in Pittsburgh.


About the project...

RE_CON 01 is a housing prototype being developed for the community of East Liberty in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Through a partnership with a local non-profit developer, East Liberty Development, Inc. (ELDI), RE_CON 01 and a variant, RE_CON 02 are the first in a series of aggregated prototypes which seek to remediate blight, and deconcentrate poverty through the growth of mixed-income communities in the region. This market rate home is being designed to cater to the current market in Pittsburgh targeting the incoming tech employees and will be sold at market-rate. Profits from the sale of the home will be held in an escrow fund by the non-profit developer and utilized to stabilize the homes of existing low income residents in the neighborhood, thus attempting to combat the forces of gentrification currently facing the East Liberty neighborhood and contribute to the development of a healthy, mixed-income community. RE_CON 01 is being designed and will be constructed in part by Carnegie Mellon University’s Urban Design Build Studio (UDBS). RE_CON 01, seeks to demonstrate how social, economic, and environmental strategies can be utilized to: 1) Remediate blight 2) develop vacant infill lots 3) Integrate local job skill training for living wages 4) Achieve high levels of performance in terms of energy 5) repurpose building material from regional building deconstruction. The project will be realized through PROJECT RE_, a non-profit transactional entity and pre-fabrication facility that is a partnership between local building material reuse suppliers and job skills training programs. Material harvested from regional deconstruction projects executed through PROJECT RE_ have been diverted from landfill and will be incorporated in the construction of the RE_CON 01 prototype. The design and construction of the home will facilitate job training opportunities for labor apprentices, many of whom come from the neighborhoods where RE_CON 01 and future RE_CON housing prototypes will be deployed. The realization of RE_CON 01 seeks to demonstrate place-specific strategies through the use of local material and development of local labor; strategies that are transferable globally. The UDBS functions on collective intelligence and collaboration. The cohort went through a series of assignments in Fall ’18 to understand the context and mission of the project and continued on to design the house in question through Spring ’19. The following pages describe the project with focus on portions that I contributed to.


material supplier

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY

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COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS & NEIGHBORS

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CONCENTRATED POVERTY

is a national issue.

79.99° W

Census tracts where 40% or more of residents live below the federal poverty threshold are considered to be areas of concentrated poverty.

POCKETS OF CONCENTRATED POVERTY

40.44° N

32.4%-48.6% pop below poverty line 24.4%-32.4% pop below poverty line 19.1%-24.4% pop below poverty line Latitude/Longitude of Pittsburgh

Concentrated poverty affects all corners of the United States. Because of the size of Pittsburgh it does not appear on a map at this scale, however looking at a smaller scale shows that these pockets of concentrated poverty are often specific neighborhoods, shaped by racist policies from the past like Redlining. 25.2% of African Americans live in areas of concentrated poverty.


In the Fall of 2018, the UDBS executed a pilot deconstruction project, DE_CON 01, of a 2005 Solar Decathlon building on Carnegie Mellon University’s campus, where the materials harvested are projected for future re-use in the RE_CON 01 & 02 market rate homes. In neighborhoods struck by concentrated poverty, the existing building stock of Pittsburgh is often left to deteriorate due to the falling value of homes, leading to blighted properties and to the degradation of neighborhoods across the city. Although these factors have lead to a current landscape struck by steep economic and racial divides, they also provide an opportunity to improve the lives of disenfranchised and marginalized individuals through the re-use of existing building stock to provide a living wage to individuals in the communities and reinvest the material in the neighborhoods. With the articulated mission of producing appropriate, replicable solutions, the UDBS will aspire to produce work that is inclusive, durable, and culturally relevant to future generations of the community.

Re_con elements proposed to be built with re-used material


I worked on the structural components along with others of the solar decathlon house deconstruction drawings and this provides a glmipse into the same. Click here to view the full set.

SIMPSON STRONG-TIE 2"X4" 20-GAUGE FACE

53 54 51

SIMPSON STRONG-TIE 2"X4" 20-GAUGE FACE

53 54

54

54

2X4 AND 2X6 DIMENSIONAL LUMBER FORM THE JOISTS OF THE ROOF OF THE NORTH SIDE GROUND FLOOR SECTION AND OF THE FLOOR OF THE LOFT. THE ON EDGE MEMBERS ARE HELD BY ANNOTATED SIMPSON HANGERS AND THE ON FACE MEMBERS ARE END-NAILED.

