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HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION

Designing for the Next Generation

SRG PARTNERSHIP

PORTLAND, OREGON

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

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HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION


The need for health professionals has never been greater. SRG closely tracks the forces affecting healthcare today: an aging population, cultural diversity, epidemics, healthcare reform and globalization. Changes in healthcare delivery will impact the kind of training required. We understand these issues so that the buildings we design help to advance the next generation of healthcare providers. SRG PARTNERSHIP

PORTLAND, OREGON

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

SRG PARTNERSHIP

PORTLAND, OREGON

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

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HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION


ABOUT SRG SRG is an award-wining design firm based in Portland and Seattle. Founded in 1972, we provide architecture, programming, planning, and interior design for higher education, healthcare, science and technology, and civic and cultural projects. Our process of discovery seeks fresh perspectives and new ideas across all markets to achieve lasting success. Our 40+ year history of designing for higher education and healthcare coalesces in our design of facilities for allied health professionals. Knowing what needs to be the same, and more importantly, what needs to be different, we create learning environments for students and instructors that strategically consolidate programs, promote interaction and introduce important community partnerships. LEFT: HEALTH & WELNESS FACILITY, LANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

SRG PARTNERSHIP

PORTLAND, OREGON

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

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HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION


FOUR ISSUES Many forces currently affect healthcare education, such as changes in funding, technology, interdisciplinary sharing, and opportunities to integrate clinical experience. Offering innovative solutions, SRG designs spaces that welcome and inspire; are flexible and adaptable; accommodate multiple uses or alternative programs; and address four issues that are central to this building type:

1. SPECIALIZED LEARNING SPACES 2. INTERDISCIPLINARY EDUCATION 3. STRATEGIC ALLIANCES

On the following pages, we’ll explain our approach and provide project case studies that give a hands-on understanding of each issue’s significance, as well as the benefit of integrating all four.

4. SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

LEFT: LIBERTY HALL, NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES BUILDING, EVERETT COMMUNITY COLLEGE SRG PARTNERSHIP

PORTLAND, OREGON

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

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ISSUE NO. 1

SPECIALIZED LEARNING SPACES

Teaching environments for health professionals are distinct in terms of pedagogy, technology and equipment, and must incorporate a variety of practical components.

subtle adjustments or additional classroom functions. Increasing the space around dental chairs or the width of the aisles allows room for students to gather. SIMULATION TRAINING

Specialized learning spaces include replicated hospital rooms for nursing, actual functioning dental clinics, simulated optometry exam rooms, and anatomy and physiology cadaver labs. Understanding all the program requirements in detail is critical to the project’s success and to managing construction costs. For example, not all the features in a simulated hospital room’s headwall need to perform. SIMULATION ENVIRONMENTS

These spaces represent real healthcare environments, but must also accommodate teaching requirements with

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Flexibility and adaptability are critical to staying ahead of rapid changes in technology. Simulation software is replacing MRI and CAT scan shells, so digital visualization theaters may soon become a standard component in health professions education.

SPECIALIZED LEARNING SPACES ALSO CONTRIBUTE TO THE BROADER LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF THE ENTIRE CAMPUS (COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONALS, OREGON INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY)

FLEXIBILITY AND ADAPTABILITY SPECIALIZED CLASSROOMS

Certain programs require a unique learning environment to ensure full support and lasting value for the pedagogy. Challenging assumptions, pharmacy may need a large flatfloor lecture room with multiple projection screens surrounded by group study rooms.

HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

We help our clients calculate how much change to anticipate, and provide robust structures and generous floor-to-floor heights as required. When budgets are strict, we develop alternative strategies that ensure essential needs are met.

MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL AND PLUMBING

Due to the complexity of this project type’s infrastructure, it’s necessary to anticipate, investigate and identify requirements early to prevent problems during construction. Providing the right voltage for medical imaging machines and allowing drain line access to dental chairs for maintenance are just two examples.


