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vol. 4. issue 63

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sac joaquin

e n o o n to p u s k o lo ve ro G t n sa a le P s: State Champ Level Up

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Todd Crivello, left, and Matthew Hayes

e v o r g t n a s a e l p

e d a m y histor pg14 arm. We’ve all heard of it, 27 Dead so how about we take a moment to understand it?

Ponderosa’s Corey 22 dedication: Pereira takes his golf pretty seriously. But c’mon: If you were that good, wouldn’t you? close: Sheldon boys just miss 18 so out on basketball hardware. 4

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pitch: Nothing is ever 6 first perfect and a lot of people were apprehensive about the new state hoops tournament. But you know what? It shows some promise for the future. And that’s something that’s good for everybody involved.

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room: Guess what? Our 8 locker fantasy baseball team is already doomed. Is it football season yet? of the Week: 10 SportStars Matthew Hayes, Pleasant Grove We swear to goodness, 32 camps: you have no reason to complain there’s nothing to do this summer.

You’re not always 12 Clipboard: gonna please everybody, so make recruiting about you.

on the cover: Pleasant Grove’s James Watson. Photo by James K. Leash

Fence: Tryouts, sign-ups, 34 The fundraisers and more!

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I

New era of state hoops isn’t perfect, but we’re encouraged

n our last issue that released on March 7, I used this space to express my frustration over how the California Interscholastic Federation bungled its first attempt at selecting teams for the Open Division tournament meant to feature only the state’s most elite teams. Many of the things that frustrated me then, still do. The poor explanation to schools of its selection criteria and the lack of foresight to set up a post-selection teleconference to help explain their choices are chief among them. However, after watching the entire state tournament play out it was hard not to also notice the positives involving the Open Division — most notably how it affected some of the lower divisions. I can tell you with absolute certainty that the College Park-Pleasant Hill boys basketball team would not be on the Bay Area cover of this issue if not for the Open Division. There’s a similar likelihood that the same could be said for Pleasant GroveElk Grove boys basketball’s presence on our Sac-Joaquin cover. With many of the typical powerhouses removed from their respective divisions to placed in the Open, it was hard not to acknowledge a little bit of new life infused into the state tournament as several programs reached regional and state finals for the first time in school history. And no team was a greater microcosm of that than College Park. Erik Stordahl’s story on the Falcons, which you can find on Page 14 of the Bay Area edition (or online at SportStarsOnline.com if you happen to be holding the Sac-Joaquin equivalent), is a Cinderalla story on steroids. Without the Open Division, College Park would not have even MADE the Div. II state tournament. And they ended up playing for a state title. To those of you who will argue that the accomplishment isn’t as great because the division was watered down without heavyweights Archbishop Mitty-San Jose (which made the Open Div. state final) and Newark MemorialNewark (which went to the Open Div. after winning the NCS Div. II tournament that College Park was eliminated from in the quarters), I say hogwash. College Park won three straight road games and then won the Div. II regional title by beating the No. 1 seed (Dublin) in an overtime game. That’s no fluke. Following the drama of first-time regional championship runs for programs like College Park, Dublin, Pleasant Grove, Deer Valley-Antioch boys or the St. Francis-Mountain View girls was both exciting and refreshing. And hopefully our cover stories this issue on two of those programs properly encapsulated those sentiments. So what’s the bottom line on the Open Division, which still has two more years of pilot program status? It’s not pure evil. If the CIF’s administration and section commissioners can get better at offering transparency to the selection process and clarity to its criteria, then much of the animosity from the state basketball community is likely to go away. During a press conference at the state finals on March 23, CIF Executive Director Roger Blake readily acknowledged that was something they’re looking in to. “That (explanation of criteria) is something we want to be better at next year,” he said. “But this is just the first year, and I think the general feeling overall is to see what the second year is like before we decide what needs to be tweaked.” Blake was a basketball coach during his career in education. We have the feeling that he gets it. The first few years of the CIF’s state championship football bowl games saw similar skepticism, and it’s turned into a widely-accepted event. The key to that was initial transparency from the CIF, and proper tweaks after a few years of evaluation. If Blake remembers that, the basketball tournament should be in good hands. ✪

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join our team PHONE 925.566.8500 FAX 925.566.8507 Editorial Editor@SportStarsOnline.com Editor Chace Bryson • Chace@SportStarsOnline. com Staff Writers Erik Stordahl, Jim McCue Contributors Bill Kolb, Mitch Stephens, Matt Smith, Clay Kallam, Bryant West, Dave Kiefer, Liz Elliott, Tim Rudd, Jonathan Okanes, Hunter Hewitt, Joe Stiglich Photography Butch Noble, Bob Larson, Jonathan Hawthorne, James K. Leash, Norbert von der Groeben, Phillip Walton, Doug Guler Intern Ryan Arter Creative Department Art@SportStarsOnline.com Production Manager Mike DeCicco • MikeD@ SportStarsOnline.com Publisher/President Mike Calamusa • Mike@SportStarsOnline.com Advertising & Calendar/ Classified Sales Sales@SportStarsOnline.com, 925.566.8500 Account Executives Erik Stordahl • Erik@SportStarsOnline.com, Phillip Walton • PWalton@SportStarsOnline.com Sac Joaqin edition: Dave Rosales • DaveRosales64@gmail.com Reader Resources/Administration Ad Traffic, Subscription, Calendar & Classified Listings info@SportStarsOnline.com Distribution/Delivery Mags@SportStarsOnline.com Information technology John Bonilla CFO Sharon Calamusa • Sharon@SportStarsOnline.com community SportStars™ Magazine A division of Caliente! Communications, LLC 5356 Clayton Rd., Ste. 222 • Concord, CA 94521 •info@SportStarsOnline.com www.SportStarsOnline.com

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your ticket to california sports admit one; rain or shine This Vol. #4, April 2013 Whole No. 63 is published by Caliente! Communications, LLC, 5356 Clayton Rd, Ste. 222, Concord, CA 94521. SportStars™© 2010 by Caliente! Communications, LLC. All rights reserved. Subscription rates: 24 issues, U.S. 3rd class $42 (allow 3 weeks for delivery). 1st class $55. To receive sample issues, please send $3 to cover postage. Back issues are $4 each. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of Publisher is strictly prohibited. The staff and management, including Board of Directors, of SportStars™© does not advocate or encourage the use of any product or service advertised herein for illegal purposes. Editorial contributions, photos and letters to the editor are welcome and should be addressed to the Editor. All material should be typed, double-spaced on disk or email and will be handled with reasonable care. For materials return, please enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. SportStars™© and STARS!™© Clinics are registered trademarks of Caliente! Communications, LLC.

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rapidFIRE Plans for spring break Sleeping in, going to swim practice

Favorite book The Sound and the Fury,

Your instrument if Store at which you were a you’d want a rock star shopping spree

Nothing annoys me more at school than ______

Best April Fool’s prank you’ve played

Classmate in my physics class

Told my mom I was pregnant

Freshmen standing in the hallway

Using a rubber band to rig a faucet to spray backwards

William Faulkner

Katie Kronick, Northgate swimming

Working out for next season

The Jungle Book,

Rudyard Kipling

Ariell Bostick, Bishop O’Dowd basketball

say what

“You look at some of the scores of these games and they’re close. That’s what you want state championships to be like. ... We were trying to create fair competition, and I think (the Open Division) is helping that.” - CIF Executive Director Roger Blake on his initial impression of how the state basketball tournament played out in the first year involving an Open Division. Jonathan Hawthorne SOFTBALL: Livermore Stampede, April 4-6, Robertson Park, Livermore — Defending champion and national No. 1, Amador Valley, is not in the tournament this year, which could leave the title open to several NorCal powers such as Sheldon, Mitty, California or Alhambra.

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GIRLS LAX: Cleveland Heights (OH.) vs. Carondelet, April 3, Diablo View MS, 5 p.m. — The state’s No. 3-ranked team takes on Ohio’s No. 8-ranked team of a year ago. BASEBALL: 44th Alhambra Easter Classic, March 30-April 4 — Well-run tourney always traditionally ends up with a dramatic, and cold, final under the lights.

BOYS VOLLEYBALL Tournam ine Prep H loaded field of NorCal a BOYS GOL April 15, R — Last cha tune-up bef

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count‘em Top 5 signs your fantasy baseball season has already gone wrong

Oderah Chidom

Number of basketball players who will be representing the Bay Area in the prestigious McDonald’s All-American Game on March 31 in Chicago. It’s by far the most Bay Area players selected in any season. Marcus Lee (Deer Valley-Antioch), Jabari Bird (Salesian-Richmond) and Aaron Gordon (Archbishop MittySan Jose) will compete in the boys game, and Oderah Chidom (Bishop O’Dowd-Oakland) will play in the girls game.

Marcus Lee

VOLLEYBALL: King of Cali ament, April 12-13, BelllarmHS, San Jose — An absolutely d might indeed determine the king at least. OLF: TransBay Tournament, Rossmoor Country Club ance for some NCS hopefuls to fore postseason arrives.

Phillip Walton BASEBALL: Franklin-Elk Grove at Elk Grove, April 9, 4:15 p.m. — It just so happens that two of the top two teams in the Sacramento region are league foes from the same city. This matchup gains extra juice thanks to Franklin ousting Elk Grove from the 2012 SJS playoffs.

