Carolina Arts & Sciences Magazine Fall 2015

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FOOD FOR ALL Local and Global Perspectives

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U N I V E R S I T Y

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N O R T H

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Jackie Fritsch

FROM THE DEAN

Food as a reflection of who we are

College of Arts and Sciences

American Studies Professor Marcie Cohen Ferris

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writes in her book The Edible South: The Power of Food and the Making of an American Region (UNC Press, 2014): “Food reflects both our national and our regional culture as surely as do art, literature, music, politics and religion.” Ferris is co-chair of the committee responsible for Carolina’s new two-year academic theme, “Food for All: Local and Global Perspectives.” We devote the fall 2015 issue of Carolina Arts & Sciences to an in-depth exploration of the Karen M. Gil impact of food on our culture, with stories on the interdisciplinary work that faculty, students, alumni and staff are doing in this area in the College of Arts and Sciences. The food grid on our Table of Contents is a key to some of those articles; look for the “Food for All” banner at the top of the pages for more content. Food is a great conversation starter, and we hope you’ll join us in the discussion about the role food plays in our lives. You may also notice some design changes with this issue. We have freshened our look in response to feedback from our readers, including an easier-to-read typeface, more white space and photos, and shorter features. You can learn more about the redesign on page 26, and enjoy a look back at 10 years of magazine covers. The search committee for the next dean of the College of Arts and Sciences is continuing its work as I prepare to return to teaching and research in the department of psychology and neuroscience. An announcement is expected later this fall. For updates on the search and the finalists, visit college.unc.edu/about-us/ dean-search. As I come close to the end of my tenure, I want to extend my deepest thanks to the many people who have made my time as dean so fulfilling and have made the College a greater place. Best wishes,

CAROLINA ARTS & SCIENCES | FALL 2015 | magazine.college.unc.edu Director of Communications: Geneva Collins Editor: Kim Weaver Spurr ’88, Associate Director of Communications Staff Multimedia Specialist: Kristen Chavez ’13 Graphic Designer: Linda Noble. Carolina Arts & Sciences is published semi-annually by the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and made possible with the support of private funds. Copyright 2015. | If you wish to receive Carolina Arts & Sciences News, our periodic e-newsletter, please send your name and email address to college-news@unc.edu. | College of Arts and Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Campus Box 3100, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3100, 919-962-1165

Karen M. Gil, Dean Kevin Guskiewicz, Senior Associate Dean, Natural Sciences Jonathan Hartlyn, Senior Associate Dean, Social Sciences and Global Programs Tammy J. McHale, Senior Associate Dean, Finance and Planning Abigail Panter, Senior Associate Dean, Undergraduate Education Robert J. Parker, Jr., Senior Associate Dean, Development, and Executive Director, Arts and Sciences Foundation Terry Rhodes, Senior Associate Dean, Fine Arts and Humanities

Arts & Sciences Foundation Board of Directors, Fall 2015 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

G. Munroe Cobey ’74, Chapel Hill, NC, Chair R. Duke Buchan III ’85, Palm Beach, FL, Vice Chair Vicki Underwood Craver ’92, Riverside, CT, Past Chair Karen M. Gil, Chapel Hill, NC, President Jonathan Hartlyn, Chapel Hill, NC, Vice President Tammy J. McHale, Chapel Hill, NC, Treasurer Robert J. Parker, Jr., Chapel Hill, NC, Executive Director and Secretary Amy Berry Barry ’91, Naples, FL Eileen Pollart Brumback ’82, New York, NY Sunny H. Burrows ’84, Atlanta, GA Courtney Miller Cavatoni ’93, Atlanta, GA Thomas C. Chubb III ’86, Atlanta, GA Mark P. Clein ’81, Chevy Chase, MD Luke E. Fichthorn IV ’92, Brooklyn, NY Druscilla French ’71, ’78, Chapel Hill, NC J. Henry Froelich III ’81, MBA ’84, Charlotte, NC Cosby Wiley George ’83, Greenwich, CT John C. Glover ’85, Raleigh, NC Henry H. Hamilton III ’81, Katy, TX Steven H. Kapp ’81, MBA ’90, Philadelphia, PA Heavenly Johnson ’05, Chicago, IL M. Steven Langman ’83, New York, NY Wendell A. McCain ’92, Chapel Hill, NC Aurelia Stafford Monk ’85, Greenville, NC Andrea Ponti ’85, London, England R. Alexander Rankin ’77, Goshen, KY Catherine Craig Rollins ’84, Atlanta, GA David S. Routh ’82, Chapel Hill, NC Tready Arthur Smith ’92 BSBA, Tampa, FL Karen L. Stevenson ’79, Los Angeles, CA Benjamin J. Sullivan, Jr. ’75, Rye, NY Marree Shore Townsend ’77, Greenwich, CT Thomas M. Uhlman ’71, ’75, Murray Hill, NJ Elijah White Jr. ’84, Houston, TX J. Spencer Whitman ’90, Charlotte, NC Cecil W. Wooten III ’68, ’72, Chapel Hill, NC


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Food for All

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FOOD FOR ALL

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Local and Global Perspectives

We celebrate the launch of Carolina’s new two-year academic theme, “Food for All,” with an issue that showcases the in-depth teaching and research our faculty and students are doing on this ever-fascinating topic (Bonus: We also feature a few alumni who have launched food careers post-UNC). At left is a key to our cover, in which every plate illustrates a story. Match the numbers to the stories below. 6

Mapping a Culinary Mashup: Laos and a Local Community

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‘A Good Butcher’: Vittles Films Digs Deep into Food and Southern Culture

10 ‘Gravy’: A Poem 12 Tracking Fast Food Chains in Asia 13 Safety First for N.C. Food Pantries 14 Passion for Pimento Cheese

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17

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15 Crazy about Collards 17 Supermarkets and Locavores: Allies or Adversaries? 21 Bye-Bye, Bugs: Jeff Dangl is UNC’s Plant Disease-Buster

Departments

22 Cherished Pages: Cookbook Author Celebrates Stories about Food

21-24 Faculty Up Close and Alumni Up Close 25 Chapter & Verse

24 Farmer’s Daughter: Launching a Food Line Celebrating Southern Pickles and Preserves

26-31 The Scoop 32-36 Honor Roll inside back cover Finale

Look for more food stories throughout this issue — we couldn’t fit them all on one cover!

Stay Connected to the College via Web, social media Magazine: magazine.college.unc.edu News/Events: college.unc.edu Facebook: www.facebook.com/UNC.College YouTube: youtube.com/user/UNCCollege Instagram: instagram.com/unccollege Twitter: twitter.com/unccollege

Cover image: Photos and concept by Steve Exum ’92. Food stylist: Elizabeth Hensley.

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LOCAL AND GLOBAL For the next two years, the Carolina community will come together around a common table with food as the University’s new academic theme — exploring a plateful of topics, including food cultures and security, nutrition, world hunger, sustainable development and the impact of climate change. In the following pages, you’ll read about the extraordinary work that faculty, students, alumni and staff in the College of Arts and Sciences are doing that advances our understanding of this most fundamental topic. Learn more at foodforall.web.unc.edu. (Photo by Steve Exum)

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PERSPECTIVES

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FOOD FOR ALL

Food, Glorious Food

Q: Why does food make a great topic for this interdisciplinary focus, and what makes UNC uniquely positioned to address this issue? A: What topic could be more foundational to a university that grapples with the challenges and problems of contemporary life in North Carolina and the world, as well as the great societal issues experienced by past generations and those that will follow us? UNC has been a leader in food studies for decades. In the 1920s, sociologist Howard Odum, who founded the South’s first department of sociology and School of Public Welfare at UNC, introduced the discipline of “regional sociology,” which brought the tools of social science to bear on the contemporary problems of the South. Diet, or the “food habits” of Southerners, was chief among these concerns. In the same era, UNC

Kate Medley

rofessor of American Studies Marcie Cohen Ferris (right) co-chairs the food theme steering committee with Alice Ammerman of UNC’s Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. We asked Ferris about everything from using food as a lens to examine history to stereotypes about Southern food to her own go-to comfort meal. She has taught and conducted research on food in American culture and the foodways and material culture of the American South.

folklorists, scholars in public health, physicians and UNC Press editors also focused on regional culture, including foodways. Today, food studies is a vibrant field of interdisciplinary study across the University.

Q: What strengths do faculty, students and alumni from the College of Arts and Sciences bring to the table? A: Continuing the table metaphor, our faculty, students and alumni are the

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best dinner guests imaginable! They bring intellectual verve from American studies, African, African American and diaspora studies, Southern studies, folklore, anthropology, archaeology, art, communication, documentary studies, environmental studies, geography, global studies, history, literature, philosophy, political science, public health, public policy, sociology, theology, biology and women’s studies to the study of food. Given the interdisciplinary nature of UNC’s


American studies department and its signature strengths in Southern studies and folklore, UNC is uniquely positioned to expand food studies throughout the University and the region. Today, UNC students can create a food studies major or minor through the interdisciplinary studies degree program. Food studies in the College is experiencing explosive growth.

Q: You co-taught the new course “Carolina Cooks, Carolina Eats” with your American studies colleague Sharon Holland last spring. For their undergraduate capstone projects, students fanned out across the state to document the history and challenges of North Carolina’s food landscape. Tell us about the oral history interviews they conducted. A: Our “Carolina Cooks, Carolina Eats” students interviewed North Carolina cider makers, coffee roasters, molasses makers, coastal innkeepers, potato farmers, produce distributors, dairy farmers, fishermen, bakers, millers, café owners, chefs, fishmongers and barbecue masters. These interviews (carolinacooks.web. unc.edu/original-research) will be incorporated in our book project on North Carolina foodways and will find a permanent archival home in the Southern Oral History Collection in UNC’s Wilson Library. Here are a few highlights: • Jeff Hare, Atlantic Seafood, Goldsboro. Hare has been in business for 21 years and sources his fish solely from independent fishermen from the N.C. coast. • Lee Gliarmis, Dick's Hot Dog Stand, Wilson. Founded in 1921, Dick’s is one of the oldest familyowned restaurants in North Carolina, providing quick, tasty, inexpensive

between the realities of plenty and deprivation, of privilege and poverty in Southern history resonates in the region’s food traditions.

meals to tobacco and farm workers for decades. It remains a popular venue with locals and tourists alike. • Bob Nutter, Maple View Farm, Hillsborough. Students learned about how the farm has evolved from a small dairy operation to an in-house bottling plant, the creation of Maple View ice cream and the formation of a new agriculture education center.

Q: In your book The Edible South: The Power of Food and the Making of an American Region (UNC Press, 2014), you use food as a lens to examine the South’s complex history. What unique insights can we gain by using food as our window into that world? A: Food is history. Food is place. Food is power. When we examine the historical arc of food in the American South, we encounter the tangled interactions of its people over time, a world of relationships fraught with conflict, yet bound by blood and attachment to place. The contradiction

Q: What stereotypes would you like to dispel when it comes to notions of “Southern food”? A: Fried chicken, biscuits and pitchers of sweet tea — the caricatures of Southern foods are so “super-sized,” enriched, sweetened and filled with butter that these iconic foods have become unrecognizable to native Southerners. Consider the Southern larder of seasonal fruits and vegetables — greens, ramps, butter beans, homemade preserves and pickles, oysters, shrimp, cured hams, pork for the pit, stone-ground grits, peanuts, Carolina Gold rice, roasted sweet potatoes, a piece of hot cornbread. Southern food is a distinctive, innovative cuisine that is grounded in the world of local agrarian traditions and the influence of global cultures. Q: What foods shaped your own family history and identity? What’s your go-to comfort food when you sit down for a favorite meal? A: Each year during the December holidays, my husband, UNC historian Bill Ferris, and I visit his childhood home in Vicksburg, Miss., where he grew up on a farm. There we enjoy a familiar Southern meal of field peas, collard greens, sweet potatoes and fried catfish, with hot cornbread served on the side. Talk about eating your history! That is one of my favorite Southern meals. Another of my favorite holiday meals — brisket and noodle kugel — represents my roots of growing up in a small, but dedicated, Jewish community in northeastern Arkansas. — Interview by Kim Weaver Spurr ’88

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Photos courtesy of Katy Clune

FOOD FOR ALL: FOODWAYS FUSION

´ or Vietnamese New Year. Food traditions are deeply important to the Phapphayboun family, as demonstrated by their celebration of Têt,

Mapping a Culinary Mashup Laos and a Local Community hen Katy Clune arrived at Carolina for graduate folklore studies two years ago, she intended to weave together her interests in Southeast Asia and textiles. She had spent her childhood in Indonesia and worked most recently at the Textile Museum at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Once in Chapel Hill, she began seeking information about Southeast Asian culture in North Carolina, where Asian immigrants make up nearly 3 percent of the population. That’s how

BY DEE REID

she met Toon Phapphayboun, whose family had fled harsh conditions in Laos during the aftermath of the Vietnam War. Phapphayboun quickly introduced Clune to the extended family, now happily re-settled in Morganton, N.C., where they own an Asian fusion restaurant and grocery popular with locals and immigrants alike.

The spicy ingredients and sticky rice that held the family together during hard times in Laos have helped them assert their cultural identity in the Blue Ridge foothills. Clune’s friendship with the Phapphaybouns took her research in a

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new direction. Instead of textiles, she pursued the unexpected opportunity to deeply document an example of global foodways in the rural American South. “Food is the sensory landscape of Laos,” Clune wrote in her May 2015 thesis for the M.A. in American studies/ folklore. The Phapphaybouns have re-created their homeland within the bright yellow walls of Asian Fusion Kitchen, where the aroma of “garlic and the sweet smell of lemongrass” fill the dining area. The spicy ingredients and sticky rice that held the family together during hard times in Laos have helped them assert their cultural identity — and make new friends — in the Blue Ridge foothills.


LEFT TO RIGHT: Clune in Luang Prabang, Laos, in 2014. • Nam khao is one of the most popular dishes at Asian Fusion Kitchen in Morganton, N.C. It combines dry stick rice with seasoned rice, fermented pork and seasonings. • An outdoor market in Laos features spices and water buffalo jerky (white strips, bottom center), which is added to a spicy dipping sauce.

“It is the taste of Laos, played out in papaya salad and chilies,” that enabled the family “to exercise their heritage among one another, the local Lao community and other Morgantonians,” Clune wrote, “remaking Laos in the American South.” The restaurant blends global and local tastes, thanks to the cooking of Toon’s sister, Dara Phrakousonh. The menu fuses imported spices with fresh-grown Asian herbs and local produce from the farmers market. Asian Fusion Kitchen, known to locals as AFK, is reaching beyond Southeast Asian immigrants. More than 75 percent of customers are nonAsian Southerners. The Lao beer on the AFK menu inspired a local brewery, Fonta Flora, to craft a special rice beer of its own. Clune was moved by the Phapphaybouns’ willingness to discuss their tragic past and welcome her into their new world. She learned that Toon’s father, a mayor in Laos, was assassinated when she was only 8 years old. Toon’s mother supported four children by selling home-cooked food. In 1980, when Toon was 14, she was the first in her family to flee communist-led Laos, canoeing and swimming across the Mekong River to a refugee camp in Thailand. Her mother later wed a

doctor who had nearly died during six years in a “re-education” camp. Toon made it to Los Angeles in 1981 and eventually helped her mother, stepfather and siblings emigrate. Now they live joyfully in a rural community where about 40 Lao families have settled. Clune traveled to Morganton 10 times for family celebrations, Buddhist temple ceremonies and visits to the restaurant. She conducted interviews in North Carolina and Laos, and gathered more than 50 illustrations, including a museum image of a story cloth depicting Lao refugees crossing the Mekong. Clune’s father, Daniel, became U.S. ambassador to Laos in 2013, providing an extra incentive for her to spend summer 2014 there, when some of the Phapphaybouns would also be visiting. The irresistible aroma of cooking permeated the air in Vientiane, the capital, where “smoke rises from grilling fish, chicken and pork,” Clune wrote. “Green papayas hang on drooping branches, just steps from the kitchen and the mortar and pestle that will pound flavor into their flesh.” Clune’s thesis committee director was Bernard Herman, George B. Tindall Professor and chair of the American studies department and an expert on

foodways. He called her thesis “an extraordinary work.” “In my 40 years of teaching, this is clearly in the top five of theses I have directed or advised,” Herman said, citing the depth and sensitivity of her research and relationship with the family. “She really got at the humanity of the huge political, social and human dynamics and changes that are occurring, and how the family makes that visible through their restaurant.” Clune’s writing about the Phapphaybouns will appear in Gravy, the Southern Foodways Alliance quarterly, and Southern Cultures, the journal of UNC’s Center for the Study of the American South. Read more at makinglaos.com and katyclune.com.

Carolina Cooks, Carolina Eats Graduate students Katy Clune and Victoria Bouloubasis (story, next page), served as teaching assistants for the new food studies class “Carolina Cooks, Carolina Eats,” co-taught in spring 2015 by American studies professors Sharon Holland and Marcie Cohen Ferris. Students documented the voices of local and global foodways across North Carolina and are sharing their findings through a website and a forthcoming book of North Carolina foodways.