ISSUE NO. 2

INTERDISCIPLINARY EDUCATION

Today’s approach to medicine is increasingly holistic. As such, environments for educating health professionals should promote interaction across disciplines. A wide variety of options exist for breaking down academic silos and expanding learning experiences. SHARING RESOURCES

The teaching pedagogies of different programs benefit from flexible and/or adaptable classroom spaces. Large sliding doors between a respiratory care lab and an adjacent nursing lab will permit them to share a “sim” man. SHARING SOCIAL SPACES

Where spaces for socializing and studying merge, learning can happen everywhere and all the time. Opening up academic spaces and exposing their activities fosters familiarity across disciplines. Introducing

food service or a coffee cart next to a gathering place builds a sense of community. CO-LOCATING FACULTY

Seeing and hearing what’s going on in other departments can inspire faculty as much as students. For a recent project, we placed the science and health professions faculty offices on two separate floors, but in a single area joined by a two-story open space. LEARNING OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM

Social spaces and circulation patterns that increase studentto-student, faculty-to-faculty and faculty-to-student interaction strengthen the overall learning environment with a sense of community and program identity. In our project for Chemeketa Community College, a centrally located Active Learning Lab helps bring everyone together.

OPEN CIRCULATION ALLOWS ALL DISCIPLINES TO COME TOGETHER (HEALTH SCIENCE COMPLEX, CHEMEKATA COMMUNITY COLLEGE)

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ISSUE NO. 3

STRATEGIC ALLIANCES

The education of health professionals depends on clinical experience, so relationships often form between the academic institution and a host of outside professional entities, such as hospitals, clinics, equipment vendors and peer institutions. At the Oregon Institute of Technology, a 300 square foot equipment demonstration area located across from a large lecture hall accommodates professionals from the hospital next door. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION PROCESS

Project goals involving strategic alliances have numerous implications. It’s critical to understand them clearly before the design process begins.

A CLINIC FOR A PRIVATE HEALTH PROVIDER HAS ITS OWN ENTRY IN EVERETT COMMUNITY COLLEGE’S NEW BUILDING (LIBERTY HALL, NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES, EVERETT COMMUNITY COLLEGE)

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HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

BUILDING LOCATION

Often the public is involved, so access, visibility and identity are especially important. The building may serve as a community resource and part of the institution’s outreach efforts. Patients visiting a clinic may need reserved parking. INTERNAL CIRCULATION

Public access also affects internal circulation. Students and patients typically must stay separate, so it’s important to understand the impact these adjacencies can have on the design of waiting areas, restrooms, teaching spaces and a wide range of support spaces.


ISSUE NO. 4

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

The priority that occupants of these buildings place on healthy environments meshes perfectly with sustainable design goals. A range of integrated strategies work to improve indoor air quality, maximize daylight and views, encourage the use of stairs, protect storm water quality, conserve energy and reduce waste. LEED RATING AND CONSTRUCTION COSTS

SRG’s integrated strategies, developed through research and experience, consistently achieve LEED Silver without an increase in cost and LEED Gold with only a slight increase. RAINWATER HARVESTING

Living in the rainy Pacific Northwest, we have a terrific opportunity to protect and celebrate a vital natural resource. Using strategies that vary in scale, detail and utility, it’s possible to create beautiful bioswales, enchanting

downspouts and concealed grey water systems that provide water for flushing toilets. REDUCING OPERATING COSTS

Conservation is the most cost effective way to reduce energy consumption. Combining ageold concepts and sophisticated modern technology, we can reduce energy consumption by 50-60% and achieve maintenance costs comparable to conventional systems. COMFORTABLE AND HEALTHY INDOOR ENVIRONMENTS

Through research and experience, aided by key consultants and computer modeling, SRG’s integrated approach takes advantage of additional mass, ceiling fans, skylights and “night flush” to create very effective passive cooling. We tailor these techniques to suit each project, resulting in comfortable spaces with lots of daylight, operable windows, natural ventilation and individual controls.

DAYLIGHTING AND VENTILATION DIAGRAMS (CHEMEKATA COMMUNITY COLLEGE’S HEALTH SCIENCE COMPLEX)

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HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION


Case Studies

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CASE STUDY

LIBERTY HALL, NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES EVERETT COMMUNITY COLLEGE EVERETT, WASHINGTON

This new building is home to programs in nursing and other health professions combined with strong foundations in biological and social sciences. It also includes a new public clinic administered by Providence Hospital Everett, a partnership supporting the regional community with health services for low-income residents and giving nursing students profession-based clinical practice.

