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BAY AREA EDITION JUNE 2019 VOL. 10 ISSUE 165


multi-sport

MULTIPLICATION

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he week this SportStars issue released coincided with the final week of the high school sporting year. Which is always a time of year when we have our rearview glasses on as we prepare to consider our end-of-year honors and lists We just completed our annual collaborative effort with the Sacramento River Cats, producing the 10th All-City Team celebrating the athletes of the Greater Sacramento region and the outer edges of the Sac-Joaquin Section. In building that list, it was hard not to notice the number of elite multi-sport athletes from 2018-19. Monterey Trail-Elk Grove’s Zach Larrier — who the River Cats named their overall male athlete of the year by awarding him the Art Savage Award — was just one example of the multi-sport stardom. He quarterbacked a 12-1 football team, contributed in 23 basketball games and then ran the state’s fastest time in the 400 meters. Readers of the Sac-Joaquin issue can read more about him on Page 10. Larrier wasn’t the only two- and three-sport standouts we came across. There was also Burbank-Sacramento’s Levelle Bailey (football, basketball) and Folsom’s DeShawn Lynch (football, basketball). For the girls, Davis lacrosse star Alex Agnew was also a key player for the Blue Devils basketball team. It went on and and on. As we begin preparing notes for our exclusive Bay Area 75 honors (due out this July), the trend has continued. Perhaps no school produces more multi-sport athletes than CampolindoMoraga, and two come to mind immediately: Lucas Allen (football, soccer and baseball) and Grant Harper (football, baseball). Not far from the Campo campus is Acalanes-Lafayette, home of Kaylee Pond — a Diablo Athletic League Most Valuable Player in both basketball and softball. Competition to crack the list is going to be tough this year for sure. But all these two- and three-sport standouts got us thinking about some of our favorite multi-sport athletes during the SportStars Magazine Era. Here’s just a few we remember fondly: Marquel Johnson of St. Patrick-St. Vincent High in Vallejo: He was our No. 1 athlete of 2016-17 after nearly propelling three different Bruins teams (football, basketball and baseball) to NCS titles. Niamey Harris of Mission-S.F.: He was the 2016 AAA Football Player of the Year and the heart-and-soul of the Bears’ CIF State Championship-winning hoops team four months later. Drew Anderson of Miramonte-Orinda: He finished No. 1 in the Bay Area 75 for the 2013-14 school year after throwing for more than 4,000 yards in football, averaging a doubledouble of 21 points and 10 rebounds during basketball season, and then hitting over .400 in 16 baseball games. Megan Reid or Miramonte-Orinda: The Matadors 2014 grad gets special recognition for playing two sports in the SAME SEASON, basketball and soccer. Could a multi-sport talent unseat defending Bay Area 75 No. 1, Haley Jones of Mitty-San Jose basketball? Join us this summer to find out. ✪

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YOUR TICKET TO CALIFORNIA SPORTS ADMIT ONE; RAIN OR SHINE This Vol. #10, June 2019 Whole No. 165 is published by Caliente! Communications, LLC, PO Box 741, Clayton, CA 94517. SportStars™© 20102014 by Caliente! Communications, LLC. All rights reserved. Receive FREE Digital Subscription in your inbox. Subscribe at SportStarsMag.com. To receive sample issues, please send $3 per copy, or $8 total for bulk. Back issues are $4 each. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of Publisher is strictly prohibited. The staff and management, including Board of Directors, of SportStars™© does not advocate or encourage the use of any product or service advertised herein for illegal purposes. Editorial contributions, photos and letters to the editor are welcome and should be addressed to the Editor. All material should be typed, doublespaced on disk or email and will be handled with reasonable care. For materials return, please enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. SportStars™© and STARS!™© Clinics are registered trademarks of Caliente! Communications, LLC.

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Opening Up Opportunity

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erhaps the biggest name for Bay Area football on the national recruiting circuit this spring would be quarterback Jay Butterfield from Liberty-Brentwood. In his second year starting for the Lions last fall, Butterfield threw for nearly 3,300 yards and 43 touchdowns in helping the team win the CIF Division 1-A state title. He’s also got the size, at nearly 6-foot-6, that college coaches love. In early May, Butterfield announced a verbal commitment to Oregon. He became the latest top Bay Area recruit to head out of California, following in the path of other recent blue-chippers like linebacker Henry To’oto’o of De La Salle (Tennessee) and running back Najee Harris of Antioch (Alabama). At least Butterfield didn’t jump ship completely out of the Pac-12 Conference, however, which is what happened two days before he committed to Oregon. That’s when California’s No. 1 quarterback recruit and perhaps the top Class of 2020 recruit in the nation, St. John Bosco-Bellflower’s D.J. Uiagalelei, announced for Clemson. So what would someone say if on the ensuing weekend following both major commitments it was possible to see Butterfield and Uiagalelei unloading passes almost side-byside to some of the best wide receiver prospects in the nation? They were doing just that at El Cerrito High’s field on May 11 at the Northern California regional camp of a national tour known as The Opening. Presented by Nike, The Opening at El Cerrito also was a place where many top players from well-known programs from outside of Northern California such as St. John Bosco, Mater Dei-Santa Ana, Bishop Gorman-Las Vegas and St. Louis-Honolulu all gathered for a chance to earn an invited trip to Dallas to be part of Nike’s The Opening, a national football camp. The quarterbacks also need to go to at least one regional camp so they can get an invite to the Elite 11 camp, which really is where a lot of top quarterbacks from each graduating class begin to develop lifelong friendships that they will carry for what they hope are long NFL careers. Since yours truly was part of the planning for the very early Nike camps and has known many of the camp directors and coaches for many years, going to this event has become a must-stop on the yearly high school sports calendar. The 2018 camp had to be missed since it was held earlier in the year in March in the middle of the CIF basketball state playoffs, but it was moved back to May this year. Both Butterfield and Uiagalelei were ripping balls effectively throughout all of the drills and one-on-ones. The MVP of the quarterbacks, however, was Ethan Garbers of Corona del Mar-Newport Beach (who has committed to Washington). The running backs were an elite group as well, but the