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Ahhh, Opening Day! So full of tradition. So rife with promise. The crack of the bat, the smell of freshly cut grass, the taste of peanuts and Cracker Jack, the moment when the Cubs are mathematically eliminated from the playoffs. Oh. And the overwhelming sense of impending doom as the first pick of your fantasy draft leaves Game No. 1 of 162 with previously undisclosed shoulder stiffness…Fantasy baseball can turn even this most glorious spring day into an utter nightmare. And, if you’re like us, well, you totally saw it coming. Here are our top five signs that you are in for a harrowing fantasy season. 1. Five words — “Maybe he can bounce back.” If you’re pinning your season on that guy, you are officially toast. And. Possibly. Last. Thanks for playing. 2. Four words. — At the conclusion of another epic 5-hour draft marathon, the guy who won your league last year walks by your draft sheet and says, “Dude, THAT’S your team?” 3. Three words. — “Dr. James Andrews.” If you see his name in a sentence with your pitching ace, well. Sucks to be you. 4. Two words. — “Play ball.” Let’s face it. That rag-tag bunch of has-beens, neverwas, and also-rans was dogmeat before you even trotted out your starting lineup. Better luck next year, chief. 5. One word. — “Hope.” Sure, sure. It springs eternal. But it is also what makes you ill-advisedly draft key players from your favorite team, thinking that they and your fantasy squad can have a big year together, and won’t it all just be sunshine and rainbows? It’s also what keeps you coming back, year after year, with new strategies, new rankings, new approaches. And dumping your hard-earned buy-in cash into a hole in the middle of the diamond. — Bill “I’m not bitter” Kolb

SOFTBALL: Amador Valley at California, April 16— If there’s one team that may challenge Amador in league play, it’s Cal. TRACK AND FIELD: Bay Area Top 8 Meet, April 19-20, James Logan HS, Union City — Popular Bay Area meet celebrates its 25th anniversary in 2013.

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BOYS LAX: San Ramon Valley at De La Salle, April 19 — A rematch of the 2012 NCS Div. I final that SRV won 5-4. TRACK AND FIELD: Sacramento Meet of Champions, April 27, Sacramento State University — The last elite meet in NorCal before postseason meets begin in mid-May.

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The senior guard led the Eagles’ offense through much of the postseason, coming up biggest in the CIF NorCal and State Championship games. Hayes averaged 16.2 points per game in the regional and state playoffs, including team highs in the final two championship contests. He scored a game-high 20 points in a 73-60 victory over Deer Valley-Antioch and followed that with 19 in the 73-57 state final against Santa Monica one week later. For the season, he finished with averages of 14.8 points, 3.5 rebounds, 2 assists, and 1.5 steals per contest. SportStars: Was there a catalyst for the increase in scoring in the playoffs, and particularly the NorCal and state finals? Matthew Hayes: The coaches just told me take (my shots) and I wanted to win (the state championship) more than anything. SSM: What was the feeling like to win a state title after not even winning your league title? MH: I’m speechless. I’m just so happy for me and my team. It is a big accomplishment for us. SSM: At what point did you truly believe this team could win a state championship? MH: After the last loss to Sheldon (in the SJS Div. I final), we knew that they were going to the Open Division. We knew this is something we can do and this is our goal. With Sheldon out of the way, we knew this was our time to shine.

April 1, 2013

honorable mention

matthew hayes pleasant grove -elk grove . basketball . senior

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Mallory Velte The Christian BrothersSacramento senior won her second consecutive CIF Girls’ Wrestling State championship with a convincing 11-2 victory in the final match. Her state title capped a perfect 40-0 season.

george corp The WoodcreekRoseville senior catcher has helped the Timberwolves to a 4-2 start by batting .529 with 9 hits and 6 RBI. He recently doubled in a 3-0 win over River Valley-Yuba City.

ali bettencourt

Phillip Walton

The Oak Ridge-El Dorado Hills junior guard led the Trojans to the NorCal final by averaging 21.2 points in regionals. Her biggest game came in a win over Wilcox-Santa Clara where she drained seven 3-pointers en route to 27 points.

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Make the recruiting process about you, and what YOU want I’m getting recruiting letters from schools in the West Coast Conference, but my friends just laugh and say a Pac-12 scholarship is all that counts. What should I tell the West Coast Conference coaches when they call?  J.B., Oakland   ell them your friends are idiots. OK, they don’t want to hear about your “friends”, and I put “friends” in quotes because a true friend wouldn’t laugh at any scholarship offer. How many of them are getting letters? All right, enough of that. Here’s the thing: It’s not at all important whether you go to a Pac-12 school or a WCC school. (Or an SEC school as opposed to a Missouri Valley Conference school, or whatever major you want to compare to a mid-major.) What matters is that, after you graduate, you can look back and say to yourself “I’m glad I chose that school.” Notice the word “I” there — there’s no reference to “friends.” The decision you make has to be best for you, not for your so-called friends, and it may be that going to Pepperdine and spending four years in Malibu is better than going to Washington State and spending four years in Pullman (see if you can find it on a map). I was just talking to a basketball player about her recruiting process. She said “I remember getting my first recruiting letter before my sophomore year, and I was so excited — until I saw what school it was. I said to myself ‘I’m never going there’.” Well, of course, that’s just where she wound up going, and she couldn’t be happier. I asked her what she, as a senior, would tell herself, as a sophomore, about the recruiting process. After she thought about it, she said “I would tell myself not to assume I know anything about any school until I see for myself.” And there are a lot of variables, from how close you want to be to home, how big a school you want to attend, and what your chances are of playing a lot of minutes. This player, for example, said “I don’t want to sit on the bench,” so she opted for a school that would give her the chance to play right away. Some people may not mind waiting their turn — but it’s important to remember that coaches recruit new players every year, and if they get some hotshot freshman who plays your position, your two years of riding the pine aren’t going to count for a thing. But you know, at that point it might not matter, and you may be loving your college experience so much you don’t mind not playing. Or you could hate it so much that you transfer — as a lot of kids who get blinded by the bright lights of the big conferences often do. Remember, Damian Lillard was the sixth overall pick in the NBA draft and might be Rookie of the Year — and his friends probably laughed when he got his first letter from Weber State. In the end, it didn’t matter that it wasn’t the Pac-12; what mattered was that he got a chance to play, to improve and to show just how good he really was. ✪

T

Clay Kallam is an assistant athletic director and girls varsity basketball coach at Bentley High in Lafayette. To submit a question for Behind the Clipboard, email Coach Kallam at clayk@ fullcourt.com

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Pleasant Grove boys basketball vanquished a history of runner-up finishes with a dominant run to the state title

F

or a team that has experienced so many seconds, it was particularly rewarding for the Pleasant Grove High boys basketball team to finally experience a number of firsts. First Northern California Regional Championship. First CIF State Championship — for the program and any Sac-Joaquin Section Division I school. And even the first time claiming the local spotlight. After living in the shadow of neighborhood and Delta River League rival Sheldon for years, Pleasant Grove finally eclipsed its counterpart by staring down a pair of Division I prospects in Kentucky-signee Marcus Lee and UNLV-bound Kendall Smith to earn a state title game berth with a 73-60 victory over Deer Valley-Antioch at Sleep Train Arena. The Eagles followed up their impressive Northern California Regional title win with an equally outstanding performance in slowing down a potent Santa Monica offense to take the state championship hardware back to the neighborhood. “They never lost focus of the goal despite a couple of setbacks early in the season,” head coach John DePonte said. “They kept coming, kept coming, and we finally broke through.” The Eagles battled their own adversity in the playoffs before persevering to earn their state title shot. After suffering a pair of competitive losses to Sheldon during the regular season, Pleasant Grove again was matched up with their familiar nemesis in the SJS Div. I final. Despite giving their best effort and playing the Huskies close all game long, the Eagles suffered a 60-57 defeat to be denied the program’s first section title. But instead of focusing on another runner-up finish, Pleasant Grove set their sights on breaking through in the Div. I Northern Regional playoffs. With Sheldon seeded in the newly-formed Open Division featuring top programs regardless of school size, Pleasant Grove had a Husky-free bracket and a singular focus. “After the last loss to Sheldon, we knew that they were going to the Open Division,” senior guard Matthew Hayes said. “With Sheldon out of the way, we knew this was our time to shine.” The Eagles earned the No. 2 seed in the regional field and steamrolled the competition en route to another visit to Sleep Train Arena. Led by its Big Three — seniors Malik Thames, Hayes, and Cole Nordquist — Pleasant Grove rolled through Piedmont Hills 60-36 to earn a rematch with perennial NorCal power De La Salle-Concord.

Pleasant Grove’s Cole Nordquist drives to the hoop during the regional final.