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The Physical Education and Health and Wellness departments share classroom facilities and enjoy the synergy produced by the new flow of people and activities between their disciplines.

HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

Targeting LEED Gold with an impressive energy use index (EUI) of 26, Liberty Hall incorporates passive and active strategies. The building is oriented to maximize daylighting, while public spaces, offices and administrative spaces benefit from natural ventilation. When needed, labs and classrooms are heated and cooled with a Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) system, an innovative energysaving technology.

SIZE

70,000 SF COMPLETION

2013 COST

$24.5 Million LEED

Pursuing LEED Gold PROGRAMS

Nursing, Physical Therapy, Respiratory Care, Phlebotomy, Surgical Technology, Clinic


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CONFERENCE ROOM PART-TIME STAFF WORK STATIONS WORK ROOM PROVIDENCE EVERETT HEALTHCARE CLINIC

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SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

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CASE STUDY

HEALTH SCIENCES COMPLEX CHEMEKETA COMMUNITY COLLEGE SALEM, OREGON

This state-of-the-art facility includes a 72,000 SF addition along with extensive remodeling and upgrades to an existing 61,000 SF building. Integrating all four of the design issues we’re highlighting in this brochure, it has expanded educational programs and attracted new professional partners. The Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) has introduced a dental clinic, while the University of Western States, a Portland chiropractic college, has co-located instructional classes here. 16

Faculty offices are grouped centrally to encourage interaction among departments and establish a bridge from new construction to the existing facility. The narrow site and dental clinic’s need for public access generated a long armature perpendicular to the existing building. The result is a series of pavilions connected by a central hallway. Student gathering spaces punctuate this simple organizing element, offering views and bringing natural light deep into the classrooms, labs and central hall. Careful coordination with equipment

HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

providers ensures functionality and long-term durability for a wide variety of unique lab spaces. Ventilation shafts, ceiling fans, additional mass and electrochromic glass skylights replace standard cooling equipment to keep occupants comfortable throughout the year without mechanical air conditioning. Celebrating rain, back-lit sculptural cisterns capture roof runoff as it cascades to the base of the building through exposed downspouts before draining into landscaped swales.

SIZE

72,000 SF Addition 61,000 SF Remodel COMPLETION

2011 COST

$30 Million LEED

LEED Silver Equivalent PROGRAMS

Basic Services, Nursing, Dental, Pharmacy, Clinic, Strategic Alliance


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SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

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HEALTH SCIENCES COMPLEX, CHEMEKATA COMMUNITY COLLEGE 1 DENTAL CLINICS 2 ALLIED HEALTH 3 DENTAL FACULTY OFFICES 4 DENTAL LAB 5 DENTAL CLASSROOMS 6 MULTI-PURPOSE CLASSROOM 7 HEALTH FACULTY OFFICES 8 PHARMACY TECH 9 COMPUTER LAB 10 ADMIN 11 SIMULATION LAB 12 LAB 13 STORAGE 14 NURSING

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HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

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48'

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RECOGNITION

AIA Portland and Architecture 2030 Design Challenge, Grand Prize 2013

Mid-Valley Green Awards, Green Building of the Year 2013

DJC Top Projects, Public Buildings, $15-50 Million, Third Place 2012

SRG PARTNERSHIP

PORTLAND, OREGON

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

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CASE STUDY

HEALTH & WELLNESS FACILITY LANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE EUGENE, OREGON

This new LEED Gold building represents health, innovation and learning in spirit and form. Our goal was to create a twostory structure that functions as a living, breathing organism. The idea of a lung emerged, bringing in fresh air and exhausting warm, contaminated air, but also promoting cost efficiency by serving multiple uses. The result is a giant light well that delivers daylight and fresh air to all classrooms on both levels. It slices completely through the building, between teaching labs and support 20

spaces, and makes sustainability the signature feature for human and environmental wellbeing. With an EUI of 35, it is projected to save $20,000 per year in energy costs. Complementing the “lung,” the building’s “heart” is a large shared space directly off the main entry plaza that encourages students to come together from all programs: nursing, EMT, physical therapy, respiratory care and therapeutic exercise/rehabilitation. Cascade mountain views and an active

HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

coffee/snack bar invite them in, while an adjacent glassenclosed meeting/study room provides an academic focus. The nursing labs replicate real hospital environments, from room sizes to simulated head wall units and equipment. Blending clinical experience with didactic needs, gathering spaces with AV projectors and marker boards are distributed throughout to integrate instruction and discussion.