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MVP nod went to Class of 2022 Raleek Brown from Edison-Stockton. Brown displayed phenomenal quickness, moves and feet, but he may not have the size to be a running back in college and may eventually become a slot receiver. “No, I didn’t expect to be MVP, but I expected to be one of them,” said Brown, who gets some coaching at Edison from former NFL receiver Lavelle Hawkins, who also was an MVP at an earlier NorCal Nike camp along with Lincoln-Stockton’s Brandin Cooks. “I feel I am representing the city out here and am glad at keeping it going (MVPs).” Going to one of these camps, however, is more about putting marks next to names on a roster of players who may not be such well-known prospects. Even with a change in format that allows evaluators much more time to look at players from different positions, it’s still impossible to see everyone. Regardless, here’s some players from SportStars’ coverage area who were definitely noticed at the El Cerrito gathering: DB Kavir Bains (Valley Christian-San Jose); TE Brock Bowers (Napa); DL Evan Branch-Haynes (Sacred Heart-SF); WR Grant Daley (De La Salle-Concord); OL Andres Dewerk (Los Gatos); RB/WR Shamar Garrett (De La Salle-Concord); DB Jalen Henderson (De Anza-El Sobrante); OL Mark Hutchison (Pittsburg); OL Gerad Lichtenhan (Davis); DE Mason Mastrov (Campolindo-Moraga); RB Isaiah McElvane (Valley Christian-San Jose); DB Trey Paster (Buhach ColonyAtwater); WR Savon Ponce (Rio Americano-Sacramento); OL Frank Poso (Branham-San Jose); DL Jamar Sekona (Marin Catholic-Kentfield); QB Daniel Susac (Jesuit-Carmichael) and OL Isaiah Tupou (Grant-Sacramento). Sure, camps like these in which the players are running around in shorts is not even in the same ballpark as being in pads and helmets and being in a real game. But they do have value when you can check out the next quarterback coming up the pipeline at a school like Folsom (Jake Reithmeier was there for the Bulldogs), and when one school has several players that look good at different positions it can be a preview of what might happen for the ensuing season. If we had to pick one team that falls into that category, it would be Valley Christian-San Jose. The Warriors should be plenty motivated to have a big season, too, after the heartbreaking manner in which they lost to St. Francis-Mountain View in last year’s CCS finals. See what we mean about how an event like the The Opening gets the juices flowing for the next football season? Happens to me every year. ✪ Mark Tennis is the co-founder of Cal-Hi Sports and publisher of CalHiSports.com. Contact him at markjtennis@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter at @CalHiSports

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CALIFORNIA NATIONAL GUARD COVER STORY

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CALIFORNIA NATIONAL GUARD COVER STORY

all the

world’s a

stage Amador Valley Sprinter Chinyere Okoro Has A Love For Acting — But Has No Time For Drama As She Chases NCS & State Gold Story by Mike Wood | Photos by Jean-Paul Toshiro Follow us on Twitter & Instagram, like us on Facebook!

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CALIFORNIA NATIONAL

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or sprinting sensation Chinyere Okoro, her world is a stage. Actually, there are two stages. The first is track and field, where the Amador Valley High-Pleasanton senior has soared to the ranks of California’s elite in the 100 and 200 meters. Then there is the theater, which fuels Okoro’s love for drama and performing. She will pursue her parallel crafts at the next level when she heads to the University of Oregon in the fall. Whether it’s acting, singing or running the 100 in front of large crowds, it brings out something special in Okoro and draws her out of her quieter side. “I think drama boosts up your confidence, too,” she said. “Just knowing that you have to act in front of a lot of people. That definitely can create a good mindset on the positive side.” She will bring plenty of positive momentum when she heads to the North Coast Section Meet of Champions at Diablo Valley College in Pleasant Hill May 17-18. The CIF State Championships are a week later in Clovis. Last weekend at the NCS Tri-Valley meet, she was first in the 200 in 24.10 and in the 100 in a meet-record time of 11.60. Based on marks as of May 15 at www.athletic.net, Okoro’s top times this

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GUARD COVER STORY

season of 11.57 in the 100 set at the Sacramento Meet of Champions, and 23.94 in the 200 at the Arcadia Invitational put her second in the state in both events. The leader in each is Calabasas’ De’Anna Nowling, the defending state champ in the 100. Notably, both of those times by Okoro are school records. She broke her own Amador Valley record at Arcadia in the 200 that she set as a junior. Okoro’s mother, Tiffany, also serves as her coach. Tiffany was a runner who pursued a professional career under Maurice Compton and Ray Norton, both of whom ran for the legendary Bud Winter of Speed City fame. But if you have pegged Chinyere as an amazing running prodigy who was running and competing from the time she could walk, you are wrong. As a youth she played a wide variety of sports. Only in the last couple of years has she set her focus solely on track. “I was slow, I was last all the time,” she said of her early days of trying track, when her interests spanned from basketball to tennis to volleyball to track. “As she got older and started to learn about the competitive side of it , she started to pick up really liking track and field and we just stuck with it,” Tiffany Okoro said. “She was really good at tennis and track. I told her she would have to choose one and focus on the one.” Follow us on Twitter & Instagram, like us on Facebook!