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D.L. Anderson

FOOD FOR ALL: FOODWAYS FUSION

Cliff Collins of Cliff’s Meat Market in Carrboro is featured in a documentary by a UNC folklore graduate student.

‘A Good Butcher’

Vittles Films Digs Deep into Southern Culture nter Cliff’s Meat Market in Carrboro, and you will quickly sense that you’ve crossed an invisible border. You’ll hear Cliff Collins wise-cracking in a familiar Southern accent. You’ll also notice the butchers, all Mexican, bantering in Spanish, and sometimes English, with chefs, professors, Latino immigrants and African-American neighbors. The butcher shop peels away a layer of the local food scene, revealing where global culture meets the

American South. That’s what attracted Victoria Bouloubasis, a UNC folklore graduate student and seasoned food journalist, who grew up near Winston-Salem in a Greek immigrant restaurant family.

The film, a directorial debut for Bouloubasis, features English and Spanish dialogue. It has been screened at two UNC food conferences and a PBS online film festival. Bouloubasis and her partners at Vittles Films have captured the bilingual cacophony of Cliff’s in a

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BY DEE REID

15-minute documentary produced for the Southern Foodways Alliance. Un Buen Carnicero (A Good Butcher) stars Tolo Martinez, whom Collins hired 20 years ago to help serve an increasingly Hispanic clientele. Martinez and the other carniceros behind the counter emigrated from the state of Guanajuato in central Mexico. They’re among an estimated 8 million undocumented immigrants working in the shadows nationwide, according to a 2010 Pew Research survey. The film, a directorial debut for Bouloubasis, features English and Spanish dialogue, with subtitles and


D.L. Anderson Annemie Tonken

TOP: Tolo Martinez was hired to serve an increasingly Hispanic clientele. LEFT: Victoria Bouloubasis.

Mexican-flavored music. It premiered at Meredith College in Raleigh and has been screened at several other local venues, including the Lantern Restaurant in Chapel Hill (whose lead sous chef is also from Guanajuato) and two UNC food conferences. This past summer it also appeared in a PBS online film festival. The documentary’s narrative takes place on July 3, 2014, the eve of Independence Day. Martinez is happily serving customers, while reflecting on the fears and frustrations simmering over his tenuous immigration status. “There are good opportunities here

in the United States,” Martinez says on camera, in Spanish. “But what we are doing is difficult because we have to do it with a lot of sacrifice. … It is a free country, but only at its convenience.” Without legal residency, he can’t advance far in his work, and he can’t risk visiting Mexico, which he left as a teenager. “I love this film,” said Marcie Cohen Ferris, UNC professor of American studies, an expert on Southern foodways and Bouloubasis’ faculty adviser. “It’s poignant and provocative, and brings attention to defining issues in contemporary food cultures of the American South.” Bouloubasis has been reporting on the local food scene for the past eight years. She is drawn to the stories of food workers in fields and kitchens, and consumers stuck in food deserts. Her work has appeared in INDY Week,

The Guardian and The American Prospect. She and former INDY colleague and photographer D.L. Anderson teamed up four years ago to form Vittles Films, with the tagline “Sustenance through Storytelling.” Their recent work has included Collards in the Cafeteria, about Gaston County Schools’ commitment to buy 10 percent of their food locally. It’s not surprising that Bouloubasis enjoys exploring the cultural complexities of the food landscape. Her father is an immigrant who was raised in a small Greek village without indoor plumbing. He worked in the food industry his entire life, from kitchens in New York to his family’s restaurant in North Carolina. “I grew up around food, and I’ve always loved cooking,” Bouloubasis said. “When I go to conferences, I seem to end up in the kitchen. I cook as soon as we finish editing film.” She was the first in the family to earn a four-year college degree. She graduated from Carolina in 2005 with a double major in journalism and Spanish. She has been a bilingual copywriter and has worked on a farm in Portugal. She then combined her interest in writing and farming by serving as communications manager for RAFI (the Rural Advancement Foundation International), a farm advocacy and research organization based in Pittsboro, N.C. For her folklore master’s thesis, she plans to explore issues of culture and identity among kitchen workers in North Carolina eateries. “It’s a luxury to spend two years focusing on one subject,” she said of the graduate program. “It’s going to help me become a better storyteller with a deeper sense of the people behind our food culture.” Watch Un Buen Carnicero and see more films at vittles.us.

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FOOD FOR ALL: A POEM

Gravy

BY MICHAEL McFEE

eat grease, flour and water, stirred till smooth — it’s what my forebears ate, if they were lucky. It’s what my mother ate, those hard dark years she worked at a sawmill way out in the mountains, learning to live on cigarettes and coffee and cold biscuits raised from the dead by gravy. Now and then she’d cook a little for us, something to moisten and darken and quicken the bowls of bland white rice or mashed potatoes I’d shape into a cratered volcano whose steaming lava overflow improved everything it touched on my dinner plate. Good gravy’s not an afterthought, a dressing, a murky cloud masking a dish’s dull prospect: whether poured from a Thanksgiving china boat or a black iron skillet in Bloody Madison, it’s the meal’s essence, where flesh meets spirit, where fat becomes faith, where juice conveys grace as red-eye, giblet, sausage, faithful sawmill — whenever I think of those savory names and the times I’ve poured or ladled or spooned then mixed and dipped and sopped up their elixir, not wanting to waste a single filling drop, my mouth starts making its own thin gravy again. Michael McFee is a poet and professor of English and creative writing at UNC. Gravy appeared in his book That Was Oasis (Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2012). Illustration by Daniel Wallace, J. Ross MacDonald Distinguished Professor of English and Creative Writing, who is an author and illustrator.

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FOOD FOR ALL: FOOD, FAST

Milking pecans for all she can he majestic pecan tree that grew on her grandmother’s farm was the inspiration for it all. When Rachel Atkinson ’15 was a firstyear student at UNC, she became involved with the student-run organization FLO (Fair, Local, Organic) Food. As many of the members began exploring veganism and drinking milk substitutes, she noted that most non-dairy milks were highly processed and certainly not local. She thought of her grandmother’s pecan tree and wondered why pecan milk was not among the offerings. She whipped up a batch and liked it. So did her friends. Learning about what it would take to bring a pecan milk beverage to market became a central focus of her UNC education.

Quick bites on research and work by UNC students

Atkinson, an interdisciplinary studies major (urban planning and sustainable development) who minored in entrepreneurship and geography, received a 2013 JNO award. The competitive grants are given to students in the e-minor to help them prepare ideas for market. She spent summer 2013 studying the state pecan farm industry on a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship. She was selected as an Honors Carolina Burch Fellow and spent summer 2014 at Brooklyn Soda Works, learning firsthand how artisanal food products are created, packaged and promoted. “The entrepreneurship classes were amazing” in helping her understand what’s involved in market research and pitching her product, she said, and the summer in Brooklyn taught her “a million small things, the tedious parts of the business, continued

Photo of pecan milk courtesy of Rachel Atkinson

FOOD, FAST

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FOOD FOR ALL: FOOD, FAST

The idea of place was always important to Grace Farson ’15. It inspired her to travel to Thailand and Burma in summer 2014 through a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship. The interdisciplinary studies and communication studies double major combined her interests to create a documentary film, Doesn’t Taste Good When Eaten Alone, focusing on the growth and possible impact of fast food chains in Burma. After decades of self-imposed isolation, Burma (also known as Myanmar) recently opened to international trade, so fast food is not as prevalent there as in other Southeast Asian countries. Farson began her trip in Bangkok, so she could compare Thailand’s food culture to Burma’s. In Thailand, there is a rising interest in fast food chains. Fast food restaurants are found primarily in shopping malls (which are also becoming more popular). On the street, food vendors and local eateries abound. Farson then traveled to Yangon (formerly Rangoon, Burma). “What initially struck me about Yangon was the small number of places to eat, apart from inside the home and on the street at tea shops and tea stalls,” she wrote in her fellowship report. While there, she interviewed tea shop owners, restaurateurs and a manager of Korean-based fast food chain Lotteria, the first fast food restaurant to open in

ABOVE: Hledan Market in Yangon. RIGHT: Claire Hannapel.

Burma. Large chains like McDonald’s have been eyeing the country for franchise options, with KFC becoming the first U.S. chain to open in Burma in summer 2015. As she interviewed people for her film, she heard mixed reactions about the projected growth of these chains. “I wasn’t totally a big fan of this idea of fast food coming into a place with so much history and so much pride in their traditional cuisine,” she said. But after her interviews, she realized more fast food spots could bolster food sanitation and provide affordable food to more people. Overall, Farson noted, people were excited about the fast food chains but nearly everyone agreed on one thing: Traditional food will never go away. — By Kristen Chavez ’13

Going with the FLO

It is easy to say you want to eat local, organic food, but what if you’re a student living on campus and dependent on the offerings of the dining hall? At UNC, that is where FLO (Fair, Local, Organic) Food comes in. “FLO is designed to bridge the divide between students and farmers,” said Claire Hannapel ’16, director

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Timarie Chan

Tracking fast food chains in Asia

Grace Farson

like what can go wrong, what it takes to get ready to sell at a market.” She is researching commercial kitchens and hopes to launch Native South Creamery after the November pecan harvest, selling her pecan milk at Durham-area coffee shops and farmers markets — “handmade, hand-bottled and sold by me.” — By Geneva Collins

of the student organization, which is committed to educating students about not just the growing of food but the myriad other issues involved in getting it to campus — harvesting and distribution, economies of scale, fuel costs, food waste. Perhaps FLO’s most visible activity is hosting the hugely popular farmers markets in the Pit during the fall and spring. But the group conducts other outreach events as well, including film screenings, a Food 101 speaker event, a potting workshop for growing herbs and field trips to visit farms and other food producers.


During the school year, FLO members meet regularly with Carolina Dining Services executives to discuss ways to improve sustainability efforts. “We challenge each other,” said Hannapel, an interdisciplinary studies major and geology minor who is focusing on food studies. “We try to push them to have more local foods,” and the executives, in turn, explain the complexities in doing so. “FLO Foods has worked for

over five years to build support for sustainable food in North Carolina,” said Rudi Colloredo-Mansfeld, professor and chair of anthropology and FLO’s faculty adviser. “Its programming offers a unique model of activism, study, and university, community and businesses partnerships.” Last October, Carolina Dining Services and FLO paired up to participate in Feeding the 5000, an international event in which the host organization serves a feast for 5,000 people made with food that would have otherwise been wasted. The menu included a curry and a cobbler made with fruits and vegetables that were misshapen, blemished or otherwise cosmetically flawed but perfectly good to eat. — By Geneva Collins

Ashley Chaifetz praises UNC’s new “Food for All” academic theme, but she would suggest an addendum: Safe Food for All.

Ashley Chaifetz

Will Owens

Safety first for N.C. food pantries

TOP: Ashley Chaifetz. BOTTOM: At one North Carolina food pantry, canned and packaged foods have been sorted and packed into boxes and bags ready for distribution.

Chaifetz, who completed a Ph.D. in public policy in spring 2015, focused her dissertation on food safety policy, particularly in food pantries and the low-income people who depend on them. Are food pantries providing safe foods to the communities they serve? For example, they don’t face the same regulations that farms or restaurants do. “With a food pantry, we’re looking at a community of people who are lowincome, and there’s a good chance they don’t have [access to] health care in the event they do get sick” from foodborne illness, she said. Chaifetz interviewed 105 food pantry managers across the state, examining how the food pantries received, stored and distributed their food: Are they getting food from regional food banks, grocery stores, food drives or hunters? How and for how long is the food transported — in the trunk of a car or a cooler? When the food makes it to the pantry, does the pantry have procedures in place for checking temperatures of the refrigerators or for workers to wash their hands? What are the pantries’ policies on past-date foods? Her research culminated in a video series of food safety guidelines for food pantry managers and volunteers, which she produced with NC State associate professor and food safety extension specialist Benjamin Chapman. The videos highlight topics such as cross-contamination, time-temperature control and proper handwashing. They also provide sample operating procedures for food pantries, resources for checking recalled products, and a flowchart that explains, for example, how to know if a dented can is safe to use. Her research earned her an N.C. Impact Award from UNC’s Graduate School. Chaifetz’s research could prove helpful to food pantries in other states as well. Learn more at tinyurl.com/pcaga9f. — By Kristen Chavez ’13

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FOOD FOR ALL: ODE TO THE SANDWICH

Passion for Pimento Cheese ur region produces and consumes the most pimento cheese in the world. But the spread isn’t Southern by birth — it is likely a product of Spain, where the red pimiento pepper has its roots. Pimento cheese first appeared in the states around 1910 and was considered a delicacy due to the imported pepper. Soon after, farmers in Georgia began growing the crop. As it spread across the South, the price of pimientos dropped significantly, making pimento cheese more affordable and a staple among workers in the Piedmont’s abundant textile industry. Many companies, including Ruth’s Salads of Burlington, grew their businesses in the 1950s by selling sandwiches to local factories. Though still served at formal tables, it was this connection to the working class that permanently situated pimento cheese in the South. Text by Emily Wallace (M.A. folklore ’10), whose master’s thesis is titled “It Was There for Work: Pimento Cheese in the Carolina Piedmont.” Today she is deputy editor of Southern Cultures journal and communications director for UNC’s Center for the Study of the American South. And yes, she always keeps a tub of pimento cheese in her refrigerator. Check out the piece she wrote for the INDY Week at tinyurl.com/5r83pbz. 14 | COL L EGE.U N C . E D U | FA LL 2 01 5 | C A ROL IN A ART S & SC IEN C ES

Steve Exum

Charlotte, Made-Rite of Greensboro and Star Food of


Jefferson Currie

FOOD FOR ALL: ODE TO THE SANDWICH

Crazy about Collards he Lumbee-centric collard sandwich is on a roll, having been featured in magazines from Our State to Garden & Gun. We recently chatted with folklorist Jefferson Currie II about this culinary creation.

Q: What is a collard sandwich? A: It’s constructed with two pieces of fried cornbread. Most of the time the bread is fried in a cast-iron pan with grease, and it is just cornmeal and salt and pepper and water. Two big pieces of cornbread and collards. And then you put a piece of fatback or whiteside meat on the bone on it. At Lumbee Homecoming, you have chow-chow [a vegetable relish] as a side — it pulls in the different flavors. And it’s normally wrapped up in tinfoil for carrying and eating. So you’ve got one piece of cornbread at the bottom, collards, one piece of cornbread on top, and a lot of times they put the fatback on top. Q: When was the first time you tried a collard sandwich? A: I don’t remember the exact first time, but it was at Homecoming years ago. I did a blog post for the North Carolina Folklife Institute [in 2008] on the collard sandwich. Cornbread is perfect — you don’t need anything with it. But with the collards, there’s a kind of salty [taste], then sweetness with the

chow-chow — and there’s the meatiness with the fatback. And collards are very earthy. It kind of encapsulates a lot of different flavor profiles. I described it once at a food conference as the perfect food to understand colonialism. You’ve got the Spanish, who brought in hogs in the 1500s, and collards and greens were from the African region, and corn from the Americas. It’s the perfect food that melds all of that, which is what Southern food is — Indian, black, white — communities coming together. Q: You mentioned Lumbee Homecoming. What is that? A: In the ’30s, ’40s and ’50s, a lot of people were leaving North Carolina’s Lumbee community for work. Some went to Baltimore, Detroit, Greensboro, Charlotte. My family ended up near Raleigh. People started going away more for college and other reasons. It’s a way of bringing the community back together in Pembroke, N.C. You have pageants, golf tournaments, fun runs, a car show, people selling crafts. It kind of culminates on the Saturday around July 4. And the food — you’ve got collard sandwiches, barbecue, hotdogs and hamburgers, and chicken bog. Chicken bog is related to a lot of coastal dishes like purloo in Charleston and gumbo. Q: You participated in a project with Sara Wood of the Southern Foodways Alliance and UNC historian Malinda Maynor Lowery of the Southern Oral History Program

at the Center for the Study of the American South to document Lumbee oral histories about food. Can you elaborate on this work? A: We talked about agriculture and farming and also what people were cooking and how they cooked it. Sara has talked to people about church events and food, and she’s looked at restaurants like Old Foundry. There was tri-racial segregation in Robeson County, but Old Foundry was a place where Indians could go to eat. Q: How does all of this tie in with your own interests and studies in folklore? A: For me, food is about family. Food is about belonging. When I think of what I ate growing up, that’s what captures me. When I would visit my mama’s family — my Indian cousins, aunts and uncles — you would walk in the house and you would have to eat. It’s about that conversation that happens while you’re together. To me, the center of the house is a kitchen table. Food liberates and lubricates the conversation. Food is love. Currie is a member of the Lumbee Tribe who graduated from UNCPembroke with a degree in American Indian studies. He currently works at the Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park and Museum in Wilson, N.C., as he completes his thesis for a master of arts in folklore in spring 2016. — Interview by Kim Weaver Spurr ’88

