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vol. 5. issue 84 bay area

May 2014


join our team PHONE 925.566.8500 FAX 925.566.8507 Editorial Editor@SportStarsOnline.com Editor Chace Bryson • Chace@SportStarsOnline.com Staff Writer Jim McCue • JimMcCue16@gmail.com Contributors Bill Kolb, Mitch Stephens, Matt Smith, Clay Kallam, Ben Enos, Dave Kiefer, Liz Elliott, Tim Rudd, Trevor Horn Copy Editor Bill Kruissink Photography Bob Larson, Jonathan Hawthorne, James K. Leash, Norbert von der Groeben, Phillip Walton, Doug Guler, Dean Coppola, Berry Ivans, III Marketing/Events Intern Ryan Arter Creative Department Art@SportStarsOnline.com Production Manager Mike DeCicco • MikeD@SportStarsOnline.com Publisher/President Mike Calamusa • Mike@SportStarsOnline.com Advertising Sales@SportStarsOnline.com, 925.566.8500 Account Executives Leslie Ellis • Leslie@SportStarsOnline.com Camps & Clinics: Ryan Arter • Camps@SportStarsOnline.com Alameda County: Berry Evans • Berry@foto-pros.com Central Valley, World Events: Anthony Grigsby • Area Director anthony.grigsby@worldeventssports.com Darin Wissner • dwissner@wordeventssports.com Reader Resources/Administration Subscription, Calendar, Credit Services Angela Paradise • Info@SportStarsOnline.com Distribution/Delivery Phillip Walton • Mags@SportStarsOnline.com Information technology John Bonilla CFO Sharon Calamusa • Sharon@SportStarsOnline.com

A WORD FROM THE EDITOR

Sometimes there’s more news and excitement than we can squeeze in. This time, we squeezed a little bit tighter and it’s left me this tiny spot down here. I’m OK with that, because it means you’re getting a jam-packed edition. For the “First Pitch” fan out there (Hi, Mom! Happy Mother’s Day), it’ll be back here on Page 6 next month. In the meantime, take this issue outdoors and enjoy the sunshine.

of the week 7 Sportstar Kaylee James, Heritage softball room: Everybody loves 8 locker moms. Personally we don’t know what we’d do without Ma SportStars (probably starve). The movies have given us many memorable maternal mavens. Only the best of the best make the list. Sorry, Ma SportStars.

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Clayton Valley Charter baseball isn’t ceding any titles to Campolindo. They’re ready to fight. can lift weights for several 31 You different reasons, but if you want larger muscle mass, Anthony Trucks will help get you there.

of the year camps & Clinics Pg. 22

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Find your sport. Turn to page 38.

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your ticket to california sports admit one; rain or shine This Vol. #5, May 2014 Whole No. 84 is published by Caliente! Communications, LLC, 5356 Clayton Rd, Ste. 222, Concord, CA 94521. SportStars™© 2010-2014 by Caliente! Communications, LLC. All rights reserved. Subscription rates: 24 issues, U.S. 3rd class $42 (allow 3 weeks for delivery). 1st class $55. To receive sample issues, please send $3 to cover postage. Back issues are $4 each. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of Publisher is strictly prohibited. The staff and management, including Board of Directors, of SportStars™© does not advocate or encourage the use of any product or service advertised herein for illegal purposes. Editorial contributions, photos and letters to the editor are welcome and should be addressed to the Editor. All material should be typed, double-spaced on disk or email and will be handled with reasonable care. For materials return, please enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. SportStars™© and STARS!™© Clinics are registered trademarks of Caliente! Communications, LLC.

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Kaylee

Got Send your nominations to: Next? Editor@SportStarsOnline.com or tweet us using #SSOTW

James

Heritage - Softball - Senior The Patriots softball team has taken off in April, winning seven of nine games and entered their April 29 game with Antioch having won six straight. A big reason for it has been James’ performance at the top of the batting order. In Bay Valley Athletic League wins over Deer Valley and Liberty last week, James combined to go 5-for-8 with five runs scored and eight stolen bases. She’s batting .614 through the team’s first 16 games (35-for-57) and has 22 runs scored.

›› IN HER OWN WORDS: “We’ve really been able to capitalize on our chances at the plate and in the field, and limit our mistakes. ... We can’t let up now.”

›› WHAT YOU DIDN’T KNOW: Kaylee’s family is big into dogs. Big dogs, actually. They own two Great Danes and one St. Bernard.

honorable mention Baylee Johnson — Castro Valley’s senior softball star mashed her way through the second week of April, going 3-for-4 with a double, a triple and four RBIs in a win over Piedmont and hitting a 2-run HR against Tennyson.

Tanner Hughes — The Foothill senior golfer shot a blistering 7-under par 65 at Poppy Ridge GC on April 28, taking medalist honors at the EBAL Championships.

Ryan McSwain — The St. Francis senior went 5-for-9 with a pair of RBI over three games at the Lancers’ Elite 8 tourney from April 22-24. St. Francis went 3-0 and beat Clayton Valley in the final.

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Rapid Fire

John Hayes Granite Bay Volleyball

Allie Timbrell Alhambra Track & Field

Farthest you've been from home Ensenada, Mexico

Trending What’s hot this week in the world of stuff that’s hot New video has emerged of Justin Bieber high-fiving friends after his infamous egg-throwing incident casting doubt on his character. Also, the sky is blue and water is wet.

Best food on campus Garden Salsa Sun Chips

My lunch from home

if you owned an exotic pet, it would be ...

Giraffe

Cheetah

favorite summer locale: beach or mountains?

George Clooney is engaged (we’re lowering the bar for ‘news’ around here). But still, we’re assuming this is all some long con aimed at robbing another casino.

Mountains

It’s true. They exist. People digging in the New Mexico desert found long-rumored, long-lost cartridges for the Atari E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial game. This leaves a Raiders winning season as the biggest unsolvable puzzle.

favorite breakfast food

After hearing of the controversy surrounding the allegedly racist remarks made by Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, famed rancher Cliven Bundy mailed in his season ticket deposit. Zack Snyder, when he’s done directing the new Superman vs. Batman movie will reportedly helm the Justice League movie. It’ll feature Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman and … Aquaman? Just kidding (we hope). He’s awful. Don’t do it, Matt Damon.

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Pancakes

Mountains

Bacon & Eggs

Aquaman generously provided from the personal archives of Mr. Zackary DeCicco

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count 'em

Top 5 sports movie moms Mother’s Day is May 11. We know you didn’t forget. Of course not. You’re such a nice boy. You’d never forget your mother. Now eat your Brussels sprouts. And, in honor of Mom, here’s our list of the top five sports movie moms of all time. 1. Mary Rowengartner (Amy Morton), “Rookie of the Year” — We knew we loved her a little when Henry’s doctor said, “funky buttlovin” after Henry broke his nose, and she didn’t bat an eye. Plus. It was her glove. It was totally her glove. 2. Leigh Anne Tuohy (Sandra Bullock), “The Blind Side” — Look. We aren’t huge Sandra Bullock fans. But it’s hard not to like her a tiny bit when she calls a redneck football fan “crotchmouth” and “deliverance” in the span of about 15 seconds. 3. Jenny Heywood (Ashley Crow), Alcon Entertainment/Entertainment Pictures/Zumapress.com “Little Big League” — It takes some serious Mom-chops to ground the manager of a Major League Baseball team — even if it’s the Twins. But a Jenny Heywood has to do what a Jenny Heywood has to do. Unintentional comedy alert: Timothy Busfield as the all-star first baseman? Stretching the entire concept of “willful suspension of disbelief.” 4. Dorothy Boyd (Renee Zellweger), “Jerry Maguire” — She had us at… no. Nope. Not going there. You can’t make us. 5. Helen Boucher (Kathy Bates), “The Waterboy” — Sure, sure, foosball is the debil, but Mama Boucher came around eventually. And how could you stay mad at a woman who eventually cold-cocked her deadbeat ex-husband and then told her son, “Now you go on and have some fun becomin’ a man?” — Bill “Happy Mother’s Day, Mom” Kolb

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That was the number of consecutive regular season softball games Archbishop MittySan Jose had won before Valley ChristianSan Jose upset the Monarchs 3-1 on April 23. Mitty went 27-0 in the 2013 regular season and had begun 2014 with 20 straight victories. Mitty’s previous regular season loss was to Amador Valley-Pleasanton on April 7, 2012. Valley Christian had not beaten the Monarchs since May of 2011.

Desiree Severance

random act of factness Did you know that NFL QB Tom Brady was not the most prominent high school athlete in his family? Our friends at CalHiSports.com sent us this gem: While Brady was a standout QB at Serra-San Mateo, his older sister, Maureen, set state records as a softball pitcher at Hillsdale. Maureen, in fact, still holds Bay Area career records for most no-hitters in a career with 29 and for most perfect games in a career with 14. Maureen pitched for Hillsdale from 1988 to 1991, then went on to become an All-American at Fresno State.

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Diamond

Dandy

It’s always a contested argument about which league is the toughest in the state each season in the major sports. In recent seasons, for example, the Trinity League in Southern California has been at or near the top of the state in football. And this spring, there have been four teams from one league — the Tri-River Athletic Conference in Fresno County — that have been in the State Top 20 in baseball. But for all-time greatness in a single sport, it’s just about impossible for any league in California to match the Bay Area’s West Catholic Athletic League in baseball. And since we’ve been part of the process of compiling the FAB 50 national rankings (beginning in 1999), the WCAL really has no peer for baseball in the entire country. The league not only has some of the oldest schools in the West — Bellarmine Prep of San Jose was founded in 1849 and Sacred Heart Cathedral-S.F. was founded in 1852 — but in baseball over the last 30 years has featured some of the best coaches the state has ever seen. At some point next season, Archbishop Mitty’s Bill Hutton should become the WCAL’s all-time coaching wins leader when he surpasses Chris Bradford of St. Francis-Mountain View. Bradford won 634 games as the Lancers’ head coach from 1974 to 2004. But Hutton and Bradford aren’t the only WCAL coaches with 600 or more wins. Gary Cunningham of Bellarmine Prep-San Jose reached 617 wins when he retired in 2008 and Serra-San Mateo’s Pete Jensen wasn’t far behind when he retired with 564 wins in 2009. Want more proof? Here’s a look at what would be our all-time WCAL baseball team based on what each player did during and after high school. Catcher – Charlie Silvera (St. Ignatius) Pitcher – Frank Bertaina (Sacred Heart) Pitcher – Chris Codiroli (Archbishop Mitty) First Base – Dolph Camilli (Sacred Heart)

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St. Francis-Mountain View’s Robin Morcate. Norbert von der Groeben photo

Infield – Jim Fregosi (Serra) Infield – Joe Cronin (Sacred Heart) Infield – Gregg Jefferies (Serra) Outfield – Barry Bonds (Serra) Outfield – Harry Heilmann (Sacred Heart) Outfield – Pat Burrell (Bellarmine) Cronin and Heilmann are in the MLB Hall of Fame, Bonds arguably should be (or arguably should not) while Camilli was an MVP for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Fregosi, Jefferies and Burrell were all multi-year all-stars. That list doesn’t include any of the current ex-WCAL players now starring in college or some others that have been standouts in the major leagues, such as first base Jim Gentile (Sacred Heart), outfielder Eric Byrnes (St. Francis-Mountain View), infielder Daniel Descalso (St. Francis), catcher Joe Kmak (Serra), outfielder Daniel Nava (St. Francis), pitcher Scott Chiamparino (Serra), pitcher Dan Serafini (Serra), infield Ed Giovanola (Bellarmine), outfielder Mike Vail (Archbishop Mitty) and infielder Aaron Bates (Archbishop Mitty). Valley Christian-San Jose is a more recent addition to the WCAL but has only added to the difficulty of any baseball team trying to go on a long win streak. The Warriors, for example, went 33-4 and 27-6 under head coach John Diatte when they won back-to-back CIF Central Coast Section titles in 2007 and 2008. Sure, there are some years in which there are even some leagues in Northern California baseball that can compare — especially the East Bay Athletic League of the North Coast Section — but for top-to-bottom loaded competition and going back 100 years there’s nothing like the WCAL. ✪ Mark Tennis is the co-founder of Cal-Hi Sports, and publisher of CalHiSports.com. Cal-Hi Sports is the authority in state rankings for football, basketball, baseball and softball, as well as the recognized state record keeper for all high school sports. Contact him at markjtennis@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter, @CalHiSports.