Okoro began high school at Amador Valley’s cross-town rival, Foothill. She didn’t run track for the Falcons her freshman year, but competed unattached in some college meets. “That definitely pushed me and I knew I could go somewhere with track,” she said. She transferred to Amador Valley for her sophomore year, but found mixed results in track with little postseason glory. With guidance from her mother, Amador Valley head coach Jason Oswalt and Dons sprints coach Barney Stocking, it began coming together. It started to click in her junior year — notably at the 2018 Arcadia Invitational, where Okoro established herself by winning the 200 meters. The experience was an eye-opener. “It was really interesting because other people come out from different areas, and that is the most exciting thing about track and field,” she said. “And they all have around the same time as you. In Arcadia, everyone comes and competes. You get pushed. And that is the thing of beauty of track and field. Getting pushed and accomplishing your own goals.” One big change has been determination, Oswalt said. “When she came in as a sophomore, it was more a question of ‘How much

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CALIFORNIA NATIONAL GUARD COVER STORY

do you like this?’ And I didn’t have any answer for that then,” he said. “I am not sure what changed, but when she came back as a junior she was showing that, ‘I like this and I have invested in it.’” The attitude and ability she showed were impressive. But that all came crashing down in an abbreviated postseason. A hamstring injury that she initially thought was mild proved troublesome. The decision was made to shut her down — no NCS Meet of Champions or CIF State Championships. She realized how much track meant to her. “When she had the injury at the league meet, she really felt a sense of loss for the first time,” Oswalt said. With her potential evident, Okoro was getting college offers. She decided on Oregon during the summer. “I am very excited for Oregon because I definitely can p.r. and just try to run in the professional circuit,” she said. “That is definitely my goal. At first it was a little tough, knowing UCLA, UNLV and San Diego were the top ones. I knew Oregon was a choice, too. At first I was a little hesitant on which school I was going to go to. I am glad I picked Oregon.” Healthy and even more determined, Okoro accelerated to high gear this spring. “Coming in she was a little more hungry and wanted to prove she could do better than what she did last year,” Tiffany Okoro said. “She created a lot of goals for herself, and has been meeting them as she has been progressing through the season. She has been definitely on the mark.” With accolades and attention on her own accomplishments, she really cherishes the team aspect. At the NCS Tri-Valley meet, she ran as part of the 1600 relay, even though Oswalt said she doesn’t like that event. It’s about the team for her. “It’s about camaraderie,” he said. “We ask our seniors to write down what was their best experience. And with everything she has won, she wrote down that she was excited when she was on the relay and they worked together and made the NCS Meet of Champions finals as a sophomore. “Sometimes people get the wrong idea because she is so serious that she doesn’t enjoy every opportunity. Obviously that means a lot for her to be part of the team.” Okoro has found motivation and inspiration to be reciprocal. “My teammates always lift me up, and my coaches as well,” said Okoro. “It’s definitely a big blessing. It also loosens up my mindset as well. I am glad I have a team that encourages me.” She’ll continue to seek that double, the 100 and 200, at the state championships on May 24-25 at Veterans Memorial Stadium in Clovis. And there are more doubles ahead. There’s Eugene, the City that Nike Built. And Oregon, the Land of Shakespeare Festivals. Sounds like an ideal match for Act II. Twice over. ✪ 14

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Behind the Clipboard by Clay Kallam

TRANSFER Tribulations I love to watch Cal women’s basketball because I see so much I can apply to my own game, but it was sad to hear that Kianna Smith was transferring to Penn State. I really liked watching her play — she could shoot, she could pass, she could defend — but now she’s gone. I heard somewhere, though, that she has to sit out a year before she can play again. Why is that? It doesn’t seem fair. E.A., Berkeley

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ell, it doesn’t seem fair because it isn’t fair. Coaches and administrators don’t have to sit out a year when they transfer, so why should players? That’s a question the NCAA really doesn’t want to answer, especially since some players transfer and can play the next year, while others can’t. What’s the difference? Usually, it comes down to money. I’m not talking about graduate transfers, who are athletes who have graduated from their present school and still have eligibility left. They can transfer and play immediately, which is great. In this case, what the money buys is a lawyer, and what the lawyer does is threaten to sue. The NCAA does not like to be sued. The NCAA is going to think long and hard about fighting a transfer request in court because of the money involved. And of course, should the court rule against the NCAA, then it threatens to erase all of the transfer rules for all athletes. But back to Kianna Smith. If her family (or a Penn State booster) is willing to pony up a few thousand dollars to threaten a lawsuit, then the NCAA might just roll over. Or if Smith has a family member or friend who’s a lawyer, or Penn State can figure out a way to get that legal representation, the chances of Smith being eligible next year go way up. Yes, that’s just another case of the rich getting richer. But really, there’s a larger question: Why are there rules about transferring in the first place?

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As mentioned, coaches and administrators can move to a job they like better than the one they have without any penalty, so why are students the ones who are told they must stick it out even though they’re unhappy? The answer, of course, comes down to one thing: The NCAA and the colleges have devised a system that works almost entirely to their own benefit. The athletes who put their bodies on the line have no input on rules and restrictions imposed on them. Note that intercollegiate sports are a multi-billion dollar industry that benefits colleges enormously (don’t believe the reports that athletic departments lose money for a second) — if they weren’t an overall positive for colleges, then you’d see schools dropping out of Div. I sports. Instead, more jump in every year, and unless every college administrator in the United States is stupid, the reason they jump in is because it benefits the college. Any major industry wants to control the labor force, and college athletics is a major industry. So the reason Kianna Smith can’t play at Penn State next year — unless she lawyers up — is that the NCAA and the colleges don’t want to give their labor force the freedom to move around because it makes it more difficult on NCAA member schools. Oh, well, freedom of movement is OK if those employees are coaches or administrators, in which case that group of adults can do what they want. ✪

Clay Kallam has been an assistant athletic director and has coached numerous sports at a handful of high schools throughout the Bay Area. To submit a question for Behind the Clipboard, email him at claykallam@gmail.com.