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FOOD FOR ALL: A LOCAL VIEW

‘Food is a Story about Class, Race and Gender’ Donn Young

BY PAMELA BABCOCK

Elizabeth Engelhardt examines cookbooks in an exhibit at Wilson Library.

lizabeth Engelhardt started writing about food by beginning with leftovers. Not the remains of a meal; the remains of her research. While she scoured resources for material to write a dissertation on women writers and environmentalism in Appalachia at the turn of the 20th century, she kept a separate file for “all kinds of materials that I suspected were interesting but didn’t quite go into the project I was working on.” Her dissertation complete, Engelhardt later returned to the file and found it filled with fascinating stories about food. Before long, she began writing about things like the “Beaten Biscuit Crusade,” a phenomenon in the late 1890s designed to get local women to stop making their staple, cornbread, and start making a much more complicated biscuit recipe. Southern food — everything from grits to gravy, moonshine to mustard greens — makes for great academic fodder. In January, the Hendersonville, N.C., native joined the College as the John Shelton Reed Distinguished Professor of Southern Studies to continue the department of American studies’ emphasis on teaching and documenting Southern culinary cultures and histories. She serves on

the board of the Southern Foodways Alliance. Her most recent anthology, The Larder: Food Studies Methods from the American South, looks at how people write and talk about Southern cultures through food. She also has written other books, including A Mess of Greens: Southern Gender and Southern Food. Engelhardt said the people of the South have cared about, collected and talked about their food stories “in a very deliberate way for a very long time,” particularly through documents, letters and diaries, cookbooks, family stories, oral histories, photographs and material objects. They also benefit from a rich history of eaters and cooks who are white, Native American, AfricanAmerican and, increasingly, Latino. “Food is also a story about class, and about race, and about gender,” she said. Engelhardt recalled her own food narrative during a fifth-grade colonial days event at her school. Girls were told to make a picnic lunch basket for the boys, who would bid on the lunch. She was mad. “Why do I have to do all this work? What are the boys doing?” When she calmed down, Engelhardt asked her grandmother to teach her how to cook her famous fried chicken and biscuits. They

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stood in her kitchen laughing and talking. What Engelhardt really loved was hearing stories about how her grandmother had once helped support her family by taking in boarders and cooking for them. Engelhardt said the “Beaten Biscuit Crusade” is ultimately about class — which people were perceived as insiders and outsiders. The short version is two women moved to eastern Kentucky to set up a settlement school and tried to convince locals to bake wheat-based breads, like the beaten biscuit, which had to be leavened by arduous hand beating. It was an attempt to “civilize” the local women. She also loves the story of girls’ tomato clubs — groups of teenage girls in the early 1900s who planted, harvested, canned and sold tomatoes. The movement began in Aiken, S.C., around 1910 and later swept the Southern United States. The girls spoke about their dreams and how they planned to spend the money. “It’s an example of both black and white adult women coming together and designing and leading these programs, and a kind of grassroots activism that surprisingly was pretty free of judgments about what the girls should do with the income,” Engelhardt said. Best of all, Engelhardt added: “The girls went on to do all of the things” they dreamed about.


FOOD FOR ALL: A LOCAL VIEW

Kristen Chavez

Supermarkets and Locavores: Allies or Adversaries? BY CYNDY FALGOUT

Meenu Tewari (left) and Rudi Colloredo-Mansfeld.

arge chain supermarkets may seem the antithesis of the local food movement, but UNC researchers have found that supermarkets can play a key role in building strong, sustainable local food systems. In a recent study, an interdisciplinary team discovered the supportive role supermarket chains can play in creating a local food system as well as the issues that help and hinder the process. “Local food activists tend to overlook how important a hometown supermarket can be in rebuilding food systems,” said Rudi ColloredoMansfeld, professor and chair of the department of anthropology and a co-author of the study “Communities, Supermarkets, and Local Food: Mapping Connections and Obstacles in Food System Work in North Carolina,” published in Human Organization. “The importance of this study was showing that rather than dividing the world into ‘local food equals good’ and ‘big, corporate food equals bad,’ these two actually fit together when you look at it from a community perspective,” he said. “These local supermarkets are potential partners.” The study’s other authors were Meenu Tewari, associate professor of city and regional planning; Dorothy C. Holland, Cary C. Boshamer Distinguished Professor Emeritus of

Anthropology; anthropology Ph.D. candidates Justine Williams and Alice Brooke Wilson; and Alena Steen of Cane Creek Farm in Saxapahaw, N.C. The local food movement grew from a desire among consumers to know who produces their food and to support local farmers. A central challenge has been figuring out how to scale production and sales sustainably while retaining the ideals of localization. Colloredo-Mansfeld, who has studied the dynamics of building local food systems in rural Ecuador and Iowa, decided to examine those dynamics in North Carolina. He teamed up with Holland, who brought connections with the state’s extensive local food network; Tewari, an expert in economic development and production networks; and the Sustainable Agriculture Program at Central Carolina Community College. Researchers spent nine months interviewing consumers, managers of food retailers of all sizes and representatives from community food organizations in central and western North Carolina. In a second phase, they collaborated with researchers at NC State University to track and support the work of employees of a large retailer committed to building connections with local suppliers. The core finding affirmed the premise of the project: Local food will

need to find space on the shelves of large grocery stores if it is to grow from a narrow specialty to a regular part of consumers’ food buying. Importantly, researchers found that shoppers are willing to buy local food from large retail chains, and that chain stores can play a major role in increasing the sales of locally grown food. However, the study found a wide gap between the definition of “local” food held by large retailers and the one held by consumers. For instance, large retailers that use third-party vendors to get produce from local farmers in a multi-state region may market apples grown in Georgia as “local” when selling them in North Carolina. Customers, by contrast, expect “local” to mean produce grown within a short distance. The authors also uncovered myriad logistical, operational and marketing challenges to local food retailing. “We found that local store managers were often very interested in incorporating local foods in a sustained way but found it difficult to do so because of the way in which their corporate headquarters organized the supply chain. Warehousing and logistics were generally outsourced to third parties,” Tewari said. “It will take some time for the mainstream food industry to respond to these challenges,” she added. “But at least we now know where the bottlenecks lie.”

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FOOD FOR ALL: A WORLD VIEW

Donn Young

Exploring Food and Politics in 1950s Vietnam BY LJ TOLER ’76

Christian Lentz, who studies agricultural and environmental issues, grows fruit trees.

s a child, Christian Lentz accompanied his father, a smalltown doctor in Rhode Island, on house calls in the countryside. Young Lentz began observing farms as sources of food. His fascination for Southeast Asia came from his mother, a Navy brat during the Vietnam War, and his uncle, who once lived in Indonesia. The result: Singular scholarship on how agricultural and environmental issues affect food distribution and hunger worldwide, but especially in Indonesia and Vietnam. “My current research uses agrarian politics to analyze processes of state formation during the Vietnamese revolution” against French colonialism in the 1950s, said Lentz, a UNC assistant professor of geography. At that time, farmers supplied food to Vietnamese troops to fuel the revolt. Their support contributed to Vietnam’s victory in the 1954 Battle of Dien Bien Phu, which brought independence. Lentz also teaches about food. His undergraduate course, “Food, Agriculture and Society,” examines food production and its social effects worldwide. Although one in five people in this

country is hungry, Lentz said, “enough food is produced to feed the world. The problem is distribution.” And so inequality also figures into his work. His future research will include exploring hunger, through work in Vietnam and Indonesia, as a social condition that indicates uneven power relations. His graduate seminar, “Agrarian Studies,” covers topics including ruralurban relations, biotechnology, rural subjectivity and landscape conversion into and out of farms. Lentz graduated summa cum laude from Cornell University with a bachelor’s degree in Asian studies and went on to earn master’s degrees in environmental science and development sociology from Yale and Cornell, as well as a doctorate from Cornell. His thesis for the second master’s grew from work on the island of Sumba in Indonesia. He interviewed farmers about crops, yields and farming strategies — as a severe drought was beginning. “I left wondering how farmers managed to cope with crisis and produce enough food to make a living,” he said. Lentz returned in 2000 amidst a locust outbreak, which followed two years of drought and a flood. People had survived on crop diversity, forest foods and sharing.

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Lentz became fascinated with Dien Bien Phu while in Vietnam in 2004 studying the language. His program overlapped with the battle’s 50th anniversary: “I took a trip to the mountain town and got hooked.” He interviewed veterans of the conflict and wrote his dissertation “Mobilizing a Frontier: Dien Bien Phu and the Making of Vietnam, 19451955.” Lentz came to Carolina in 2011. Previously, he was an interpreter for the State Department. He speaks Indonesian, French and Vietnamese. The Carolina Asia Center enabled Lentz to return to Vietnam in 2012 to develop a geography course on the country. Now he teaches “Geography of Vietnam,” a first-year seminar that covers fields, river deltas, rice paddies, cities, forests and mountains. At home, Lentz grows peaches, plums, blueberries, raspberries and more with his daughter, 7, and son, 4. The children help mix compost, purge dandelions, chase rabbits from the garden and “love to water.” He’s happy they’re learning that food comes from the Earth and added, “As long as I’m gardening, I might as well grow something I can eat.” ➤ Online Extra: For more from Lentz’s travels, visit cclentz.web.unc.edu.


Photos courtesy of Jennifer Ho

FOOD FOR ALL: FIRST PERSON

LEFT TO RIGHT: High school senior Jennifer Ho (sitting, right) with her mother and Uncle Frank. • Oxtail stew was a favorite of Uncle Frank’s. • Ho visits Jamaica to pay homage to her uncle.

Feeling Frank have been in Jamaica for four days and cannot find a place that makes ox-tail stew. I ask one of my aunts, but she says that it’s not something you typically find on a restaurant menu. She’s not sure why. The flavor of ox-tail haunts me, and I am determined not to leave Jamaica without tasting it. Why I am so intent on finding this dish is a bit of a mystery to me. It was never one of my favorites growing up (that would be stew peas), and because my mother does not make ox-tail stew, I’ve only ever eaten it at one of my aunts’ homes. Yet now that I am finally here — in Jamaica — I am craving this dish, particularly the pleasure of sucking the segments of the ox-tail, absorbing all the gravy with my mouth and tongue. Only after extracting all the juices that I can from the crevices of each bone, do I leave these pieces on the side of my plate. Cleaning your bones of any remaining flesh or flavor is paramount in my family, especially for my Uncle Frank. The bones on his plate always look like washed and polished specimens ready for display in a museum showcase. Frank is a champion eater. Was a champion eater. I still forget to use the right tense. But then, how can the past tense really be the right tense to use for

BY JENNIFER HO

my Uncle Frank? I am in Jamaica because Frank wanted his ashes scattered here; he wanted to come home. Though he spent over half his life in North America, Jamaica was where his heart and soul belonged. And perhaps most tellingly, Jamaica was where his mouth and stomach longed to return. While he had diverse tastes, his true passion was for the food of his youth: jerk pork so spicy and hot it would make your mouth burn; rice and peas with the flavor of coconut and thyme infusing the saltiness of the beans and sweetness of the rice; stew peas, the meat so tender after braising in the pot that it would fall off your fork; beef patties in flakey pastry; pungent curry goat; savory ackee and salt fish; and of course ox-tail stew, which Frank liked to sprinkle with Pickapeppa Sauce, the ubiquitous bottle with the parrot on the label that would always come out of the refrigerator whenever we served Jamaican food at family gatherings. I wonder what taste my Uncle Frank missed the most as his diet became more and more restricted in the last months and weeks of his life. Was it the smell of Jamaican food? The burn of scotch bonnet peppers so hot it makes your mouth blister, or curry goat stewed all day in a crock pot, the meat falling apart as soon as you stick in your fork. Or perhaps it

was ox-tail stew, savoring the flavor of the meat that had been simmering in spices and broth for half a day, the aroma distinct and pungent as only a food that plunges you back into memory can be. My uncle embodied his name: he was candid, direct, and sometimes (maybe oftentimes) blunt. He was Frank. From his life and his example I, too, have learned to be frank. Like my uncle, I strive to speak truth to power, to be that contrarian who looks at a different perspective and seeks a different opinion, not for the sake of being contrary but to make sure that the majority rule does not become the only voice in the room. I have learned, over the years that doing the hard thing teaches us lessons about ourselves that we would never learn by taking the easy route. And I have learned that being frank can be empowering. Jennifer Ho is an associate professor of English and comparative literature. Her book, Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture (Rutgers University Press), was published this past spring. This excerpt is from a forthcoming essay in The Asian American Food Anthology and is part of a project investigating her family’s migration from Hong Kong to Jamaica to North America. Watch a video of Ho cooking rice and peas and discussing family, identity and food at magazine.college.unc.edu.

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FOOD FOR ALL: SYLLABUS class, I asked how many people had ever been in a cornfield. Two students out of 20 raised their hands. Now, we have more students whose families have gardens. Students advocated for having opportunities to get their hands in the dirt, look at soil and bugs, to experience the things we’re talking about in class.” As part of a service-learning com-

Kim Weaver Spurr

ponent, in 2014 the class developed a Liberty Garden, part of the Carolina Campus Community Garden, in observance of World War I. “While Victory

FIRST, A FOOD DIARY “Agriculture and the Environment,” a course offered through the curriculum for the environment and ecology, is taught by environmental ecologist Amy Cooke (Ph.D. ’07). Begun in 2009 with 24 students, the class now has 60 students in two

Gardens from World War II were about community-building, Liberty Gardens were about food security, since main crops were being shipped to Europe. Students had to research what people were growing in North Carolina from 1914 to 1917. Zucchini, for example, was not available, but peppers and peas were.” Each semester students also visit farms to talk about the

sections, with one for Honors students.

challenges facing farmers in the N.C. Piedmont.

Course content

“These students may not be farmers ...”

“We start out the semester by talking about the history of

“But they will be lawyers and decision-makers. It’s

domestic agriculture, moving on to modern crop production

important for them to understand agriculture so that they

and agro-ecological issues,” Cooke said. “We look at policies

can shape policies that sustain agriculture in North Carolina

such as the Farm Bill and discuss issues of sustainability and

and beyond and so they can be informed consumers. A lot

land use, genetically modified food and the impact of food

of students are interested in international development and

production on the environment.”

conservation. These students are pretty amazing,” Cooke said. Anne E. Corrigan ’16 said of the course, “Everyone

Where does your food come from? The first assignment is for each student to keep a 24-hour food diary of everything consumed. Then they source all the in-

should have this basic understanding of agriculture and food production as it impacts every human every day via our decision-making, consumption and environmental impact.”

gredients of one dish. “It may be the first time they think about what’s in their food beyond ‘I just ate chicken,’” she explained.

Amy Cooke teaches courses on the intersection of natural

“What’s on that chicken? Garlic? Pepper? They have to find out

resource management, international development and human

where the crop was domesticated, even down to the spices. I’m

rights, and is particularly interested in water, agriculture and

trying to get them to pay attention to what they’re eating.”

Africa. In conjunction with anthropologist Rudi ColloredoMansfeld, Cooke organizes the Real Food Calculator internship.

Making things real for students Cooke provides hands-on experiences for students. “Most of our students are suburbanites. When I started teaching this

UNC students work with Carolina Dining Services and Aramark to audit purchases for the amount of fair, local and organic foods being served in Lenoir Dining Hall.

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— By Dianne Shaw


Photo courtesy of HHMI

FOOD FOR ALL: FACULTY UP CLOSE

BYE-BYE, BUGS

Jeff Dangl is UNC’s plant disease-buster BY DIANNE SHAW

Enjoy fresh tomatoes and corn on the cob? So do plant pests and pathogens. Globally, the

problem of crop loss is substantial. And the loss due to pests and pathogens means a huge waste of water on the nowdestroyed crops. “If we can recapture that 30 percent loss of our crop yield, we’ve just grown 30 percent more food and saved a lot of water,” said UNC plant biologist and geneticist Jeff Dangl. It’s a constant battle between plants and pathogens, and Dangl, who conducts elegant research into how plant immune systems fight off pathogens, is helping the plants increase and refine their defenses. The model system that he and other scientists use for research is the thale cress plant, Arabidopsis, a relative of cabbage and radish. Dangl helped to map the genome for this plant, completed in 2000, and ever since, scientists have been probing its molecules to understand its mechanisms of immunity. His leading-edge research led to an appointment in 2011 as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute-Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Investigator. He also holds the John N. Couch Distinguished Professorship in the College. The battle between plants and pathogens is high-pitched, but scientists are discovering more about plants’ multi-tiered system to fend off destruction. Plants fight pathogens in two ways. In the first line of defense, plant cells recognize pathogens with cell surface “recognition receptors,” an antennae-like identification system developed through the evolution of all land plants. Successful pathogens obviously have evolved a way to avoid this

detection. They do so using pathogen “effector proteins” that are injected into the plant cell. Therefore, plants evolved a second line, called “effectortriggered immunity,” that responds to pathogen effectors using a second immune receptor system inside the plant cell. These plant receptors, called NLRs, serve as an early warning system, recognizing and activating the immune response. Another recently described plant weapon are decoys. Like waving red flags, these plant decoys look like the real target for a pathogen’s effector. The plant uses them to attract pathogen effectors, thus activating an associated NLR to turn on the immune response to destroy the pathogen. Dangl and others are decoding these decoys in the plant genome and hope to molecularly engineer them. “If we understand how a receptor goes from an ‘off’ to an ‘on’ state, then we’re a step closer to being able to control it,” Dangl said. “Once we understand more, we can reverseengineer the system and develop plants that are more diseaseresistant.” A key element to healthy plant growth is its environment above and below the soil, called a microbiome. Within this microbiome, microbes help plants promote root growth, use nutrients more efficiently or fight off pathogens. Dangl’s lab is dissecting and reassembling microbial environments to understand how a plant assembles its optimal microbiome. Better understanding of microbiomes could lead to using fewer pesticides. Dangl and colleagues recently reported a major advance in the understanding of microbiomes in Science’s early online edition Express. They found that the defense hormone salicylic acid helps select which bacteria live both inside and on the surface of a plant’s roots, keeping some bacteria families out and actively recruiting others. With a better understanding of microbial communities, it might be possible to manipulate those communities to increase plant productivity, he said. Dangl routinely employs team science, made easier by his location in UNC’s Genome Sciences Building. “We couldn’t do what we do without team science,” he said. “For example, I have students from the UNC department of bioinformatics and computational biology doctoral program working with me and with biologist Corbin Jones. Without those students, my microbiome research wouldn’t exist.”