53 53

UNDERSIDE OF LOFT SHOWN WITH JOISTS AND LVL MEMBERS.

54 54 54 54 54

53

51

54 53 53 54 53

51

TENSILE ST 53

53 54 53

5 16"

PLATES FIXED TO THE LVL MEMBERS OF THE LOFT WITH THE TENSILE STEEL CABLES ATTACHED.

53 53 54

3/8-16 4 21" PARTIALLY THREADED STEEL HEX BOLT (1" THREAD), MATCHING HEX HEAD NUTS AND 38" INNER DIA STEEL FLAT WASHERS, CONNECTING LVL MEMBERS AT THE BASE OF THE FRAMING STRUCTURE OF THE LOFT.

81

NYLON STRAPS

CARLISLE CCW

79

HARD HAT

WORK GLOVES

POWER DRILL HIGH VISIBILITY VEST

53

REMOVAL OF THE LOFT

AFTER UNFASTENING ONE SIDE OF THE CONNECTION, ENSURE ANOTHER INDIVIDUAL HAS SECURED HOLD OF THE LVL MEMBER BEFORE REPEATING THE UNFASTENING PROCEDURE

3 4"

52

LAG BOLTS 51

3 4"

3 8" STEEL H DRIVE NUT

SOCKET WRENCH

5 STACKED WALL SIPs

LOFT MODULE

DISCONNECTING THE PSL MEMBERS FROM THE LOFT PRIOR TO DISENGAGING THEM FROM THE STRUCTURE.

2 STACKED ROOF SIPs

4 GROUND FLOOR STRUCTURE REMOVAL PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

ON SITE SIP STORAGE TO BE SAWED OFF INTO SMALLER PIECES.

51

3/8-16 3 21" HEX DRIVE PARTIAL STEEL BOLT (1" LG THREAD), M HEAD NUTS AND 38" INNER DIA

53 53

51 52 51 52 52 51 51 51 51

3 8"X3" LAG BOLT WITH 3 8" INNER DIA STEEL FLAT WASHER. 5 16"

METAL PLATE CONNECTOR AT THE TOP OF THE FRAMING LVL MEMBERS OF THE LOFT

NYLON STRAPS

51 51

51 52 51

52

REMOVAL OF PSL MEMBERS BY CRANE AFTER TYING THE NYLON STRAP SECURELY

3/8-16 4 21" PARTIALLY THREADED STEEL HEX BOLT (1" THREAD), MATCHING HEX HEAD NUTS AND 38" INNER DIA STEEL WASHERS HOLDING PSL MEMBERS TOGETHER.

PSL

PHILIP HEAD SCREW

METAL PLATES 52

WOODEN LEDGE

51

PSL AND THE WOODEN LEDGE SCREWED TOGETHER WITH A METAL ANGLE 3/4-10 2 41" HEX DRIVE PARTIALLY THREADED STEEL BOLT (1 21" LG THREAD), MATCHING HEX HEAD NUTS AND 3/4" INNER DIA STEEL FLAT WASHERS CONNECTING PSL MEMBERS TO THE CONCRETE SLAB. PICTURE SHOWING UNINSTALLATION PROCESS.

51

3 PSL REMOVAL PERSPECTIVE

FULL LENGTH FILLET WELD FOR THE 165 " THICK STEEL PLATES.

NOT TO SCALE

5 16"

THICK STEEL PLATES SHOWING WELDS


53

53 3/4" I.D. STEEL FLAT WASHER 51

61 51 51 51 54

THE 5/16" THK STEEL PLATE SHOULD BE UNFASTENED USING A POWER DRILL/SOCKET WRENCH WITH A 3/4" BIT AND A 3/4" CRESCENT WRENCH (1 PERSON)

37 TENSILE STEEL CABLE 53 53 54

53 53 54 53

51 53 53 53 41

66

51 FIRST FLOOR FRAME BELOW LOFT

61 53 62

53

UNINSTALLING THE SIP ROOF OF THE LOFT

CARLISLE CCW 3/8 - 16 X 3-1/2" HEX DRIVE PARTIALLY-TURGADED STEEL BOLT (1" LG THREAD)

HEX T

POWER DRILL 3/8" SOCKET BIT WORK GLOVES 53

3/8" CRESCENT WRENCH

2

THE 5/16" THK STEEL PLATE SHOULD BE UNFASTENED USING A POWER DRILL/SOCKET WRENCH WITH A 3/8" BIT AND A 3/8" CRESCENT WRENCH

LOFT REMOVAL PEREPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

81

NYLON STRAPS

61

LLY THREADED MATCHING HEX STEEL WASHERS.