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San Luis Obispo’s 805 Elite Volleyball Club Earns Its First Bid To Junior Nationals

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ith a home base in San Luis Obispo, the 805 Elite Volleyball Club has always found itself a bit in limbo. The club is too south to be a consistent presence in the Northern California Volleyball Association, and a bit too north for a steady dose of Southern California Volleyball Association play. Whether 805 is playing as a member of NCVA (which it does with its nine girls teams), or SCVA (where its three boys team compete), the club is now firmly on the map. That’s thanks to the 805 Elite 17-Black girls team — which recently punched the 9-year-old club’s first ticket to Junior Nationals. The 17-Black team went 7-2 over nine USA Division matches at the NCVA Far Western Qualifier in Reno from April 26-28. It was good enough for third-place and an extreme amount of euphoria. “They were very excited,” 17-Black coach Chip Blaney said. “For a lot of the girls, it’s been a goal since they were little. Since they started playing club volleyball in this area as 12- and 13-year olds. It was something a good majority had been chasing for a long time.” The oldest girls team within 805 Elite’s program is truly a regional all-star team. It became so after another area club was forced to disband at the end of last year and 805 picked up some of the displaced talent. Six different high schools are represented among the 12 girls — all current juniors along with one sophomore. “That’s really one of the cool things about this group,” club director and recently named head coach of Cal Poly Women’s Volleyball Caroline Walters said. “It really is a collection of the best kids from our area.”

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Tamara Wright

The team features four players from Arroyo Grande High: Defensive specialist Grace Devaney, middle hitter Taylor MacCuish, hitter Whitney Thompson and hitter Makenna Wolfe. There are three from Mission Prep-San Luis Obispo: Middle blocker Olivia Goodwin, setter Elaina Bosshardt and defensive specialist Brooke Fledderman. San Luis Obispo High has two players: Setter Dylan Van Rooyen and middle blocker, Kayla Craft. There’s also Phoebe Corgiat, a hitter from Paso Robles High; Jahnine Ricafrente, a libero from RighettiSanta Maria; And Mackenzie Wright, a versatile utility player from Atascadero. The team has qualified for the USA Volleyball Girls Junior National Championships July 2-5 in Indianapolis. “The biggest key for them is going to be focusing on the things they’ve done well this season,” Blaney said. “This won’t be the typical level of competition that we see. But, if they can stay focused and play their game, they’ll surprise themselves — and others — with how well they can play.” ✪ Follow us on Twitter & Instagram, like us on Facebook!

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, d r u H Logan s e n a l a c A g n You s r e v i l e D m a Te t u o k a Bre t a h T n Seaso A d e d Inclu e t a t S 5 Top 2 s t I d n A g n i k Ran I n o i s i v i D t s r Fi y r o t c i V f f o y a l P am l l a K y a l C y Story b ras e d e F t n i G Photos by

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T

he dark clouds rolled in over the hills that hover past right field. Though the wind did not howl — as it sometimes can — it was still a chilly spring day at Acalanes High in Lafayette on May 14. And if you believe in omens, it did not appear the gods were smiling on the Dons baseball team for its first-round North Coast Section Division I game. Dublin, a battle-tested opponent that had survived the baseball wars of the East Bay Athletic League, had senior three-sport star Grant Manning on the mound, an imposing presence at 6-foot-6 who carried a 2.45 ERA into the game. Acalanes countered with its exceptionally deep staff, starting with Logan Hurd and his 1.74 ERA. The distant fences and grey skies set the stage for a classic pitchers’ duel, which went extra innings before anyone managed to score. Finally, with two outs in the bottom of the ninth, junior Cole Murgia poked a double into left field and Acalanes claimed its first-ever Div. I playoff win, 1-0. And the Div. I reference is key, because Acalanes is a Div. III school by enrollment. But after winning the NCS Div. III title in 2016, the program voluntarily moved up to Div. I — and since then, had not won a postseason game. With just one senior starter on the field, and one senior getting significant innings on the mound, lack of experience was a concern as well. This year, though, despite that drought and youthful roster, the expectations were much higher than just getting a win. A new coaching staff came in, headed by Campolindo-Moraga grad and youth coach Clint Hoover. He inherited a horde of young talent returning from a team that won 16 games in 2018. Still, the coaching change did not come without some controversy, and there was concern that the change in direction could disrupt the process — but Hoover and his assistant coaches smoothed out most of the potential bumps in the road. And coming into that game against Dublin, Acalanes was 22-2 and ranked 21st in the state by Cal-Hi Sports. The team’s ERA was 1.08, and though the offense sometimes sputtered, the defense, especially in the outfield, was outstanding. “There are no big secrets,” said Hoover, who played at Cal before moving on to the professional level for two years. “We’re really balanced, though the depth of our pitching is unique.” That was shown against Dublin when three pitchers — Hurd, Eddie Burns and Nick Kresnak — each threw three scoreless innings. And the defense was flawless, including a blink-and-you-missed-it double play with sophomore sensation Davis Diaz making a fabulous turn after a feed from second baseman Murgia. The offense? Well, it’s been a boom-or-bust effort, with Acalanes scoring 10 or more runs nine times, and three or fewer eight times, including just one run total in the two losses. Junior center fielder Nick Barmont acknowledged that sometimes the lack of experience was an issue. “It definitely has worked against us,” he said. “We’re really young.” But countering that was the positive attitude of the new coaches. “We’re not afraid to make mistakes,” said Barmont. “We’re more involved and more engaged. The coaches want everyone to improve, whether they’re starters or coming off the bench. We look forward to being out here.” Kresnak, the third baseman and No. 3 hitter, agrees. “Everyone is closer,” he said, “and that’s been huge for us.” Kresnak also pointed to some shifts in emphasis in practice.