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Briana Brough, Chapel Hill Magazine

FOOD FOR ALL: ALUMNI UP CLOSE

CHERISHED PAGES A cookbook author celebrates the stories about food that bring communities together BY KIM WEAVER SPURR ’88

Award-winning cookbook author Sheri Castle (RTVMP ’82) was 4 when she created her first recipe: a smoothie-like concoction she called “Hawaiian Tropic Delight.”

She made the beverage in her grandmother’s blender and mailed the recipe to the Betty Feezor Show, a cooking show that ran on WBTV in Charlotte from 1953 to 1977. “She was the Martha Stewart of her day, focusing on cooking and sewing and crafts,” Castle said, sipping on an Italian soda recently at Open Eye Cafe in Carrboro. “Betty sent me an autographed headshot, which my grandmother took as a sign I would grow up and marry Betty’s son.” Castle never set out to focus on food as a career. She came to Carolina and studied script writing and mass communications research. But she grew up in Boone, N.C., around cooks and Southern gardens, absorbing valuable information from her grandmother, and became “endlessly fascinated about the stories of food in our lives.” “Food is evocative,” Castle said. “If you ever need a conversation starter, if you can pick a food memory, you can talk to anybody.”

Her latest foray into telling people’s stories through food is The Southern Living Community Cookbook: Celebrating Food and Fellowship in the American South (Oxmoor House, 2014). Castle sorted through 45,000 recipes that readers submitted to Southern Living magazine over nearly five decades to create a rich collection of regional favorites. When deciding among equally delicious recipes, Castle turned to the stories behind them. “For example, there were dozens of poundcakes,” she said. “Then I came across this story of a guy, Eddy McGee, who carried the mail in Elkin, N.C., and whereas there are people who would give their mail carrier treats for Christmas, Eddy made a cream cheese poundcake for the people on his route. There’s your winner.” In addition to writing about food, Castle is a recipe developer and a culinary instructor at Southern Season, a gourmet food emporium in Chapel Hill. To hone her skills, she often traveled to Italy, “determined to be the best Mediterranean/Italian cook that I could be.” On one trip, she had an epiphany. She wound up in Umbertide, Italy, “a dead ringer visually for the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains.” It was a moment she captured in The New Southern Garden Cookbook: Enjoying the Best from Homegrown Gardens, Farmers’ Markets, Roadside Stands & CSA Farm Boxes (UNC Press, 2011). “The thing was, we were eating the food I grew up with — soup beans with a little bit of pork, greens, stewed apples — and they made these things in the hearth that were like a biscuit,” she recalled. “The big ‘ah-hah’ was if these people in this place deserve respect and cultural awe for their foodways, then my people and my place do, too. It changed the trajectory not only of my career but my life and the way I think. It was my first step back home.” Cooking isn’t complicated, Castle stressed, “You just have to do right by the [main] ingredient.” The New Southern Garden Cookbook is arranged just that way, organized by the type of fruit or vegetable as a starting point. Her favorite meal, in fact, is pretty simple: a vegetable plate, maybe some squash casserole, a stack of perfect tomatoes, a side of cottage cheese. “There would be cornbread and corn on the cob, and cucumbers and onions in vinegar. Last night what I had for dinner was some really good watermelon. I cut it into squares and chopped up some jalapeño and put that on it and sprinkled it with coarse sea salt. It was absolute heaven.” ➤ Online Extra: Castle talks about chocolate gravy, fermented half-runner green beans, her magic pickling rock and more at aspokendish.com.

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Kristen Chavez

FOOD FOR ALL: ALUMNI UP CLOSE farm or in a processing plant. “Recently, my colleague and I spent three hours in the morning at a farm right outside of Chapel Hill. The farmer wanted to know how to obtain the best feed ratios for optimum nutrition and weight gain for pastured pigs and cattle,” she said. That afternoon, they visited Left Bank Butchery to discuss “whole animal utilization,” a practice that champions using as much of the animal as possible, cutting down on waste. Then they had a quick lunch at Sarah Blacklin ’06 is helping players in the pasture-based meat industry, Saxapahaw General Store, where the everyone from farmers to chefs, succeed chef wanted information on finding a BY KIM WEAVER SPURR ’88 specific kind of roasting hen. Blacklin is also leading the planning for the annual Carolina Meat arah Blacklin (interdisciplinary studies ’06) Conference, which she calls a “huge local meat throw down.” admits she couldn’t tell the difference between The fall event has become the biggest local pasture-based broccoli and arugula plants when she applied meat event in the nation and is “a mixture of James Beard chefs to be a farmhand at Maple Spring Gardens in and livestock farmers and advocates.” northwestern Orange County. And NC Choices’ biennial Women Working in the Meat She also didn’t have a driver’s license. Business seminar — to be held again next year — brings “When I got hired, I had to quickly get my license, and I women farmers, butchers and chefs together for two days of still didn’t tell [owner Ken Dawson] that I had only been driving workshops at Lantern Restaurant in Chapel Hill. The event was for two days,” said Blacklin, who was a student at Carolina at mentioned in a January 2015 article on North Carolina’s “food the time. “I crashed the truck into the side of his barn the first sisterhood” in The New York Times. week.” While at UNC, Blacklin took classes in environmental studDespite that inauspicious beginning, Blacklin’s love for the ies and folklore, making connections between science and food land and the people who farm it has helped her on her career activism. She spent six months at a field site in Manteo, learning journey from farmhand to Carrboro Farmer’s Market manager about wetlands and the fisheries industry. After graduation, she to her present position as program director of NC Choices. moved to Ocracoke to manage a bed and breakfast and, on the With NC Choices, she focuses on the pasture-based meat side, to dive deeper into work with local fisheries. industry, working as an advocate and cooperative extension “I took some time to get more coastally rooted, and I really educator for everyone across the supply chain from farmers to enjoyed that,” she said. chefs. It is a program of the Center for Environmental Farming Today, with NC Choices, she sees herself as a “connector,” Systems, a partnership between NC State and N.C. A&T a skill she traces back to her Carolina education. universities and the N.C. Department of Agriculture. “I don’t claim to be an animal scientist,” she said. “I really “We work with the farmers who raise the livestock, the try to connect people to resources, and that can be applied to processors, the chefs, butchers and whole animal retailers any discipline.” She also plans to use that mindset as a member — anyone who’s a player in raising, buying, packaging and of UNC’s new food theme steering committee. preparing meat,” Blacklin said. NC Choices offers educational In her spare time, Blacklin tends to a big garden on her workshops, technical assistance and strategic networking home property, where she and her fiancé grow tomatoes, opportunities to help ensure that each business in the supply cucumbers, squash, potatoes, cabbage, beans and sometimes chain is making a profit. Although a niche industry, it is growing; even broccoli. today there are about 850 local, sustainable meat farmers in She no longer has a problem identifying plants. North Carolina. On any given day, Blacklin spends time on the road, on the ➤ Online Extra: Learn more at ncchoices.ces.ncsu.edu.

MEAT MAVEN

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Lissa Gotwals

FOOD FOR ALL: ALUMNI UP CLOSE

FARMER’S DAUGHTER A career pivot leads to the launch of a food line celebrating Southern pickles and preserves BY PAMELA BABCOCK

It may seem surprising that someone with a

master’s degree in geology who once studied a volcano in Italy — OK, it was the Stromboli Volcano — is making her mark as founder of an artisanal food business celebrating the flavors of the South and the soils of the North Carolina Piedmont. To April McGreger ’02, creator and owner of Farmer’s Daughter Brand Pickles and Preserves, it makes perfect sense. “Cooking and geology are both sciences, and there’s a lot of room for curiosity and exploration in both,” said McGreger, who was raised on a sweet potato farm in rural Mississippi. “And I really like the cultural side of cooking. I’ve always been a very curious sort of person — a seeker in that sort of way.” Farmer’s Daughter strives to promote sustainable, smallscale agriculture and handmade preserving. The company sells mostly pickles and Southern-style preserves, which McGreger and three employees craft in a farm kitchen in Hillsborough, N.C. Her focus is on seeking out local sources for the fruits and vegetables she uses, cooking in small quantities to ensure consistency, and adding more fruit and less sugar to the preserves than the industry standard. Although her employees help with hulling, chopping, washing, filling jars, labeling and shipping, every batch in the fickle pickle and preserve process is cooked by McGreger. “It’s actually really difficult,” McGreger explained. “I don’t have a recipe because I’m not using a standardized product. I

know what I’m looking for. Sometimes the fruit is riper than others, and that means it’s lower in [natural] pectin.” She doesn’t add pectin, relying instead on evaporation to thicken the preserves. This yields “vivid, fresh flavors and a luxurious soft set,” said McGreger, who learned how to pickle and preserve from her mother and grandmother. As a graduate student, McGreger traveled to Sicily to study two volcanoes, Mount Etna and the Stromboli, in the Aeolian Islands. When she returned, she realized she was more passionate about food than rock formations. In 2001, money was tight so she took a part-time job at the Lantern Restaurant in Chapel Hill, working her way up to pastry chef. She left in 2007 to start her business. McGreger initially focused on baking and selling items like sweet potato and blueberry scones at the Carrboro Farmers’ Market. She switched to pickles and jams after her son was born and she tired of the baking all-nighters before market days. Farmer’s Daughter sells primarily at farmers markets but also online and at select retailers across the country. The business also has a Jam Club and a fermented vegetables “Culture Club,” which operate similar to CommunitySupported Agriculture subscription services. McGreger’s husband, Phil Blank (SILS ’97), an artist and illustrator, designed the company logo and print materials. Several of the company’s products have garnered Good Food Awards, including its strawberry-honeysuckle jam and sweet corn and pepper relish. Farmer’s Daughter’s Bourbon’d Figs were selected for Cooking Light’s 2012 Taste Test Awards in the artisanal category. Two of its newest seasonal products, a Bradford watermelon rind pickle and chili lime watermelon jam, have wait lists. McGreger and Farmer’s Daughter have been featured in dozens of publications, including Eating Well, Southern Living and Garden & Gun. She hopes to eventually open a storefront and pen more books — she is the author of Sweet Potatoes (Sept. 2014, UNC Press). Planned projects include a collaboration with her husband that would illustrate a year in the Farmer’s Daughter kitchen, with recipes, and a history of food preservation in the South. A career highlight was being a guest chef at January’s Southern Foodways Alliance’s Taste of the South event in Walland, Tenn. She taught preserving to an assemblage of celebrated “foodies.” “These were some of my favorite Southern chefs and favorite Southern cookbook writers,” McGreger recalled. “It was really amazing.” ➤ Online Extra: Learn more at www.farmersdaughterbrand.com.

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FOOD FOR ALL: CHAPTER & VERSE

Leigh Beisch

CAROLINA CLAM CHOWDER DOWN-EAST STYLE Serves 4 to 6

Once you’ve passed through North Carolina’s

capital city of Raleigh en route to the coast, you find yourself in the vast region known as “Down East.” The red clay soil gets sandy, the pine trees grow taller, and the highways flatten out. A few hours takes you to the coast­line, which forms an undulating chain of slender islands, curving and bending to enclose the Pamlico Sound. The sound and Inland Waterway it feeds teem with boats, while the Atlantic Ocean churns with marine life, pelicans, swans and wild geese. People who live in communities on or near the Outer Banks call themselves “bankers,” and share a love and respect for nature in their landscape, which is unlike any other place on Earth. Sea­food restaurants abound, with fancy versions of clam chowder among their offerings, but none beats this homespun version, sans cream, sans razzmatazz. Nothing to it — “nothing” being a few worthy items: chewy, flavor-packed clams; potatoes; onions; and a handful of bacon. Minutes of minor effort, and you’ve created a simple feast. Saltine crackers go nicely with this, though Skillet Cornbread would fit right in. • • • • • •

36 to 48 small clams, such as little­necks, or 24 large clams, enough to yield about 1 cup of clam meat 6 ounces thick smoky bacon, finely chopped 1 cup finely chopped onion 1 1/2 cups peeled chopped red or white potatoes 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

1. Rinse the clams well and place them in a stockpot with about 2 cups water. Cover and bring them to a rolling boil. Cook just until the clams open, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove them from the heat, transfer the clams to a plate or bowl, discarding any that do not open, and let them cool, reserving all the cooking liquid. 2. When the shells are cool enough to handle, remove the clam meat and reserve. (If you used larger clams, chop the clam meat coarsely so that it’s easy to eat with a spoon.) Strain the liquid, discard­ing the shells, and reserve it alongside the clams. 3. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, cook the bacon until it is nicely browned and aromatic, about 3 minutes. Scoop out the bacon and set it aside, reserving the grease in the pan. 4. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, until fragrant and shiny, but not browned, about 5 minutes. Add the potatoes, bacon, salt, pepper, and reserved clam cooking liquid, along with 2 1/2 cups water. Simmer over medium-high heat for about 20 min­utes, or until the potatoes are tender. Add the clams back into the pot and cook just enough to heat them through, about 1 minute more. Serve the chowder hot or warm. As the weather turns cooler and we start craving a bowl of hearty soup, cookbook author, cooking teacher and culinary historian Nancie McDermott of Chapel Hill (English ’73) offers this recipe for “Carolina Clam Chowder Down East Style.” It’s from her new cookbook, Southern Soups & Stews: More Than 75 Recipes from Burgoo and Gumbo to Etouffée and Fricassee. (Chronicle Books, September 2015). ➤ Welcome to Chapter & Verse, our new books page. Find more books by Carolina alumni and faculty at magazine.college.unc.edu.