2 9 O C T 2 0 1 8

F O R D E C O N

52

61 SIP PANELS DISLODGED BY CRANE USING GALVANIZED STEEL PICKPOINTS AND NYLON STRAPS AND PLACED ON THE GROUND.

BOTH 28' ROOF SIPS WERE SECURED TO THE PSL STRUCTURE BY 12" LG PAN HEAD #3 SQUARE DRIVE PARTIALLY THREADED SELF-TAPPING WOOD SCREW (3" LG THREAD) AS A STRAIGHT EDGE

52

61

KEY NOTES: ¾” THK CEDAR EXTERIOR CLADDING 1. 2. RED MAPLE INTERIOR CLADDING 3. ¼” CYPRESS PLYWOOD 4. ¾” THK x 3” WIDE OAK INTERIOR TONGUE-AND-GROOVE CLADDING 5. ⅜” THK OAK INTERIOR CEILING PANELS 6. 1" BIRCH HARDWOOD TRIM WITH P.U. COATING 7. 1/2" DOMESTIC BIRCH PLYWOOD SHEATHING WITH P.U. COATING 8. BIRCH HARDWOOD DADO BORDER WITH P.U. COATING 9. ¼” ASH PLYWOOD VENEER 10. GYPSUM WALL BOARD 11. BACKER ROD WITH DRY CAULK 12. HARDWOOD TRACK SHOE WITH GASKET SEAL 13. BIFOLD DOOR TRACK 111 SERIES BY JOHNSON HARDWARE 14. MILLED HARDWOOD DOOR WITH GASKET SEAL 15. STANDING SEAM METAL ROOFING 16. PERFORATED METALWORK 17. SOLID GALVANIZED STEEL AWNING 18. PERFORATED GALVANIZED STEEL AWNING 19. FIXED WINDOW: REFERENCE AS2.11 20. AWNING WINDOW: REFERENCE AS2.11 21. MIXED TYPE WINDOW: REFERENCE AS2.11 22. SINGLE EXTERIOR DOOR METAL WITH INSET GLAZING AND STATIONARY PANEL 23. DOUBLE EXTERIOR DOOR METAL WITH INSET GLAZING 24. INTERIOR DOOR WOOD WITH INSET GLAZING 25. INTERIOR DOOR WOOD 26. EXTERIOR METAL DOOR FRAME 27. INTERIOR METAL DOOR FRAME 28. LADDER TO LOFT 29. PV PANELS BP5170 BP SOLAR MONO-CRYSTALLINE 30. RACK FOR PV PANELS 31. SOLAR THERMAL COLLECTOR 32. RADIATOR FOR SOLAR THERMAL COLLECTOR 33. 4” CELLULAR POLYCARBONATE INTERLOCKING PANEL 34. ⅝” TRIPLE WALL CELLULAR POLYCARBONATE 35. POLYCARBONATE EDGE DETAIL 36. ALUMINUM FRAMING FOR POLYCARBONATE 37. SHIM/BLOCKING 38. 3/4" RIGID INSULATION 39. 1" RIGID INSULATION 40. APA RATED OSB PLYWOOD SHEATHING FOR WALLS 41. OSB PLYWOOD SUBFLOOR 42. CLOSED CELL INSULATION 43. BIRCH PLYWOOD / RIGID INSULATION COMPOSITE CONSTRUCTION 44. 1” x 3” WOOD FURRING STRIPS 45. WALL MEMBRANE CCW 705 46. ICE AND WATER SHIELD 47. TCS GUTTER 48. TCS FLASHING 49. 10 GA GALVANIZED CARBON STEEL COLLAR 50. 20 GA GALVANIZED STEEL 51. PREFAB BRACKETS, 5/16” THK WELDED STEEL PLATE 52. 3-1/2” X 9-1/4” PSL MEMBER 53. LVL MEMBER 54. 2”X4” DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 55. 2”X6” DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 56. 2”X10" DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 57. 