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Davis Diaz

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“There’s been a lot of repetition of things that are really important for a good baseball club to do. It’s good to work on first-and-third situations so you know how to handle them when they come up, but they don’t happen that often. We took a lot more ground balls this year, and you get ground balls every game.” Hoover, though, believes being one year older was just as critical. “Having one more year of experience,” he said, “and believing that they’re good has made a big difference.” Of course, it doesn’t hurt to have good players. Acalanes has a lot of them, with Diaz the best of a very talented group. “His future is as bright as anybody’s,” said Hoover. “Anything you can ask on a baseball field, he can do.” Diaz is the shortstop, but he’s also the backup catcher and leadoff hitter. And like most of the players, he’s been involved in high-level youth and travel baseball for several years. In fact, many of the players have been competing with and against each other since third grade. “We’ve all been together a while,” he said, “and it’s really helped us.” As for the change in coaching, Diaz said, “Both coaching staffs were great to us, but most of us have known Coach Hoover for a while, so it was an easy transition.” “Easy,” however, is not a word that applies to the Div. I postseason, not with No. 5 in the nation De La Salle-Concord looming on the other side of the bracket, and lots of potential land mines between that firstround win and an NCS title game. But Hoover and the Dons haven’t looked back since making the jump from Div. III. “We wanted to stay at D-I,” Hoover said. “That’s where I want to be with this group.” And that’s where this young group wants to be as well, as the groundwork has been laid for future success. There are talented freshmen scattered throughout the junior varsity and freshman teams, and the only issue might be finding room on the roster and playing time for those knocking on the door. Still, Diaz feels that there’s no reason to wait for a title. He and many of his teammates have been playing high-level baseball for high stakes for years, and he’s not worried about the pressure getting to the team. “There’s no pressure at all,” he said. “We don’t need to make these games bigger than they already are. We just need to go out and do what we’ve been doing all year.” ✪

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ear y t s r fi y “It was m urse o c g n o l swimming ot g I . r e m m in the su at the t u c l a i r t my ent v e s r e d n Sa Summer ight R . ) e l l i v e (in Ros mates m a e t d a away I h aying s e m o t p running u got t s u j u o y d, ‘Oh my Go cut! l a i r t c i p your Olym ting.’ And xci e o s s ’ t a Th at h w , h a e Y ‘ I was like an?’” e m t a h t does rtman — Zoie Ha

I

f it seems as though Zoie Hartman’s rise to elite swimmer was an immediate success story — well, it really was. All things considered. After she wrapped up her Monte Vista High career with a May that included four North Coast Section titles, one NCS record-breaking swim and her third and fourth career CIF State Championship swims, it’s hard to believe she was practically a novice just three years earlier. Hartman only began competitive year-round swimming two years before she arrived on the Danville campus in late summer of 2015. But by the following summer, she was at the U.S. Olympic Trials in Omaha. And only then did it really dawn on her how good of a swimmer she could be. “It was my first year swimming long course in the summer,” Hartman recalled. “I got my trial cut at the Summer Sanders event (in Roseville). Right away I had teammates running up to me saying ‘Oh my God, you just got your Olympic trial cut! That’s so exciting.’ And I was like ‘Yeah, what does

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that mean?’” Hartman didn’t join a swim team until she was 12. That’s when her family moved from Arizona to the Bay Area. Both her parents had played collegiate basketball for Simpson College in Iowa and they encouraged Zoie to try a number of sports early on. She tried softball, soccer and basketball while living in Arizona. None of them stuck like swimming did. She transgressed to year-round swimming with the Crow Canyon Sharks Club pretty quickly. Sharks head coach Ethan Hall saw the building blocks for a standout swimmer almost immediately. “It was just her second year swimming,” Hall said. “She was definitely tall and strong. She had a lot of power — but she was still learning the strokes. … She was raw and she had a lot to learn. She was just a really hard worker and took instruction very very well.” She qualified for junior nationals in her first year of competitive swimming. “That’s pretty abnormal,’ Hall said. “She then got that Olympic cut in the 100 meter breaststroke and that opened her eyes to what she could be. In Omaha at Olympic Trials she got to see what the top of the sport was doing. She set a goal at that point to get back there, and she’s worked her way pretty close.” Follow us on Twitter & Instagram, like us on Facebook!

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Another Bay Area swimmer competing at the 2016 Olympic Trials was a Stanford student named Maya DiRado. She would make the Olympic team and come home from Rio de Janeiro with two golds, one silver and a bronze. It was her NCS Championships record that Hartman erased on May 4. Hartman’s NCS finals time of 1 minute, 55.76 seconds was more than fourtenths of a second faster than the 1:56.17 mark DiRado set in her senior year at Maria Carrillo-Santa Rosa in 2010. And get this: It wasn’t even Hartman’s fastest career 200 IM. She broke 1 minute, 54 seconds at the junior national in August 2018. Hartman paired her record swim in the 200 IM with a 100 breaststroke championship. She also swam the second leg on Monte Vista’s 200 freestyle relay championship team, and was the anchor leg to the 400 freestyle relay championship quartet. Not surprisingly, Monte Vista won the girls team title. “I really didn’t have a ton of goals,” Hartman said of her approach to her final high school season. “I just really wanted to make it a really enjoyable senior year for me. I was focused on so many goals in my sophomore and junior years. I just told myself that I’m going to swim my hardest — whatever that makes of it, that’s what will happen.” That seemed to work out alright. A week after her five-title NCS Saturday, Hartman defended her CIF State Championships in both the 200 IM and 100 breaststroke. None of these performances surprised Hall. “People look at her and see the long arms and her height and they assume she’s a natural,” the coach said. “But I’ve never coached a swimmer more consistent and dedicated. We train 20 hours of week and she hasn’t missed a moment of that training for four years. She trains through all the things that get in other swimmers’ way — illness, homework, whatever. “That’s her biggest superpower: She continues to show up day-in and dayout no matter what.” That superpower will travel with her wherever she goes. For the next four years, that means the University of Georgia. “When I went there on my unofficial visit and walked on to the pool deck, it was just a very welcoming atmosphere,” Hartman said. “I was really looking for something like that. Academically they had programs there that excited me. It just felt right.” Hartman plans to major in exercise and sports science with an eye on a career in physical therapy. Before she flies off to Athens, Georgia, she’ll compete in one more major Bay Area meet — the USA Swimming Senior Nationals from July 31-Aug. 4 at Stanford. She’s got qualifying marks in the 50- and 100-meter freestyle, 100 and 200 breaststroke and 200 IM. That will be her take-off point for the next level — and she’s approaching it with the same level-headed work ethic that’s driven her along this accelerated path of success. “I just want to try and get better,” she said. “Whether that’s in my swimming or my academics, I know there’s always room for improvement.” Hall expects she’ll find that improvement. And quickly. It’s what she does. “Georgia coach Jack Bauerle has developed national athletes in the past,” Hall said. “The school has all the facilities and resources Zoie needs to take it to the next level. She’ll be a valuable Georgia Bulldog from the outset, and it will only help her.” It will probably go well for the Bulldogs as well. ✪ 28