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THE SCOOP

A new look to launch our second decade

INSIDE: Hodding Carter • Cross-Town Rivals, Not • Debunking DaVinci Code • Brilliant Bioinformatics

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We celebrated 10 years and 20 issues of Carolina Arts & Sciences magazine last spring, which prompted us to think about a makeover. We emailed a survey to our nearly 15,000 readers, and your responses provided valuable feedback that shaped our redesign. You told us that shorter features, an- easier-to read typeface and simpler layout were key. Creative packaging of content would help you better navigate the pages. You suggested we go for a more stylish, modern look. You liked the idea of themed issues, and we thought the kickoff of Carolina’s twoyear academic theme, “Food for All,” offered the perfect opportunity to try that out. You said you like photos, and lots of them, and that you enjoy seeing old photos from your time at Carolina. We’ve added a new feature, #Throwback (p. 28), in which we have combed the archives to find a photo we hope will spark some memories. Let us know what you think of our new look, and thank you for taking the time to read Carolina Arts & Sciences magazine. Share your thoughts by emailing spurrk@email.unc.edu. — Kim Spurr ’88, editor

INSIDE: Basketball Memoir • Southern Lit Central • Rangoon Rendezvous • Greeks Give Back

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EYES IN THE SKY

Stellar mentoring and an astronomical discovery

INSIDE: Taylor Branch • Terrific Teachers • Jewish Studies • $5 million gifts

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CONNECTED LEARNING AND LIVING

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Cobb Hall students collaborate 24/7

CYCLING CHINA

SUPER SCIENCE COMPLEX

New international studies reach beyond old borders

State-of-the-art facilities open new doors to discovery

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THE KENAN LEGACY

World-class faculty, students and facilities

THE DEVIL AND DANIEL WALLACE

FACING THE FUTURE

TOAD TRACKER

ALSO INSIDE:

Tar Heels experience Asia up close

• Politics and the Press • Deportation Dilemmas

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SOLAR HEROES

Pioneering solutions to the energy crisis

• Student superstars

• Tim Tyson’s Book on Stage and Screen

• New Faculty Stars • Slavery Lessons • Steve Birdsall & Fred Brooks • Remembering Ron Hyatt

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• Chronicling N.C. Movie-Going

ALSO INSIDE:

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CELEBRATING CAROLINA FIRST: • Distinguished Professors and Fellows • Global Giving and Learning • New Programs and Scholarships • Dedicated Donors

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PLAYMAKERS REACHES OUT Acting, Teaching and Engaging the Community

ALSO INSIDE • Football Fallout • Lensing Lessons • ’Hotel Rwanda’ Revisited

ALSO INSIDE:

• Innovative education: 10 years later • ‘Abroad’ in the Cherokee Nation • ‘Lost Boy’ is found

MINDS ON A MISSION

CREATIVE COLLABORATIONS

TOOLS FOR SOLVING THE WORLD’S GREATEST CHALLENGES

Faculty and students breaking new ground in Chapel Hill, China, Italy and the Galapagos

ALSO INSIDE • Innovative teachers • Entrepreneurial students • Research that matters, from BP spill to childhood health

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Opportunities and challenges in post-apartheid South Africa ALSO INSIDE: Fine Wine, Blue Roots The President Who Slept in South Building She’s a Hit with the Dodgers

T O TA L IMMER SION

The art and science of water in our world ALSO INSIDE:

They, Robots • Whirligig Wonders • Slaves’ Poignant Searches

L E A R NING 2.0: ENGAGING, EXPERIENTIAL, ENTREPRENEURIAL

GIANT STEP FOR GENOMICS

New building sparks cutting-edge collaboration

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China’s Gilded Age

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Women’s Studies Trailbla zer

‘Good’ Investment

ALSO INSIDE: AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES • TERRORISM 10 YEARS OUT T H E

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LOVIN’ L AVA

A UNC geologist probes Chile’s volatile Llaima Volcano

BREAKING BARRIERS FROM GRAPHICS TO ROBOTICS

A L S O I N S I D E : • Hungry for the humanities • A mapmaking pioneer • Help for first-generation students • A newcomer embraces the Tar Heel State

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• Science that bridges disciplines • Preserving a culture in Panama • Immersed in Earl Scruggs

FRONT PORCH PORTAL

• Yearlong look at WWI

SOUTHERN RESEARCH HOME CELEBRATES 20 YEARS

A L S O I N S I D E : • Addiction science • Classes with a beat • Asia up close

A L S O I N S I D E : Career-enhancing experiences • Biomedical engineering Pete Seeger remembers • N.C. heritage tourism T H E

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A recap of our 20 covers, 2005-2015.

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Photo courtesy of Bob Young

THE SCOOP

From left, 1957 team members Joe Quigg, Bob Young and Lennie Rosenbluth.

A love of Carolina basketball and poetry Endowed professorship honors ’57 championship team, donor’s wife BY LJ TOLER ’76

When Bob Young and Lennie Rosenbluth came from their native New York City to Carolina — as recruits for a team destined to become 1957 basketball national champions — they dined on some strange concoctions. “We had Southern fried chicken, turnip greens, hush puppies and things we’d never heard of,” said Young. “But it tasted good right away, because we were hungry.” However, his main impression wasn’t about food. “The most important thing was the way the people of North Carolina received us, the students and everyone, and how welcome they made us feel. It was one of the best four years of my life.” After graduation, Young joined the U.S. Marines and went on to a successful career in sales and marketing at companies including The New Yorker magazine. Now retired in Naples, Fla., he

recently bequeathed $2 million to the College of Arts and Sciences for the Robert F. and Patricia A. Young and the 1957 Carolina Basketball Team Professorship of Poetry. He wished to honor his beloved wife, Pat, who died April 12, and the team. Beverly Taylor, chair of the English and comparative literature department, called Young’s generosity “a wonderful way for an alumnus to honor his past at UNC by investing in the University’s future. “Although some students today are a bit afraid of studying poetry, they often discover a lifelong passion when they do,” she said. Poetry? Pat Young loved it. She wrote some herself. She earned a degree in fine arts from Finch College and worked on what Young called “the creative side” of businesses. Young recently found his wife’s note in one of her poetry books, quoting an unnamed source: “The books of theologians gather dust upon my shelves, but the pages of the poets are stained with my fingers and blotted with my tears.” Young also was versed in verse: “I

was an English major, and I took poetry. I struggled with Milton’s Paradise Lost and Chaucer, but I loved it.” Young recognized the ’57 team for its prowess on and off the court. “Everyone graduated and went on to successful careers. To me, that was pretty remarkable. “I thought this professorship was an opportunity to draw attention to their achievement — having gone undefeated (32-0) and defeating [heavily favored] Kansas in triple overtime [in the championship game] and Michigan State in triple overtime the night before” in the semifinals. Young hopes others will give to the professorship to honor the storied ’57 team. Poet and Professor Michael McFee said the professorship will help the department and creative writing program build on a strength that has attracted the best students on campus for generations. “As senior faculty retire, this professorship will guarantee that we can continue to serve students interested in reading and writing poetry by bringing in an outstanding teacher to guide them,” he said. Since retiring, Young has worked with the Frank McGuire Foundation, the Marine Corps League, various charities and a school for kids with discipline problems. He has a message for alumni who might consider giving to the professorship: “Never forget what that education did for you. In large measure, having a degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a stepping stone to a successful career in whatever field you choose.” For more information on making a gift to the professorship, contact Angela O’Neill, assistant director of development, Arts and Sciences Foundation, 919-8432745, or angela.oneill@unc.edu.

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THE SCOOP

#THROWBACK

Readers responded with wonderful details

Photos from the N.C. Collection, Wilson Library

about the photo featuring the late Father James Devereux’s 1975 English class which we published in our spring ’15 issue. Multiple people identified the following alumni: In the front row, far left in the white jacket and tie, is Hillsborough, N.C., novelist David Payne ’77. In the second row, left, in the striped shirt is Raleigh lawyer John Russell ’77. Seated beside Russell is UNC cardiologist David Tate ’77. Readers said they thought the class was located in either Greenlaw, Saunders (now Carolina) or Bingham halls. Vee Allen Waldrop ’76 believes she is “the dark-haired girl on the back row on the right.” She wrote: “Father Devereux was an enthusiastic teacher and quite stimulating. He had our class to his home for dinner that semester — an evening to remember.” ➤ Read more at magazine.college.unc.edu.

Kenan History Professor Emeritus Hugh Lefler is featured in this photo (left) with female students. Can you help us identify anyone in the photo? Where and when was it taken? Do you have memories to share of professor Lefler’s class? Email Kim Spurr, spurrk@email.unc.edu, and share your stories.

UNC humanities team brings Gastonia mill into digital age mill under one roof is now the subject of the largest digital humanities project ever undertaken by UNC. Digital Loray (projects.dhpress.org/ loraydigital), an online archive documenting the history of Loray Mill in Gastonia, N.C., came together through a near-perfect alignment of business, philanthropy, volunteerism, education and technology. Robert Allen is James Logan Godfrey Distinguished Professor of American Studies and director of Carolina’s Digital Innovation Lab. He sees the renovation of the iconic mill as a unique opportunity to collect, preserve and share both the history of the mill and the stories of some of the tens of thousands of people who have worked there and lived in the mill village over the past century. ➤ Read a feature story by Susan Hudson and watch a video by Kristen Chavez at magazine.college.unc.edu.

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Kristen Chavez

What was once the region’s largest textile


THE SCOOP

Two Carnegie Fellows named

Two professors have been named

Kristen Chavez

inaugural Andrew Carnegie Fellows by the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Patricia Sullivan, an associate professor in the department of public policy and the curriculum in peace, war, and defense, and Zeynep Tufekci, an assistant professor in the UNC School of Information and Library Science and an adjunct professor in the department of sociology, are among 32 scholars selected for the honor. The fellowship program recognizes those who are pursuing research on the challenges facing U.S. democracy and international order in the next 25 years. Sullivan, an award-winning teacher and scholar, focuses her research on the utility and limitations of employing military force and providing foreign military assistance to attain policy objectives. Her book, Who Wins? Predicting Strategic Success and Failure in Armed Conflict, was published by Oxford University Press in 2012. She teaches courses in national and international security, global policy and social science research design, and is

Kia Caldwell

Caldwell appointed director of faculty diversity initiatives

Kia Caldwell’s research focus on gender and race in Brazil was sparked during her sophomore year at Princeton University when she heard a presentation by black

Patricia Sullivan

Zeynep Tufekci

training and supporting a new generation of scholar-practitioners through the U.S. Army’s Advanced Strategic Planning and Policy Program. Tufekci’s research interests revolve around the intersection of technology and society, and her academic work focuses on social movements and civics,

privacy and surveillance, and social interaction. Her forthcoming book, Beautiful Tear Gas: The Ecstatic, Fragile Politics of Networked Protest in the 21st Century (Yale University Press), will examine the dynamics, strengths and weaknesses of 21st century social movements.

Brazilian activist Joselina da Silva. “I realized I wanted to study AfroBrazilian women’s lives once I got to graduate school,” said Caldwell, a UNC associate professor of African, African American and diaspora studies and an adjunct associate professor of anthropology. Her first book, Negras in Brazil: Re-envisioning Black Women, Citizenship and the Politics of Identity, was published by Rutgers University Press in 2007. She is currently completing another book, Gender, Race and Health Equity in Brazil: Intersectional Perspectives on Policy and Practice.

Caldwell was appointed by Dean Karen Gil to become the College’s second director of faculty diversity initiatives, succeeding Pat Parker, who became chair of the department of communication on July 1. Caldwell’s teaching and research interests also focus on black feminism, HIV/AIDS, health policy and human rights. She has conducted HIV prevention research focused on young black adults in North Carolina and is the principal investigator on a project funded by the UNC Center for AIDS Research, the Sister Circle Study. Caldwell is also passionately committed to furthering diversity efforts in higher education. She is co-director of the African Diaspora Fellows Program, which provides professional development opportunities in African, AfricanAmerican and Afro-Latin studies to N.C. middle- and high school teachers.

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THE SCOOP

Carolina students bring sci-fi to life sewing and creative crafting, Carolina’s graduate costume production students are working their way onto a platform even bigger than the stage. The Washington, D.C.-based Museum of Science Fiction was in its early developmental stages when Steve Dreyer was tasked with finding precise costume replicas from famous science-fiction feature films and television shows. Dreyer and the museum found what they Graduate student Denise Chukhina works on a flight attendant suit for the Museum of Science Fiction. needed in the dramatic art department in UNC’s College of Arts and Sciences. that included designing mock-ups, makerspace, 3-D printers churned out Graduate costume production cutting and stitching the fabric, and the piece in a matter of minutes. students were tasked with creating two creating shoes from scratch. One new Sci-fi artifacts debuted in July at replicas that will go into pop-up museum tool, however, proved to be a time a pop-up exhibit at Reagan National exhibits. Those replicas will eventually find machine of sorts: the makerspace 3-D Airport in Arlington, Va. a home in a brick-and-mortar museum. printing lab at the Kenan Science Library. Students have more time to First on the production line was a Instructor and costume crafts artisan artfully fashion a stillsuit replica from flight attendant suit from the film 2001: A Rachel Pollock said recreating the Pan the film Dune. That project is slated for Space Odyssey. Am medallion on the flight attendant’s completion in summer 2016. Graduate student Denise Chukhina turban would have taken hours of tedious ➤ Text by Carly Swain; for a video, handcrafted the replica with a process labor. But with the help of librarians at visit magazine.college.unc.edu.

Frey honored for distinguished service

Jackie Fritsch

David Gardner Frey (AB ’64, JD ’67), pictured with Dean Karen Gil and his wife, Judy, received a 2015 Dean’s Award for Distinguished Service to the College. Frey was honored for being a long-time champion of the arts and humanities at Carolina. He serves as chairman of the Frey Foundation, established in 1974 by his parents, Edward J. and Frances T. Frey. A gift to establish the Frey Foundation Distinguished Visiting Professorship in the College has brought more than 30 of the nation’s most renowned leaders and scholars to UNC for lectures, classes and more. Frey’s support of the visual and performing arts includes three endowed distinguished professorships. ➤ CNN’s Fareed Zakaria will deliver the Frey lecture on March 8. For more information, visit college.unc.edu/frey.

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Carly Swain

With hours of hand-


ence in Stockholm in late August. Hawking’s public lecture was part of a historic gathering of the world’s most accomplished physicists. In his remarks on “Quantum Black Holes,” Hawking spoke about one of the most complex questions facing physics today: how to resolve the paradox between From left, Chancellor Carol Folt, Stephen Hawking and Einstein’s theory UNC professor Laura Mersini-Houghton of gravity, which Stephen Hawking discusses predicts the loss of physical information black holes at UNC-sponsored in the formation of black holes, and a conference in Stockholm fundamental law of quantum theory, which states that no information about -Chapel Hill Chancellor Carol the physical state of anything can ever L. Folt welcomed renowned physicist disappear from the universe. Stephen Hawking in front of a sold-out The Hawking Radiation Conference crowd at the Hawking Radiation Conferwas co-sponsored by UNC, along with

UNC

Hill Hall auditorium begins $15 million renovation

Hill Hall, the historic heart of the music department, closed in early June to begin an expected 18-month, $15 million renovation. Work will center on improvements to Hill Hall’s rotunda and 450-seat auditorium in the century-old building. The performance space will be renamed the James and Susan Moeser Auditorium in honor of the former chancellor and his wife, who are organists and teachers at Carolina. The renovation uses no stateappropriated funding. A $5 million gift from the William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust kick-started the project. The Office of the Provost provided an additional $5 million. The College has raised about $3.4 million so far of the remaining $5 million in a fundraising campaign. The extensive upgrades for the auditorium include adding a climate control system, state-of-the-

the Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics. It was co-hosted by KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University; the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology at the University of Cambridge; and the Julian Schwinger Foundation. Laura Mersini-Houghton, associate professor of theoretical physics and cosmology in UNC’s College of Arts and Sciences, initiated the conference. Her recent work on black holes spurred new discussion among physicists. Hawking singled out MersiniHoughton on his Facebook page, thanking his friend and colleague “for bringing this event together.” “In all likelihood, we will never have so many of these preeminent scholars in modern physics in the same place again, trying to solve one of the most fundamental questions related to black holes and the nature of space-time,” Mersini-Houghton said. ➤ Read more and watch a video by Rob Holliday at magazine.college.unc.edu.

art acoustical treatments, a professional-grade stage, equipment and a piano lift. Currently, the auditorium has no air conditioning, rendering the space essentially unusable four to five months of the year. The dated two-story rotunda will be transformed into an expanded, ABOVE: An architectural rendering of the new Hill Hall rotunda. light-filled space suitable for receptions, intimate performances and complete the renovations. as a central gathering space for the ➤ For more information on department. An enhanced backstage naming a seat in the James and Susan area with updated dressing rooms Moeser Auditorium or other naming and storage, improved lighting and opportunities, visit hillhall.unc.edu modernized administrative and teaching or contact Peyton Daniels Stokley at spaces adjacent to the rotunda will 919-843-5285, peyton.stokley@unc.edu. C AROL IN A ART S & SC IEN C ES | FA LL 2015 | CO LLEGE.U N C.EDU | 31

Image courtesy of Quinn Evans Architects

Photo courtesy of UNC

THE SCOOP


Honor Roll 2015 THANK YOU! The College of Arts and Sciences gratefully thanks the 12,219 donors who supported its students, faculty and programs in fiscal year 2014-2015. Every charitable gift made to the College strengthens its 222-year-old tradition of educating students in the arts, humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. The 2015 Honor Roll recognizes donors who made gifts to the College of Arts and Sciences between July 1, 2014, and June 30, 2015, qualifying them for membership in the following giving societies: • Cornerstone Society — $25,000 and above • Chancellor’s Circle — $10,000 to $24,999 • Carolina Society — $5,000 to $9,999 • 1793 Society — $2,000 to $4,999 • Dean’s Circle — $1,500 to $1,999 • Young Alumni Levels — Students: $250 Classes 2005 to 2009: $1,000 and above Classes 2010 to 2014: $500 and above In academic year 2015, 1,426 donors provided support at the Dean’s Circle level or above, equipping the College with vital resources for creating and sustaining a first-rate academic experience at Carolina. The Honor Roll does not include pledges, bequests or other planned gifts to the College. This list has been prepared with great care to ensure its accuracy. To report a mistake, please contact Ashlee Bursch at 919-8439853 or ashlee.bursch@unc.edu. Thank you, once again, for generously supporting the College of Arts and Sciences at Carolina!