Story by Jim McCue • Photos by James K. Leash, Phillip Walton

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In the 2012 NorCal playoffs, De La Salle eliminated Pleasant Grove in the quarterfinals with its trademark lockdown defense. This time, with the game on the Eagles’ home court, the tide was turned as Pleasant Grove shredded the Spartans’ defense to record a convincing 68-51 semifinal win and punch its ticket to the regional final. Thames exploded for a postseason-high 31 points against a De La Salle defense that was holding opposing teams to 38 points per game. Hayes added 13 points as the Eagles nearly eclipsed the 38 points per game average for Spartans’ opponents by halftime. Pleasant Grove led 37-17 at the intermission and never allowed De La Salle to threaten its lead in the second half. The performance earned a postgame tweet from renown De La Salle coach Frank Allocco: “Season ends with loss to an outstanding Pleasant Grove team that was clicking on all cylinders!” Still, despite getting that monkey off their backs, the Eagles only earned a NorCal final showdown with the 800-pound gorilla that was Deer Valley. On the strength of Lee and Smith, the Wolverines had accumulated a 26-5 record and North Coast Section championship that included wins over De La Salle and San Leandro. Deer Valley lost a shootout with Sheldon 97-92 in January, but its star power had the majority of observers giving the Wolverines an edge over the Eagles. Lacking the marquee names and flash, Pleasant Grove was content to concentrate on the basics to fight for its long-sought championship. The Eagles understood they would have to battle the Wolverines’ size on the low post with pure grit — and that determination and fundamentals were their greatest weapons. “We knew it would come down to heart in the end and that’s what we’re best at,” Nordquist said. “We really just had to dig down.” Pleasant Grove led throughout the NorCal championship game until Deer Valley countered with a pressing defense that forced numerous turnovers. The Eagles’ 36-27 halftime advantage disappeared with less than a minute remaining in the third when the Wolverines took a brief 47-46 lead before Pleasant Grove carried a one-point advantage into the final eight minutes. The Eagles opened the final period with an 11-4 run that stretched their lead to 59-54 with 4:02 remaining in the game. From there, Pleasant Grove was a perfect 12-for-12 from the free throw line to hold off Deer Valley and pull away for the unprecedented championship. “We have been striving to play that perfect game,” DePonte said of the Eagles’ clutch fourth-quarter free throw shooting and making 27-of-28 foul shots in the game. “I think that once we got on a roll, everyone just fed off the success that we had from the line.” Hayes credited the calmness of the team down the stretch to the guidance that DePonte provided during a break after Deer Valley briefly claimed the lead. “Coach told us to keep our emotions low and keep attacking their press,” Hayes said. “He just told us to keep our cool.” That coolness vaulted Pleasant Grove to the regional title and made the Eagles the hottest SJS squad as well as the last one standing. With losses by the other four SJS schools in NorCal finals, the Eagles were the lone section representative to play for a state title. In the third trip to Sleep Train Arena in a month, Pleasant Grove had a true home-court advantage over visiting SoCal Div.-I champ Santa Monica. The familiarity of their surroundings and a student body cheering section dubbed “The Flock” gave the Eagles extra confidence that they rode to the historic state championship. Duplicating the previous week’s effort of neutralizing the opponent’s top offensive threat, the Eagles focused on slowing Cal-recruit Jordan Mathews. Pleasant Grove forced the Vikings’ star to exert himself at both ends of the floor against the Eagles’ typical aggressive style of offense and defense. “We wanted to attack him and make him play defense and get his legs tired, and hopefully draw some fouls on him as well,” DePonte said of the game plan for Mathews. “We wanted to make him play both sides of the ball and keep him off-balance.” The plan worked to perfection when 16

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Mathews fouled out early in the fourth quarter after scoring just two points in the second half. Without Santa Monica’s top threat on the floor, Pleasant Grove was able to focus on maintaining a double-digit lead until the final horn sounded. The Eagles had some flaws in the state final, including sophomore center Marquese Chriss getting into his own foul trouble and a subpar shooting night from the free throw line. Role players like Thomas Fitzgerald, who scored six points and grabbed eight rebounds while filling in for Chriss, stepped up as the team found a way to win. “We never quit playing, and never quit playing together,” Nordquist said. The Big Three not only led the Eagles’ on the court, but commanded respect and navigated their squad through the ups and downs of the season as true leaders. The trio was each three-year varsity players who earned that respect of teammates as well as coaches to be true extensions of the staff both on and off the court. “We have grown together,” Nordquist said of the Eagles’ senior trio. “Every year we got better, and this was our year to shine.” After the final runner-up finish to Sheldon in the SJS final, the veteran trio embodied the Eagles’ never-say-die attitude that led to the team’s historic run to the ultimate first-place finish. “Getting this is a reflection of all of the hard work, and I’m glad that with all the hard work it finally paid off and we were finally able to break through,” DePonte said. “It was a lifeteaching situation about perseverance. “They kept believing and they kept the faith, and it’s just great for these guys to break through.” ✪

FAR LEFT: Matthew Hayes led the Eagles in scoring throughout the state tournament, which included a combined 39 points in the regional and state finals. LEFT: Malik Thames pushes the ball up the floor in the regional final against Deer Valley.

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Final rankings Records are final. (source: MaxPreps.com) 1. (4)

Archbishop Mitty-San Jose

28-6

2. (2)

Sheldon-Sacramento

27-6

3. (1)

Salesian-Richmond

30-4

4. (5)

Modesto Christian

29-4

5. (10)

Pleasant Grove-Elk Grove

28-6

6. (7)

Deer Valley-Antioch

26-6

7. (3)

Bishop O’Dowd-Oakland

26-4

8. (6)

De La Salle-Concord

27-5

9. (8)

Serra-San Mateo

25-6

10. (NR)

College Park-Pleasant Hill

27-6

11. (11)

San Leandro

25-6

12. (13)

Newark Memorial

23-8

13. (14)

Dublin

26-7

14. (9)

Sacramento

25-8

15. (NR)

Sacred Heart Cathedral-SF

21-12

16. (NR)

Campolindo-Moraga

22-9

17. (12)

Antelope

25-7

18. (NR)

Cardinal Newman-Santa Rosa

32-4

19. (16)

El Cerrito

22-11

20. (NR)

St. Joseph Notre Dame-Alameda 25-12

DROPPED OUT No. 15 Palo Alto, No. 17 Capital Christian-Sacramento, No. 18 Freedom-Oakley, No. 19 Monte Vista-Danville and No. 20 Heritage-Brentwood.

BIGGEST MOVER Without question it was upstart College Park, who entered the rankings at No. 10 after it went from a quarterfinal loss in the NCS Div. II tournament to reaching the CIF Div. II state final. Their NorCal

championship run included three road victories and a gritty overtime victory over then-No. 14 Dublin.

TEAMS STILL RANKED FROM PRESEASON TOP 20: 14 KNOCKING ON THE DOOR Capital Christian-Sacramento (26-5), Bellarmine

Prep-San Jose (22-10), Freedom-Oakley (20-10),

Enterprise-Redding (25-4), McClymonds-Oakland

(22-8), Piedmont Hills-San Jose (24-8), Weston RanchStockton (22-8), San Marin-Novato (21-12), RiordanSF (20-12).

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Lasting Impression Sheldon’s heralded group of seniors fell just shy of its state championship goal, but it was intent on leaving the Huskies in good hands

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By jim mccue | Senior Contributor

his season was supposed to be the season the Sheldon boys basketball team took the next step. One year removed from losing in the CIF Division I state final to perennial power Mater Dei-Santa Ana, the Huskies set their sights on winning one more game than the year before. Sheldon had an established tradition of greatness, the majority of its starting lineup returning, and the addition of transfer Darin Johnson to finally tip the state championship scales in their favor. Unfortunately, none of those factors were an answer for Archbishop Mitty-San Jose and its blue chip recruit Aaron Gordon in the Open Division Northern Regional final. “We didn’t seem to have that jump that we normally have,” senior Dakarai Allen said of the final game. “It was a sad moment, but we have to move on.” Allen admitted that moving on was difficult for the first few days after the 70-50 loss at Sleep Train Arena, but the entire team, including the 10 seniors on the roster, are eager to pass the torch to the next group of Huskies. “The young guys might not be as good as this group, but they are just as determined to win,” head coach Joey Rollings said. “Everyone thinks that we will have a big dropoff, but our goal next year is to win section again.” The next generation of Huskies will have some big shoes to fill and an extremely high bar to aim for. In 2008, Rollings took over the program with senior stars Darius Nelson and Ramon Eaton leading a talented group that included freshmen Allen, D’Erryl Williams, and Ryan Manning. Sheldon won the first of four consecutive Sac-Joaquin Section Div. I titles that season as the trio of freshmen learned the ropes. Through their four years, Allen, Williams, and Manning became mainstays in the starting lineup and Sheldon became synonymous with success. As their careers were winding down at Sheldon, the trio understood it would have to prepare their younger teammates for the challenges ahead — much like they were prepared by the likes of Nelson and Eaton. “It started with DeMarcus Nelson and continued through Darius and Ramon before this group came along,” Rollings said of the Huskies’ tradition carrying over from one group to the next. “Once you start winning, kids want to come play at the school and everyone wants to win and expects to win.

Sheldon senior Dakarai Allen braces to go up for a basket as he’s swarmed by Archbishop Mitty defenders during the Huskies’ 70-50 loss in the Open Div. regional final on March 16. Photos by James K. Leash

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Senior D’Erryl Williams worked hard to prepare his successor for 2013-14.