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BE VOCAL about your stress get mental: erika westhoff

I

n my 20 years as a mental skills coach, there’s no doubt that stress is a bigger part of young athletes lives today — more than ever before. So much so, it’s showing up in very serious ways in the body. One of the most detrimental ways stress shows up in the body is through a disorder I see more and more, Vocal Cord Dysfunction. VCD can be terrifying for an athlete. Essentially, while at full effort the body becomes over stimulated from physical, mental and environmental stress. As a result, the body attempts to shut down by closing the vocal cords, not allowing air to move into the lungs and forcing the athlete to stop. While Vocal Cord Dysfunction is a complicated disorder studied in clinics around the country, there’s no doubt stress plays a big part in how VCD episodes develop. I see a lot of athletes with this condition. Many of them have similar symptoms and often fit a personality profile referred to in research as “stress-prone,” or more commonly as “Type A.” These are athletes who are often talented, very hard working and push themselves — both in sports and in the classroom. A great example of an athlete with this condition is Rick. Rick was a runner. A very good runner. He had an outstanding freshman year with his high school cross country and track teams. Then, during summer training prior to his sophomore year, something started to go terribly wrong. Rick felt his throat tighten and eventually close up halfway through races and tougher training runs. He was forced to stop, no matter how badly he wanted to keep going. But strangely enough, once he stopped, he could catch his breath and pick up the pace once again. After this happened a few times, Rick became fearful it would happen again. Often, it did. Therefore he began to hold back. The combination of anxious feelings about possibly having to stop and frustration that his times were steadily increasing made for a very difficult summer of training. Rick and his mom did their homework and were able find a Vocal Cord Dysfunction clinic to get a clear diagnosis and breathing techniques, both key areas to help athletes learn to manage VCD. The last step was a referral from the clinic to me, to teach Rick how to manage his stress and avoid VCD episodes altogether. We began by teaching Rick all the mental training fundamentals — the same skills I teach athletes who come in to simply add to their training toolbox. We put extra emphasis on all relaxation and stress management skills ›› Progressive relaxation ›› Meditation ›› Breathing ›› Imagery ›› Self-talk strategies We also ensured Rick had a solid plan of how to integrate these skills into his pre-race routines. Rick needed a good sense of control over what stressed him and how he responded to that stress. Once this control was established, Rick was able to start pushing his runs once again. Cross country season proved to be the perfect experimental time for him to really nail down his race preparation and race management. As the season progressed, he was able to focus more and more on race strategy and pushing himself. Rick was running some of his best races going into the postseason, where he finished in the top 15 of his state as a sophomore. Rick’s confidence was sky high and he was excited about the upcoming track season. While Vocal Cord Dysfunction is never cured, Rick now has it well controlled. The keys to controlling VCD are three-fold: 1) Diagnosis from a medical doctor (is it asthma or is it VCD?), 2) breathing techniques from a skilled speech therapist or pathologist, and 3) mental skills training with a sport psychology professional who has experience working with VCD. With all three pieces of the puzzle in place, the success rate for athletes with VCD is excellent. ✪ Erika Westhoff is a CEO and certified mental trainer at EW Performance in Pleasanton.

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See hundreds of more camps like these at SportStarsMag.com/Camps BADMINTON East Bay Badminton Spring Camp Elite. Intermediate. Beginner? It doesn’t matter. If you are interested in badminton, come to our spring camps! We have age groupings from 19 and under to adult classes. Badminton is a sport for the masses Info: 510.655.8989 or info@eastbaybadminton.com BASEBALL Bentley School Summer Baseball Camp Bentley School Summer Sports Camps are an opportunity for rising 5th-12th graders to develop skills and interest in a variety of sports. All camps are coed and offer instruction and coaching Monday-Friday for each session. Info: rrafeh@bentleyschool.net Branham Bruins Baseball Camps Varsity baseball coach Tony Pianto runs this camp for boys and girls ages 5-14. Camp is excellent for all skill levels. Opportunity to participate in age and skill appropriate drills and scrimmages. Two June sessions. 9am-1pm. Info: baseball.branhamsportscamps.com/ summer-camps.cfm; aepianto@yahoo.com City of Walnut Creek Baseball Camp Camp Age: 8-13 offers a fully staffed and supervised camp. Summer Camps: Registration opened Feb. 28. For more information: walnutcreekrec.org or call (925) 943-5858 De La Salle Youth Baseball Camp Offers four sessions for incoming 4th-9th graders. Emphasize proper techniques for running, stealing, throwing, receiving, hitting, bunting, pitching, catching, outfield and infield. Staff will analyze the camper in real game situations and scenarios. Info: dlshs.org/athletics/ camps-clinics; summercamps@dlshs.org or call 925.288.8100 ext. 7090 Golden Era Spring Baseball Academies Choose between our Hitting, Pitching or Infield Academies. Golden Era is also home to the Oakland Immortals Club team. Info: (925) 339-1078; goldenerabaseballclub.com/springacademy-2018 Headfirst Baseball Academy & Camps Headfirst camps are known throughout NorCal for player development. Players will learn the correct mechanics of each position. Info: Coach Michael, MJi0209@aol.com; Coach Mario, Mario74iglesias@aol.com Moreau Catholic Baseball Camps Provides customized program tailored to individuals. Begin in weight room or on the field working on strength training or agility, then work on defensive and offensive work on the baseball field. Open to grades 2-9. Info: 510.881.4300; OSailors@moreaucatholic.org Nike Baseball Camps Offer athletes a variety of youth baseball camp options. Depending on the camp and its unique schedule, our campers can spend the entire week at one of our many locations