2"X12" DIMENSIONAL LUMBER 58. COMPOSITE LUMBER DECKING 59. COMPOSITE LUMBER RAILING 60. COMPOSITE LUMBER RISERS 61. 10 ¼” THK SIP 62. ¾” THK PLYWOOD 63. ⅜” THK PLYWOOD 64. WR GRACE WATERPROOF MEMBRANE 65. 2’ 1-¾” LVL BLOCKING 66. C 10X22 STEEL CHANNEL 67. WT 9X32.5 STEEL SECTION 68. 18” DIA. CAST CONCRETE FOOTING W/ #4 BAR AND STL BEARING PLATE 69. 3½” THK POURED CONCRETE SLAB W/ EMBEDDED PEX TUBING 70. LIGHT FIXTURE 71. STAINLESS STEEL BAR HANDLE 72. WOODEN CUBBY 73. WOODEN KITCHEN CABINETRY SET 74. STAINLESS STEEL MICROWAVE 75. STAINLESS STEEL OVEN 76. STAINLESS STEEL STOVE 77. OPEN CELL SPRAY FOAM INSULATION 78. SEE MECHANICAL KEYNOTES 79. PREFAB BRACKETS, 1/2” THK STEEL PLATE 80. OSHA-COMPLIANT CRANE HOOK 81. SPREADER BAR 82. 8' 0" TALL CONSTRUCTION FENCE AT WORK AREA BOUNDARY BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 83. PORTABLE TOILET PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 84. 30 YARD ROLL OFF DUMPSTER PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 85. 180 DEGREE ACCESS GATE PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 86. EXISTING TREE 87. EXISTING LAMP POST 88. EXISTING CURB AND SIDEWALK 89. EXISTING PLUMBING EASEMENT/CONNECTIONS 90. 12' LONG X 8' WIDE X 3' HIGH 10-YARD ROLL OFF RECYCLING DUMPSTER PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 91. 35' ROLL OFF TRUCK FOR DELIVERY OF DUMPSTERS PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 92. 50-TON CAPACITY NATIONAL CRANE NBT50 MOUNTED ON A PETERBILT 359 4-AXLE CHASSIS WITH A 102’-0” BOOM LENGTH PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 93. FLAT BED TRUCK W/LIFT GATE FOR PORTABLE TOILET SERVICING PROVIDED BY GENERAL CONTRACTOR 94. TEMPORARY ELECTRICAL SERVICE, 4 GFCI DUPLEX OUTLETS PROVIDED BY ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 95. SCAFFOLDING 96. PORCELAIN CAROMA DUAL FLUSH TOILET 97. PORCELAIN HAND SINK 98. BATHROOM FIXTURES 99. OAK RAILING 3' 6-1/8" LONG X 1' 0-9/16" WIDE, 44" ABOVE FLOOR 100. ¾” THICK X 3” WIDE BATHROOM DECKING 101. METAL SUPPORT FOR RAISED FLOOR PANEL 102. CONTINUOUS PIANO HINGE 103. 4”X3/4” PLYWOOD FLOOR PANEL 104. 2”X2” LVL FLOOR SPACER 105. STEEL FLOOR RISER

5000 FORBES AVENUE DE_CON 01 PITTSBURGH, PA 15213

TEEL CABLE

URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERISTY 5 0 0 0 F O R B E S A V E N U E 201 COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS P I T T S B U R G H , P A 1 5 2 1 3

3/4 - 10 X 2-1/4" HEX DRIVE PARTIALLY-THREADED STEEL BOLT (1-1/2" LG THREAD)