*Deceased

Cornerstone Society ($25,000 and Above) • Laura and John Beckworth, Austin, TX • Peter and Heather Boneparth, Lawrence, NY • Mr. Karl Franklin Brumback and Mrs. Eileen Pollart Brumback, New York, NY • R. Duke Buchan III and Hannah Flournoy Buchan, Palm Beach, FL • Lee and Sunny Burrows, Atlanta, GA • Ann W. Burrus, Richmond, VA • Jan and Steve Capps, Wrightsville Beach, NC • Michael and Julianne Capps, Raleigh, NC • Dr. and Mrs. Eric D. Carlson, Los Gatos, CA • W. Lowry and Susan S. Caudill, Durham, NC • Bobby and Jane Caviness, Winston-Salem, NC • Frances Chapman and John F. Mangan, Charlotte, NC • John Edward Chapman III and Elizabeth Pearce Chapman, Chapel Hill, NC • Latta Chapman, Alexandria, VA • Mr. Max C. Chapman Jr., Houston, TX • Mark P. Clein, Chevy Chase, MD • Aimee and Tom Chubb, Atlanta, GA • Jason Ralph Cox, Repulse Bay, Hong Kong • Vicki U. and David F. Craver, Riverside, CT • Rose and Steve Crawford, Bronxville, NY • Stephen Cumbie and Druscilla French, Chapel Hill, NC • Cynthia and Matthew Cutts, Los Altos, CA • Olivia Ratledge Delacruz, Vero Beach, FL • Robin Richards Donohoe, San Francisco, CA • Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. Dorn, Washington, DC • Steven S. Dunlevie, Atlanta, GA • Mr. John Gray Blount Ellison Jr., Greensboro, NC • Luke E. and Katherine Bryan Fichthorn IV, Brooklyn, NY • Kristine Karen Forney and William Flaville Prizer, Westlake Village, CA • Molly and Henry Froelich, Charlotte, NC • Duvall S. and J. Rex Fuqua, Atlanta, GA • Lisa and Robert Gfeller, Winston-Salem, NC • Hanson S. Gifford III and Alexandra S. Gifford, Woodside, CA • Ms. Joan Heckler Gillings, Chapel Hill, NC • John and Sallie Glover, Raleigh, NC • Peter T. and Laura M. Grauer, New York, NY • Julia S. Grumbles, Chapel Hill, NC • William Henry Grumbles, Chapel Hill, NC • Wendy R. Hamburger-Langman and M. Steven Langman, New York, NY • R.M. Hanes, Charlottesville, VA • Tom and Lisa Hazen, Chapel Hill, NC • Howard Holsenbeck, Houston, TX • Barbara and Pitt Hyde, Memphis, TN • Bob and Molly Joy, Vonore, TN • Joseph Michael Kampf, Potomac, MD • Steven H. Kapp, Philadelphia, PA • Frank* and Betty Kenan, Chapel Hill, NC • Thomas Stephen Kenan III, Chapel Hill, NC • Mr. Clifford M. Kenwood, New Orleans, LA • David Mabon Knott and Virginia Commander Knott, Mill Neck, NY • Mr. Nolan Delano Lovins, Lenoir, NC • Mr. and Mrs. John Macfarlane, Darien, CT • Douglas and Shawn Mackenzie, Palo Alto, CA • Stephen Nabeil Malik and Kathleen Kitts Malik, Raleigh, NC • Carolyn Carter Maness, Raleigh, NC • Brian and Susan Mashburn, West Bloomfield, MI • William Howard McAllister IV and Kathryn P. McAllister, Newport News, VA • Mr. Charles A. McLendon Jr., Charleston, SC • Mr. Peter H. McMillan, San Francisco, CA • Dr. and Mrs. C. Curtis Meltzer, Amelia Island, FL • Ralph and Juli Mosley, Nashville, TN • T. David Neill and Scottie G. Neill, Winston Salem, NC • Stephen Nislick and Linda Marcus Nislick, New York, NY • Mr. Dean E. Painter Jr., Raleigh, NC • Mr. Gary Wilton Parr, New York, NY • Kim and Phil Phillips, Chapel Hill, NC • James Arthur Pope, Raleigh, NC • John A. Powell, New York, NY • Sylvia Price, Chapel Hill, NC • Lilian Pruett, Chapel Hill, NC • Martin L. and Carol Fri Robinson, Charlotte, NC

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Cathy Rollins and Arthur Rollins, Atlanta, GA Frances P. Rollins, Durham, NC Lee Ann and Peter Rummell, Jacksonville, FL Nelson Schwab III, Charlotte, NC George J. Still Jr. and Elizabeth Still, Atherton, CA Edward M. Strong and Laurel Durst Strong, New York, NY Benjamin J. Sullivan Jr., Rye, NY Mr. and Mrs. Crawford L. Taylor Jr., Birmingham, AL John Lothrop Thompson and Patricia Rumley Thompson, Atlanta, GA Russell and Debbi Tuck, Wenham, MA John L. Turner, Winston Salem, NC Eileen Shields West and Robin West, Washington, DC Elijah White Jr., Spring, TX Nancy and Monty White, Raleigh, NC Robert A. Wicker, Greensboro, NC Ted Wieseman, Jersey City, NJ James H. Winston, Jacksonville, FL Mr. and Mrs. Leonard W. Wood, Atlanta, GA

Chancellor’s Circle ($10,000 to $24,999) • Nancy Robertson Abbey and Douglas Dix Abbey, San Francisco, CA • Pam Anderson, Evanston, IL • Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Bielsky, London, United Kingdom • John Daniel Binnie and Michelle Arthur Binnie, Greenwich, CT • Mr. and Mrs. W. Robert Bizzell, Kinston, NC • Stephen G. Brantley, MD, Tampa, FL • Lelia E. Blackwell and John D. Watson Jr., London, United Kingdom • Mr. and Mrs. William S. Brenizer, Glen Head, NY • Derick Close, Rock Hill, SC • Rebecca and Munroe Cobey, Chapel Hill, NC • Ann Rankin Cowan, Atlanta, GA • Keith O. Cowan, Atlanta, GA • Michael F. and Monica Longworth Coyne, New York, NY • Mr. Richard S. Craddock Jr., Bellevue, WA • Donald W. Curtis and Barbara Curtis, Raleigh, NC • Stephen and Linda De May, Charlotte, NC • Mr. Michael A. DiIorio, London, United Kingdom • Dorothy Edwards, Tarboro, NC • Rob and Leigh Edwards, Charlotte, NC • Mike and Mindy Egan, Atlanta, GA • Mr. and Mrs. Michael Elliott, Charlotte, NC • Douglas R. Evans, Dallas, TX • Mr. Jonathan Bernard Fassberg and Mrs. Edith Fassberg, New York, NY • Pamela Hicks Ferguson, New York, NY • Frank Lee Flautt III, Knoxville, TN • Dr. and Mrs. Jaroslav T. Folda III, Chapel Hill, NC • Jeremy Randall Fry and Leigh Nicole Fry, Olathe, KS • Dr. and Mrs. J. Brooke Gardiner, Mountainside, NJ • N. Jay Gould, New York, NY • The Paul Green Jr. Family, Chapel Hill, NC • Matthew Michael Guest and Paige McArthur Guest, Maplewood, NJ • Robert H. Hackney Jr. and Shauna Holiman, New Preston, CT • Mr. Henry H. Hamilton III, Houston, TX • Michael A. Harpold, PhD, Durham, NC • Richard and Ford Hibbits, Raleigh, NC • William T. Hobbs II and Elizabeth Gilman Hobbs, Charlotte, NC • Mr. James W. Howard Jr., Atlanta, GA • Robert Luther Huffines and Lisa Goddard Huffines, New York, NY • Gregory Hunt, Raleigh, NC • Glenn H. Hutchins, Rye, NY • Lyle V. Jones, Chapel Hill, NC • Donald P. Kanak, Wanchai, Hong Kong • Mr. Craig J. Kaufmann, Atlanta, GA • Mr. James Graham Kenan III, Lexington, KY • Nancy and Willis King, Summit, NJ • Maggie Kuhn, Columbus, OH • Mary Ann Bishop Largen, Charlotte, NC • Jon Larson and Susan Croce, Oradell, NJ


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Hal and Holly Levinson, Charlotte, NC Mr. and Mrs. Michael Liotta, Mooresville, NC Dr. Myron B. and Mrs. Anne Cone Liptzin, Chapel Hill, NC Billy and Laura Logan, Greenwich, CT S. Spence McCachren Jr., Maryville, TN Lane Morris McDonald, New York, NY Mr. Emmett English McLean, Birmingham, AL Charles Moehrke Jr., Cary, NC Dena and Chris Moore, Richmond, VA Janet Neal and Kevin Neal, Jacksonville Beach, FL Mr. Jason P. Norris, Austin, TX Dong-Young Oh and Grace Choi, Saratoga, CA Elizabeth Ragland Park, Raleigh, NC Nathaniel Ragland Park, Raleigh, NC Geoffrey Van Buskirk Parker and Nancy McLean Parker, Highlands, NC Florence and James L. Peacock, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth J. Phelps, Charlotte, NC Edwin and Harriet Poston, Chapel Hill, NC R. M. Propst and D. L. Wood, York, SC Ed and Suzy Rankin, Fairview, NC Benjamine and Jennie Lou Reid, Coral Gables, FL Alex Robertson, New York, NY Bennett and Sally Rogers, San Francisco, CA Laura and Jeffrey Schaffer, Summit, NJ Barbara Johnson Schneider and Peter Wayne Schneider, Atlanta, GA Brent M. Sheerer, Centerville, OH John and Jessica Skipper, Wilton, CT Eric and Lori Sklut, Charlotte, NC James H. Smith Jr., Burlington, NC Ann Lewallen Spencer, Winston-Salem, NC C. Austin and Stephanie Stephens, Atlanta, GA Ms. Christina Elizabeth Story, Park City, UT Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Story III, Atlanta, GA Elizabeth G. Taylor and David W. DeBruin, Chevy Chase, MD J. M. Bryan Taylor and Carolyn Clark Taylor, Charlotte, NC Mr. and Mrs. John A. Taylor, Winston-Salem, NC William W. Taylor III, Washington, DC Justin Allen Thornton and Debra Wheless Thornton, McLean, VA Dr. Murray W. Turner, Charlotte, NC Tom and Betsy Uhlman, Madison, NJ Robert Wessell, New York, NY Mr. and Mrs. Stephen B. Westfall, Atlanta, GA Charles Leigh Wickham III, London, United Kingdom Mr. and Mrs. John R. Wickham, Charlotte, NC Ms. Caroline C. Williamson, New York, NY J. Blake Young Jr. and Carol Payne Young, Atlanta, GA Neil and Sharon Zimmerman, Houston, TX

Carolina Society ($5,000 to $9,999) • Mr. Wilton J. Aebersold, New Albany, IN • Mr. and Mrs. Lee S. Ainslie III, Glen Head, NY • Mr. and Mrs. Michael K. Alford, Jacksonville, NC • Daniel Armstrong III, Washington, DC • Dr. Q. Whitfield Ayres, Arlington, VA • Robert M. Ayers, San Jose, CA • Edward T. Baur, Naples, FL • Edmund Beck, Glasgow, VA • Win and Rosanah Bennett, Chevy Chase, MD • Daniel and Ann Bernstein, Bronxville, NY • Dr. and Mrs. Ben W. Bolch, Nashville, TN • Drs. David and Stephane Booth, Stow, OH • Mr. and Mrs. W. Lee Borden, Goldsboro, NC • John L. Brantley, Ponte Vedra Beach, FL • Gene Brigham, Gainesville, FL • Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Bryant, Gastonia, NC • Hacker and Kitty Caldwell, Chattanooga, TN • Hardwick Caldwell, Lookout Mountain, TN • Diane Elliott Caton, Charlottesville, VA • Andrew and Margaret Certain, Seattle, WA • Norman P. Chapel and Mary Beth Chapel, Edina, MN • Sanford A. Cockrell III, Madison, CT • Robert F. and Helen H. Conrad, Hillsborough, NC • G. Lee Cory Jr. and Karen Spencer Cory, Charlotte, NC

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Blake Coules and Brenda Coules, Raleigh, NC Mr. and Mrs. William C. Cramer Jr., Panama City, FL Neil and Laura Brown Cronin, Boston, MA Dr. and Mrs. Frederic Dalldorf, Pittsboro, NC Fred Davenport, Wilmington, NC James Edward Delany and Catherine Fisher Delany, Hinsdale, IL Dr. and Mrs. Joseph M. DeSimone, Los Gatos, CA John A. Dickinson and Nancy Lee Wilson, Houston, TX Dana B. DiPrima, New York, NY Christina Sampogna Downey, Riverside, CT Michael Nathan Driscoll, Manassas, VA Beth and Chuck Duckett, Winston Salem, NC Dr. and Mrs. Chip Duckett, High Point, NC Ms. Cynthia Ann Dy, Palo Alto, CA Russell S. Edmister, Chapel Hill, NC Laura deBoisfeuillet Edwards, Chapel Hill, NC Gail McGregor Fearing, Chapel Hill, NC John A. Fichthorn, Darien, CT Luke and Nancy P. Fichthorn III, Vero Beach, FL Dan Fitz, London, United Kingdom David and Nancy Fortenbery, Charlotte, NC Mr. John Edward Fox, Berkeley, CA Raymond Wilford Fraley Jr., Fayetteville, TN Tripp Frey, Hood River, OR Ben Gambill, New York, NY Timothy M. and Cosby W. George, Greenwich, CT Ms. Kristin S. Gilbert, Maplewood, NJ James S. Gold, New York, NY Buck and Kay Goldstein, Chapel Hill, NC Bill and Leigh Goodwyn, Charlotte, NC Bill Ross and Susan Gravely, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. Timothy Richard Graves and Mrs. Cathey Stricker Graves, Manhattan Beach, CA John D. Gumbel and Stacey Gumbel, New Bern, NC Mr. Douglas A. P. Hamilton, Warren, CT Margaret Augur Hancock, Dallas, TX William and Barbara Happer, Princeton, NJ Chandler Hardwick and Monie T. Hardwick, Bluffton, SC JoAnn and James Harllee, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. and Mrs. William B. Harrison Jr., Greenwich, CT Mr. Sam M. Hayes, Raleigh, NC Emmett and Hubert Haywood, Raleigh, NC John Frank Hoadley and Beth Carol Fuchs, McLean, VA The Honorable and Mrs. Truman McGill Hobbs, Montgomery, AL Greg and Julie Hobby, Charlotte, NC Harriet T. Holderness, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. Christopher Michael Holmes and Mrs. Mildred Webber Holmes, Washington, DC Ron and Cheryl Howard, Greenwich, CT Lauren Taylor Hubbell, New York, NY Chris and Anna Hunter, Louisville, KY Dr. Karen Jacobson and Dr. Peter L. Jacobson, Wilmington, NC Hilary and Stewart Karlinsky, Menlo Park, CA Robert E. and Mercedes Kaufman, Boca Raton, FL Jerry Kilpatrick, Austin, TX Jo and Gary Kosciusko, Alexandria, VA Amanda Kay Kyser, Chapel Hill, NC Kimberly Kyser, Chapel Hill, NC Lisa Lambert, Dallas, TX William Pope Langdale, Valdosta, GA Seymour M. and Carol Levin, Greensboro, NC Lana Lewin, New York, NY Leon Otis Livingston, Memphis, TN Ms. Paula Jean Lombardi, Charlotte, NC Lee and Trey Loughran, Atlanta, GA Joe Loveland, Atlanta, GA Thomas Luther Lutz, Dallas, TX Timothy James R. Matt and Myra Whaley Matt, Wilmington, NC Mr. Mark John McCann, Oak Park, IL Mr. and Mrs. William O. McCoy, Chapel Hill, NC Heloise Merrill, Charlotte, NC Charles and Valerie Merritt, Durham, NC Daniel and Leah Miller, Charlotte, NC