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“This year’s seniors took the younger guys under their wings, and they truly want the best for the next group.” The young Huskies, which include freshmen Devin Greene and Ian Miller, were exposed to the work ethic, attitude, and talent of this year’s senior class. Every practice, the starters went all-out against their younger counterparts, sometimes teaching them with the force of a bruising Williams drive or the wonder of an Allen gliding drive. “(D’Erryl) went at Devin all year long,” Allen said of the on-court tutelage. “And from the first day, everything I did, Ian had to do it.” This year’s seniors taught more than just their younger teammates, though, as a long line of defeated opponents can attest. Sheldon finished with a 27-6 record against a schedule that included seven opponents which played for state championships in their respective states and divisions. The Huskies would have likely gotten another shot at a state title were it not for the introduction of the Open Division to the state tournament this year. Mitty, who won the last two Division II state crowns would not have been in the way of another shot at Mater Dei if not for the change that grouped all of the best programs into one super group, regardless of division. “It was an honor to be placed in the Open Division, but it kind of hurt us a bit,” Rollings said. “I thought that overall we did a great job this season considering (the level of competition) we faced.” The trio of Allen, Williams, and Johnson led the Huskies all season long, often taking turns carrying the offensive load.

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“This group was very special,” he said. “They were successful and no one cared about who got the credit. One guy could score just five points one night, but then come back with 35 the next game.” For their efforts, all three were rewarded with scholarships to take their games to the next level, and Rollings hopes that Manning will be offered a scholarship soon as well. Allen and Williams, who have played together for years, will continue as teammates at San Diego State while Johnson will head north to the University of Washington. With their immediate futures secured, it would be easy for the graduating seniors to focus solely on their next step. Allen, for one, is not quite done with Sheldon basketball though. While he continues to work hard in the offseason with local hoops guru Ron Nelson to prepare for the next level, he will be finishing off his support for the young Huskies to make sure that they are ready for their next level as well. “Darius and Ramon left us with big shoes to fill, and me and (D’Erryl) took the torch from them and took it upon ourselves to be leaders,” Allen said. “Now it’s up to the next group to carry on the tradition.” Allen pointed to the support of his family and the community as reasons that he is passionate about leaving the Sheldon boys basketball program in good hands. “My family and the community supported us through thick and thin and made my high school experience memorable,” he said. “Sheldon has helped make it possible for me to get to the next level.” Now Allen and his fellow seniors will have to find out if their tutelage will help Sheldon basketball to find its own next level. ✪

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Best Ever? Final Rankings

Records are final. (source: MaxPreps.com)

Rank, Prev. Team

Record

1.(1)

Bishop O’Dowd-Oakland

30-3

2. (2)

St Mary’s-Stockton

32-3

3. (3)

Miramonte-Orinda

27-3

4. (6)

Carondelet-Concord

27-4

5. (4)

St. Mary’s-Berkeley

30-5

6. (5)

Archbishop Mitty-San Jose

24-7

7. (7)

Sacred Heart Cathedral-S.F.

25-7

8. (8)

Salesian-Richmond

29-8

9. (10)

Sacramento

27-5

10. (12)

Kennedy-Sacramento

24-8

11. (11)

Oak Ridge-El Dorardo Hills

28-5

12. (9)

Heritage-Brentwood

26-6

13. (NR)

Berkeley

22-12

14. (16)

Monte Vista-Danville

24-6

15. (13)

St. Ignatius-SF

21-11

16. (18)

McClymonds-Oakland

26-4

17. (NR)

Lynbrook-San Jose

25-6

18. (14)

Eastside Coll. Prep-E. Palo Alto 22-9

19. (NR)

St. Francis-Mountain View

24-9

20. (15)

Brookside Christian-Stockton

26-5

DROPPED OUT No. 17 Wilcox-Santa Clara, No. 19 Enterprise-Redding, No. 20 McNair-Stockton

BIGGEST MOVERS Berkeley jumped into the rankings in the 13th spot thanks to a great run through NorCal Division I – which still couldn’t quite push the Yellowjackets past some teams that didn’t win D-1 because 12 losses are, after all, 12 losses.

TEAMS STILL RANKED FROM PRESEASON TOP 20: 16 KNOCKING ON THE DOOR Enterprise-Redding (29-2), Pinewood-Los Altos Hills (24-8), Oakland Tech (20-7), Amador Valley-Pleasanton (19-10), Campolindo-Moraga (25-6), Bradshaw Christian-Sacramento (28-3), Vanden-Fairfield (28-5), Wilcox-San Jose 23-5, Deer Valley-Antioch (17-10), Burlingame (28-3), Menlo School-Atherton (22-10), Gunn-San Jose (21-7), Moreau Catholic-Hayward (21-8), Alameda (21-9), Sacred Heart Prep-Atherton (22-10), Soquel (25-3), Lowell-S.F. (27-6).

Bishop O’Dowd delivered on its endless hype by winning the Open Division title By Chace Bryson | Editor

There was a moment. Those who were paying close attention to the Bishop O’Dowd High bench between the third and fourth periods of the CIF Girls Open Division State Championship on March 23 might have seen it. It was merely a look. A look shared between the four star seniors. The look said it all. “At the start of the fourth quarter, all four of us got together and gave each other a look,” the Duke-bound Oderah Chidom said. “We knew this was it. It was time. And that’s when the big run happened and Windward wasn’t able to retaliate.” Windward-Los Angeles, which entered the game on a 32game winning streak and sporting the nation’s No. 3 ranking according to MaxPreps.com, had beaten Bishop O’Dowd just three months earlier. But a highly-motivated O’Dowd had the Wildcats playing catch-up for much of the state final. The Dragons led 40-33 going into the fourth quarter. And the look between seniors was a “let’s end this now” moment. And they did. Outscoring the Wildcats 20-12 in the final quarter, Bishop O’Dowd (30-3) won the first Girls Open Division championship, for its second consecutive state title, and cemented its place among the most dominant girls basketball teams of Northern California and Bay Area history. It was the four seniors that made it all go — the versatile wing/forward Chidom, point guard Ariell Bostick, and the two imposing post threats, K.C. Waters and Breanna Brown. All four have been part of the varsity program since their freshman year. “The seniors started with me when I took over as head coach,” Malik McCord said during the press conference following the state championship victory. “Every year is a special year with each team. What made this year really special is I started with these kids. I watched them grow, and they watched me grow as a coach. To end the right way, it can’t get any better than ending with a championship.” The four seniors all played a significant role in their final victory together. Waters and Brown each posted doubledoubles, and together combined for 34 rebounds — nearly as many as Windward had as an entire team (36). Chidom posted nine points and 12 rebounds and Bostick played the spark plug for everything. The San Diego State-bound point guard had a team-high 17 points but finished the game in the distributor role, leading fast breaks as a fatigued Windward team tried to keep pace. She finishing with five assists. “Without her it’s a struggle,” Chidom said of Bostick. “Playing with Ariell has been amazing. She’s probably the best point guard I’ve ever played with. Her tempo, and her ability to calm us all down as well as her ability to get us all going. It’s huge.” Brown, who is bound for Virginia Tech, is probably the least-celebrated of the big four. For no reason other than she’s probably the least outspoken. However, her impact in the state final was obvious. She scored 10 points and grabbed 14 rebounds — seven of which came off the of-

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Jonathan Hawthorne

Bishop O’Dowd’s Oderah Chidom

fensive glass. She had never met Waters before the summer leading into their freshman year, but their dads had known each other and bragged to one another about their daughters’ basketball success. Waters was the first to bring up that summer before her freshman year, when the four of them all officially met for the first time and immediately began sharing their lofty goals. “To end this year the way that we did is amazing,” said the Cal-bound Waters, who had 12 points and 20 rebounds against Windward. “We came in eighth grade summer doing open gyms at Bishop O’Dowd and talking about what we’re going to do together. We said then that we’re going to go out on top, and for us to complete that dream is amazing. I keep thinking I’m going to wake up back in the hotel before this game even started. I’m so happy.” Whether the 2012-13 Bishop O’Dowd team goes down as Northern California’s greatest team will be talked about and debated in the coming months and years. The gravity of that may not be completely felt by these seniors, though they know they did it their way. And there’s pride. That look said it all. “It’s a great feeling leaving that legacy on the floor,” Bostick said. “We had a lot of support. It’s crazy. I still can’t believe it.” ✪

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Story by Jim McCue • Photos by James K. Leash 22

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G

olf has always been near to Corey Pereira. Living within a short walk of Cameron Park Country Club, including the last eight years on the course’s 10th green, has ensured that the sport is never far away from the Ponderosa High senior. But golf as a career pursuit is relatively new to Pereira, who has emerged as one of the Sac-Joaquin Section’s top individual players. “I started playing real young at 4-years old when my Dad would take me out on the course and have me hit and putt,” Pereira said. “I got serious playing in tournaments seven or eight years ago, but it was not until about two years ago that I got real serious about golf as something that I wanted to pursue for a career.” Pereira has made quick work of advancing toward a job as a golfer, already signing a letter of intent to pursue golf and a degree at the University of Washington in the fall. He earned scholarship offers from Washington and a handful of other schools based on success in high school competition along with a solid summer on the junior amateur circuit, which included a victory at the Future Collegians World Tour (FCWT) Championship in Florida. The foothills native has traveled around the country to hone his game against top competition, but his development has benefited most from tireless training and practice on his home course. Ponderosa golf coach Richard Fox knows where to look for his top player regardless of the time of day or time of year. “He recently won a two-day tournament and the next morning I stopped by the course and he was out on the practice green,” Fox said. “He is just driven and always wants to do more to get better.” Fox tried to encourage Pereira to take an occasional day off, but even major holidays are not exempt from his dedication to repetition. He estimates that he misses playing and/or practicing maybe 5-7 days per year, which did not include Christmas Day 2012. “Actually, I practiced four hours on Christmas last year,” Pereira said when it was suggested that some days might be assumed days off from the routine.