GENERAL NOTES: 1. THESE DOCUMENTS ARE THE COPYRIGHTED PROPERTY AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OF THE CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO (UDBS). THE DOCUMENTS ARE NOT TO BE REPRODUCED OR UTILIZED FOR ANY PURPOSE OTHER THAN ORIGINALLY INTENDED AND AS STIPULATED ON THE COVER SHEET AND TITLE BLOCK. USE OF THE DOCUMENTS FOR ANY PURPOSE, SPECIFICALLY STIPULATED OR NOT, SHALL BE GRANTED ONLY VIA AUTHORIZED WRITING BY THE CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO AND ITS DIRECTOR, JOHN FOLAN AIA, LEED AP. 2. NONE OF THE DOCUMENTS INCLUDED IN THE DRAWING INDEX ARE INTENDED TO BE CONSIDERED IN ISOLATION OF ONE ANOTHER. ALL PARTIES/ENTITIES UTILIZING THESE DOCUMENTS FOR COST ESTIMATION, BIDDING, QUANTITY SURVEY, AND/OR CONSTRUCTION SHALL CONSULT THE GENERAL NOTES AND INFORMATION LOCATED ON THIS SHEET AND ALL "G" SERIES (GENERAL INFORMATION AND DATA) SHEETS FOR INFORMATION AND CONDITIONS GOVERNING WORK DESCRIBED IN DOCUMENTS LISTED IN THE DRAWING INDEX BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH PROCUREMENT AND/OR CONSTRUCTION. GENERAL INFORMATION AND DATA SHEET(S) ("G") PROVIDE CODE, PROCEDURAL AND USE GUIDELINES GOVERNING ALL BID AND/OR CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS. ALL BIDDERS, ESTIMATING, AND PRICING SHALL UTILIZE COMPLETE SETS OF THE BIDDING AND/OR CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS IN QUANTIFYING AND CONSTRUCTING. NEITHER THE OWNER, ARCHITECT, NOT URBAN DESIGN BUILD STUDIO (UDBS) ASSUMES RESPONSIBILITY FOR ERRORS, OMISSIONS, OR MISINTERPRETATIONS RESULTING FROM THE USE OF INCOMPLETE SETS OF BIDDING AND/OR CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTS. 3. EXISTING SITE CONDITIONS WILL REMAIN UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE 4. MATERIAL YIELD WILL BE TRANSPORTED TO PROJECT RE_ UNLESS NOTED OTHERWISE

CHAINSAW

61

54

1 ROOF SIP REMOVAL PERSPECTIVE NOT TO SCALE

NAIL THE 2"X4" DIMENSIONAL LUMBER IS NAILED INTO THE SIP PANEL, THEN CUT THE SIP PANEL INTO 4'X8' PANELS USING THE 2"X4" AS A STRAIGHT EDGE

AS3.14

HARD HAT W/ FACE SHIELD

20

OF

STRUCTURE EXPLODED PERSPECTIVES

TWO 28' SIP ROOF PANELS WERE LIFTED FROM THE STRUCTURE USING THE 50-TON CRANE

37


HOME - one of many montages developed iteratively - in search of the universal, fundamental dimensions of scale, shadow and material that one associates with the feeling of being at home.

Neighbourhood - Breeding familiarity through drawings with the neighbourhoods surrounding the site to help contextualize concepts of HOME in the context where it will be implemented.


RE_CON-NAISSANCE

4

1

Vacant Lots 315-317 N.st Clair

2

Contextually Generated Form

5

Building Excavation

Separated Private and Social

6

3

Building Massing

7

Extension Of Social Space Outdoors

8

12% Driveway Slope With Combined With 15’ Setback Separates Vehicular Entrance

Social Connection Maintained 25 Degree Roof Angle 1384khw/M2 Ave. Incident Radiation 550 Sqft Area For 30 Panels At -25n Orientation

Roof Angle Optimized To Pv Panels

9

To allow for maximum area with 8’ ceiling height on third floor

Dormers To Maximize Space

Locations of Market Studies Conducted in Pittsburgh


ARCHITECTURE

18'-4"

50'-3 1/4"

Third Floor

18'-4"

50'-3 1/4"

Second Floor

50'-3 1/4"

5'-0 3/4"

First Floor

18'-4"

18'-4"

50'-3 1/4"

Basement Floor


The Pittsburgh market for an urban single family home expects 1800-2500 sqft homes with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, a roof deck, a garage and an open floor plan. Our potential buyer profile and the comparable analysis sets the price point between $550,000 and $800,000. Because the target buyer group is at the beginning of adulthood and in the process of building their career and their families so the flexibility of the space, and the ability to grow they will have to relocate as their needs change.