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softball Rankings Records are through April 26; all record are final 1. (1) — Mission Viejo 17-0 Diablos have won two major tournaments. 2. (2) — Amador Valley-Pleasanton 17-0 If Dons finish unbeaten, they have a good chance to be No. 1 in state and nation. 3. (3) — Archbishop Mitty-San Jose 21-1 We didn’t drop the Monarchs after losing first game to Valley Christian. Still leading the WCAL. 4. (12) ▲ M. L. King-Riverside 19-3 Wins over Norco and Corona Santiago boosted the Wolves. 5. (6) ▲ Vacaville 19-0-1 This team similar to Vintage from last year year in the Sac-Joaquin. Can Bulldogs win D1 title without a loss? 6. (7) ▲ Alhambra-Martinez 15-2 Kylee Perez (UCLA) and friends almost did as well in SoCal Michelle Carew Classic as Amador Valley. 7. (8) ▲ Pacifica-Garden Grove 17-4 Mariners are 0-2 vs. Mission Viejo but still have doubleheader on the schedule against Mission Viejo. 8. (13) ▲ Clovis 26-1 Winning the NorCal Classic title bumped up the Cougars after suffering first loss a week prior 9. (4) ▼ Santiago-Corona 19-3 Despite loss to M.L. King, Sharks still have 13-0 win over Chino Hills and 27-1 win over West Ranch. 10. (10) — Chino Hills 19-4 Washington-bound sisters Tannon and Taylon Snow putting up huge offensive totals for the Huskies. 11. (5) ▼ Esperanza-Anaheim 18-4 Aztecs have a win over Pacifica and one loss came with No. 2 pitcher in the circle. 12. (16) ▲ Los Osos-Rancho Cucamonga 17-3 This team has been highly ranked in top division of CIF Southern Section all season so far. 13. (19) ▲ Chino 20-3 Ace pitcher Miranda Viramontes has already led team to two CIFSS titles in Division II. 14. (NR) ▲ Huntington Beach 16-3 The Oilers had a huge week with wins over Marina and Edison. Marina’s pitcher is going to Michigan. 15. (15) — Rocklin 15-4-1 One loss was to Amador Valley and two others were later avenged. 16. (NR) ▲ Valley Christian-San Jose 15-4 Brynne Fitzpatrick has been averaging more than two strikeouts per inning. 17. (NR) ▲ Yucaipa 16-4 Pitcher Brooke Bolinger will play next at University of Nevada. 18. (18) — James Logan-Union City 15-2 We’re keeping a wary eye on two-time defending NCS D1 champs. 19. (NR) ▲ Leland-San Jose 15-3 Chargers have two wins over Pioneer, which has two wins over Carlmont. 20. (NR) ▲ El Camino Real-Woodland Hills 17-1 L.A. City Section favorite has handed only two losses to 20-2 Oaks Christian. Dropped Out: No. 9 Vista Murrieta-Murrieta, No. 11 WestviewSan Diego, No. 14 Elk Grove, No. 17 Pleasant Grove-Elk Grove and No. 20 Granada-Livermore.

baseball Rankings 1. (3)

Records are through April 26; all record are final ▲

Clovis

27-4

Ranking was done before Cougars played No. 6 Buchanan in a huge 2-game set April 28-May 2. 2. (2)

Rancho Bernardo-San Diego

17-3

St. Francis-Mountain View

19-3

Likely first-round MLB draft pick Alex Jackson (a catcher) leads the Broncos. 3. (5)

Lancers have been No. 1 in the state this season and remain in hunt for final No. 1 rankings. 4. (6)

Harvard Westlake-North Hollywood 19-3

It was a slow start for the Wolverines, who were No. 1 in the state last season. 5. (9)

Elk Grove

16-4-1

Buchanan-Clovis

20-4

Bellarmine-San Jose

19-4

Set to take on No. 9 Temecula Valley in the second Boras Baseball Classic final. 6. (10)

7. (11)

A two-game sweep of Clovis West moved up the Bears.

This ranking was done before the Bells played No. 3 St. Francis on Tuesday, April 29. 8. (13)

9. (14)

Cathedral Catholic-San Diego

18-3

Temecula Valley-Temecula

15-4

Clayton Valley Charter-Concord

19-1

Pitcher Brady Aiken could be the No. 1 pick in June’s MLB draft. Bears have been great outside of their league, not so great inside of it. 10. (7)

Winning NCS D2 title over Campolindo and others has to be the focus for the Ugly Eagles 11. (16) ▲

Wilson-Long Beach

20-4

Huntington Beach

17-4

School with one of the great baseball traditions in SoCal moved up five spots. 12. (1)

The Oilers were No. 1 after winning Hard 9 National Classic, then got swept by Fountain Valley. Loyola-L.A.

16-4-1

Hart-Newhall

16-3-1

15. (15) —

Otay Ranch-Chula Vista

15-4*

16. (18) ▲

Pleasant Grove-Elk Grove

14-4

17. (17) —

California-San Ramon

15-3

Norco

18-2

13. (4)

At one point, the Cubs had 11-game win streak and had climbed to No. 1. 14. (8)

Indians have a big win over Nevada powerhouse Bishop Gorman.

This team did well at San Diego Mike Morrow Lions Club tourney. Coach Rob Rinaldi once coached Dustin Pedroia at Woodland. East Bay Athletic League leaders lost only to St. Francis at Elite 8 tourney.

18. (NR) ▲

Cougars have a win over Great Oak, which is team that just swept previous No. 12 Vista Murrieta. 19. (NR) ▲

Fountain Valley

15-6

Barons improved to 9-1 in tough Sunset League with two-game sweep of Huntington Beach. 20. (20) —

Archbishop Mitty-San Jose

Coach Bill Hutton and team have a win over St. Francis.

16-5

Dropped Out: No. 12 Vista Murietta-Murietta and No. 19 Clovis West-Fresno

*Forfeit wins or losses not included.

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STICK IT OUT Lacrosse may still lack regular attention from those outside the game, but soccer was once like that too in the U.S.

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I play lacrosse but I don’t get any respect. I could play other sports, but I really love lacrosse. But it doesn’t seem like people here think it’s a real sport. Why is that? It’s a great game, and you have to work hard to be good at it. P.F., Walnut Creek

L

acrosse is a real sport, there’s no question about that, and I think you’re probably wrong that a lot of people don’t respect it. More likely, a lot of people really don’t know much about it — just like people way back in the day didn’t know anything about soccer and didn’t think it was as good a game as it is. Still, the fact that lacrosse was a regional sport (the Northeast) for years and years makes it foreign to a lot of people in California, and what people don’t understand, they usually don’t appreciate. Many people also look at lacrosse and some other “newer” sports, right or wrong, as sports kids play when they’re not good to enough to play the traditional games. For example, the unfounded assumption for many is that kids play lacrosse because they can’t make the softball or baseball teams, so then it follows that the lacrosse players must not be that good. This is simply wrongheaded thinking, but hey, we still have the designated hitter in the American League, so it’s not like wrongheaded thinking doesn’t stick around way too long. Another issue with lacrosse, as with many sports, is that it’s not a good TV game (or even in person, really) because you can’t see the ball very well. The only way to know if someone has scored, as with ice hockey, is by the reaction of the players rather than actually tracking the ball into the

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net. That’s frustrating for casual viewers, and it’s a problem hockey has never quite overcome. But, again like ice hockey, once you’ve actually played the sport you realize just how physical it is, and just how much skill is involved, and how fit the players have to be. It’s a big field, with just ten players, and the midfielders are running the whole time. The goalies also play with minimal padding and protection, and taking a hard shot off the leg or body is going to leave a painful mark. The sport is growing rapidly, though, and not just in Northern California, but all over the country. As time goes on, I think more familiarity with the game will make it easier for people to respect the athletes who play it. That’s what happened with soccer, which was barely considered a sport in this country way back in the 1970s — primarily because so few Americans had actually played it seriously, but now the English Premier League is all over television and Major League Soccer is adding franchises. That’s probably not much comfort now, as the ignorant will still continue to assume that what they don’t know about must not be worth much, but your best course of action is to try and rise above the naysayers — and then see if you can get them out on the field and try to play the game. It won’t take them long to see what lacrosse is really about, and why so many people love playing it. ✪ Clay Kallam is an assistant athletic director and girls varsity basketball coach at Bentley High in Lafayette. To submit a question for Behind the Clipboard, email him at clayk@ fullcourt.com

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Can anyone stop the Campolindo reign? Two-thirds of the way through our third year of the East Bay SportStars Cup competition, and the Cougars look poised to hold the cup for a third straight year. As a quick reminder, the competition runs the length of the school year and culminates in mid-June with the crowning of the East Bay’s most successful high school athletic program. Schools can accumulate points through a variety of ways. They are as follows: 100 — Have an athlete named SportStars of the Year (Fall, Winter or Spring) 200 — Win a team league championship 250 — Have an athlete be named All-State (First-team overall only) 300 — Win a section championship (team or individual) 350 — Win a scholastic section championship for highest team GPA 400 — Win an individual NorCal title 500 — Win a team NorCal title 700 — Win an individual state championship 1,000 — Win a team state championship It actually wasn’t an overly productive winter for Campolindo, although it did add a section championship in girls soccer. Mostly the Cougars rested on the huge lead they took in the fall behind huge cross country and girls volleyball seasons. Campolindo has plenty of strengths in the spring too — boys volleyball, baseball and boys swimming, just to name a few — so catching it could be a tough order. As for the team’s chasing the Cougars, the biggest surprise is third-place St. Joseph Notre Dame. The Pilots boys basketball team gave the school its second state title of the year after boys cross country brought home a banner in the fall. St. Joseph sits 1,400 back of Campolindo and just 50 points behind second-place James Logan. The Colts had just 400 points after the fall season but rocketed to second after winning eight section titles and one state championship during the winter. Based on its spring track record, it’d be hard not to consider Campolindo the favorite to win a third straight cup. But as we all know, nothing is for sure until they play the games.