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The Bruins played in a couple of tournaments in Hawaii last year, and Fox said the team spent plenty of time on the beach when it was not on the course — with the exception of Pereira. When the coach sought out his star, he found him in his room catching analysis and highlights on the Golf Channel. It may be surprising to some that Pereira is not an anti-social golfing machine. Rather, he is a very friendly athlete who is as popular with teammates and foes as he is skilled in his craft. Fox, who took over as the golf coach at Ponderosa seven years ago after coaching the school’s storied wrestling program for nearly 30 years, marvels at Pereira’s personality and complete package. “Corey is a great student, a great golfer, and just a great individual,” Fox said. “I just enjoy being around him.” Pereira sports an above-4.0 grade point average, and the smarts extend beyond the classroom. His season 18-hole average is hovering around 69 with much of the regular season’s tournaments to be played before divisionals, Section Masters, NorCals, and state come into focus in late May and early June. The key to Pereira’s success is and always has been his short game. Finally filling out his frame this season (he increased his height by almost three inches since his junior year), Pereira has never turned many heads with tape-measures drives off the tee. But, get him around the green and he can measure up with anyone. “He can get up-and-down with the best of them and is a phenomenal putter,” Fox said. “I never count out a par as long as he is close to the green.” Pereira rode his short game to an impressive junior season. He shot a 70 (2-under) at the Section Masters Tournament to finish in a tie for third place before firing a 1-under 71 at the NorCal Tournament to tie for eighth place and qualify for his first state tournament. At the CIF State Championships, Pereira finished tied for sixth place after carding an even-par 71. The experience of playing against the best high school golfers in California and witnessing fellow SJS golfers claim both the individual and team titles left Pereira energized. “It was an amazing experience and I think that it will definitely help me if I can get back to state again this year,” he said. “I was in a bit of awe last year, so I think that at least the first drive would be easier for me this year.” While qualifying for the state tournament is a realistic goal, Pereira has simpler goals he’s focused on during the high school season. “I would love to make it to state again, but my main goals are to try to get better, have a lot of fun, and improve my average,” he said. Achieving those goals will likely punch his return ticket to California’s top high school tournament, but his coach believes Pereira’s game lends itself better to multiple-round tournaments rather than single-day events. Navigating through single-round play leading to the state tournament requires skill as well as luck, according to Fox. “Just getting to state is a difficult process,” the coach said. “In one-day tournaments, the best players don’t always advance. In a three-day tournament, though, I would put him up against anyone in the state.” Both player and coach agree a return to the state tourney is far from the end of the line for Pereira. With sights set on improving his game at Washington and then turning pro, Pereira’s senior season is just a step in the direction that he wants to go. “I absolutely want to take it to the highest level,” Pereira said. “That’s why I practice as much as I do and work as hard as I do. It’s all part of preparing for the future.” That future, according to Fox, is extremely bright. “He won the Father Barry Tournament at Jesuit and they give the winner a red jacket,” Fox said. “When I saw him putting that jacket on, I had no doubt in my mind that someday the jacket that he wears as a champion might be green.” ✪

Sac-Joaquin Section Golf—Players to Watch

With the 2012 team and individual state champions hailing from the Sac-Joaquin Section, much attention will be given to local players as the 2013 boy’s golf season progresses toward the postseason. Here’s our list of names to watch. › Brandon Baumgarten, Senior, Granite Bay — Baumgarten leads the Grizzlies’ quest to repeat as state champions, and will be aided by 2012 breakout performer Jeffrey Inouye-Wong. Baumgarten carded even-par scores at the 2012 Section Masters and NorCals before his 73 (2-over) state performance helped Granite Bay claim the team title. › Andrej Bevins, Senior, Christian Brothers — The Falcons’ star anchors a solid lineup that will again challenge for top section honors. Bevins posted low score for underclassmen at the 2012 Section Masters (67) and NorCal Championships (71). He finished with a respectable 77 (6-over) at state. › Quinn Carlsen, Sophomore, Oak Ridge — The Trojans’ young gun carded the team’s low score at Section Masters as a freshman with a 76. › Chase Dossa, Senior, Davis — Dossa is a four-year varsity player and a big hitter who could make some noise if he can find consistency around the greens. Dossa will be key to Davis’s attempt to return to postseason prominence. › Stephen Griggs, Senior, Jesuit — Consistency has been key for the Marauders’ No. 1 player, posting the team’s low score for underclassmen at Section Masters in both his sophomore and junior seasons. › Justin Raskin, Senior, Del Oro — Playing in the considerable shadow of 2012 CIF state champion Austin Smotherman, Raskin quietly built his own résumé with clutch postseason performances. His even-par 72 at the Section Masters helped Del Oro qualify for NorCals, and he advanced to the state tourney as an individual by winning a playoff.

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THE PEREIRA FILE

› TOP FINISH OF 2012: Won Future Collegians World Tour (FCWT) Championship at PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, in May by five strokes. Pereira recorded a 54-hole total of 214 (-2) to claim the title. › CAREER BEST 18-HOLE ROUND: 8-under 64 Cameron Park Country Club, 2012 › TOUGHEST COURSE PLAYED: Torrey Pines Golf Course, La Jolla, California › STROKE PLAY/MATCH PLAY: Stroke play

› BEST CELEBRITY GOLF MOMENT: At age 6, Pereira was invited inside the ropes at Riviera Country Club by Gary Player. The legendary golfer told Pereira that if he caught a ball he tossed him he could keep it. Corey caught it.

› BEST FEELING YOU CAN REMEMBER ON A GOLF COURSE: Winning the FCWT Championship – “It was my first really big win, and I had been struggling with my game for like six months before that tournament.” › AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE: 280 yards › AVERAGE PUTTS/ROUND: 28

› FAVORITE GOLFER: Martin Kaymer –“He’s classy and consistent” › DREAM FOURSOME: Ben Hogan, Steve Stricker, Tiger Woods

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The baseball season is in full swing and many players are facing the frustrating characteristics of “Dead Arm.” A month ago you were throwing in the mid-to high 80s and now you are struggling to touch 80 mph: What happened? “Dead arm” is truly one of baseball’s biggest mysteries and can affect both pitchers and position players. The symptoms can be associated with and without pain, but the defining characteristic is a drop in throwing velocity of between 3-8 mph. Many players think their arm is injured and get an MRI only to find out that there is no structural damage. So what is going on? Classic “dead arm” is usually caused from one or a combination of the following conditions: 1. Rotator cuff muscles are deconditioned or fatigued. The function of the rotator cuff muscles is to stabilize the humeral head (ball) in the glenoid (socket). When these vital muscles are deconditioned or fatigued, they are rendered ineffective in offering dynamic stability during high velocity throwing. This loss of stability is enough to allow the humeral head to migrate superiorly (move up in the socket), causing impingement of the rotator cuff tendons, and or superior labrum.

2. Scapular dyskinesis. Scapular dyskinesis is an alteration in the normal position and motion of the scapula (shoulder blade). The scapula and the arm move in rhythm with each other. When the scapular stabilizing muscles are not functioning correctly, it not only affects the stability of the shoulder, but it also reduces the transfer of energy from the trunk to the arm, thus reducing throwing velocity. This is why we call the “scap” the weak link in the kinetic chain for throwing athletes.

3. Tight posterior shoulder. The posterior cuff muscles can tighten due to the repetitive micro-trauma that occurs during the decelerating phase of the throwing motion. A tight posterior cuff is one of the main contributors to GIRD (glenohumeral internal rotation deficit) which increases the risk of injury unless proactively managed with a targeted stretching routine for the posterior shoulder.

The first two conditions listed can be addressed using the Crossover Symmetry Rotator Cuff and Scapular Strengthening System. The tight posterior shoulder can be addressed in less than two minutes by simply adding this stretching routine following practice or a game. Take these proactive steps and don’t let “Dead Arm” affect your performance this season. 1. Circles — Select the appropriate Crossover Cord. Grab the single cord with your throwing arm. Facing the eye level attachment, backup until there is resistance on the cord. While maintaining good posture, bend over at the waist. Relax your throwing arm and perform 15 circles clockwise and 15 circles counterclockwise. The diameter of the circles should be around 10 inches. Focus on relaxing your muscles. 2. Crossbody Over (PICTURED)— Select the appropriate Crossover Cord. Grab the single Crossover Cord with your throwing arm. With your body facing sideways to the attachment and the throwing arm to the outside, walk away from the attachment until there is resistance on the cord. With your opposite hand, grab your elbow and pull it toward your neck. Relax your muscles and hold the stretch for 30 seconds. Do not be over aggressive with this stretch. 3. Crossbody Under — Repeat the initial steps of the stretch above, and then walk away from the attachment to create resistance. While maintaining good posture, bend over at the waist. With your opposite hand, grab your tricep and pull it toward your chest. Relax your muscles and hold the stretch for 30 seconds. Again, do not be over aggressive.