Dormer window

Solar Array

Bedroom (203 sq ft) Roof deck (97 sq ft)

Bathroom (44 sq ft) Bedroom (195 sq ft)

Master Bedroom (41 sq ft) Walk in Closet (67 sq ft) Bathroom (56 sq ft)

Laundry (49 sq ft)

Mechanical Room (41 sq ft) Powder Room (25 sq ft) Kitchen (200 sq ft) Dining (180 sq ft)

Double height Living (230 sq ft) Porch (115 sq ft) Terraced Ramp to Basement/ Garage


SECTIONS


Double Height Space

Clerestory Windows

Metal Panel Cladding

Double Height Living Space

Clerestory Windows

Third Floor Bedroom


Double Height Living Space

Master Suite


Transverse Section


R-40 Walls 2 X 6 Top Plate 4’ O.c Prefabricated Panels 5.5” Closed Cell Spray Foam R-20 5/8” Sheathing Vapor Barrier 4” Xps Insulation R-20

Windows_pella Architect Series Low E-Coated Dual Pane U-0.25

R-30 Conditioned Floor 2 X 6 Bottom Plate 3/4” Flooring Warmboard Hydronic Radiant Floor Coils 1-3/8” Radiant Subfloor 2 X 10 Rim Board 2 X 10 Floor Joists 5/8” Dry Wall

Exploded Perspective


Enclosure systems R-60

Roof

McElroy Metal Meridian Panel Air Barrier 5/8” OSB Sheathing 4” R20 40 XPS Rigid Insulation 11” R44 Dense Packed Cellulose 2 O.C. 2x12 Wooden I-Joists 5/8” Gypsum Board

Basement Wall

5” R19 XPS Rigid Insulation Ivany Block Wall

R-20

Basement Floor

Poured Concrete 4” R20 XPS Rigid Insulation

R-30


R-40

Wall

Taktl Rain Screen Air Barrier 5/8” OSB Sheathing 3” R11 40 XPS Rigid Insulation 7.5” R30 Dense Packed Cellulose 5/8” Gypsum Board

R-6.25

Windows

R-4.7

Door

R-30

Conditioned Floor

475 Bewiso Anne Double Sash

Pella Encompass

McElroy Metal Meridian Panel Air Barrier 5/8” OSB Sheathing 4” R20 XPS Rigid Insulation


RE_CON - Scaling up

PHASE 01 Development of Re_con site with water management strategies

PHASE 02 Urban development of N st clair street

PHASE 03 Development of sites on the opposite side of the street

PHASE 03 Replication of recon housing strategy across the neighbourhood


Urban Site Strategy RE_CON’S urban design strategy is implemented in phases to soften the landscape and extends social connection through continuing porch culture. FUTURE POTENTIAL TO CREATE A MIXED INCOME NEIGHBORHOOD 60-80% MEDIAN INCOME Annual Income:

$46,650

23.8% of families in East Liberty are families with kids

<60% MEDIAN INCOME Annual Income:

$36,540

69.6% of households in East Liberty are single mothers

MARKET RATE

NOT IN WORKFORCE

Annual Income:

Annual Income:

$156,023

$28,399

79.1% of families in East Liberty are families without kids

17.3% of people in East Liberty are seniors 65+

Future potential to create a mixed income neighbourhood

RE_CON 01 aspires to promote social and cultural sustainability through its functional organization and use of material. The organization of RE_CON 01 is designed to sympathetically align with ELDI’s objectives of fostering spaces for social engagement on the interior and exterior of the house and cultivating a lively and safe streetscape. Outdoor living space, including a front porch, is provided to connect the home’s living spaces to the street and support the “porch culture” that is so prevalent in Pittsburgh. Rebuilding porch culture creates an environment where community members have eyes on the street, creating a safer environment, and creates an outdoor room with a direct connection to the neighborhood, connecting neighbors and building community. Regionally-sourced building materials help to enhance the identity of the neighborhood and promote longterm investment in place. The replicabilty ensure business for ELDI as well as fostering their social agenda by promoting mixed income sustainable communities.