1. Campolindo. . . . . . . . . 5, 450 2. James Logan. . . . . . . . 4,100 3. St. Joseph Notre Dame. . 4,050 4. De La Salle. . . . . . . . . . 3,550 5. Albany. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,150 6. Dougherty Valley. . . . 3,100 7. Monte Vista. . . . . . . . . 3,000 8. Bishop O'Dowd. . . . . . 2,450 9. (tie) Livermore . . . . . . 1,950 Miramonte. . . . . . . . . . 1,950 14

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11. San Ramon Valley............... 1,850 12. Carondelet........................... 1,800 13. St. Mary’s............................. 1,600 14. Salesian............................... 1,350 15. Hercules.............................. 1,200 16. Piedmont............................. 1,100 17. Deer Valley.......................... 1,050 18. El Cerrito.............................. 950 19. (tie) Arroyo........................... 900 Liberty.................................. 900 Newark Memorial................ 900 22. (tie) Northgate...................... 800 Valley Christian.................... 800 24. (tie) Alhambra...................... 600 Berkeley................................ 600 Clayton Valley....................... 600 College Park......................... 600 Encinal.................................. 600 Foothill................................... 600 Heritage................................ 600 31. Concord............................... 550 32. Mission San Jose................ 500 33. Freedom.............................. 450

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Ryan First, Campolindo volleyball

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NO Armed with experience, talent, athleticism, nationally-ranked Campolindo is feeling the pressure

I

n volleyball terminology, they’re called dive lines. Combining volleyball moves with corporal punishment, players sprint downcourt, dive headfirst onto the floor, get up, and do it again … and again. For Campolindo High, the No. 3-ranked boys volleyball team in the nation by MaxPreps. com, this was no training session. It was, essentially, a twisted postgame victory celebration. The Cougars had just dispatched Miramonte-Orinda in three quick sets, all in under an hour. The sun hadn’t even set yet on the green Moraga hills. But Campo co-coaches Dave Chen and John Vuong sensed that the greatest danger to their defending Northern California Division II championship team is complacency. Not a lack of effort, but a lack of being sharpened. When some of the goals the three-time defending North Coast Section Div. II champion had set were not being reached … well … postgame dive lines were one consequence. “It’s a very special group,” said Chen, who has combined with Vuong to go 188-47 at Campo since taking over in 2008. “They have so much experience. It’s a luxury very few coaches get. On the other hand, they’ve been there. They’ve done so much that finding a way to drive them, or have them drive themselves every day, is a challenge.” Most of the Cougars (28-2 through April 27) have year-round experience through the Pacific Rim and Diablo club programs, and many of the rest play other sports. The result is a successful mix of experience, athleticism, and balance rarely seen at the high school level. When Campo swept Whitney-Rocklin in the inaugural NorCal Div. II title match last year, Campo sophomores Jack Eisner, Ryan First, and Michael Standring tied for the team lead in kills, with 12 apiece. The offense is versatile to the extreme, with any player on the floor, including dual setters in the 6-2 offense — Joe Worsley and Yize Dong, a transfer from North Carolina — serving as offensive threats. “We don’t want the go-to guy,” Chen said. “That’s been our philosophy. We define balance and diversity, so we can attack from all points on the court, and relieve the pressure on any one player. The pressure to win is hard enough without putting it on the shoulders of one person.” And yet Campo’s calling card is defense. The Cougars don’t have great height. Eisner, First, Standring, and Worsley all are under 6-feet and could struggle if facing a big blocking team. “This team depends on defense,” Worsley said. “When our defense lacks, that’s when we start struggling. That’s why we have two losses.”

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Campo’s only losses have come in the semifinals of major invitationals: to Torrey Pines-San Diego at the Beach City Invitational in La Jolla, and to Buchanan-Clovis at the Karch Kiraly Tournament of Champions in Santa Barbara. There remains no state tournament, so another NorCal crown is the objective. In fact, it’s expected. When Chen noticed the team losing its focus, they met to discuss it, and Chen received a surprising answer. “We’re feeling the pressure,” more than one player said. “We’re expected to win and no one’s giving any other school out there enough credit,” Chen said. “It’s coming from different angles — parents, friends, brothers and sisters. They all mean well, but it’s the constant barrage that’s taxing, and you magnify that in your head. I was thankful someone finally admitted it. We have to win, there’s no alternative.” Chen tries to diffuse that pressure by deflecting it. Tough to do when the team has gone 68-4 the past two seasons. “If you’re worried so much about the pressure out there, it’s going to be nothing like the pressure I’m putting on you now,” he told them. It’s in these situations that Chen is thankful for a player like the experienced Joe Worsley, the junior setter/rightside hitter. “His control and level-headedness is such an advantage,” Chen said. “The rest of the team can draw stability through that. We have other guys who can show emotion, but when it comes down to it, that’s your floor leader, that’s your quarterback. That’s what you want to see.” As for his volleyball skills, “it’s his versatility … to make something out of nothing, and make it look effortless.” Worsley and his brother Gage, a freshman libero, are in many ways the backbone of the team. They are the sons of Roger Worsley, a longtime collegiate coach and founder and coach of the Pleasant Hill-based Pacific Rim Volleyball Academy. The family’s sojourn into volleyball has been roundabout. Roger was a baseball player at Cal Poly before a knee injury ended his playing career. However, he always aspired to be a coach and gravitated toward the softball field, which was near his

Yize Dong

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Gage Worsley

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apartment. Many of the softball players had friends or roommates who played volleyball, including many in his apartment building. That’s how Worsley was introduced to the game. He became hooked. He landed his first volleyball coaching job as a student assistant to the Cal Poly women’s team and, after graduation, became the girls’ coach at Tennyson High in Hayward. The coaching life took him to William Woods University in Fulton, Mo., University of Hawaii, where he served as technical director to legendary women’s coach Dave Shoji, and to Rochester Institute of Technology as head men’s coach. “I didn’t want the boys to feel as though they had to play volleyball,” Roger said. “We enrolled them in everything. We wanted them to pick their own route.” Joe and Gage were introduced to a variety of sports growing up, but, not surprisingly, gravitated to volleyball. A soccer incident helped determine that choice. At age 6, Gage was big for his age and too physical for the coed soccer league he was placed into. The Worsley parents argued that Gage should play an age level up, which would allow him to play on Joe’s boys team. But their pleas were ignored. During one game, a female defender ran toward Gage just as he blasted a shot, and the ball smashed into her face. The Worsleys were horrified. “That’s it,” Roger said. “He’s going to hurt somebody.” So, they pulled him from the league, and volleyball became his sport of choice. As the boys grew older, their skills became more evi-

dent. Joe, for instance, picked up the setting position with ease as a 10-year-old. Unlike in soccer, both were allowed to play as teamamates an age-group up in volleyball. Their skills got to the point where their parents realized that if the boys truly wanted to explore their potential in volleyball, it should be in California, where the best players and competition is. They agreed that if they could land a job in California, they would move there. When mother Christine was hired as athletic director and dean of physical education at Diablo Valley College, their wish came true. Roger, in club ball at least, has coached them ever since, and the boys have thrived. “It’s a huge benefit,” Gage said. “He knows when to play dad and knows when to coach. But when he’s coaching, he’s demanding. He runs our club team like a college program, with two-hour mandatory study sessions when we’re on the road.” The boys teamed to win the U.S. under-12 beach national championship and paired up again recently to win a tournament in Santa Cruz and achieve an adult AA rating, a huge achievement for teenagers. Both were invited to the USA Volleyball High Performance Championships in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., in July, 2013, for the showcase event that introduces young players into the U.S. national team system. Joe has been selected for the youth national training team and is hoping to make the cut this summer to wear a U.S. uniform. But, until then, the Worsleys are more than willing to lead dive lines in the quest for another NorCal title for Campolindo High. ✪

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Mariya Moore

Salesian • Basketball • Senior

Mariya Moore grew up wanting to be the next Mia Hamm. Basketball wasn’t something she wanted a whole lot to do with. Then she met Natalie Romeo. Romeo, the point guard for Carondelet High and an honorable mention on this page, has had plenty of assists in her career. But convincing Moore — with the help of her dad, Vince — to drop soccer and pursue hoops, is one assist that should put her on Salesian High’s Christmas card list for years to come. In a four-year varsity career, Moore led the Pride to three NorCal titles and will graduate as far and away the program’s most-decorated girls basketball player. She culminated things in her senior year by being named a McDonald’s All-American and leading Salesian to a 30-7 record and a NorCal Open Division championship. With season averages of 17.8 points, 8.6 rebounds, 7 assists and 3.5 steals per game, along with unwavering leadership of a championship team, Moore was the clear choice as the SportStars Female Winter Athlete of the Year. “I think she was arguably the best player in Northern California,” said Salesian boys basketball coach Bill Mellis, who saw her play several times this season as part of boys-girls doubleheaders. “I thought she really developed her game over the last year as well. She seemed to elevate in the key moments. There were very few times when they needed her and were not successful. ... This year, more than others, she just looked like she was having a lot of fun playing basketball.” The fun may be just beginning. Moore will continue her basketball career at Louisville next fall. There’s no word on whether she’ll be the ringer for her dorm’s intramural indoor soccer team, though.

THE MOORE FILES

THE STATS: What couldn’t Moore do on the basketball floor? She contributed for the Pride in almost every category. She averaged 17.8 points, 8.6 rebounds, 7 assists and 3.5 steals a game. SIGNATURE PERFORMANCE: In a hard-fought 70-68 win over South Medford on Jan. 18, Moore posted a quadruple-double of 19 points, 10 rebound, 12 assists and 10 steals. STEP RIGHT IN: Louisville coach Jeff Walz is expecting Moore to make an impact as early as her first year with the Cardinals. “We lose four seniors that play significant minutes,” he told SportStars in a late January interview, “and we look for Mariya to compete for minutes next fall.”

Berry Evans III

Honorable Mentions

Natalie Romeo, Sr., Carondelet basketball — The Nebraska-bound point guard brought the ball up, ran the offense, defended a top opponent and scored as much as the Cougars needed. She didn’t get the McDonald’s All-American nod like a few other Bay Area talents, but outside of Mariya Moore at Salesian, Romeo’s value to her team’s success went unparalleled. She averaged 19.8 points along with 7.8 assists, 5.1 rebounds and 5.6 steals a game.

GIRLS COACH OF THE YEAR

Stephen Pezzola, Salesian basketball: Sure, it helps to have a McDonald’s All-American on your roster (Mariya Moore), and a 6-foot-4 center committed to play in the Pac-12 (Zoe Correal), but the rest of Pezzola’s rotation was filled with lesser-known talent and up-and-coming underclassmen. After losing the NCS Div. IV final to rival St. Mary’s, the Pride stormed their way to the NorCal Open Division title.

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Mikayla Cowling, Sr. St. Mary’s-Berkeley basketball — Cowling’s silky-smooth style made things look easy for the Cal-bound McDonald’s All-American. Her versatility and athleticism made her a matchup nightmare at both ends of the court. She averaged 16.1 points, 8.3 rebounds and 4.6 assists. One special skill: She was a fearsome shot blocker (59 on the season).

FEMALE RISING STAR

Chloe Eackles, Soph., Pinewood girls basketball: Eackles wasn’t the best sophomore among Bay Area girls basketball (Sabrina Ionescu of Miramonte was arguably the best soph. in the state, but was already well established before the season), but the 5-foot-10 post for the Panthers played a huge role in helping Pinewood to a CIF Div. V state title. Eackles averaged close to seven points and seven rebounds. She had eight points, 11 rebounds and six assists in the NorCal final.

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Ivan Rabb Bishop O'Dowd • Basketball • Junior

With Aaron Gordon having graduated from Archbishop Mitty-San Jose and moved on to star at the University of Arizona, the 2013-14 season was the year that Rabb was to become the new darling of Bay Area boys basketball. And boy, did he not disappoint. Ranked as the No. 1 recruit in the nation for the Class of 2015, Rabb’s list of suitors is a who’s who of collegiate programs. We’re talking Kansas, Duke, North Carolina, Kentucky and defending-champion Connecticut, just to name a few. And why not? The 6-foot-10 talent beasted his way through a stellar junior year. He averaged 27 points and 14 rebounds in leading the Dragons to a 28-5 record and a CIF Northern Regional Open Division championship. Rabb showcased a game that not only featured strength around the rim, but also a developing mid-range game complete with feathery turnaround jumpers. “His potential is boundless,” Dragons coach Lou Ritchie said of his star after the Dragons fell to Mater Dei-Santa Ana in the Open Division State Final. Bishop O’Dowd reached the state championship game by defeating Capital ChristianSacramento in the NorCal final one week prior. Rabb played all but three minutes of the game on a sprained ankle. He’d injured the ankle in the team’s previous game four days earlier and hadn’t practiced on any of the three days leading up to NorCal final. He scored 26 points and added 13 rebounds and six blocks. D.J. Wilson, Capital Christian’s 6-foot-9 Michigan-bound senior, scored 29 points but Bishop O’Dowd still won 70-60. “He’s one of the top players I’ve played against,” Wilson said of Rabb. “It would be cool to play against him again in college.” Something tells us that Wilson will get that chance.