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nationwide. Info: 1-800-NIKE-CAMP Performance Pitching With Matt Jarvis Performance Pitching offers structured methods of training designed specifically to the develop core skills players need. We have more than 25 years of experience in private instruction. We teach you the fundamentals of the game, how to improve your play, and a passion for baseball. Info: info@performancepitching.net; (877) 797-6174 Salesian Red & Gold Baseball Camp One week camp for 4th-8th graders includes offensive, defensive and mental drills. Includes position-specific and team defensive skill competitions, offensive skill competitions and team competitions. Also includes ways to improve the mental approach with former college baseball guest speakers. July 8-12. Cost: $175. Info: salesian.com/athletics/sportscamps St. Patrick-St. Vincent HS Camps A camp that provides the opportunity to learn new techniques, improve individual abilities, make new friends and have fun! Develop skills and reach a new level of play and selfconfidence. All areas of the game are covered. Campers grouped by age and skill level. Info: 707-644-4425; m.delgado@spsv.org TPC Baseball & Softball Camps Spring-winter camps feature skills, drills and competitions in all major areas (hitting, pitching, throwing, fielding). Players will have blast while improving their skills with our TPC staff and often guest appearances from former and current professional baseball players. Info: 925-416-1600 info@thepitchingcenter.com,” BASKETBALL De La Salle Basketball Camp Five sessions aimed at teaching shooting, ball handling, passing, rebounding, defense, footwork, 1-on-1 moves and big man moves will all be covered. Our camps stress having proper attitude, teamwork and listening skills. . Coed camp is open to K-incoming 9th graders. Info: dlshs.org/athletics/camps-clinics; summercamps@dlshs.org or call 925.288.8100 x7090 Nike Basketball Camps Offering day and overnight camps all over the country. Enjoy the ultimate basketball camp experience at some of our nation’s most beautiful college campuses. Or get better each day with one of our high-level coaches at a location closer to you. Info: 1-800-NIKE-CAMP Moreau Catholic Frank Knight Camp Improve your skills with Coach Frank Knight III, who coached the Mariner Team to the 2017 and 2019 NCS Championships. Campers may attend 1 or 2 sessions. Open to boys and girls, entering grades 2-9. Info: fknight@moreaucatholic.org; 510.881.4300 Moreau Catholic Girls Basketball Camps Coach Jose Alvarez teaches skills needed both on and off the court, using our progressional

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See hundreds of more camps like these at SportStarsMag.com/Camps curriculum and focusing on the whole player. Open to girls, grades 3- 8. Focus on respect, teamwork and responsibility. Info: JAlvarez@ moreaucatholic.org. (510) 881-4300 Modesto Magic Basketball Association If you are a girl ages 4-17, we can take your game to the next level. We offer leagues, camps, clinics, tournaments, private lessons and AAU traveling teams. Open to all skill levels. Info: Stan Silva, 209-765-5107; ssilva1920@aol.com Salesian Basketball Camps For 4th-8th graders, led by Salesian boys basketball coach and former California Coach of the Year, Bill Mellis. We provide outstanding instruction, including individual fundamentals and building confidence through drills and team play for boys and girls. Session I: June 24—28; Session II: July 8—12; Session III: July 15—19, 2019. Cost: $175.00 per session. Info: salesian.com/athletics/sportscamps Salesian Girls Half-Day Skills Clinic For 4th-8th grade girls to improve fundamentals. Staff expected to include Dustin Hirashima, Bernard Brown, Justin Reid, Greg Ginsburg, Alana Horton, Isabell Ampon, Richard Rincon, Justin Rollolazo, Sam Sims & guest coaches and members of the Pride varsity team. Info: salesian.com/athletics/sportscamps St. Patrick-St. Vincent Intro To Basketball Great introduction for boys and girls. The focus is on fun and fundamentals. Campers work with smaller basketballs and lowered rims which help ensure proper form. Campers participate in offensive and defensive drills and station work, followed by team games. Info: 707-644-4425; m.delgado@spsv.org St. Patrick-St. Vincent Girls Camp Campers participate in offensive and defensive drills and station work, followed by games. Additionally, players are provided preparation for summer leagues and tournaments. Info: 707-644-4425; m.delgado@spsv.org St. Patrick-St. Vincent Boys Camp Campers participate in offensive and defensive drills and station work, followed by games. Additionally, players are provided preparation for summer leagues and tournaments. Info: 707-644-4425; m.delgado@spsv.org Bentley School Summer Boys Camp The complete skills camp covers a wide range of skills from ball handling, passing, shooting, and defensive principles. Rising 6th-9th graders will play small games and have competitions. Info: (925) 283-2101 ext. 3241 rrafeh@ bentleyschool.net City of Walnut Creek Basketball Camp Age: 8-13, fully staffed and supervised camp. Learn fundamentals of basketball and let you show off your skills in games. Info: walnutcreekrec.org or call (925) 943-5858

Cal Basketball Camp For Girls Our camps provide instruction for players of all skill levels, as each camp is designed to emphasize individual improvement, fundamental skills, teamwork, sportsmanship and enjoyment. Info: 1-800-GO-BEARS FOOTBALL City of Walnut Creek Flag Football Camp Age: 8-13 offers a fully staffed and supervised flag football camp. In this fun and recreational, non-contact version of football the skill development and games will allow kids the opportunity to explore football. Info: walnutcreekrec. org or call (925) 943-5858 Jesse Sapolu Men In The Trenches Academy We are one of the premier camps in the nation dedicated to teaching the fundamentals of playing the offensive and defensive lines. MITT gives young athletes the opportunity to learn all the nuances about the Offensive and Defensive Line while getting to compete against other top linemen in the country. Camps are open for all players grades 5th-12th in various cities. Info: mittnorcal.com California Football Academy Camps Contact and non-contact camps available for ages 6-14 during and June. The camps take place in Oakley. CFA offers flag football leagues and tournaments also. Oakley, Concord and San Ramon. Info and registration: see our website or call 925-625-2222; email californiafootballacademy@hotmail.com DLS’s Bob Ladouceur Championship Camp Learn sound, fundamental offensive and defensive techniques for pre-high school player. Demonstration, individual drills teach basic skills to both beginning, experienced players. Warm-up, physical conditioning, skills drills and review. Full contact is not a priority. June 17-20. Info: dlshs.org/athletics/camps-clinics; summercamps@dlshs.org or 925.288.8100 x7090 St. Patrick-St. Vincent HS Football Camp California State Champion Coach Lane Hawkins and his experienced staff provide skill development in a fun and competitive environment. Campers grouped by age and experience. Campers will participate in skill drill followed by 7 on 7 flag football games. Info: 707-644-4425; m.delgado@spsv.org Campolindo Cougar Camps Full Gear Camp We develop fundamentals and techniques for tackle football. Quantity of contact based on appropriate skill level or readiness. Grades 4-8. Camp staffed by full complement of experienced coaches and certified trainer. Info: (925) 280-3950 X 5163; kmacy@acalanes.k12.ca.us Moreau Catholic Football Camps One of the unique Moreau Catholic Football traditions is attending this 6-9th grade Summer Camp. This non-contact camp is a great way to learn fundamentals of football. Info: rgatrell@moreaucatholic.org; 510-881-4333