The following are excerpts from a full detailed report that show a variety of factors and simulations run on the Jacobs house.

Definition of Unit Space The living room was selected for the simulations. The large floor-to-ceiling windows are only in the spaces adjacent to the garden; one of the bedrooms and the living room. Other spaces in Jacobs House have small window-to-wall ratios and do not receive much sunlight. Our simulations are run with the assumptions that the occupancy of the building space is office use with 8AM to 6PM weekdays usage. The living room usage is closer to the office usage than the bedroom usage, so the living room is selected for the visual radiation analyses.


Image BasedImage Daylighting Additional BasedVisualizations Daylighting Visualizations (Bonus) In this section. weawill show a comparable analysis of visualizations from run simulaThis section shows comparable analysis of visualizations from simulations on the baseline and then themodel suggested design with modified window tions runmodel on the baseline and then themodel suggested design model withlocations modi- and improved quality of glazing. The simulations been run show luminous fied window locations and improved qualityhave of glazing. Thetosimulations havedistributions been within the concerned space at 9am and 3pm at critical dates in the year (December run to show luminous distributions within the concerned space at 9am and 3pm at June and March). images the left show whereas critical datesThe in the yearon (December Junethe andbaseline March).conditions The images on thethe leftones showon the right show the suggested design. the baseline conditions whereas the ones on the right show the suggested design.

figure 4.1.1 - Luminous Distribution comparison between Baseline model (left) and Recommended model (right) on 21st March at 9am.

figure 4.1.2 - Luminous Distribution comparison between Baseline model (left) and Recommended model (right) on 21st March at 3pm.

figure 4.1.3 - Luminous Distribution comparison between Baseline model (left) and Recommended model (right) on 21st June at 9am.

figure 4.1.4 - Luminous Distribution comparison between Baseline model (left) and Recommended model (right) on 21st June at 3pm.


quicklook lookthrough through the the luminous luminous distribution distribution diagrams diagrams show show that that in in the the recommended recomAAquick model, themodel, distribution is a lot more the baseline This would definitely mended the distribution is even a lot than moreineven than in model. the baseline model. contribute a greater visual comfort and avoid highcomfort contrast patches This wouldtowards definitely contribute towards a greater visual and avoid of highlight and darkness. allows for a more diffused throughout the year. The contrast Itpatches of light andhomogenous darkness. Itand allows for alighting more homogenous and scale provided each frame candela perinsquare metreexpresses incident on the diffused lightinginthroughout theexpresses year. Thethe scale provided each frame surfaces of the space. the candela per square metre incident on the surfaces of the space.

figure 4.1.5 - Luminous Distribution comparison between Baseline model (left) and Recommended model (right) on 21st December at 9am.

figure 4.1.6 - Luminous Distribution comparison between Baseline model (left) and Recommended model (right) on 21st December at 3pm.

figure 4.2.1 - Daylit conditions comparison between Baseline model (left) and Recommended model (right) on 21st March at 9am.

figure 4.2.2 - Luminous Distribution comparison between Baseline model (left) and Recommended model (right) on 21st March at 3pm.


figure 4. - Workflow used to generate luminous distribution graphics

figure 4.2.3 - Luminous Distribution comparison between Baseline model (left) and Recommended model (right) on 21st June at 9am.

figure 4.2.4 - Luminous Distribution comparison between Baseline model (left) and Recommended model (right) on 21st June at 3pm.

figure 4.2.5 - Luminous Distribution comparison between Baseline model (left) and Recommended model (right) on 21st December at 9am.

figure 4.2.6 - Luminous Distribution comparison between Baseline model (left) and Recommended model (right) on 21st December at 3pm.


Environmental Course Reports Retrofitting an existing residence (Fall 18, CMU) for Prof Vivian Loftness. Click HERE. High Performance Systems Design for ECS (Fall 18, CMU) for Prof Nina Baird. Click HERE.

Basic Computational Skills

Parametric arrays based on Attractor Points


Parametric building envelope responsive to sunlight

Still from Grasshopper Animation showing Azimuth at various times


Profile for Srinjoy Hazra

Portfolio_SrinjoyHazra  

Containing select works till Fall 2020.

Portfolio_SrinjoyHazra  

Containing select works till Fall 2020.

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