THE RABB FILES

Phillip Walton

THE STATS: There’s no higher-ranked junior in the country than Rabb, according to ESPN.com. Rabb averaged 27 points, 14 rebounds and five blocks a game for the Dragons. He also shot 65 percent from the field. SIGNATURE PERFORMANCE: In a Jan. 17 game at Berkeley, Rabb delivered a tripledouble of 27 points, 11 blocks and 10 rebounds. He was 10-for-11 from the field, with seven dunks. He also added five assists. LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION: Rabb’s career location will more than likely be determined by a future NBA Draft. But if he weren’t to have a career in basketball, he said he’d be interested he’d be interested in pursuing a career in business and real estate.

Honorable Mentions Temidayo Yussuf, Sr., St. Joseph Notre Dame basketball — The four-year standout concluded

Jonathan Ayala, Sr., Ygnacio Valley soccer — It’s no stretch to say that Ayala may be the best

had 21 points and 16 rebounds in the state final and finished the season averaging a dominating

most dynamic scorer. Ayala closed out his four-year varsity career by netting 32 goals and adding

his Pilots career with his second Div. V state championship. The Long Beach State-bound forward double-double of 18 points and 16 boards. St. Joseph finished 33-2.

boys COACH OF THE YEAR

Nick Jones, Monte Vista boys basketball: In just his second year at the helm for the Mustangs, the Monte Vista alum lead the program to a 32-1 record and its first state title. He did so without a true star player, building the team’s success on senior leadership and a smothering defense. The Mustangs finished the year ranked No. 4 in the state.

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soccer player to ever wear a Warriors jersey. If not, he certainly will be remembered as the program’s seven assists while leading Ygnacio Valley to a 20-3-1 record. He finished his career with 86 goals.

MALE RISING STAR

Suliman Khorami, Soph., Dublin boys soccer: The Gaels forward was the driving force behind Dublin’s run to the NCS Div. II championship. Khorami led the team in both goals (21) and assists (10) as the Gaels went 21-2-4 and won the NCS Div. II tournament as the No. 3 seed.

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FULL SPEED Kayla Fitzgerald, Granada. Photo by Phillip Walton Records are through 4/26. (source: MaxPreps.com) 1. (1)

— Amador Valley-Pleasanton

17-0

2. (2)

— Archbishop Mitty-San Jose

21-1

3. (3)

— Alhambra-Martinez

15-2

4. (4)

— Vacaville

19-0-1

5. (8)

▲ Granada-Livermore

14-3

6. (6)

— James Logan-Union City

15-2

7. (9)

East Union-Manteca

20-1

8. (11)

Rocklin

15-4-1

9. (5)

Pleasant Grove-Elk Grove

17-5-1

10. (16) ▲

Leland-San Jose

15-3

11. (13) ▲

Woodcreek-Roseville

16-5

12. (12) — Pioneer-San Jose

16-4

13. (14) ▲

Carlmont-Belmont

18-3

14. (15) ▲

Pioneer-Woodland

19-3

15. (NR) — Valley Christian-San Jose

15-4

16. (10) ▼

13-6

Elk Grove

17. (17) — Roseville

17-4

18. (20) ▲

Tracy

18-4

19. (7)

Oakdale

18-2-2

San Benito-Hollister

15-2-1

20. (NR) ▲

DROPPED OUT No. 18 Sierra-Manteca and No. 19 Ponderosa-Shingle Springs

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Johanna Grauer and nationally-ranked Amador Valley charges after the NCS title that’s eluded them the past two seasons

J

By Chace Bryson | Editor

ohanna Grauer might never have been so happy to lead off an inning. With her Amador Valley High softball team locked in an East Bay Athletic League battle with a talented Granada team fast on the rise, the Bay Area’s most dominant pitcher over the past three seasons had just surrendered a game-tying run in the bottom of the fifth. Suddenly it was a 1-1 game and the home fans for Granada had come to life. Grauer, who hits in the No. 3 hole for the nationally-ranked Dons, held a laser-lock focus in the on-deck circle prior to the start of the sixth inning. “There’s a reason we have her batting third,” Amador Valley coach Teresa Borchard said. “We know she’s going to come up with a clutch hit, because she’s just stubborn that way.” With two strikes on her, Grauer took an outside pitch and spanked it into right field for a single. Emily Roskopf came in as a courtesy runner and promptly stole second. Then Ashley Lotoszynski — a senior who might be just as stubborn as

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Grauer — laced an RBI single to left field and moved up to second base on the throw home. She would score two batters later on senior catcher Victoria Molina’s sacrifice fly to right field. Grauer didn’t let another Granada batter reach base, retiring the Matadors in order in their last two frames. Game over. The Dons win again. That’s how championship-level teams operate. Amador Valley is unquestionably a championship-level team  — even though Grauer, Lotoszynski, Molina and the other four seniors on the team haven’t put an NCS championship medal around their necks since their freshman year. Two years of dominance ending in disappointment and frustration have built up to this season. Even the clichè of being on a mission seems like an understatement. “I think we’ve had two disappointing years,” Borchard said of an NCS Div. I runner-up finish in 2012 and a shocking firstround upset in 2013 when Grauer was unable to pitch due to an ankle injury. “Each year we had a team that could take the NCS title home and just couldn’t finish that. They are not going to take things for granted this year. They’ve continued to work Upload photos and team stats! www.SportStarsOnline.com


ahead››› FAR LEFT: Johanna Grauer winds and fires a pitch during the Queen of the Mountain Tournament in mid-March. LEFT: Dons leadoff hitter Nicole Yozzo leads the team with 22 hits, 12 runs scored and a .361 average.

Photos by Phillip Walton

all year long. They’re a year older and more mature. They adjust quicker to the situation and they are more present when they need to be present.” The Dons entered their final game of April with an unblemished 17-0 record. They are ranked No. 2 in the nation by MaxPreps.com and No. 2 in the state by CalHiSports.com — behind an also-undefeated Mission Viejo in both cases. Amador Valley had the opportunity to finish 2012 as MaxPreps National Champions before suffering their first loss of the season, 1-0 to James Logan in the NCS Div. I final. Grauer allowed just three hits in that game and struck out 17. It’s scary what she might produce if she gets another chance at starting an NCS final with an undefeated record and potential national crown on the line. She’s doing everything she can to get there. The UCLA-bound fireballer has pitched all but 1.2 innings for the Dons in 2014. In 120 innings of work, she’s allowed just three earned runs (0.17 ERA), struck out 187 against 27 walks. Ten of her 17 wins have come by shutout. “I think a lot of people think of her as a power pitcher,” Borchard said. “I think that discredits her in many ways. I think she’s very smart about adjusting to batters. As she’s gotten older she’s learned to add finesse. ... It’s just been fun to watch her pitch, and I think she’ll continue to get better. The bottom line is that she’s a gamer.” The entire group of seniors is composed

of gamers it seems. Many of them have been playing with one another since they were 9or 10-years old. “We’ve all known each other for the longest time,” said Lotosynski, a gold glove-level UC Davis-bound shortstop who led the team with 11 RBI over the first 17 games. “We all sit together at lunch, joke around with each other, make faces at each other when we’re doing interviews.” When the calendar hits May, the Dons will have six regular season games left on the schedule — all of them EBAL contests. Two of those will come against a scrappy Carondelet team, and there will also be a rematch with Granada on May 8 and a season finale against rival Foothill on May 15. Confident in their pitching and defense, the Dons will be stressing offense down the stretch. “I think our biggest thing that we’re focused on is just hitting,” Grauer said. “We’re not having a lot of high-scoring games. Most of them are pretty close. For us, it’ll be about keeping up and not just sitting on that one run when we get it.” Perhaps the perfect record will be in play, and perhaps it won’t. But Borchard would be shocked if this group let anything get in its way of an NCS crown. “I think they want two (NCS championship) medals around their neck at graduation,” the coach said. “It’s a very special group, and I don’t think for one second they don’t want to do anything other than take that title home.” ✪

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Gabe Taylor

Nick Madrigal, Elk Grove. Photo by James K. Leash Records are through 4/26. (source: MaxPreps.com) 1. (1)

— St. Francis-Mountain View

16-3

2. (2)

— Campolindo-Moraga

15-3

3. (3)

— Clayton Valley Charter-Concord

19-1

4. (4)

— Bellarmine-San Jose

19-4

5. (5)

— Elk Grove

15-4

6. (6)

— Archbishop Mitty-San Jose

16-5

7. (7)

— Valley Christian-San Jose

17-6

8. (8)

— De La Salle-Concord

13-4

9. (9)

— California-San Ramon

15-3

10. (11) ▲

San Ramon Vly-Danville

14-4

11. (14) ▲

Pleasant Grove-Elk Grove

12-4

12. (16) ▲

College Park-Pleasant Hill

16-3

13. (18) ▲

Davis

12-8-1

14. (12) ▼

Amador Valley-Pleasanton

12-6

15. (17) ▲

Serra-San Mateo

12-10

16. (13) ▼

Oak Ridge-El Dorado Hills

12-8

17. (20) ▲

Jesuit-Carmichael

13-5-1

18. (NR) ▲

Maria Carrillo-Santa Rosa

17-2

19. (NR) ▲

Los Gatos

20-4

20. (19) ▼

Franklin-Elk Grove

14-7

DROPPED OUT No. 10 San Benito-Hollister and No. 15 St. Ignatius-S.F.

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With stellar starting pitching & a stout offense, Clayton Valley Charter could be a real threat to Campolindo’s NCS Div. II stronghold

I

By Chace Bryson | Editor

t probably wasn’t a coincidence. Still, when Gabe Taylor met Austin Cannedy on his first day of school after transferring into Clayton Valley Charter High as a junior in 2013, a relationship was forged. “The first person I knew at CV was Austin,” Taylor said. “He was one of my first friends. We’ve been boys since the beginning of last year.” Both play baseball. Both are pitchers. But they’d have to wait an extra year before they could be teammates. With the varsity roster already crowded with returning talent, Taylor was asked to get his feet wet in the Eagles

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program at the junior varsity level. And while he was doing that, Cannedy posted a 9-0 mark and 0.72 ERA for a 22-win varsity squad. Taylor has been itching to prove himself ever since. And it started this fall when he won the starting quarterback job and led Clayton Valley to an undefeated Diablo Valley Athletic League title and 11-2 overall record. That confidence has carried over to the baseball diamond, where Taylor and Cannedy are one of the best onetwo pitching punches in the East Bay. As of April 28, both pitchers were 7-0 on the season and the Eagles were among NorCal’s top teams after a 19-1 start. Clayton Valley Charter actually opened the year by winUpload photos and team stats! www.SportStarsOnline.com