SIZE

43,500 SF COMPLETION

2010 COST

$12.9 Million LEED

LEED Gold Certified PROGRAMS

Nursing, EMT, Respiratory Care, Therapeutic Exercise/ Rehabilitation, Clinic


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SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

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HEALTH & WELLNESS FACILITY, LANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE 1

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OFFICE POD

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HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

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RAINGARDEN


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CASE STUDY

CENTER FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONS OREGON INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY KLAMATH FALLS, OREGON

Although far from Oregon’s population hub, the Center for Health Professions is a Pacific Northwest nucleus for undergraduate and allied health education. This structure connects education, the healthcare industry and medical device manufacturers, and welcomes strategic partners, including the OHSU School of Nursing. Strengthening relations with the adjacent hospital, an alcove off the main lobby allows vendors to demonstrate medical equipment, facilitating interaction between faculty, students and hospital staff. 24

Various study/social spaces give students choices and really encourage learning outside the classroom. Distributed along a central circulation spine, they strategically connect different programs and are conveniently near faculty offices, labs and classrooms in both quiet and busy areas. Unique infrastructure and space requirements also accommodate a variety of medical imaging programs and their large and expensive equipment.

HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

A central spine brings daylight deep into the interior, but the building’s most notable sustainable strategy is an extensive approach to capture and treat storm water runoff, especially significant in this high desert region. Starting on the downhill side of the main parking area, the building funnels all the runoff to its south end and into the campus’ front yard where it settles. A series of weirs slows and directs the flow. After a heavy rain, an interesting garden becomes a dramatic water feature.

SIZE

93,000 SF COMPLETION

2006 COST

Phase 1: $10.75 Million Phase 2: $12.8 Million LEED

LEED Silver equivalent PROGRAMS

Nursing; EMT; Medical Imaging; Radiologic Science; Nuclear Medicine Technology; Diagnostic Medical Sonography; Vascular Technology; Echo Cardiography; Clinical Laboratory Science


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SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

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CENTER FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS, OREGON INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

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HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

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PORTLAND, OREGON

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

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CASE STUDY

CREIGHTON HALL, HEALTH PROFESSIONS CAMPUS PACIFIC UNIVERSITY HILLSBORO, OREGON

This project exemplifies the numerous and varied demands inherent in designing for health professions education. As the first building on an entirely new campus for Pacific University, Creighton Hall’s challenges included establishing a strong identity, maintaining continuity with the adjacent hospital campus, and providing space for all its required public uses: nonprofit health clinic, dental clinic, retail space and food service.

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Bringing all of the University’s health professions programs together in one building was a huge step toward fostering interdisciplinary education. The overall goal was to introduce many opportunities for students and faculty to socialize and work together. A large open lobby, exterior entry court and food service on the ground level signify shared destinations, while an open central stair, surrounded by glass on the upper floors, provides visibility to increase

HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

familiarity and understanding. The medical library, a resource for all students, is conveniently located on the second floor, along with the dental lab that also serves the public. The lab’s generous central aisle plus wide spaces between the dental chairs allows students to gather for teaching moments. Our integrated design process, focusing on the most costeffective sustainable strategies, achieved LEED Gold.