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See hundreds of more camps like these at SportStarsMag.com/Camps SOCCER Berean Christian Girls Camp For girls, 4th-8th grade, hosted by Berean Christian coach Breanna Burtt, girl’s varsity players & college players. Fundamentals, shortsided work, and full field scrimmages. June 1012, 9am-12pm. Info: bereansummercamps@ gmail.com; 925-945-6464 De La Salle Soccer Camp Terrific opportunity for boys and girls who look to excel. Athletes can expect to participate in competitive drills, skill development exercises and daily competitions between campers. June 10-13, 8:30am-12:30 pm. Open to incoming 6th-9th graders. Info: www.dlshs.org/ athletics/camps-clinics;summercamps@dlshs. org or 925.288.8100 x7090 De La Salle Academy/Advanced Training Open to ALL elite players 8th-12th grade. Focus is on technique, increasing tactical awareness and position specific functional training. Premier-Gold level players preferred as camp is designed for an advanced level of training/competition. July 29-Aug. 1, 8:30-10:30am. Info: www.dlshs.org/athletics/ camps-clinics;summercamps@dlshs.org or 925.288.8100 x7090 City of Walnut Creek Soccer Camp Ages: 8-13 offers a fully staffed and supervised camp. The beautiful game has never looked better than through the fun and challenging skill development and games that assist the experienced player to improve, as well as teach the basics to the new player. Info: www. walnutcreekrec.org or call (925) 943-5858 East Bay Sports Lil’ Kickers Lil’ Kickers is a national, non-competitive child development program for boys and girls ages 18 months to 12. Your children will not only learn the fundamentals of soccer, but have fun and create new friendships in the process. Info: chris@sanramonsports.com. 925-831-9050 Menlo School Boys Soccer Camps The Menlo School boys soccer camp develops players’ fundamental technical skills, allowing them to better enjoy the game. These skills will be developed through a series of progressive drills, then applied to game situations. Players will benefit from the Menlo soccer program’s fun team-building environment. Open to grades 8-12, all levels. Info: www.menloschool. org/athletics/camps-and-clinics.php; info@ menloschool.org; 650.330.2000 Walnut Creek Surf Development Days/Skills Clinics Summer Camps and Clinics for players entering 1st-8th grades. We offer camps and clinics at Arbolado. Each fun week will include new objectives to improve the technical and tactical skills of all players. Camps are run by WCSC Professional Training Staff and are fun and engaging. Info: wcsc_info@wcsc.org

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St. Francis Catholic High School Camps Led by Maryclaire Robinson, St. Francis Varsity head coach. Provides opportunity to become familiar with the St. Francis program and train in individual techniques and striking and tactical awareness. All elements emphasized: warm-up, trapping, dribbling, passing, shooting, small-sided games and stretching. Info: www.stfrancishs.org/sports-camps; summer@stfrancishs.org; (916) 737-5050 Olympus Soccer Summer Training Program Programs offered are for ages 8-12 and 13+. Drills, skills and complete understanding of the game are taught by experienced coaches. Info: 530-567-5200, polito.olympus@gmail. com or miguelsandoval.olympus@gmail.com Nike Soccer Camps For soccer enthusiast looking to improve skills, work hard and have fun! Offering coed, girls, and boys only programs at fantastic soccer venues with a safe, healthy and fun learning environment for all ability levels. Info: 1-800-NIKE-CAMP Diablo Futbol Club Camps & Clinics Diablo FC is committed to instilling passion and enjoyment in a positive, safe, competitive environment. Our comprehensive program and professional staff train players in the mental, physical, technical and tactical aspects of soccer in order to reach their individual potential and compete at the highest level of play. Info: www.diablofc.org; 925-7988-GOAL Bladium Soccer Camps Fun and challenging skill-intensive games structured to improve fundamental soccer skills and knowledge. Designed for all players ages 7-10 who want to improve their fundamental soccer skills and knowledge in preparation for the Bladium West Ham United International Academy’s more advanced training. Info 510814-4999 x111 or AlamedaSA@Bladium.com Heritage Summer Clinics & Player I.D. Camp Heritage is a Pleasant Hill/Martinez based competitive soccer club. Players 8-18 can try out and compete at the highest levels. We are always looking for qualified boys and girls to play on our competitive teams. Tryouts happening in May. Clinics and I.D. Camps during the summer. Find us on Facebook, Instagram or www.HeritageSC.com. Info: info@ HeritageSC.com Moreau Catholic Coed Soccer Camps Our youth summer day camps are designed for players of all levels who want to learn and improve their fundamental skills in a fun and encouraging environment. Small-sided games to encourage personal involvement and enhance the understanding of team concepts; technical and ball mastery skills sessions; shooting drills, and much more! Info: ABaillou@moreaucatholic.org or CoachDanielVazquez@gmail.com ✪

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Profile for Caliente! Communications

Bay Area Issue 165 June 2019  

Bay Area Issue 165 June 2019  

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