Austin Cannedy

Photos by Phillip Walton

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ning its first 19 games. Its first loss came to a nationallyranked St. Francis-Mountain View team in the championship game of the Lancers’ own Elite 8 tournament on April 24. The Eagles lost the game 3-0, but neither Taylor or Cannedy pitched in the game. Each had pitched and won previous games in the tournament earlier that week. “You don’t like to lose, so there was a bit of a bitter taste afterward,” Clayton Valley coach Casey Coakley said. “But it was still a great experience for us to be in a non-conference tournament on the road and get our feet wet to a playoff-like feel. If anything, I think the team left that loss more confident than it ever was. If that’s one of the best (teams) the state has to offer, than we’re right there.” The dominances of the Eagles hasn’t solely been the product of its starting pitching. It certainly doesn’t hurt when team’s can post a batting average of .350. Everybody contributes, too. Six different players have 10 or more RBI. Three more have at least eight. Senior catcher Ethan Utler leads the team with 19 RBI. Taylor and Cannedy are rarely clamoring for run support. But that’s not the only benefit they have. “Honestly, it’s knowing that I have one of the best defenses in California behind me,” Taylor said a day after picking up his seventh win of the season in the first round of the Elite 8, a six-inning effort in which he allowed Newark Memorial one run on seven hits with four strikeouts and no walks. “I just try to feed the barrel. I don’t even worry about strikeouts. My infield just doesn’t make mistakes, and when they do it’s really rare.” Taylor’s performance against Newark Memorial lowered his season ERA to 2.07. He’s struck out 36 and walked just six over 40.2 innings of work so far. “He plays with a little edge,” Coakley said of Taylor. “I

think because it’s his first year of varsity baseball and he’s hungry.” Cannedy, who pitched his fourth complete game of the season in beating Amador Valley 3-1 in an Elite 8 semifinal, has a 1.14 ERA with 59 strikeouts and 17 walks over his first 49 innings this season. He doesn’t lack for confidence or hunger, either. “It’s his up there. He owns it,” Taylor said of his friend. “Nothing else matters other than him going to the plate and putting ourselves in a good situation to win. I know whenever he’s on the mound that we’re going to get a great start and have that opportunity to win.” The Eagles have three regular season games left after May 1. The first will come against a struggling Berean Christian team, but the last two will be a home-and-home doubleheader with DVAL foe and fellow title-contender College Park on May 6 and 8. Those two games will go a long way in deciding the league champion, although the DVAL does hold a postseason tournament to determine its automatic qualifier to the North Coast Section playoffs. Clayton Valley is all but certain to gain one of the top two seeds in Div. II. The other will likely go to defending-champion Campolindo, which coincidentally ended the Eagles season in the Div. II semifinals a season ago. What are the Eagles focusing on to help give themselves a shot at their second NCS title since 2009? “The biggest key for us is to be offensive in big games,” Coakley said. “We’re really comfortable with our pitching and defense, it’s just a matter of being able to attack and throw 4-to-5 runs on the board against a real quality pitcher.” Taylor and Cannedy are ready to do their part. They’ve been waiting for this for close to two years. ✪

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Headfirst Baseball’s Area Code Showdown Gets Bigger, Better

California-San Ramon shortstop Cameron Santos is an alumni of the Area Code Showdown and will play at Chico State next fall. Contributed photo

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Southern California isn’t the only destination in the state for top baseball showcase events. In fact, when the renown Area Code Games conclude in Long Beach this summer, Headfirst Baseball will be holding its fourth annual Area Code Showdown event from August 8-10. The Showdown originated in 2011 as a way to decide which high school league was the best out of the 510 and 925 Area Codes. It was played tournament-style and the EBAL won in each of the first two years. For the 2013 Showdown, the event was expanded beyond leagues to pit area codes against one another. The 925 was the overall winner, setting the tables for the 2014 Area Code Showdown. This year the Area Code Showdown scouts will gather lists of all of the top players in the 650, 925, 510 and surrounding area codes in the 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 grad years. While the event is invitation-only, hopefully players can register for a tryout on the Area Code Showdown website, AreaCodeShowdown.com. The event still has two its four tryouts left before the rosters will be cemented.

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Plenty of collegiate scouts attend the Showdown, and many are part of the teams’ coaching staffs. Just like the famous Area Code event down south, awards are handed out throughout the event for each team and the tournament as a whole. Here’s a look at some of the top honorees from the 2013 event. TOP PLAYERS 2014 – Austin Dondanville, De La Salle-Concord 2015 – Caleb Van Blake, Benicia 2016 – Tyler Toland, Deer Valley-Antioch 2017 – Amaury Reed, Pleasant Grove-Elk Grove 2018 – Alex Williams TOP PITCHERS 2014 – Christian Viramontes, Heritage -Brentwood 2015 – Zach Keever, Alhambra-Martinez 2016 – Austin Manning – St Mary’s-Berkeley ✪ For more information on the Area Code Showdown, as well as Headfirst Baseball, be sure to check out an extended version of this article at SportStarsOnline. com/Headfirst-ACS.

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powered by trucks: anthony trucks There are three main ways to train when it comes to weightlifting. You can lift for muscular strength, muscular power or muscular size. Within those, a person could work on additions like stamina and recovery for each area as well. For this article we’re going to focus on hypertrophy (muscle size), and more distinctly drop sets. When it comes to building muscle mass the goal is to increase the number of reps, and the weight, and shoot for an intense muscular burn while completing the reps in a full range. In short, more reps and heavier weight. This creates micro tears in the muscles that will eventually heal and force the muscle to adapt to the external stresses placed on it. The adaptations occur in the form of a larger muscle grown by increasing the cross sectional fiber size and allowing more weight to be moved later on as the size and strength of the muscle increases. There are many ways to create a program to achieve muscle growth. I’m going to focus on one of the many ways by talking about what we call “drop sets.” Drop sets are lifts in which you use a lighter weight in comparison to the weight you use during your working/previous set(s). Drop sets essentially mean dropping the weight down. The way this works, is that it helps the body to kind of “finish off” the muscle group after you’ve gotten a great workout, or a great heavy set. Doing this allows us to get the last little micro tearing of that muscle to allow for greater gains in muscle size as it recovers and grows. I’m going to go over three of the many, simple ways you can incorporate drop sets into your workouts to start getting those great gains in muscle size.

1) Finisher Drop Set This is accomplished by completing your regular workout sets and reps until you’re essentially gassed and tired from the workout. You then drop the weight, as much as 25 percent, and do as many reps as possible to finish off the muscle and get that good burn. 2) Decreasing Drop Sets This is best done on a cable machine. You start each set with a high weight that is hard for you to complete successfully for a given amount of reps or until failure, then, once you’ve finished those reps, you immediately drop the weight by 5-10 pounds and crank out the next reps, and so on, until you’ve gotten to the lowest weight you want to use and you can barely feel your muscle anymore. 3) Strip Drop Sets This one is a little trickier and will involve three workout partners. This is when you drop the weight after each rep and go until failure. For example, using this technique while bench pressing, load the bar with a weight that is hard for you to accomplish twice using as many 10-pound weights as possible on the bar. You start by doing one rep, and every time you lower the bar to touch your chest your partners each remove a 10 pound plate from their respective sides. This drops the weight by 20 pounds each rep until you get down to a naked bar and work the muscle until it burns like the summertime asphalt. As summer approaches, this should be a great addition to your training to get your body ready for the swimsuit season. ✪ Anthony Trucks is the owner of Trucks Training facility in )Brentwood and covers weight training for SportStars.

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tri steps: liz elliott

Tips to keep you safe and comfortable when biking on roadways The bike portion is the second leg of a triathlon, and the distance is half of the race. As a triathlete, you will need to understand the fit, form, safety and handling of cycling, feel comfortable riding in traffic and in emergency situations, as well as feel ready to complete the bike with good fitness after the swim.  When biking on the road, you are a vehicle, and must follow all the same rules as motorists. Riding your bike on the road will give you a whole new appreciation for cyclists when you are a driver. BE PREDICTABLE: Hold your line, use predictable hand signals, and don’t swerve into traffic. You want to ride so motorists and other cyclists are not wondering what you will do next.   SEE AND SMILE: Your best safety features are your eyes and your smile. Keep your eyes open for hazards on the road, but also to make eye contact with motorists when stopped at lights and other times you are changing positions. Make eye contact, give a head nod and smile. A smile goes a long way. It helps the motorist see you as a person, not just that looney in spandex. ROAD RIDING REMINDERS: ›› Wear a helmet securely fastened to your head under the

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chin at all times. ›› Ride single file. ›› Stay as far to the right of the road as safely possible. That does not mean riding in the dirt. If there is no shoulder or bike lane, ride to the left of the white line, and stay there. ›› Do not make unnecessary or sudden swerves into traffic, even when reaching for or putting away a water bottle. ›› Ride consistently, and hold your line. ›› Use hand signals to show direction and stopping. Just like at the DMV, “left, right, stop or slow down” out of the car window. ›› Use your voice. Call out debris in the path to other riders, and the direction you are heading. For example, when passing, yell “On your left.” This signals the rider in front that you will pass, and they should hold their line on the right. ›› Always pass on the left.   ›› Stop at every stop sign and light. You are held to the same traffic rules as a car.  ✪ Liz Elliott was an All-American collegiate swimmer and is the head coach at Tri-Valley Triathlon Club.

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hip pain: hunter greene, m.d.

LISTEN TO YOUR HIP: Chances are hip pain means something, so have it looked at sooner than later Hip and groin pain is common in young athletes and usually signals a problem. One of the most common causes of hip pain is a condition known as femoroacetabular impingement or FAI. FAI involves an abnormal hip anatomy where the bones of your hip joint come too close and pinch tissue or cause too much friction. The pinching or friction may cause articular cartilage damage and labral tears and may result in hip arthritis at a younger age than usually occurs. Sports associated with FAI include ballet, cycling, golf, soccer, running, football, basketball, hockey and lacrosse, as well as deep-squatting activities such as power lifting. Symptoms may include: ›› A locking, clicking or catching sensation within the joint ›› Pain sitting for long periods of time ›› Difficulty putting on socks and shoes ›› Difficulty walking uphill ›› Low back pain

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›› Pain at the sacroiliac joint, the buttock or side of hip. Non-surgical treatment may be tried first. However, if pain persists, arthroscopic surgery is usually highly effective. During hip arthroscopy, the doctor inserts a tiny camera via a small incision in the hip joint to see the joint and make an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. During surgery, the surgeon may also remove loose cartilage, smooth or repair damaged cartilage, or trim bone spurs. Arthroscopy is an outpatient procedure, so patients return home the same day. After a period of rehabilitation, most patients are able to return to full, unrestricted activities. If hip pain is getting in your way, have it checked out. The earlier FAI is diagnosed and treated, the less likely it is to develop into major issues later in life. ✪ Hunter Greene, M.D., is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon with Summit Orthopedic Specialists in Carmichael. He is the region’s only orthopedic surgeon fellowship trained in hip arthroscopy.

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perfectly

FRUSTRATED get mental: ericka carlson

Is this you? ›› Strong work ethic ›› High expectations for yourself ›› Very competitive ›› Good student ›› Talented athlete ›› Work to please others (parents, coaches) ›› Worry (excessively at times) about making mistakes ›› Put A LOT of pressure on self ›› Hard time mentally recovering from mistakes ›› Easily frustrated If this sounds like you, chances are you consider yourself a “perfectionist.” You strive to connect every pass, make every play, execute every drill perfectly. You push yourself to win every sprint, and anything less than perfect feels totally frustrating. That’s a good thing, right? Wrong. The irony of being a perfectionist is that you’re failing all the time. When is the last time you succeeded at having an absolutely perfect practice, game or drill? There are perfect moments in sport (enjoy every second!), but there are not totally perfect training

sessions, games or practices. There are always ways to get better. Striving to be perfect may help you push to work harder and get it right, but the failure rate of perfectionism (100 percent) is not a great confidence builder. What’s the solution? Make a small shift away from perfectionism to striving for excellence. What’s the difference? Both mindsets require an incredibly tough work ethic, pushing hard to improve, high expectations, being detailed and highly competitive — all excellent characteristics for high achievement. The difference lies in how you manage challenges. Perfectionism has zero margin for error, which is why perfectionists are easily frustrated and often upset about their performance. Excellence, however, indicates that mistakes, set-backs and challenges are inevitable — and are actually extremely valuable for developing as an athlete. The excellence mindset helps you work through challenges with less frustration, so you learn faster and build more stable confidence. Not just confidence as a competitor, but also confidence in your ability to overcome challenges, which is one of the most advantageous mental toughness skills. ✪ Erika Carlson is a certified mental trainer and owner of Excellence in Sports Performance in Pleasanton.