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Duggan Moran is the CEO & Founder of Crossover Symmetry. The Crossover Symmetry System has become the gold standard for performance arm care in professional and collegiate sports. It is currently being used by over half of the teams in the MLB, NBA, NFL, NHL and over 75 percent of major universities. Supported by science and designed by a leading physical therapist, the Crossover Symmetry System takes the guesswork out of shoulder health and performance. To find out more, visit www.gocrossover.com   

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Five points of technique when using plank position training time: tim rudd While coaching exercises that involve the prone plank position, I utilize a five-point checklist to ensure spinal health and appropriate strengthening of posture. The plank is a great beginner level exercise to teach spinal stability as an anti- extension and flexion exercise of the spine. This is required to perform many strength exercises safely and effectively as well as many athletic skills required in sport.

1

Your athletes should maintain a standing type posture in a horizontal position. This means that the axis of the ankles, knees, hips, shoulders, and the ears should stay in a line and the spine should maintain a natural curvature.

2

The shoulder girdle should maintain a neutral alignment and not collapse back or round forward. The scapula (shoulder blades) should stay bedded and not wing out or squeeze together.

3 4

The pelvis should remain in a neutral alignment. It is common for the lower back to be flattened in a tail tucking like posture. Focus on maintaining a natural lumbar curve.

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The hips should stay parallel to the ground and centered side to side. It is a common error to collapse the feet inward. Rather, the feet should remain perpendicular to the ground.

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During plank-oriented exercises where a limb is lifted from the ground, only the limb and not the body should move. It is a common error to drop the hip of the lifted limb and/or to pull the hips out of center. Maintain the starting posture and only move the limb.

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Tim Rudd is an IYCA specialist in youth conditioning and owner of Fit2TheCore.

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powered by trucks: anthony trucks

Strength isn’t always physical When it comes to the weight room, many people don’t realize there is usually more strength being displayed by people training than just the weights they’re moving. My girlfriend is about to partake in her second fitness competition and it’s amazing to see the strength it takes on the mental side to simply climb towards her goal of “physical strength.” There are individuals in the gym every day that are there tired, hungry, hurt, unhappy, and the list could go on and on. The only thing is that you’ll never know it until its you. There will be a defining moment when you have a goal of getting stronger and you hit that wall where you want to give up, give in to the pain, or you’re just too tired to go that day. It is at that moment that you find out the kind of “strength” you truly have. In my playing career in the NFL, I had MANY of those days, but I did what it took to succeed every day. I knew there was some opponent of mine out there taking that day off and THAT is what drove me — to keep in mind that all I had to do was NEVER take that day off and I would surpass him. Then on game day when he broke down from his lack of preparation I devoured him like a bodybuilder killing a donut after hoisting up that first place trophy. Be in it to win it, or don’t be in it at all!! Anthony Trucks is the owner of Trucks Training facility in Brentwood and covers weight training for SportStars.

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get mental: erika carlson

How much is too much

I am often asked by parents, “How hard should I push my kids to succeed in sports?” You want them to enjoy their experience, work hard and of course, play their best. But where is the line? How much is too much? As it turns out, it’s not just about how hard you push, but more about what you’re pushing. A 2011 study published in the Journal of Applied Sport Psychology found specific factors that helped to influence decreasing anxiety as the sport season progresses. The study measured four factors with 307 kids ranging in age from 9-14 years old: › Perceived Parental Pressure — Researchers asked the young athletes how much parents set expectations, gave evaluations after a game, and became upset with them if they didn’t play well. › Parent-Initiated Motivational Climate — This is a fancy term to describe the content of the expectations and evaluations. › Mastery — focused on learning and enjoyment (low to high) › Ego — focused on winning and outcomes (low to high) Performance Anxiety was assessed in 3 different ways › Somatic — “My body feels tense” › Worry — “I’m worried I will make a mistake” › Concentration — Disruption “I can’t focus.” The results might surprise you! Here they are… › Strong parent pressure + low mastery or high ego = High Anxiety › Strong parent pressure + high mastery = Lowered Anxiety To help athletes perform, especially those who tend to get nervous and anxious, pushing a strong agenda focused on learning new skills, mastering technique and lots of hard work will not only help minimize anxiety but produce excellent development and more performance.

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Erika Carlson is a certified mental trainer and owner of Excellence In Sports Performance in Pleasanton.

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health watch: dr. nirav k. pandya

Micro-fracture surgery: What is it & why is it needed Not a week goes by in sports without the public hearing on ESPN about a professional athlete who undergoes micro-fracture surgery. But what exactly is micro-fracture surgery? In order to understand the surgery, you first have to understand what dissipates shock and keeps joints moving smoothly in the body: hyaline cartilage. This material is the covering on the ends of bones; allowing joints to glide through their range of motion and absorb stress from the wear and tear of sports. Not surprisingly, this cartilage can get damaged, leading to pain, swelling, and stiffness in joints (i.e. knee and ankle). If the injury is bad enough that small craters of exposed bone are formed, it can potentially mean the end of one’s athletic career. Micro-fracture is a surgical technique done through a camera (arthroscope) in which small holes (“fractures”) are created at the ends of the bones which have these cartilage defects. These little holes cause the bone to bleed; bringing in new cells which can form new cartilage (not as good as the original but still better than nothing!) in the defects. After the surgery, patients have to take several months off of sporting activity to allow the new cartilage to form. If successful, patients have a good chance of returning to sports with what would have otherwise been a career altering injury. Dr. Nirav K. Pandya is a pediatric orthopedic surgeon specializing sports injuries at the Children’s Hospital in Oakland.

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BASEBALL/SOFTBALL

All Star Academy of Baseball All-Star Academy in Santa Clara features a 17,000-square foot indoor and outdoor training facility that is home to a variety of instructional programs designed to develop the total player. ASA offers All Skills Camps for ages 7-12, and Summer Boot Camps for 12 & under, middle school, high school competitive athletes. Info: 650-961-2255; www.asabaseball.com Cabernet Baseball Club The Livermore-based club not only hosts The Pitching Center’s Spring Break Baseball Skills Camp 2013, it also is home to training and recreational leagues in other sports — including football, soccer, futsal, softball and lacrosse. Lil’ Baseball offered for ages 3-7. Info: 925-416-1600, www.cabernetindoorsports.com EJ Sports EJ Sports provides positive, instructive baseball programs that includes camps, teams, conditioning clinics for ages 7-18. Exciting, bully-free environment to help players improve athletically and build confidence. Our instructors possess the capability to teach concepts and relate to youth based on their comprehension level and athletic ability. Our staff consists of qualified coaches dedicated to improving and continually learning newest techniques in baseball. Info: 925-866-7199, www.ejsports.com. The Pitching Center In an effort to develop baseball players to their full potential, The Pitching Center has become the Total Player Center, a full-service baseball/softball training academy. We provide comprehensive, fully-integrated programs that evolve based on the best research and information in areas from health/safety, peak performance, education techniques and more. Ageand skill-specific programs available for ages 8-18. Info: 925-416-1600, www.thepitchingcenter.com.

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BASKETBALL

All Out Sports League Our camps are geared toward teaching fundamentals. Every aspect is covered: dribbling, shooting, layups, passing, cross-overs, defense, help defense, boxing out and more. Camps open to boys, girls ages 6-16. We hold a multi-week Spring Academy in Clayton, four-day Summer Academy in Antioch. Info: 925-203-5636 or www.alloutsportsleague.com Bald Eagle Basketball Camp Get improved skills, passion for becoming their best. We give campers a choice period each day to play more basketball, go swimming, play sports camp games, have fun in our activity arcade — whatever summer fun they choose! This year we’ve ramped up our staff with more coaches who have high level playing and/or coaching experience, not to mention their PCA Certification like every staff member at Bald Eagle Sports Camps. Info: 888-505-2253. CalStars The Stars Basketball Academy offers youth and high school summer camps. The SBA is a fundamental based skills development camp for kids in third grade-high school. We offer three youth (3rd-8th) sessions and two high school sessions. Camps are conducted by Clay Kallam (Bentley HS), Kelly Sopak (Miramonte HS), Dan Middleton (Northgate HS), Raul Reyes (Miramonte HS) and Elgin Leslie (Campolindo HS). Camps also assisted by former high school, college players. Info: www.calstars.org. FastBreak Basketball Margaret Gartner, highly-decorated girls basketball coach for Carondelet, leads this girls camp focused on fundamentals. Three week-long sessions: Session I, June 24-28, Grades 4-10; Session II, July 1519, Grades 1-6 and Session III, July 22-26, Grades 4-10. Learn, improve basketball fundamentals, skills while having fun. Info: www.FastBreakBball.com; or email Fastbreak_club@yahoo.com

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Hawk Basketball Academy We focus on skill development, challenging the individual to push themselves to become the very best. Focusing on: footwork, dribbling, proper shooting technique, reaching your highest level of performance, improving your mental game, preparing for CYO, high school and AAU. Info: 510-943-9252, facebook.com/ hawkbasketballacademy. I’m Possible Training (Mike Allen) Whether you’re beginner or on varsity, this program will help you excel. Improve ballhandling, footwork, shooting, overall fitness. I’m Possible is a world-renowned basketball program authored by NBA skills coach Micah Lancaster. Mike Allen, head trainer for the Bay Area located in Los Gatos, runs clinics for athletes of all levels from pros to AAU and high school. By registering, you can download the program, which lists a library of drills. Info: 408224-8503 or email mikeallen@possibletraining. com, www.possibletraining.com/mikeallen NorCal Courts Basketball Camps Norcal Courts in Martinez covers all major fundamentals: dribbling, passing, shooting, defense, rebounding. The Spring Break Camp is April 1-5: 5th graders (9-11 a.m.), 6th-8th graders (noon-2 p.m.), high schoolers (3-5 p.m.). Sessions have fun, exciting drills that will help them become better players. Camps run by qualified high school coaches from Cal Stars and Cagers Basketball. Info: 925-4575081; www.norcalcourts.com