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James and Susan Moeser, Chapel Hill, NC Sandra and Bill Moore, Chapel Hill, NC Mark Morris and Julie Morris, Raleigh, NC Shawn Healy Morton and Emily SooHoo, Charlotte, NC Philip Victor Moss, Allendale, NJ Joel and Judy Murphy, Atlanta, GA Sally Marie Murray, Lubbock, TX Sunil Nagaraj, Palo Alto, CA Katharine Caldwell Nevin, Johns Island, SC Stephen and Mary Novak, Weaverville, NC Thomas LaFontine Odom and Carmen H. Odom, Manteo, NC John and Cynthia O’Hara, Chapel Hill, NC Nell Otto, Greenwich, CT Ming Ouh-Young, Taipei, ROC Mr. and Mrs. Willard J. Overlock Jr., Greenwich, CT Robert L. Page, Greensboro, NC Robert and Jane Parr, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. and Mrs. Jim W. Phillips Jr., Greensboro, NC Lana and Kevin Phillips, Bronxville, NY Daniel Craig Pignatiello, Long Beach, CA Mr. Andrew C. Pike, Charlotte, NC Michael B.* and Sandra Piller, Los Angeles, CA Mr. and Mrs. James B. Pittleman, McLean, VA Bryan Holmes Pope and Greer Barber Pope, Atlanta, GA Jane Bethell Preyer, Chapel Hill, NC Dr. N. Darlene Walker, Houston, TX Katherine P. Reeves and Eric Reeves, Dallas, TX Sandy Fleischman Richman, New York, NY Francis O. Rollins and Lydia E. Rollins, Houston, TX Coleman D. and Carol M. Ross, Chapel Hill, NC Nicole Wilson Rubin, Portola Valley, CA James M. Schnell and Harriet Hodges Schnell, Richmond, VA Dr. Stephen B. Sears, Siler City, NC Robert and Pearl* Seymour, Chapel Hill, NC Bimal and Rina Shah, Durham, NC Kenneth L. and Cheryl A. Shepard, Port St Lucie, FL Sallie Shuping-Russell, Chapel Hill, NC Dr. and Mrs. Gary R. Smiley, Spartanburg, SC Ed and Carol Smithwick, Chapel Hill, NC Joan W. Sorensen and E. Paul Sorensen, Providence, RI Peter F. and Linda Spies, Monmouth Bch, NJ Leigh-Ann Sprock, Charlotte, NC John Curtis Staton and Margaret McLanahan Staton, Atlanta, GA Dr. W. Reid Thompson III and Mrs. Elizabeth A. Thompson, Baltimore, MD Otis Edward Tillman Jr. and Audrey Boone Tillman, Columbus, GA Frank and Sara Torti, San Francisco, CA Mr. and Mrs. John L. Townsend III, Greenwich, CT Arthur Vaughn Tucker Jr., Fairfield, OH William Tyne, London, United Kingdom Mr. Andrew W. Vail, Chicago, IL Thomas Harrison Watkins and Sharon Brown Watkins, Blacksburg, VA Mr. and Mrs. David Newton Webb, Greenwich, CT Stacia Byers Wells, Atherton, CA Braxton Deams West and Carrie Davis West, Cary, NC John Robbins and Campbell Lucas Wester, Charlotte, NC John Finley White III and Ashley Baker White, Raleigh, NC J. Spencer Whitman and Leslie M. Whitman, Charlotte, NC Christopher Cummings Whitson and Julia Higdon Whitson, Nashville, TN Kylie Williams, Pittsboro, NC Samuel Adams Williamson, Larchmont, NY Libby and Jenner Wood, Atlanta, GA Thomas M. Woodbury, New York, NY Ray Allen Yount and Agnes Bell Yount, Cumberland, MD

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1793 Society ($2,000 to $4,999) • Charles M. Abbey, Edgewater, MD • Virginia M. Aldige, Chapel Hill, NC • Allison and Steven Aldrich, Los Altos, CA • James and Julie Alexandre, Haverford, PA • Mr. John Fredrick Altschuler and Mrs. Leah Harris Altschuler, Studio City, CA • Joseph Albert Aluise, New Orleans, LA • Ivan V. Anderson Jr. and Renee Dobbins Anderson, Charleston, SC • Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Jackson White Archie, Darien, CT • Edmund Argesta, New York, NY • Kelly Gallagher Armstrong, Richmond, VA • Deirdre and Richard Arnold, Durham, NC • Thomas Brady Arnold, Charleston, SC • Fay Pushkin Aronson, Coral Gables, FL • Katherine and Andrew Asaro, Chapel Hill, NC • Mr. Todd Aaron Ashe and Mrs. Elizabeth Thomas Ashe, Alpharetta, GA • Ronald Azuma, San Jose, CA • Gregory Arthur Baer, Chevy Chase, MD • Mac and Ellen Ball, New Orleans, LA • Dr. L. Jarrett Barnhill Jr., Hillsborough, NC • Evelyn Barrow, Pittsboro, NC • Philip D. Bennett, London, United Kingdom • Leslie Benning and Rafael Bejarano, New York, NY • Frederick D. Benton, Aiken, SC • Mr. and Mrs. John A. V. Berry, Ashland, VA • Louis and Erica Bissette, Denver, CO • Gregory Bollella, Redwood City, CA • Lavinia Price Boyd, Brenham, TX • Richard Grant Brady, Pelham, NY • Frederick Baker Bridgers, Elm City, NC • Mr. and Mrs. Bradford B. Briner, Chapel Hill, NC • Frederick and Nancy Brooks, Chapel Hill, NC • Thurman Seay Brooks and Anne Campbell Brooks, Charlotte, NC • Drs. Jay Bryson and Margaret Commins, Charlotte, NC • Mr. and Mrs. Edmund S. Burke Jr., Chapel Hill, NC • Mr. and Mrs. John W. Burress III, Winston-Salem, NC • Robert B. Butler, Phoenix, MD • Mrs. Marion Byrd, Jacksonville Beach, FL • Timothy Cage, New York, NY • A. Britt Canady, Charlotte, NC • Paul Teige Cantey, Decatur, GA • Robert Carithers, Seattle, WA • Brian Stewart Carl, Houston, TX • Dr. Bruce W. Carney and Dr. Ruth Ann Humphry, Carrboro, NC • Nicholas Carr, Greensboro, NC • Thomas D. Carr, Chicago, IL • William Singleton Carroll, Bellevue, WA • Courtney and Philip Cavatoni, Bristol, VA • Robert M. Chadwick, East Windsor, NJ • Dr. Jefferson Chapman, Knoxville, TN • Dr. and Mrs. Scott J. Childress, Philadelphia, PA • Ms. M. Dockery Clark, Charlotte, NC • Mr. and Mrs. Roland E. Clemmons, Clayton, GA • Michael and June Clendenin, Chapel Hill, NC • Whitney and James Cohen, Saint Petersburg, FL • Mr. Harvey Colchamiro, Greensboro, NC • Robert D. Coleman, Columbia, SC • Ms. Wylene Righton Commander, Palm Beach, FL • Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Cone Jr., Greensboro, NC • Clint Alexander Corrie and Stacy Ann Newman Corrie, Dallas, TX • Mr. and Mrs. Russell S. Cowell in memory of Russell S. Cowell Jr., Williamsburg, VA • Lester Leroy Crafton Jr., Nashville, TN • Robert Denniston Crews, San Carlos, CA • Mr. Charles Armstrong Cross, McLean, VA • M. Brian Daniels and Julie Rose Daniels, La Canada Flintridge, CA • Rebecca Wesson Darwin and Cress Darwin, Charleston, SC • Derick Garnard Singh Davis Jr. and Maxine Brown-Davis, Cedar Point, NC • Mr. Thomas Fitzgerald Davis Jr., Columbia, MD • Anna Deak-Phillips, Charlotte, NC • Charles Demetrowitz, Mitchellville, MD

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

George Raymond DeVeny, Louisville, TN Jean Larkin Dobson, Charleston, SC Joseph S. and Jackie W. Dormagen, Third Lake, IL W. Christopher Draper Jr., Califon, NJ Timothy and Eliza Earle, Winnetka, IL H. Timothy Efird II, Gastonia, NC David H. Ehrlich and Barbara B. Ehrlich, Washington, DC Emmett N. Ellis IV and Patricia L. Truscelli, Dobbs Ferry, NY Mr. and Mrs. Ronald and Kathleen Ellison, Burlington, NC Dr. and Mrs. John W. Entwistle III, Philadelphia, PA Pat and Jack Evans, Chapel Hill, NC Nijad and Zeina Fares, Houston, TX Nancy J. Farmer and A. Everette James, Chapel Hill, NC Cherie Fogle Faulkner, Raleigh, NC Mr. Alan S. Fields, Lexington, MA Walter Fleischer, McLean, VA Alexander G. and Janet M. Floyd, Raleigh, NC Benjamin E. Fountain III, Dallas, TX Diane Frazier, Pittsboro, NC Shayne Gad and Novie Beth Ragan Gad, Cary, NC Portia Gage, San Jose, CA Gary J. Gala, Chapel Hill, NC Paul Shellie Gardner and Kristen Johnson Gremillion, Columbus, OH Larry L. and Carol G. Gellerstedt, Atlanta, GA Guido Gerig, Salt Lake City, UT Anne Marie Ghigo, San Francisco, CA Peter S. Gilchrist III, Huntersville, NC Walt and Taryn Gillikin, Smyrna, GA James Sevier Gilliland Jr., Memphis, TN Donald Gilman, Muncie, IN David and Lallie Godschalk, Chapel Hill, NC Jonathan Scott Gombinski, Miami, FL Steven Gombinski, Miami Beach, FL Gerry Good, Lake Oswego, OR Barry Gordon, Troutman, NC Lawrence and Freddie Gray, Richmond, VA Sarah Reckford Gray, Atlanta, GA Drs. L. and O. E. Greenwald, Efland, NC Steven and Gail Grossman, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. and Mrs. Louis H. Gump, Johnson City, TN Mr. Harvey D. Gunter Jr., Chapel Hill, NC Pickett Murray Guthrie and Robert Guthrie, Chapel Hill, NC Janet Hadler, Chapel Hill, NC Judy Hall, Bethesda, MD W. Clay Hamner and Margaret S. Hamner, Chapel Hill, NC Carol Cutherbertson Hamrick, Charlotte, NC Christopher Harbinson, Raleigh, NC Joseph M. Harmon, MD, Mount Pleasant, SC Dr. Thelma O. Harms, Chapel Hill, NC Dr. O. James Hart Jr., Mocksville, NC Wesley Raymond Hawfield and Amret Thompson Hawfield, Winston-Salem, NC Kathleen Samsot Hawk, Houston, TX Deborah Hinton, Bethesda, MD Julia Hobbie-Low and John Frederick Low Jr., Chapel Hill, NC Dr. and Mrs. Carl C. Hoffmann, Mebane, NC Dr. Steve E. Hoffman, Littleton, NC Jenny Hofler, Apex, NC Augusta and Gill Holland, Harrods Creek, KY Peter Duncan Holthausen, Cary, NC Lawrence L. Hooper Jr., Reisterstown, MD James Richard Huddle and Jane Fuller Huddle, Charlotte, NC Mr. Robert H. Huffman, Bellevue, WA Jerry* and Barbara Hulka, Chapel Hill, NC Torrence M. Hunt Jr., Pittsburgh, PA Mr. and Mrs. Bill Hyder, Charlotte, NC Dr. Linda Dykstra Hylander, Fries, VA Barbara I. Jacobs, Stamford, CT Pembroke N. and Patricia C. Jenkins, Wilmington, NC George Jenne, Chapel Hill, NC Kathy and Kenneth John, Arlington, VA George and Janet Johnson, Atlanta, GA Neal Johnson, Charlotte, NC Sarang Joshi, Salt Lake City, UT

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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Robert and Teresa Kadlec Jr., Manhattan Beach, CA Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey A. Kaufman, Needham, MA C. H. “Jack” and Joyce Keller, Hilton Head Island, SC Michael D. Kennedy, Atlanta, GA Drs. Kimball and Harriet King, Chapel Hill, NC Paul F. Knouse Jr., Winston-Salem, NC Robert and Kathryn Kuykendal, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. Robert R. Laidlaw, Southern Pines, NC Tom and Donna Lambeth, Winston-Salem, NC Oren and Mary Lang-Furr, Seattle, WA Dorothy Shuford Lanier, Bedford, NY Philip M. Lankford, Chapel Hill, NC Eugene Y. Lao, Burlingame, CA Mr. and Mrs. William P. Lathrop, Atlanta, GA Mr. R. Michael Lawrence, Yardley, PA Eleanor Wright Lindemann, Charlotte, NC J. Weston Lockhart, Charlotte, NC Ms. Elizabeth Pankey Lotspeich, Miami, FL Matthew and Rebecca Lowell, Los Altos, CA Patricia Lummus, Atlanta, GA Richard B. and Linda C. Lupton, Westerville, OH Rhett and Virginia Mabry, Davidson, NC Scott MacDonald, Del Mar, CA Alexander Huntley Mackintosh, Sr., Mid-Levels, Hong Kong Mr. Wendell Carlton Maddrey, Upper Montclair, NJ Robert and Vivian Manekin, Owings Mills, MD Dr. Mavis Mann* and Benjamin F. Reeves, Huntsville, AL Brent Marriott and Ann James Milgrom, Charlotte, NC D. G. and Harriet Martin, Chapel Hill, NC Dr. Eddie R. Mayberry, Hilton Head Island, SC Darlynn McCarter, Wake Forest, NC Robert McCarthy, Boulder, CO John and Lee McColl, Atlanta, GA Pattie Sapp McCrady, Atlanta, GA Dr. and Mrs. Thomas B. McElwee, Charlotte, NC Georgeann Smith McGrew, Atlanta, GA Alexander Duncan McLean, Memphis, TN Sallie A. McMillion, Greensboro, NC Mark Williams Mealy and Posey Mealy, Charlotte, NC Molly Monk Mears, Atlanta, GA Jim and Carol Medford, Greensboro, NC Andrew and Delynda Mehlhop, Spring, TX Dyke Messinger and Deborah Messinger, Salisbury, NC Bertram Goodwin Minisman Jr. and Carol S. Minisman, Birmingham, AL Elizabeth Lynn Mitchell, Arlington, VA Nikhil Mittal and Pritha Mittal, New York, NY Frederick Karl Molen, Garnet Valley, PA David Moore, Swannanoa, NC Bill Mordan, Ascot, United Kingdom Dr. Jeffrey M. Morrison and Dr. Suzanne DePalma Morrison, Raleigh, NC Danny and Margaret Mullis, Mount Pleasant, SC Lee and Ava Nackman, Chapel Hill, NC Richard Edward Nantelle III, Cleveland, OH Alan S. Neely, Sr. and Butchie Neely, Atlanta, GA Kurt Douglas Newman, Bethesda, MD John Ng, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong Mr. and Mrs. Leon S. Niegelsky Jr., Chapel Hill, NC Charles E. Noell, Monkton, MD Mr. and Mrs. McKee Nunnally Jr., Atlanta, GA Dr. Edward M. Olefirowicz and Mrs. Karri A. Olefirowicz, Chapel Hill, NC Paul Oliver and Sheila Barry-Oliver, Pinellas Park, FL Wilson Orr and Caroline Cockrell Orr, Memphis, TN Richard Osborne, Charlotte, NC Maccy and Don Paley, Lawrence, NY Mr. Jim Pang and Mrs. Diana J. Rosenfeld, Cordova, TN Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Pappas, Durham, NC Beverly Pappy, Charlotte, NC


• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Mr. David M. Parker, Chapel Hill, NC Dr. Gwenevere C. Parker, Bayside, NY Ms. Pam D. Parrish, Winnetka, IL Josie Ward Patton, Chapel Hill, NC Anne and Billy Pizer, Durham, NC Caleb Joseph Pollock, Lafayette, CO John Poulton, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. E. Allen Prichard, Charlotte, NC Elizabeth B. Pritchett, Atlanta, GA Frank and Ellen Proctor, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong Mr. Alfred Purrington and Dr. Suzanne Townsend Purrington, Raleigh, NC Richard J. Razook, Miami, FL Michael Renwick, Brookhaven, GA Sandra Renwick, Charlotte, NC Dr. Terry Rhodes, Senior Associate Dean for Fine Arts and Humanities, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Ritok Jr., Chapel Hill, NC Deborah and Ed Roach, Chapel Hill, NC Larry E. and Debra B. Robbins, Raleigh, NC Wyndham Robertson, Chapel Hill, NC Sarah Duckett Robinson, McLean, VA Nancy Marie Rodriguez, Houston, TX Daniel Wiskirchen Rupp, Central, Hong Kong John Russell and Kelley Russell, Raleigh, NC Jay W. Sammons, New York, NY William L. Scarborough Jr., Asheville, NC Paul Schipper and Denise Bruner, Arlington, VA Mr. Ryan E. Schlitt, Dallas, TX David Schwartz and Maria Sobico, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. and Mrs. Jay Schwartz, Atlanta, GA Ray Schwartz, Chapel Hill, NC David Bertram Scott and Donna Ennis Scott, Lake Waccamaw, NC Suzy and Buford Sears, Buffalo, NY Frances Jane Seymour, Washington, DC Steve Shafroth, Chapel Hill, NC Randall Shangraw, Sterling, VA Sarah Williams Shangraw, Sterling, VA David Sheffer and Julie Sheffer, Charlotte, NC C. Scott Shultz and Leigh Huff Shultz, Maplewood, NJ Joseph Sitter, Cary, NC Mr. John H. Small, Greensboro, NC Jerri Sheryl Smith, Mooresville, NC Equia Barnette Snead, Richmond, VA Mr. and Mrs. James McNeil Snow, High Point, NC Robert W. Spearman and Patricia H. Spearman, Chapel Hill, NC Kenneth G. Starling, McLean, VA Michael A. Stegman, Chapel Hill, NC Linda and Mason Stephenson, Atlanta, GA Dale A. Strickland, Durham, NC Colonel L. Phillip Stroud Jr. and Lisa Matthews Stroud, Cary, NC Joel Thomas Sutherland and Katherine E. Sutherland, Carrboro, NC Andre Tamers and Cindy Cuomo, Chapel Hill, NC Jimmy and Ellyn Tanner, Rutherfordton, NC Francis Bailey Teague and Katherine Redmond Teague, Charlotte, NC Brian Teets and Molly Putman Teets, New York, NY Ashley Ivester Tewell, Decatur, GA Davis Leon Thompson Jr., Charlotte, NC Nathan Tibbits, Washington, DC Michael Trinh, San Francisco, CA R. Rand Tucker, Ann Arbor, MI Tom and Judi Tygart, Jacksonville, FL Marium and James Van Meter, Lexington, KY Deborah and Frederick Van Zijl, New York, NY Ms. M. Christine Vick, Alexandria, VA J. Vann and Jennifer Vogel, Basking Ridge, NJ Mary Frances Vogler, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. Ira Jay Wagner, Bethesda, MD Caroline E. Wainright and Colby D. Schwartz, Atlanta, GA Mr. Edward Dale Wall, Morganton, NC Ashley Watson, Flourtown, PA Alan H. Weinhouse, New York, NY James Alphonso Wellons, Philadelphia, PA Ryan Scott Wesslen, Charlotte, NC