SIZE

105,000 SF COMPLETION

2006 COST

$19.2 Million LEED

LEED Gold Certified PROGRAMS

Dental Hygiene; Pharmacy; Physical Therapy; Occupational Therapy; Optometry Clinic; Physical Assistant; Psychology


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HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

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PORTLAND, OREGON

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CASE STUDY

COLUMBIA HALL CLATSOP COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASTORIA, OREGON

The first phase of a threephase redevelopment project, Columbia Hall makes the Jerome Campus feel cohesive for the first time and highlights a growing regional focus on health professions education. Generous gathering spaces combined with dramatic views of the Columbia River and Astoria Bridge bring the student

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body together in a much-needed center that confirms a sense of place and belonging. Encouraging interaction, new labs for the Science and Allied Health Departments, a learning center for the Developmental Education program, community meeting space, campus dining facilities and a bookstore are

HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

now all available under one roof. Numerous sustainability strategies, featuring natural ventilation and daylighting, make the building a long-term high performance asset.

SIZE

48,000 SF COMPLETION

2010 COST

$27 Million PROGRAMS

Basic Sciences; Medical Assistant; Nursing; Anatomy


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HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION


SRG PARTNERSHIP

PORTLAND, OREGON

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

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CASE STUDY

BIOSKILLS TRAINING LAB ACUMED HILLSBORO, OREGON

Acumed, a rapidly growing manufacturer of orthopedic implants, brings in visiting surgeons for product training as part of its marketing outreach. This new 8,500 SF training center, inserted into the existing facility, emphasizes flexibility with a training room for up to 88 people, locker facilities, a

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ten-station cadaver lab, variety of lab support functions and spaces to showcase products. Two fully equipped rooms and a product display area with a Skyfold partition wall maximize the use of space. Audiovisual equipment connects to the cadaver lab where moveable

HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

tables accommodate different sized groups for real-time demonstrations and distance learning. For Acumed’s large inventory of products, walk-in refrigerators and freezers give numerous specimens ample storage.

SIZE

8,500 SF COMPLETION

2011 COST

$2 Million PROGRAMS

Anatomy; Cadaver Lab


CASE STUDY

SCIENCE, MATH, ART AND NURSING FACILITY GRAY’S HARBOR COLLEGE ABERDEEN, WASHINGTON

This new STEM building will serve the departments of Science, Math, Art and Nursing by providing physical and life science laboratories, nursing skills laboratories, art studios, meeting spaces, general classrooms, and computer labs. STEM’s classrooms will incorporate the latest research for integrating technology and

hands-on-learning. Classrooms will be centered on learners rather than instructors. Flexible furniture, integrated analog and digital technologies and multiple presentation zones will help teachers move about the classrooms as the “guide on the side” rather than the “sage on the stage.”

Targeting LEED Gold, STEM is designed to maximize sun exposure in a rainy region. Its rooftop plaza and green space mark the main entrance and provide welcoming and engaging outdoor learning spaces that overlook the rest of the campus to the north.

SIZE

69,950 SF COMPLETION

2015 COST

$34 Million PROGRAMS

Science, Math, Art, Nursing

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CONSTRUCTION COSTS & SUSTAINABILITY Based on our research, data, and history of success, SRG has developed a unique and consistent approach to minimizing energy consumption and maximizing lasting value for our clients. By fully integrating passive strategies into the design, construction costs are comparable to buildings with conventional HVAC systems and subsequently save considerable amounts in operating costs.

SRG PROJECT OTHER PROJECT

LEED Gold: Health Professions Campus, Pacific University

$240/SF

LEED Silver Equivalent: Health Professions, Phase II, Oregon Institiute of Technology

$260/SF

LEED Gold: Student Fitness Center, Everett Community College

$270/SF

LEED Silver Equivalent: Health Sciences Complex, Chemekata Community College

$285/SF

LEED Gold: Health & Wellness Facility, Lane Community College

$290/SF

Clark Center, Washington State University

$245/SF

Science and Health Building, Skagit Valley Community College

$275/SF

Health Sciences Building, Clackamas Community College

$285/SF

Allied Health Building, Lake Washington Technical College

$285/SF

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PORTLAND, OREGON

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

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621 SW MORRISON, SUITE 200 PORTLAND, OREGON 97205 (503) 222-1917 110 UNION, SUITE 300 SEATTLE, WASHINGTON 98101 (206) 973-1700 WWW.SRGPARTNERSHIP.COM

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HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION: DESIGNING FOR THE NEXT GENERATION

Health Professions Education: Designing for the Next Generation  

An overview of SRG's experience with health professions facilities.

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