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FALL INTO IT

training time: tim rudd for iyca

The Wall Drill Progression is designed for stiffness in the core and lower body In the previous issue of SportStars, I showed two foundational movements for creating foot, ankle, quad and butt stiffness. Now, we up the intensity and difficulty of the “Leaning Tower Series” discussed in the last two columns: This part is called the Wall Drill Progression The athlete should stand around 3 feet from the wall with arms fully extended out in front of them. Cue the first two elements discussed last week — the golf ball between butt cheeks for stiffness in the core, butt, quads, ankles and feet, in a rise equal to the height of a credit card (on ball of foot, heel grazing ground). Next the athlete will intentionally fall into the wall. On contact, there should be very little give with arms with no movement through the hips (the hips should not collapse toward the wall). You should be able to draw a straight line up from the ankles through the knees, hips, shoulders and ears. The key is to for the athletes is to be stiff through their quads (front of legs) and butt in this double-leg position, critical for core, foot and ankle stiffness. Once the athlete understands, and can maintain stiffness in this position accordingly, they should progress to hip-separation wall-drill holds. The athlete will push into the ground with their right foot (maintain butt and quad stiffness) and punch the opposite knee up (should look like the letter “A” with the foot staying dorsi-flexed for ankle stiffness). The athlete should hold this position for 10 seconds before repeating it with the opposite leg and knee. Coaches or trainers should be looking for coordination of the foot pushing into the ground and the knee punching up simultaneously while maintaining stiffness in the glute, quad, ankle and foot. The goal is technical proficiency, not fatigue. An athlete’s understanding and ability to get stiff during this wall drill is key to optimizing his or her ability to accelerate and decelerate when progressing through to the last installment of the “Leaning Tower Series,” which will be covered in next month’s issue. Watch a video representation of these movements, as well as the first two steps which were covered in April, by visiting SportStarsOnline.com/video/TrainingTime ✪ Tim Rudd is an IYCA specialist in youth conditioning and owner of Fit2TheCore.

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even more camps + clinics at sportstarsonline.com BASEBALL/SOFTBALL All Star Academy of Baseball All-Star Academy in Santa Clara features a 17,000 square foot indoor and outdoor training facility that is home to a variety of instructional programs. ASA offers All Skills Camps for ages 7-12, and Summer Boot Camps for 12 & Under, middle school, and high school athletes. Info: 650-961-2255; www. asabaseball.com Cabernet Baseball Club The Livermore-based club not only hosts The Pitching Center’s Spring Break Baseball Skills Camp, its also hosts its own baseball summer camps. Each camp is designed for specific skill development. We feature camps for the youngest and newest players ages 5 - 7 all the way to the most elite high school and college players. We keep our student to instructor ratios low. This ensures the best possible instruction experience for each participant. Lil’ Baseball is also offered for ages 3-7. Info: 925-416-1600, www.cabernetindoorsports.com Cal Club Baseball CCB is one of the premier college development baseball programs in California. We have hitting sessions on Saturdays and Sundays. Times for these hitting

sessions will be sent out at the beginning of each week and will be listed on our website. In these hitting sessions we set up stations for players to work on hitting for power, gap-to-gap, two strikes, balance and opposite field. Pitching sessions are set up with stations to get specific work on certain mechanics for pitching. Info: erick@calclubbaseball. com; (408) 204-8771 Fieldhouse Baseball Camps/Clinics The Fieldhouse is an indoor baseball facility providing baseball-related developmental and training services for teams and organizations. These services include baseball classes for hitting, pitching, catching, base running, infield and outfield defense, speed/agility/strength training, and teaching the mental aspect of baseball. Along with the class instruction, our services also include developing a long term training and development program for baseball organizations interested in developing a sustainable and successful program. Info: Don Gieseke; don@thefieldhouse.net Got ‘Em Baseball College Development The College Development Camp is a camp geared toward those elite high school student athletes that have aspirations of playing at the next level.

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We have teamed up with numerous colleges, professional instructors, current MLB scouts, motivational speakers and life skills coaches to bring to you an unforgettable 4-day/3-night baseball and life skills experience. The College Development Camp for grades: 9-11 takes place at University of the Pacific & Delta College in Stockton. Max Number of Campers: 60. Info: baseball@gotembaseball.com Gregg Jefferies Sports Academy Former first-round draft pick for the New York Mets, Gregg Jefferies put together an amazing 14-year career at the Major League level. Now he can train you! Enlist in camps and specialty clinics like hitting and pitching classes; onsight rehab and arm care, speed and agility, srength/core classes, team programs or join our monthly Baseball Membership. We even offer Family Membership Plans so all your children can be involved and share our 12,000 square foot indoor facility. Info: (510) 209-6194; (925) 484-1036; tarynalexander13@ gmail.com Headfirst Baseball Academy Though many people have heard about Headfirst, few understand the HF network, especially in the Upper Division. The basic principle is that we want

to train young players who are willing to work hard to make the next level. We are proven in the area of recruiting talented players and developing them. Most importantly (and this is the most overlooked concept by young players) Headfirst is proven in having the relationships with colleges that will result in players being connected with their desired school. Info: MJi0209@aol.com; Mario74iglesias@aol.com The Pitching Center In an effort to develop baseball players to their full potential, The Pitching Center has become the Total Player Center (TPC), a full-service baseball/softball training academy. We provide comprehensive, fully-integrated training programs that evolve based on the best research and information available in areas from health/safety, peak performance, education techniques and more. Age- and skill-specific programs are available for students aged 8-18. Info: 925-416-1600, www.thepitchingcenter.com. Redwood Christian Baseball Camps Our annual baseball camps are directed by varsity coach Jim Cleveland in July. Camps feature outstanding instructors and two great weeks with seven sessions including Skills Camp – Ages 8-12, Hitting Camp – Ages 9-15, Ad-

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vanced All Skills Camp (2 wks) – Ages 13-16, Pitching Camp – Ages 9-15 and Catching Camp – Ages 10-15. Info: rcsathletics.org; 510-317-8988 South Bay Sports Training Baseball/ Softball These one-of-a-kind camps are a great opportunity for any young player to obtain the skills, knowledge, and resources needed to become a better player. Camps serve players aged 6-14. Info: (408) 283-0643; southbaytraining@aol.com BASKETBALL Advantage Basketball Camps Advantage Basketball Camps are for kids 7-18. Players grow and learn about more than basketball in our sessions. Advantage camps’ main focus is ball handling skills and moves off the dribble. Trying to learn the rest of the game is a waste of time if you can’t handle the ball. We also cover shooting, defense and court awareness. We run a professional camp that is hard work but produces great results. Our newest camp is on Rocklin. For all dates/locations: 425670-8877; info@advantagebasketball. com, www.advantagebasketball.com Bald Eagle Basketball Camp Campers walk away with improved skills and a deeper passion for becoming

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even more camps + clinics at sportstarsonline.com their best. Our unique format gives campers a choice period each day to play more basketball, go swimming, play sports camp games, have fun in our Activity Arcade —whatever summer fun they choose! This year we’ve ramped up our staff with more coaches who have high level playing and/ or coaching experience, not to mention their PCA Certification like every staff member at Bald Eagle Sports Camps. Info: 888-505-2253. East Bay Bulldogs The Bulldogs are pleased to bring back our hugely popular Week Night Skills Workouts. The program focuses on fundamental skills that are tough to spend much time on in practice. We do three 2-hour long skills workouts, that are open to boys and girls from 2nd-12th grade. This is a complete workout touching on all skills needed to play the game. You don’t have to be a Bulldogs player to attend. We are based in Martinez. Info: PGLeClaire@comcast.net; 925-570-1334 Mike Allen Sports Camps I’m Possible Training’s Mike Allen, can take your skills to the next level. I’m Possible is a world-renowned basketball program authored by NBA skills coach Micah Lancaster. Allen is the head trainer for the Bay Area location in Los Gatos. Info: (408) 2248503, mikeallen@possibletraining.com Moreau Catholic Basketball Camp Co–ed basketball camps for incoming grades 3-9, Cost: $150/session, $400 for all sessions: Week 1 6/16 – 6/20; Week 2 6/23 – 6/27; Week 3 6/30 – 7/3. All camps 9am – 2pm; Info: Varsity coach Frank Knight, knight@moreaucatholic.org; moreaucatholic.org/Athletics NorCal Courts Basketball Camps Norcal Courts in Martinez covers all the major fundamentals: Dribbling, passing, shooting, defense, rebounding. Sessions will have fun and exciting drills for campers that will help them become better players. Camps are rub by qualified coaches from Cal Stars and Cagers Basketball. Info: 925-4575081; www.norcalcourts.com Ray Wear 5 Basketball Ray Wear is a former Michigan State University Grad and All-Big 10 star who hosts basketball skills camps nationwide. The camp visits Northern California on April 27 at NorCal Courts in Martinez. Camp package includes Game Gear reversible jersey and solid short, Reebok drawstring bag, cotton tee and Rebok Zig Kick Hoops. Info/Registration: raywear5.com Redwood Christian Basketball Camp Our camps are directed by varsity basketball coach Drew Sanchez each June. They are designed for players who want to learn and improve skills. SHOOTING CAMP: This camp is focused on teaching technique of shot and footwork. SKILLS CAMP: This camp will incorporate all the fundamental skills of the game with a fun, competitive approach. Info: rcsathletics.org; 510-317-8988 CHEER/DANCE CheerGyms.com Customize your clinic to fit your needs! Let us teach the clinic you need to take your team to the next level! We offer residential overnight camps that include many awards, team bonding ideas and an experience of a lifetime. We also offer Two-Day Camps for a less-pricey overnight experience.