CHEER

CheerGyms.com Customize our clinics to fit your needs. Cheergyms.com runs the best overnight residential camps. We offer practical, fun material and professional, knowledgeable staff. Camps do

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not exceed 375 cheerleaders with one staff member for every 15 cheerleaders. Two-day camps also available. Private camps allow you to pick the hours, decide what they will learn. Camps also available for coaches. Intense Training Camps let you can pick one specific thing to work on for just $10 per student per hour. Info: morton@cheergyms.com, 925-6858176, www.cheergyms.com

ENRICHMENT

Bald Eagle Jr. High Leadership Camp Giving your child a road map to create success is extremely powerful. Our Jr. High Leadership Camp includes tangible experiences working cooperatively with peers, leading groups, public speaking, making friends, understanding community service, living an active lifestyle through fun camp activities. Info: 888-505-2253. Dianne Adair Programs Come join any of our eight summer sites for our fun and exciting summer program. Each week campers choose from several camps including sports, fashion, drama, CSI, science and more. In addition to weekly camps, we have weekly field trips to places like an A’s or Giants game, museums, the Jelly Belly Factory, Six Flags, the pool, the movies, parks and the zoo. Field trips and camps vary by site. Offers, rates may vary at any of our nine locations. Info: www.dianneadair.org.

FITNESS

Children’s Hospital “Learn What It’s Like To Be An Athletic Trainer.” Workshop exclusively for HS students, March 1-2. Includes: Overview of careers in sports medicine; ankle injuries and taping techniques; wrist, hand, thumb injuries and taping; knee injuries and RICE therapy; stretching techniques; low back injuries and CORE Training; sports

concussions; shoulder injuries, rehabilitation. Class credit, certificate of completion and reference materials. Run by Children’s Hospital Sports Medicine staff, held in Oakland. Also available: yoga, athletic development, speed camps, circuit training. Info: 510-428-3558 Fit 2 The Core As a Youth Conditioning, Speed/Agility and Nutrition Specialist with the International Youth Conditioning Association, Fit-2 The Core Training Systems offers innovative approach to getting athletes back on the field. We work on a solid athletic foundation while focusing on individual progress. Instruction in movement training, injury reduction, linear/lateral speed development, foot speed and agility, power development, proper weight training techniques and functional strength training. Athletes are closely supervised, with attention on proper technique, safety. We offer 2 days/week or 3 days/week program options. Free two-week free pass. Info: www.fasteryoungathletes.com, 925-639-0907. Renaissance ClubSport We offer sports, speciality camps for kids 5-12 during school breaks. Participants receive instruction in a variety of sports, activities and projects. Working parents can take advantage of our extended hours for both morning and afternoon sessions. Families with multiple children receive 10 percent discount for each additional sibling registered for the same week. Info: 925-942-6344. Trucks Training Trucks Training was started by people who grew up in the area, experienced the world and came back to provide a service that we feel our community lacks. We have proven records and know what it takes to achieve the next level of sports & fitness safely and effectively. Home-

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town feel from true hometown people. We offer 1-on-1, group and small group training for both fitness and sport-specific needs. Info: truckstraining.com; 925-756-7321

FOOTBALL

All Out Sports League Camps in Antioch, Clayton. Four day noncontact camp teaches every position, geared toward the fundamentals. Every aspect is covered: blocking, tackling, running, defense, offense, special teams and more. Camps are open to boys, girls ages 6-16. Info: 925-2035636, www.alloutsportsleague.com LinemenInc Camps Utilizing top college coaches and former NFL linemen, LinemenInc has produced a nationally-recognized camp and coach’s clinic. LinemenInc blends a fast paced, technically skilloriented curriculum with a level of competition not found in other camps. Tuition is reasonably priced and includes camp, room, meals and jersey. In 2012, LinebackerInc was added. Info: www.linemeninc.com. Next Level Training Combine This spring combine and football camp is April 6 at Emerald Park in Dublin for football players ages 7-18. The camp will feature 10-year NFL defensive back Donovin Darius. Youth camp are 9 a.m-noon, high school camp is 1-4 p.m. Focuses of the combine will include speed, agility, strength, quickness and conditioning. Info: DariusNextLevelTraining.com; 904-290-3320 NorCal Football Camps Led by Ken Peralta, Norcal Football Camps are focused on serving youth ages 7-14. Norcal Flag Football Leagues serve kids entering grades 2-6. Info: Ken, 650-245-3608, norcalyouthfootballcamp@yahoo.com; www.norcalfootballcamps.com.

GOLF

The First Tee-Contra Costa The First Tee Summer Camp is a youth development program for boys, girls ages 7-18. Participants will learn about golf and life skills and values inherent to the game. We have offerings at courses in Antioch, Concord, Martinez and Walnut Creek. Fee assistance available. Info: Angela Paradise, 925-686-6262, Ext. 0, www. thefirstteecontracosta.org. The First Tee-Oakland Participants receive a minimum of 12 hours of instruction over an eight-week period. Instruction is conducted at three City of Oakland affiliate courses. We introduce the game of golf in a way that allows participants to progress with the mechanics required. Offered at little or no cost. Info: 510-352-2002; www.thefirstteeoakland.org The First Tee-Silicon Valley Spring classes begin in early March and seasonal classes are offered at Rancho del Pueblo Golf Course (San Jose) and Palo Alto Golf Course. We welcome participants ranging from 2nd to 12th grade. Scholarships available. Info: www.thefirstteesiliconvalley.org The First Tee-Tri-Valley We offer seasonal camps for youth ages 7-17, held at the Pleasanton Golf Center. Life Skills Experience Classes begin in early March. Oncea-week summer slasses also available. Info: 925-462-7201; www.TheFirstTeeTriValley.org. LPGA-USGA Girls Golf Camp All-girls golf camp at Boundary Oak taught by LPGA and PGA member Teaching Professionals. Improve short game, irons, woods and trick shots. Practice on range, short game area where we play games while building on fundamentals. Etiquette and character built into the

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curriculum. Finish by playing nine holes. Info: LPGAKatie@gmail.com; 925-482-4547

GYMNASTICS

East Bay Sports Academy Summer day camps offer the best in gymnastics, cheerleading, and tumbling. Half-day and full-day camps for girls, boys ages 5 and up for both recreational and competitive athletes. Our 13,000 square foot facility has the newest equipment, including the brand new superbouncy, safety-rated Weller Spring Floor, which is the largest in the world. Gymnastics & cheerleading camps: July 15-18, July 22-25, August 5-8, August 12-15. Competitive gymnastics camp (Levels 4 & up): July 8-12. East Bay AllStars Cheerleading also private minicamps and clinics for all kinds of cheerleading. Info: www. eastbaysportsacademy.com, 925-680-9999 .

HORSEBACK RIDING

Earthquake Arabians Our skilled staff and individual instruction gives each rider an opportunity to advance at his or her own pace while creating individual goals for success. If a competitive riding program is what you’re looking for, Earthquake Arabians has been continuously successful in the Arabian show ring. Spring and summer camps are around the corner. Info: www.earthquakearabians.com, 925-360-7454.

OUTDOOR/ADVENTURE

Bear Valley Mountain Outdoor adventures including kayaking, tennis, cycling, hiking, camp fires and more. Soccer (ages 9-16); archery (9-adult); teen climbing and Bear Valley’s Day Camps for ages 3-18 provide mountain fun. Eight-week, weeklong and day camps. Every camper will have the opportunity to enjoy a selection of mountain activities including: rock climbing, sailing,

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canoeing, hiking, swimming, disc golf, art and crafts, kayaking, biking, wilderness adventures and more. Info: www.bearvalley.com. Diablo Rock Gym Offering kids summer camps every week JuneAugust. Ages 6-17; multiple kid and/or week discounts. Info: 925-602-1000. Epic Indoor Skatepark Skateboard and scooter camps available in June, July and November. Only $250 for a week or $50 per day. Skateboard deck or scooter grips included with a full week of camp. Lunch and snack provided. Info: www.epicindoorskate.com.

RUGBY

Diablo Rugby Youth rugby is one of the fastest growing sports in the U.S. Based in Clayton, our club is dedicated to providing a positive rugby experience for boys at high school, jr. high and youth levels. Info: 925-381-5143, http://diabloyouthrugby.clubspaces.com.