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Gregory and Anne Wessling, Cornelius, NC Ross and Kerry Whitaker, Salt Lake City, UT Christina Nelson Williams and Bradford Alan Williams, Raleigh, NC Mr. and Mrs. J. Blount Williams, Raleigh, NC John and Millicent Wilkerson, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. and Mrs. James M. Wilmott, Bronxville, NY Ashley and John Wilson, Chapel Hill, NC Campbell McNair Wilson and Elena Strauss Wilson, Charlotte, NC Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Winston, Sr., Raleigh, NC Mr. and Mrs. H. Vernon Winters, Winston-Salem, NC Lori Wittlin and Bradley Lewis, Houston, TX Mr. Charles J. Wolfe Jr. and Ms. Sandra Roth, New York, NY Joseph M. Wolz and Beth M. Wolz, Youngsville, NC Mr. and Mrs. Harold Woodard, Apex, NC Lee Polk Woody Jr., Baltimore, MD William Lewis Wortmann, Washington, DC Wei Wu and Amarjit Singh Budhiraja, Chapel Hill, NC Hiroko Yanagida and Frederick Baker, Mount Pleasant, SC Lynda Yang, Charleston, WV Sandra and Franklin Zieve, Midlothian, VA

Dean’s Circle ($1,500 to $1,999) • David Alan Adamson, Chapel Hill, NC • John and Leah Aldridge, Atlanta, GA • Eben Alexander, Charlottesville, VA • Dr. and Mrs. John Granville Alley Jr., Raleigh, NC • Chris and Mary Anderson, Bowie, MD • Ms. Teresa C. Artis, Cary, NC • Samuel Robert Bagenstos, Ann Arbor, MI • O. Kenneth Bagwell Jr., Chapel Hill, NC • George Bakatsias, Bahama, NC • Rodney Harwick Bell, Miami, FL • Neill Bellamy, Richmond, VA • Steve Benezra, Ph.D., Hillsborough, NC • Christina Benson, Alexandria, VA • Adar Taun Berghoff, Atlanta, GA • William Bogache, Myrtle Beach, SC • Esthel Bolton*, York Harbor, ME • D. Byron Braswell, Cary, NC • Dr. and Mrs.* Edwin L. Brown, Asheville, NC • Virginia Cardenas, Raleigh, NC • Ranieri Cavaceppi and Hilary Dove, Washington, DC • Daniel Clift, Boston, MA • Ginger and Brian Coffey, Houston, TX • Dionne Michelle Colbert, Atlanta, GA • Carlie Cunningham, Chapel Hill, NC • Mr. John Withers Currie, Columbia, SC • Ronnie Dail, Santa Monica, CA • Van Womack Daniel III, Wise, VA • Ernest Davenport, Columbia Heights, MN • Jan L. Davis, Cary, NC • Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Deering, Charleston, SC • Ms. Eileen K. Doherty, Durham, NC • Ruth L. Doyle, Warrensburg, MO • William W. Espy, Atlanta, GA • Jerry R. Everhardt and Margaret DuBose Avery, Raleigh, NC • Timothy and Annegret Fauser, Chapel Hill, NC • Richard and Susan Fry, Beulaville, NC • Mr. Phillip R. Gillespie, Bernardsville, NJ • Jeffrey Glans and Louise Perkins, Trumbull, CT • Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence J. Goldrich, Virginia Beach, VA • Mr. and Mrs. F. Borden Hanes Jr., Winston-Salem, NC • J. Patrick Hayden and Christi L. Hart, Charlotte, NC • Mr. Timothy B. Hefner, DPO, AP • Charles Henderson Jr. MD, York Harbor, ME • David James Howell, San Francisco, CA • John C. and Susan M. Hoyle, Washington, DC • Ms. Mary Elizabeth Huey, Cincinnati, OH • Maryann Hutchison, Los Altos, CA • Kelly and Christian Johnson, Golden, CO • LaTanja Johnson, Winston-Salem, NC • William and Mary Johnston, Darien, CT • Robert and Claudia Kadis, Raleigh, NC

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Hugon Karwowski and Joanna Karwowski, Chapel Hill, NC Susan Kelly, Chapel Hill, NC Daniel Kennedy, Chattanooga, TN Philip L. Kirstein, Princeton, NJ Mr. David Michael Krinsky, Pasadena, CA Brent and Alexa Kulman, Greensboro, NC Kim and Kevin Kwok, San Francisco, CA Elizabeth Lamar, Nashville, TN Mr. and Mrs. Haynes Pell Lea, Charlotte, NC Daniel Lebold and Simona Farcas, Chapel Hill, NC James and Dianne Leloudis, Chapel Hill, NC Mrs. William Little, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. and Mrs. W. Ward Marslender, Raleigh, NC Richard McAdams, Urbana, IL Patrick McAllister, Franklin, NC Timothy McCoy, Richmond, VA Pamela Lynn McLean, Raleigh, NC Alexander McMillan, Tai Po, Hong Kong William and Elaine Mebane, Raleigh, NC Timothy Mehringer and Claudia Viveros, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. Craig Messinger and Mrs. Debra Messinger, Mendham, NJ Cameron Murphy, Paris, France Mary and Richard Navins, Ipswich, MA Paul and Linda Naylor, Durham, NC Mr. and Mrs. N. Carter Newbold IV, Signal Mountain, TN Robert Nixon and Leslie Bauknight, Plantation, FL Jonathan Oberlander, Carrboro, NC Robert J. Parker Jr. and Sarah Elizabeth Taylor, Chapel Hill, NC Cynthia and Bruce Parks, Seattle, WA Scott Petermann, Valdosta, GA Julie Petricone, Coral Gables, FL Jonathan and Jennifer Pingle, Kensington, MD Mr. Emmett G. Rand Jr., Wilmington, DE Thomas E. Reynolds, Atlanta, GA Kelly W. and Zachary T. Rike, Atlanta, GA Jonathan and Joanne Rogoff, Stillwater, MN Dexter and Bonnie Rumsey, White Stone, VA Michael Charles Shindler and Andrea Gellin Shindler, Orlando, FL The David B. Sloan Jr. Family, Wilmington, NC Alfred Smith, Lookout Mountain, TN Tready and Thayer Smith, Tampa, FL Philip Snyder, Durham, NC Dr. and Mrs. Richard L. Sprott, Potomac, MD Michael W. Stephens, Savannah, GA Hugh and Marilyn Stevens, Raleigh, NC Janet S. Taylor, Charlotte, NC Rebecca Eve Tillet, Newtown, PA David Erich Tyson and Treva Watkins Tyson, Raleigh, NC Mark Valence and Susan Valence, Lyme, NH Bill and Susan Veazey, Greensboro, NC Mr. and Mrs. Hal G. Waddell III, Burlington, NC Elizabeth Campbell Walker, Greenwich, CT Tzu-Horng and Shun-Ching Wan, Cary, NC Iris and Stephen Weiss, Chapel Hill, NC Mr. Martin R. West III, Chevy Chase, MD Dr. Jesse L. White Jr., Chapel Hill, NC Mr. Mark S. White, Cary, NC Thomas Whitehurst, Fort Payne, AL Jeffrey C. Whittington, Winston Salem, NC Michael Lafon Wiley and Jodi Wiley, Pittsboro, NC Captain and Mrs. Charles H. Witten, Columbia, SC Geoffrey W. Wright, Winchester, MA

Corporations, Foundations, Estates, and Trusts • Abauman Family Foundation, Inc. • Abbey Revocable Living Trust • Abbott Fund • Alpha Natural Resources Services • Alpha Phi Omega • American Endowment Foundation • American Express • American Football Coaches Foundation • American Medical Society for Sports Medicine • Amgen Inc. • Anadarko Petroleum Coporation • AON Foundation • Apple, Inc.

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Ashley Flowers Family Dentistry AT&T Augusta Brown Holland Philanthropic Foundation Ayco Charitable Foundation Baltimore Community Foundation Bank of America BB&T Bell Family Foundation Blue Bell Foundation Blue Cross Blue Shield Of North Carolina Bowman and Gordon Gray Trust Brady Foundation, Inc. Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. Capital Group Co. Capital One Cardinal Track Club Carlson Family 1993 Living Trust Carolina Meadows Carolina Trust Chapman Family Charitable Trust Charles G. Koch Charitable Foundation Charles Goren and Hazen Family Foundation Charlesmead Foundation Chevron Corporation Cisco Systems Coca-Cola Company Colgate-Palmolive Combined Jewish Philanthropies of Greater Boston Commeo Fidenter Foundation Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta Community Foundation for National Capital Region Community Foundation of Gaston County Community Foundation of Greater Memphis Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee Community Foundation of New Jersey Connie Burwell White & William W. White Foundation Cowan Foundation Credit Suisse USA Cumberland Community Foundation Curtis Foundation Daniel-Mickel Foundation of South Carolina Deloitte Doris G. Quinn Foundation Dorothy Barnhill Edwards Trust Dowd Foundation Duke Energy Foundation E. Craig Wall Sr. Foundation E.T. Rollins Jr. & Frances P. Rollins Foundation Earl N. Phillips Family Foundation Edelman Foundation Eli Lilly and Company Elizabeth T. Williams Charitable Lead Trust Ellison Family Foundation Emwiga Foundation Enterprise Community Investment Ernst & Young Essick Foundation Estate of Rubye Diane Burke Estate of Edgar Thomas Cato Estate of Allen Harris Chappel Estate of Sue Himelick Fisher Estate of Sammie Ruth Fletcher Estate of Martha M. Keffer Estate of Melinda Sue Meade Estate of James N. Murdock Estate of Mary Upshaw Pike ExxonMobil Fay P. Aronson Trust Fine Feathers Foundation for the Charlotte Jewish Community Fox Family Foundation Frank Borden Hanes 1990 Revocable Trust Fred and Charlotte Hubbell Foundation Frey Foundation Full Frame Film Festival Futurewei Technologies, Inc. Galloway Ridge at Fearrington General Electric Company Geometric Marine Services, Inc. George H. Johnson Properties Georges Lurcy Charitable and Educational Trust Goldman Sachs

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Gombinski Properties Limited Partnership Google Governors Club Granville Towers Greater Greenville Community Foundation Harvard University Harvey Dalton Gunter Jr. Revocable Trust Herman Goldman Foundation High Point Community Foundation Hill Family Fund Hobbs Foundation Hobby Family Foundation Hope Christian Community Foundation Howard Brothers Investments, LLLP Hutchins Family Foundation Hyde Family Foundations Hyperice, Inc. Infusion Intel Corporation Interactive Intelligence, Inc. International Positive Psychology Association Interstate Transportation Equipment, Inc. J. McLaughlin Georgica Pine 2 J5 Jackson D. Breaks, II Revocable Trust Jacobson Jewish Community Foundation Of South Palm Beach County Jewish Community Foundation of Metrowest NJ Jewish Community FoundationDurham/Chapel Hill Jewish Foundation of Greensboro John S. and James L. Knight Foundation John William Pope Foundation Johnson & Johnson Joseph H. Wade Living Trust JP Morgan Chase & Company Julian Price Family Foundation Kenan Family Foundation Kensington Square Foundation KPB Corporation KPMG Foundation Kulynych Family Foundation II Kurt Weill Foundation for Music Kyser Foundation Langman Family Fund LeighDeux, LLC Lenovo Leon A. & Pattie M. Dunn Family Foundation Levine-Sklut Foundation Lila P. Friday Revocable Trust Lockheed Martin Lookout Foundation Inc. Lunsford Richardson Preyer Charitable Lead Unitrust Lyell Dawes Jr. Trust Mackenzie Family Foundation Maddrey Foundation Mantissa Corporation Mark & Bette Morris Family Foundation Mary Frances S. Chapman Revocable Trust Massage Envy-South Point Matthew Gfeller Foundation McKinley Family Foundation Med Emporium, LLC Mental Canvas Merck & Company, Inc. MetLife Microsoft Corporation Morgan Stanley and Company N. Darlene Walker & Associates LP National Athletic Trainers Association National Center for Women & Information Technology National Philanthropic Trust Network for Good New York Community Trust Norman & Rose S. Shamberg Foundation North Oak LLC Northwestern Mutual Foundation Novartis US Foundation NVIDIA Olivia R. Gardner Foundation Open Society Institute Paracosm, Inc. Paul Green Foundation Persian Carpet, Inc. Peter B. and Adeline W. Ruffin Foundation

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Peter J. Frenkel Foundation Peter T. and Laura M. Grauer Foundation Prentice Foundation, Inc. PriceWaterhouse Coopers Primerica Foundation Prudential Foundation Randleigh Foundation Trust Rao Family Foundation Realan Foundation Realo Discount Drug Stores, Inc. Red Hat Renaissance Charitable Foundation Inc. Render Family Foundation Reynolds American Foundation Richard & Karen Razook Family Foundation, Inc. Robert L. Merrill Jr. Rev Trust Robertson Foundation Ron and Cheryl Howard Family Foundation Roy A. Hunt Foundation Ruth M. Greenberg Revocable Trust Salisbury Community Foundation SAS Institute, Inc. Schwab Family Charitable Contribution Schwab Fund for Charitable Giving Seymour and Carol Levin Foundation Shell Oil Company Sigma-Aldrich Corporation Silicon Valley Community Foundation Simon & Schuster Smith Family Foundation Snyder Watchorn Foundation, Inc. Southern Season Spray Foundation Streetsigns SunTrust Banks, Inc. T.S. Kenan, III Living Trust Taylor Charitable Trust TechWerks LLC Texas Instruments, Inc. The B. W. & Barbara Miller Foundation The Boston Foundation The Brent Milgrom Family Foundation, Inc. The Columbus Foundation The Dena & Chris Moore Family Foundation The Dickson Foundation The Educational Foundation of America The John R. and Carolyn J. Maness Family Foundation The Knott Family Foundation The L. & C. Wood Family Foundation The Leon Levine Foundation/ Sandra and Leon Levine The Minneapolis Foundation The Robertson Scholars Program The Robinson Foundation, Inc. The Selavy Foundation The Shubert Foundation The Stuart S. and Birdie Gould Foundation The Tad Beck Fund The Tuck Family Trust Thomas S. Kenan Foundation Townsend Family Foundation Triangle Community Foundation Truist TSWII Management Company Ultra-met UNC Student Activities Fund Office United Way of Miami-Dade United Way Silicon Valley University Florist US Bank Valdosta Flying Service, Inc. Verizon W. Trent Ragland Jr. Foundation Walt Disney Company Wells Family Charitable Foundation Wells Fargo Wentworth & Sloan Jewelers Whitehall At The Villa William A. Stern Foundation, Inc. William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust William Travis Jewelry Winston-Salem Foundation Xcel Energy Foundation Yang Family Dentistry


FINALE

AMERICAN CHILDHOOD (Photo by Lily Clarke ’16) Clarke is a religious studies major who is pursuing minors in creative writing and biology. She captured this picture of her cousins several years ago when taking them out for ice cream in Fairview, N.C. | “It’s been fun seeing them grow up, and documenting our time together always captures moments that are more telling of childhood and of life than I realize when I am originally taking the picture,” she said. | Her photo was featured in the spring 2015 issue of the undergraduate literary magazine Cellar Door.


THE UNIVERSITY o f N O RT H C A RO L I N A COLLEGE OF A RT S & S C I E N C E S

NONPROFIT U.S. POSTAGE PAID UNC–CHAPEL HILL

T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F N O RT H C A RO L I N A AT C H A P E L H I L L C A M P U S B OX 3 1 0 0 205 SOUTH BUILDING CHAPEL HILL, NC 27599-3100

Frey-Zakaria Ad Ad-CAS Mag v3_Layout 1 9/8/15 12:32 PM Page 1

F R E Y F O U N DAT I O N D I S T I N G U I S H E D V I S I T I N G P R O F E S S O R L E C T U R E

FAREED ZAKARIA IN DEFENSE OF A LIBERAL EDUCATION SAVE THE DATE: MARCH 8, 2016 Host of CNN’s Fareed Zakaria GPS, contributing editor at

The Atlantic and Washington Post columnist Fareed Zakaria is widely respected for his thoughtful analysis and ability

to spot economic and political trends. In his latest book,

In Defense of a Liberal Education, he argues for a renewed

commitment to the world’s most valuable educational tradition.

This spring he comes to UNC to make his case for how a liberal arts education is more than a path to a

career, it’s an exercise in freedom.

college.unc.edu/frey


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