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Finally, there are Private Camps in which your cheerleaders get all the attention. You pick the hours and decide what they will learn. Cheergyms. com facilities in Concord, San Jose and Petaluma! Info: morton@cheergyms.com, 925-685-8176 ENRICHMENT Bald Eagle Jr. High Leadership Giving your child a road map to create success as a young adult is extremely powerful. Our Jr. High Leadership Camp includes tangible experiences working cooperatively with peers, leading groups, public speaking, making friends, understanding community service, and living an active lifestyle through FUN camp activities. The quality of our encouraging curriculum helps build confidence and perspective. All camps run in 1 week sessions, June and July, with SIX total sessions to choose from. Full Day, Half Day & Extended Care options are available. Info: 888-505-2253. Dianne Adair Programs Come join any of our eight Dianne Adair summer sites for our fun and exciting summer program. Each week campers will be able to choose from several camps, including sports, fashion, drama, CSI, science and so many more. We take weekly field trips to places like an A’s or Giants game, museums, the Jelly Belly Factory, Six Flags, the pool, the movies, parks and the zoo. Field trips and camps vary by site. Offers and rates may vary at any of our nine locations. Info: www.dianneadair.org. FENCING Stanford Fencing Camp For the beginning fencer, this camp at Stanford University teaches the elegant sport of Fencing from experienced staff. You will learn how to thrust, parry, and lunge like the musketeers! This camp is open to anyone who wants to learn how to fence and is 8-18 years old. The average age of the camper ranges from 8 -13. Fencing camp runs half day from 9am -noon We provide all equipment. Info: Cdarcey@stanford.edu; 650.725.3001; www. stanfordfencingcamp.com FITNESS Children’s Hospital Athletic Training Conference This workshop is designed especially for high school students interested in sports medicine careers. Learn about ankle injuries and taping techniques; wrist, hand, and thumb injuries and taping; knee injuries and RICE Therapy; stretching techniques, lower back injuries and CORE training, sports concussions; shoulder injuries and rehabilitation. The two-day workshop runs April 4 (5:308:30 pm) and April 5 (8 am-5 pm) at Children’s Hospital Oakland, Outpatient Center Auditorium. Info: Call (510) 428-3558; www.chofoundation.org/ sportsconference Children’s Hospital Sports Speed Camps Learn and put into practice the five pillars of SPEED training. Emphasizing flexibility, stability, strength, power, and speed. We’ll give you the training secrets that will make you faster than you’ve ever been before. The 2-week program is best suited for athletes (ages 12-19) who play soccer, football, basketball, lacrosse, and track & field. Space is limited to 15 athletes per session with 3 sessions offered. Camps are held in Walnut Creek and Berkeley. Info: (510) 428-3558 Fit 2 The Core

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even more camps + clinics at sportstarsonline.com As a youth conditioning, speed/agility and nutrition specialist with the International Youth Conditioning Association, Fit-2-The-Core Training Systems offers an innovative approach to getting your young athletes back on the field of play post-rehabilitation, continuing the process by progressing their bodies to handle what they must endure on the field or court. Athletes are closely supervised while being coached through the workout, with attention on proper technique and safety. For our Back to Sports programs we offer training weekdays, with 2 or 3 days/week options. Info: www.fasteryoungathletes.com, 925-639-0907. Renaissance ClubSport We offers sports and speciality camps for kids ages 5-12. Participants have fun-filled, active breaks as they receive instruction in a variety of sports, activities, and projects. For families with multiple children, we offer a 10% discount on each additional sibling. Info: Kids World at 925.942.6344. Trucks Training We know exactly what it takes to achieve the next level of sports & fitness safely and effectively. A true hometown feel from true hometown people. We offer 1-on-1, group and small group training for fitness and sport-specific needs. Info: truckstraining. com; 925-756-7321 FOOTBALL AG Evaluations Artie Gigantino, a former NFL coach with the Rams and Raiders, and college coach at USC and Cal, offers players evaluations and consultations. Its guidance for your football future. Info: artiesports@ yahoo.com, 925-209-9465 All Out Sports League Our football camps are held in Antioch and Clayton. The four-day non-contact camp teaches every position on the football field and are geared toward the fundamentals. Every aspect of the game is covered. Camps are open to boys and girls ages 6-16. Info: 925-203-5636 or www.alloutsportsleague.com Cascade Football Team Camp The purpose of the Cascade Team Camp is to provide a fundamental camp for high school athletes to learn the game of football from their own coaching staffs and to allow teams to meld together and spend quality team time for activities. The 5-day, full-contact camp is held at the beautiful campus of McCloud High at the base of Mt. Shasta. It’s attended by 7 teams and features facilities for both 11-and 8-man teams. Info: Matt Hunsaker 530-2330333; m61hunsaker@gmail.com Coach Cotter Football Camp This Moreau Catholic High camp is designed for everyone to have fun while learning essential football skills in a non-contact environment. Each camper will have the opportunity to learn the skills for all offensive and defensive positions. Campers will also tour the campus, weight room and team room areas. Each day of camp will conclude with “Mariner Ball,” a fun touch football game giving everyone an equal opportunity to participate. Info: (510)-881-4333 or acotter@moreaucatholic.org Cougar Football Camp This is a full-gear youth football camp for grades 4-8 which is now in its 18th year. Long-respected Camplindo High coach Kevin Macy is the lead

instructor for the camp which runs from July 7-18 and takes place from 1:30-5 pm each day. Info: CampoFootball.com, kmacy@acalanes.k12.ca.us, 925-280-3950 ext. 5163 Diablo Football Camps We offer contact and non-contact camps for players ages 6-14 which take place at Laural Ball Field and Shady Oaks Park in Oakley. Info/registration: 925-625-2222, www.DiabloFootball.com. East Bay Youth Football Academy EBAYFA is designed to provide instruction to young boys and girls about the game of football. In addition to developing skills and running drills to teach fundamentals, EBAYFA also teaches you how the game is played. Our summer schedule is open for registration. We have two sessions in June and July at Bladium in Alameda and a session July 1519 at Bishop O’Dowd High in Oakland. All summer camps are for ages 6-10 and run from 9am-1pm Monday through Friday. Info: 510 599-4292; mike@ebay-fa.com National Academy of Athletics Contact Camp This is an evening camp from 5:30-7:30pm for youth football players to improve their fundamental skills and techniques. Coaches are local youth coaches who specialize in teaching kids between the ages of 7-9, 10-12 and 13- 5. Campers are grouped by age and ability. These week- long sessions are offered at different locations throughout Northern California. We also offer our Run-PassCatch flag football camp. Info: info@naofa.us; Bay Area: 415-296-6686; North Bay: 707-541-2365; Toll Free: 866-90-SPORT National Wing T Team Camp We have been presenting exceptional WING-T football camps for 27 years with a superior staff, comprised solely of highly successful college and high school coaches from around the country. We highlight the importance of teamwork, self-discipline and consideration of others, while helping players to develop the confidence and work ethic needed to attain their full potential. This year’s NorCal camp is at Escalon High. The High School Wing-T Camp (helmet/shoulder pads) and Youth Wing-T camp (no equipment) both occur in June. Info: 209-2474700, ecoachlou@hotmail.com Walnut Creek Marauders The Walnut Creek Marauders are part of the Diablo Valley Youth Football Conference. This division represents 18 cities across Contra Costa, Solano, Napa and Alameda counties. The Marauder tackle football program is led by trained volunteer coaches who strive for the personal and athletic growth of each athlete. Info: (925) 941-4745; ldavenport41@ gmail.com GOLF The First Tee The First Tee Summer Camp is a youth development Golf program for boys and girls ages 7-18. Participants learn about golf and the life skills and values inherent to the game. Check with local chapters, Oakland, Contra Costa, Tri-Valley, Silicon Valley or find another at thefirsttee.org GYMNASTICS East Bay Sports Academy Summer Day Camps at East Bay Sports Academy offer the best gymnastics, cheerleading, and tumbling SUMMER CAMP FUN anywhere! We

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even more camps + clinics at sportstarsonline.com offer four AMAZING WEEKS of half-day and full-day camps for girls and boys ages 5 and up. Recreational and competitive athletes will benefit from training with most-committed coaches in the Bay Area. Our 13,000 square foot facility is clean, bright, and has the newest equipment around. We host private minicamps and clinics. We gladly welcome all high school, middle school and youth football teams. Info: www.eastbaysportsacademy. com, 925-680-9999. LACROSSE ENCORE Lacrosse Our camps are for those players looking to take their game to the next level. Jonathan Christmas is present at every camp where the focus is on developing each and every player according to the S.T.R.I.V.E. model (Sustainable, Training, Reactive coaching, Innovative, Video, Energy). Beginners, check out our introductory and intermediate camps. All camps offer goalie training and there are a limited number of goalie discounts available. Camp locations include Walnut Creek, Belmont, Marin, Sacramento and San Francisco. Info: info@EncoreLacrosse.com MARTIAL ARTS Hanabi Judo & Japanese Culture Camp Hanabi’s Judo and Japanese Culture Summer Camp is a fun, active introduction to the traditions of Japan. Every themed session will have children learning judo (a require-

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ment in Japanese schools), Japanese songs, Japanese stories as well as the main artistic, linguistic or culinary activity. Info: (510) 5308312; dan@hanabijudo.com USKS Adult and children’s programs, kick box fitness, mixed martial arts. Providing excellence in martial arts instruction and services for the entire family. 925-682-9517; www. usksmartialarts.com. OUTDOOR/ADVENTURE SPORTS Bear Grylls Survival Academy Man vs. Wild’s Bear Grylls has designed his Survival Academy to offer outdoor enthusiasts the chance to learn his extreme survival technique in the mountains near Yosemite National Park. You will learn the ultimate self-rescue skills from the world’s most-recognized survivalist. Info: (209) 588-9131; alan@ beargryllssurvivalacademy.com Diablo Rock Gym We offer kids summer camps every week starting in June and ending in August. Sign up for a week at a time or multiple weeks. Ages 6-17; multiple kid and/or week discounts. Call for pricing, 925-602-1000. Tri-Valley Triathlon Club We will train you for a sprint, Olympic or half-ironman triathlon. Join us at one of our free practices occurring 3-5 times a week. Located in the East Bay with practices in Fremont, Newark, Union City, Pleasanton,

Dublin, Livermore and San Ramon. Info: liz@ trivalleytriclub.com RUGBY Diablo Rugby Based in Clayton, our club is dedicated to providing a positive rugby experience for boys at high school, jr. high and youth levels. Info: 925-381-5143, diablorugby.com SOCCER Dublin United Soccer Camps Dublin United Soccer is pleased to offer their excellent program in a day camp format. Each camp session is one week long, and runs from 9-noon. Spring Break Camp runs from Marcy 31-April 4 for girls and boys ages 5 - 17. Our camps feature a fun & friendly atmosphere with challenging curriculum. We take an educational approach to coaching that focuses on being inclusive & welcoming of all players. Participants are not required to play for DUSL. Interested community members are invited and encouraged to attend. Info: td@dublinsoccer.org Heritage Soccer Club HSC Soccer camp will be held at Tesoro Fields in Concord from July 14-18 from 9am - 2pm. This camp is open to all U8 - U15 boys and girls (HSC and non-HSC players are welcome). Come and have a great time and learn about soccer techniques. Players will be instructed by coaches with 25+ years of experience at almost every level. Also,

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even more camps + clinics at sportstarsonline.com goalkeeping trainer Bojan Merik will be present as well. Fees are $200 for HSC players and $300 nonHSC players. Info: conctat Julio Borge at Julio@ heritagesc.com, www.HeritageSC.com Impact Soccer Club We are a community-based organization dedicated to the development of the soccer culture in Brentwood, Oakley, Antioch, Knightsen, Byron and Discovery Bay. Our summer camps are run by Impact Coaching Director Rick Morin. Rick has 30 years of coaching experience and coaches at Carondelet High and the Univ. of California. Impact’s Junior Academy Program, for under-6 is designed to provide age-appropriate soccer training and the proper foundation for young players in our club. Info: richardmorin1@comcast.net, (925) 323-1410 West Coast Soccer Lead by nationally-recognized coach and former SJ Earthquake, Troy Dayak, the WCSC’s programs are designed to bring professional experience and guidance to youth soccer players across Northern California. West Coast Soccer camps create an environment that encourages experimentation and a passion for the game. Info: www.westcoastsoccerclub.com West Contra Costa Youth Soccer League Our program caters to competitive youth players ages 8-9. The main focus of our program is not on winning, but on the development of the total soccer player within the framework of a team. We also offer specialized training for strikers and goalkeepers. Info: 510-758-5288, http://wccysl.com.