SOCCER

Gino’s Soccer Academy The official camp of the Walnut Creek Soccer Club, run by WCSC Director of Coaching, Tom Ginocchio, and staffed with WCSC club coaches & players. Five one-week programs for ages 4-17 in July and August. Along with regular full- and half-day soccer programs, GSA runs the following specialty programs: team camps (recreational, competitive), advanced player academies, high school player academy, goalkeeper academies, all boys/all girls academies. Info: www.ginossocceracademy.com, 925-937-4466 Heritage Soccer Club Two fun-filled sessions: June 24-28, July 22-25. Camp runs from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Cost

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for Heritage members is $150 for one session, $250 for both. Non Heritage players: $225/$325. Sibling discounts: $50 each. Heritage camp focuses on learning new skills and honing existing ones. Compete in small-sided games and camp tournaments. Camp also includes keeper and striker training, conditioning, nutrition and developing your mental game. Registration is open to boys and girls ages 7-14. Info: www.HeritageSC.com West Coast Soccer Programs designed to bring professional experience and guidance to youth players across Northern California. The WCS coaching staff has created a curriculum to build the necessary foundation for your child to continue to grow. WCS camps, clinics and training programs create an environment that encourages experimentation and a passion for the game. Info: www.westcoastsoccerclub.com West Contra Costa Youth Soccer League Our program caters to competitive youth players ages 8-9. The main focus is not winning, but on development of total player within framework of a team. We also offer specialized training for strikers and goalkeepers. Younger ages focus on foot skills. We desire to promote personal responsibility, fitness, sportsmanship and teamwork. Info: 510-758-5288, wccysl.com.

SWIMMING-DIVING

Sherman Swim School Our year-round schedule allows children and adults to learn, retain and improve their swim skills. We teach from age 9 months to adults, from non-swimmers to competitive. Our private or semi-private lessons allow you to progress at your pace. We also offer beginning and competitive diving classes. Info: 925-283-2100, www.ShermanSwim.com.

TENNIS

ClubSport Valley Vista Our camps are designed so that we touch on all aspects of the game: stroke production, conditioning, strategy, footwork and psychology. Our low prices help make summer camp more affordable than ever. Eight sessions offered between June 17 and Aug. 16 geared toward players ages 7–16 from beginner to intermediate levels. ClubSport Valley Vista members receive discounted rates. Info: 925-934-4050.

VOLLEYBALL

Bay Area Blast Summer Clinics Offering summer skills clinics for players of all ages, skill levels at NorCal Courts in Martinez. Morning clinics for 6th-8th grade girls and boys or players who are beginner/intermediate level. Evening clinics for 9th-12th grade girls and boys or players who are intermediate/ advanced level. Info: www.bayareablast.com/ summerclinics.html City Beach The City Beach volleyball club is based out of Santa Clara and has achieved a vast amount of national success while sending an array of athletes to the college level. The club offers summer camps and clinics. Info: CityBeach. ClubSpaces.com Pacific Rim Volleyball Through private lessons and opportunity for year-round skills classes, athletes of any age or level can learn and improve the skills to gain a competitive edge. For athletes with limited experience, we help develop solid fundamentals. Our advanced training, for junior levels (12th grade & below) will provide athletes opportunity to excel at becoming elite players in preparation for high school and/or collegiate volleyball. Info: www.pacificrimvolleyball.com.

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Advertiser Index ❒❒ All Out Baseball & Softball In Season.........................24 ❒❒ Army National Guard Recruiter.....................................5 ❒❒ Back Forty B B Q.........................................................17 ❒❒ Bay Area Blast Volleyball Club....................................17 ❒❒ Bear Valley Mountain Camps......................................40 ❒❒ Big O Tires Northern California/ Nevada.......................2 ❒❒ Blaze Volleyball..........................................................35 ❒❒ Cabernet Indoor Sports..............................................20 ❒❒ Cal Athletic Camps.....................................................38 ❒❒ Championship Athletic Fundraising...........................21 ❒❒ Cheergyms.Com.........................................................19 ❒❒ Children’s Hospital And Research Center.....................31 ❒❒ Club Sport..................................................................11 ❒❒ Community Youth Center...........................................38 ❒❒ Core Volleyball Club....................................................34 ❒❒ De La Salle High School..............................................38 ❒❒ Diablo Futbol Club......................................................25 ❒❒ Diablo Rock Gym........................................................37 ❒❒ Diablo Trophies & Awards...........................................37 ❒❒ Dianne Adair Enrichment Programs.............................3 ❒❒ E J Sports Elite Baseball Services................................34 ❒❒ East Bay Sports Academy...........................................23 ❒❒ East Bay Youth Sports Camps.....................................33 ❒❒ Excellence In Sport Performance................................31 ❒❒ Fit 2 The Core..............................................................29 ❒❒ Golden Key Realty & Mortgage Bankers Inc...............38 ❒❒ Halo Headband..........................................................38 ❒❒ Hawk Basketball Academy.........................................34 ❒❒ Heritage Soccer Club..................................................13 ❒❒ Home Team Sports Photography................................36 ❒❒ Image Imprint............................................................36 ❒❒ Impact Soccer....................................................... 36, 38 ❒❒ Jump Highway...........................................................34 ❒❒ Mountain Mike’s Pizza..................................................7 ❒❒ Muir Orthopedic Specialists........................................29 ❒❒ National Scouting Report...........................................35 ❒❒ Passthaball.................................................................38 ❒❒ Pro Hammer Bat.........................................................32 ❒❒ Rocco’s Pizza...............................................................37 ❒❒ Rockin Jump......................................................... 35, 39 ❒❒ Sacramento River Cats................................................16 ❒❒ Saint Mary’s Athletic Summer Camps.........................35 ❒❒ Sherman Swim School...............................................34 ❒❒ Sport Clips..................................................................11 ❒❒ State Farm Jimmy Harrington Agent..........................12 ❒❒ Stevens Creek Toyota..................................................26 ❒❒ Sutter Delta................................................................28 ❒❒ The First Tee Of Contra Costa...................................6, 38 ❒❒ TPC.............................................................................37 ❒❒ U S Cryotherapy..........................................................30 ❒❒ United States Youth Volleyball League.......................38 ❒❒ Velocity Sports Performance................................ 35, 37 ❒❒ Walnut Creek Soccer Club...........................................32 ❒❒ West Coast Soccer Club...............................................36

U.S. Youth Volleyball League Camps are for beginner, intermediate, advanced players for boys, girls. We have a player-to-coach ratio of 8:1. Focus on spiking, serving, setting, passing, blocking, defense, offense and game strategy. Six-, four- and two-person formats allow kids to play in every position. Registration fee includes a T-shirt, completion certificate, snacks and water. Info: 888988-7985, www.USYVL.org.

WRESTLING

Community Youth Center Offers young athletes opportunity to participate and excel in one of the world’s oldest sports. The program trains, challenges wrestlers at all age groups from kindergarten through high school, and all experience levels. The program is nationally recognized under the guidance of coach Mark Halvorson. Info: 925-6717070, Ext. 229, www.communityyouthcenter.com.

MULTI-SPORT

Bald Eagle Sports Camps A great blend of non-traditional “ultimate” games along with traditional summer activities, especially the soft-sword “Zaber Games” that no other camp in the Bay has. Every activity is inclusive of any level athlete, and our message creates encouragement from coaches and teammates. Even the non-sports child will feel motivated to play and love our camp and the highly competitive athlete will feel challenged. It’s the perfect mix of fun activity, message and culture. Ages K-8th grades. Info: 888-505-2253. Cal Camps Camps are offered in variety of sports for girls, boys ages 5-19, with week-long, half-day, full-day and overnight options. Most camps on campus in Berkeley and are held from June through August. The 2013 Cal Athletics Camps include the following sports: baseball, boys and girls basketball, boys and girls rowing/crew, field hockey, football, boys and girls golf, girls gymnastics, rugby, boys and girls soccer, softball, boys and girls swimming, boys and girls tennis, boys and girls volleyball and girls water polo. Info: CalBears.com/camps. City Beach Kids Camp Camps in Fremont for ages 6-15 and are chockfull of activities, including rock climbing, interactive games, free play at the entertainment hub and courts (based upon availability). Camps are offered in 1-, 3- and 5-day session (w/ full- and half-day options) and run from June 20-Aug.30. Spring camps: March 29, April 1-5. Info: CityBeach.com; 510-6512500 x105. De La Salle Camps Our athletic summer camps provide a fun, skillbuilding week for kids. Camps appeal to local youth with a variety of athletic interests. De La Salle will offer the following sessions: football, track & field, lacrosse, wrestling, quarterback & wide receiver, lineman, volleyball, baseball, soccer, water polo and strength & conditioning. Week-long sessions run June 8-June 27. Info: summercamps@dlshs.org; 925-288-8100, Ext. 7090. East Bay Youth Sports Association We are a year-round, full-service youth sports organization dedicated to the growth and development of character, sportsmanship, confidence, teamwork, ability and fun. We offer family friendly schedules and a relaxed, enjoyment of sports in a less-thancompetitive atmosphere that offers both the player and their families the best that youth sports can offer. Our camps schedule includes spring break camps for ages 5-12 and summer camps for ages 5-14. Info: www.eastbaysummercamps.com Saint Mary’s College Camps We offer boys and girls overnight, day, team and specialty athletic camps for ages 4-18. Camps include: multi-sport (badminton, basketball, flag football, handball, paddleball, soccer, softball, street hockey, swimming, tennis, volleyball), individual sport camps (baseball, boys basketball, girls basketball, golf, rugby, lacrosse, boys soccer, girls soccer, softball, tennis, volleyball). Each clinic features the head coach of the respective Gaels’ program. Info: www.smcgaels.com, smccamps@stmarys-ca.edu, 925-631-4386. ✪

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SJ Issue 63, April 1, 2013