SWIMMING/DIVING Santa Clara Aquamaids JUMP IN with the Santa Clara Aquamaids and learn the basics of synchronized swimming! The Santa Clara Aquamaids are looking for swimmers ages 7-12, who are eager to learn, attentive, able to follow directions and work cooperatively in a group setting. Basic synchro skills are taught such as sculling, ballet legs, simple figures, arm strokes, land drilling, and more. The Santa Clara Aquamaids has been producing world-class synchronized swimmers and Olympic athletes since 1964. We have programs designed for beginning through elite levels. Info: 877 722-4630; 408 988-9936; info@aquamaids.org Sherman Swim School Located in Lafayette, our year-round schedule allows children and adults to learn, retain and improve their swim skills with little interruption. Lessons are offered on M-W-F’s and T-Th’s over 3-4 weeks. We teach from age 9-months to adults and non-swimmers to competitive levels. Our private or semi-private lessons allow you to progress at YOUR pace. We also offer beginning and competitive diving. Classes (30 min. long) are taught in three-week sessions. Either on M-W-F or T-Th. Info: 925-283-2100, www.ShermanSwim.com. Terrapins Swim Team Camps and clinics open to all ages and ability levels @ Concord Community Pool. Visit our website for fees/registration info. Info: www.terrapinswim. com

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even more camps + clinics at sportstarsonline.com TENNIS ClubSport Valley Vista Our club has been hosting summer tennis camps in the Walnut Creek area for 33 years, with expert instruction. Tennis pro Dale Miller and his team will teach your children the fundamentals of tennis or help them improve their skills for recreation or competition. Camps are designed to touch on every major aspect of the game — stroke production, conditioning, strategy, footwork, psychology and most importantly, FUN! Players will be grouped according to level of play and age. Info: 925-934-4050. VOLLEYBALL Bay Area Blast Summer Clinics Bay Area Blast Volleyball Club (BABVC) is a volleyball organization in Martinez. Our primary goal is to build character and develop sportsmanship. BABVC offers personalized 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1 lessons and skills clinics designed for beginner and intermediate players. The clinics focus on player development in the fundamental skills. BABVC holds two summer skills clinics for boys and girls of all levels, each running three nights a week for two consecutive weeks from 7-9 pm at NorCal Courts in Martinez. Sessions cost $125. Info: tracyfeldmann@gmail.com

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City Beach Volleyball With facilities in both Fremont and Santa Clara, we offer a wide variety of camps and clinics to serve junior girl players of all experience levels. Academic Camp is for the rising 10-12th graders looking for an opportunity to work with over 15 college coaches.The Sand Program takes place on the sand courts at West Valley College from April-June with 18 sessions to improve your outdoor skills. Our traditional summer camp serves players of all levels. We also have Saturday Sessions available. Info: (408) 654-9330; aaron@citybeach.com dan@citybeach.com Core Volleyball Club We offer a competitive, fun environment where your daughter will enjoy competing at a high level not only in games, but in practices as well.Our goal is to prepare your daughter for the next level; whether that is her middle school, high school, or college program. Clinics are held at Velocity Sports Performance in Dublin. If you are looking for some extra touches prior to tryouts this is an excellent clinic for you. We work on all skill development and fundamentals. Info: info@teamcvc. com; Ph: 925-925-230-9795 Moreau Catholic Volleyball Camp Girls volleyball camp for incoming

grades 6-9, Cost: $100; July 7 – 11, 4:30 – 7:30pm; Info: Coach Ami Schelin, aschelin@moreaucatholic.org; moreaucatholic.org/Athletics Pacific Rim Volleyball Pacific Rim Volleyball Academy in Pleasant Hill is dedicated to providing athletes with the technical, tactical and physical training, to reach their highest potential. Pacific Rim will assist each athlete in reaching maximum performance through proper training and nutrition education. Our advanced training for junior levels (12th grade & below), will provide the opportunity to become elite players at the high school and/or collegiate level. Clinics are available for beginners, girls fall ball and skills-specific, boys skills-specific, open play and private lessons. Info: (585) 313-2215; rworsley@pacificrimvolleyball.com U.S. Youth Volleyball League The United States Youth Volleyball League is hosting a series of volleyball camps this summer in several Northern and Southern California locations. The USYVL is the leader in developing and maintaining youth volleyball leagues for boys and girls ages 7-15. Its motto “Volleyball starts here,” clearly represents its commitment to the development of the sport. Each camp is taught by instruc-

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tors who have played or coached at the club, high school or college level. Registration fee includes a t-shirt, certificate, snacks and water. Info: 1-888-988-7985, www.USYVL.org. WRESTLING Community Youth Center The Concord-based CYC wrestling program trains and challenges wrestlers at all age groups from kindergarten through high school, and all experience levels from beginner to champion. The program offers three types of week-long (July & August) wrestling camps. The Elementary Camp for ages 5-10 and The All Corners Camp for ages 11-18, and the Advanced Camp serves the same age group and runs in August. Each camp runs from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. daily at the CYC. Camp fees vary slightly. Info: 925-671-7070, Ext. 229, www.communityyouthcenter.com. MULTI-SPORT Cabernet All Sports Camp All Sports Summer Camp at Cabernet includes soccer, dodgeball, baseball, obstacle course, crush zone and more! We have a variety of cost options available. Early drop-off 8am (+$10) and late pick-up 4pm (+$15); are available also. Registration limited to 80 kids per day. Drop-in on the day of will be accepted

up to 80 kids for an additional charge of $5 per listed camp price. Come on down! Info: 925-455-8300 Cal Camps Enrollment for Cal Athletic Camps are now open. Space is limited, so please make sure you reserve a place now. Camps are offered for girls and boys ages 5-19, with week-long, half-day, fullday and overnight options. Most camps take place on campus in Berkeley and are held from June through August. Among the sports offered are: Baseball, Basketball, Rowing/Crew, Field Hockey, Football, Golf, Rugby, Soccer, Strength & Conditioning, Swimming, Tennis, Volleyball and Water Polo. Enrollment is based on a first-come, first-served basis. Info: CalBears.com/camps. City Beach Kids Camp Our Kids’ Camps at the Fremont location are available to ages 6-15 and are chock-full of activities for your child to enjoy. Activities include rock climbing instruction,interactive games, free play at the entertainment hub and courts (based upon availability) and a healthy snack. Let them spend the day at City Beach. Camps are offered in 1-, 3- and 5-day session (w/ full- and half-day options). Info: CityBeach.com; 510-6512500 x105.

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even more camps + clinics at sportstarsonline.com De La Salle Camps De La Salle High School will host athletic summer camps to provide a fun, skill-building week for kids. Camps appeal to local youth with a variety of athletic interests. De La Salle will offer the following sessions: Football, Track & Field, Lacrosse, Wrestling, Quarterback & Wide Receiver, Lineman, Volleyball, Baseball, Soccer, Water Polo and Strength & Conditioning. In addition to serving local athletes, the camps also benefit De La Salle students by contributing to The Bishop John S. Cummins Scholarship Program. Info: summercamps@dlshs.org; 925-288-8144. Lafayette Moraga Youth Association The Lafayette-Moraga Youth Association is a nonprofit organization providing year-round athletic programs for all school age youth in the Lafayette and Moraga communities, including softball and baseball, girls volleyball, basketball, soccer and swimming. Several of these sports offer year-round camps. Info: (925) 377-LMYA; membership@ lmyaswim.com Livermore Area Rec and Park Sports Camps LARPD offers a variety of sports for all ages. The popular Sports Camp (ages 5-12), Pee-Wee Sports Camps (ages 3-5) and Flag Football return to complement year-round traditional Baseball/T-Ball, Basketball, Soccer, Volleyball, Golf and Tennis programs from youth to teens. New sports have taken off with the introduction of Frisbee Golf, Gymnastics and Martial Arts. Most of our sport-specific camps accommodate ages 8-14. Info: (925) 373-5733; zsilva@larpd.dst.ca.us

Saint Mary’s College Camps Camps for ages 6-18. Dates posted, registration open. Our camps include: All-sports, baseball, basketball, rugby, lacrosse, soccer, softball, tennis and volleyball. Each clinic features the head coach of the respective Gaels’ program along with a handpicked staff of trained professionals. Each athlete will have the opportunity to develop their skills through individual instruction, group instruction and game experience. Click “camps” at www.smcgaels. com for detailed information and to register on line. Info: smccamps@stmarys-ca.edu, 925-631-4386. UC Davis Camps offered in basketball (boys, girls), field hockey, lacrosse, soccer (boys, girls), baseball, volleyball, football, softball, water polo. Ages, dates vary. More info: www.ucdavissportscamps.com USA Elite Camps We offer camps with superior instruction from professional athletes and top Division I collegiate coaches. Sports served by USA Elite Camps include boys and girls basketball, boys and girls soccer, girls volleyball and baseball. See our ad in this issue for more info. Valley Christian Sport Camps VCS sports camps are a place for boys and girls, grades K-12, to make the most of their athletic potential. From June to August on our San Jose campuses, we offer programs for football, baseball, tennis, soccer, volleyball, basketball, cheer, strength& conditioning, leadership and multi-sport programs. Info: 408-513-2455 ✪

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Back Forty Texas B B Q Roadhouse & Saloon.....................................................................17 Bay Area Festivals Inc. Kidfest Field Of Dreams.................................................................21 Big O Tires Northern California/ Nevada.............................................................................2 Cabernet Indoor Sports....................................................................................................39 Cal Athletic Camps...........................................................................................................46 Cal Diving Club.................................................................................................................42 California Family Fitness.....................................................................................................5 California Flag Football Academy.....................................................................................41 Campolindo High School Cougar Camp............................................................................40 Championship Athletic Fundraising.................................................................................29 Cheergyms.Com...............................................................................................................38 Club Sport........................................................................................................................15 Club Sport Renaissance....................................................................................................34 Community Youth Center.................................................................................................46 Concord Police Association...............................................................................................36 Concord Youth Football & Cheerleading...........................................................................44 Contra Costa Federal Credit Union....................................................................................18 Core Performance........................................................................................................44,45 Core Volleyball Club..........................................................................................................45 De La Salle High School Football Coaches Clinic................................................................46 Diablo Rock Gym..............................................................................................................45 Diablo Trophies & Awards.................................................................................................45 Dianne Adair Enrichment Programs.................................................................................47 East Bay Bulldogs Basketball............................................................................................45 Excellence In Sport Performance......................................................................................35 Fit 2 The Core....................................................................................................................36 Franklin Canyon Golf Course.............................................................................................46 G Tech Anti Microbial...................................................................................................26,27 Garaventa Enterprises......................................................................................................38 Got’em Baseball...............................................................................................................30 Gregg Jefferies Sports Academy ......................................................................................32 Halo Headband................................................................................................................46 Hanabi Judo.....................................................................................................................41 Head First Baseball West Coast.........................................................................................37 Heritage Soccer Club........................................................................................................40 Hobo Sports Baseball Academy........................................................................................45 Home Team Sports Photography......................................................................................41 Kangazoom......................................................................................................................43 Lafayette Parks & Rec Summer Camps.............................................................................44 Little League World Series..................................................................................................4 Mountain Mike’s Pizza......................................................................................................13 Muir Orthopedic Specialists..............................................................................................35 National Scouting Report.................................................................................................44 Play It Again Sports..........................................................................................................14 Redwood Christian Athletic Camps...................................................................................45 Rhino Sports Of Northern California.................................................................................14 Robert Livermore Community Center...............................................................................38 Rocco’s Pizza.....................................................................................................................45 Sacramento River Cats......................................................................................................38 Saint Mary’s Athletic Summer Camps...............................................................................42 Santa Clara Aquamaids....................................................................................................43 Sherman Swim School.....................................................................................................38 Sport Clips........................................................................................................................19 State Farm Lisa Truesdell Agent........................................................................................25 Stevens Creek Toyota........................................................................................................20 Summit Orthopedic Specialists..........................................................................................3 Sutter Health East Bay........................................................................................................5 Terrapins Swim Team.......................................................................................................14 Tilden Park Golf Course.....................................................................................................46 Tpc / The Pitching Center..................................................................................................25 U C Davis Health System...................................................................................................48 U C S F Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland......................................................................33 U S A Elite.........................................................................................................................17 United States Youth Volleyball League.............................................................................48 Valley Christian Viking......................................................................................................12

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Bay Area Issue 84, May 2014