Boyd Street Magazine November 2021

Page 1

Local Barber Organizes Street Ministry

Helping Guests

Normanite in the Spotlight

Dan Quinn

What’s Eating Norman

Yo Pablo

November 2021 • Issue 11 • Volume 20

October 9, 2021 • Cotton Bowl • Dallas, Texas • 3:01pm CT

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Features

NOVEMBER CONTENTS 2021

ISSUE 11– VOLUME 20 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mark Doescher

Parents Helping Parents

20 by Krystyn Richardson

MANAGING EDITOR Lindsay Cuomo

Supporting families facing substance use disorder.

PHOTOGRAPHY

Mark Doescher

CONTRIBUTORS

“Macon” It Happen

24 by Rae Lynn Payton

24

Jill Macon of Precision Grooming in Norman is on the front lines helping those in need through her street ministry.

Normanite in the Spotlight:

28 Dan Quinn

Roxanne Avery | Callie Collins Lindsay Cuomo | Kathy Hallren Shannon Hudzinski | Chelsey Kraft Bill Moakley | Rae Lynn Payton Chris Plank | Krystyn Richardson Chat Williams

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES

Haley Gauley - haley@sportstalk1400.com Trevor Laffoon - trevor@sportstalk1400.com Perry Spencer - perry@sportstalk1400.com

PUBLISHER

Casey Vinyard

by Chelsey Kraft Moving to Norman to attend OU forever changed the life of “Papa” Quinn.

In Memory of RANDY LAFFOON

Merry and Bright

32 by Callie Collins

Love for Lions is making Christmas better for students in need.

The Benefits of Shopping Small

36 by Callie Collins

How local retail supports quality of life in Norman.

Boyd Street Magazine 2020 E. Alameda Norman, Oklahoma 73071 Phone: (405) 321-1400 E-mail: editor@boydstreet.com Copyright © Boyd Street Magazine

40

Any articles, artwork or graphics created by Boyd Street Magazine or its contributors are sole property of Boyd Street Magazine and cannot be reproduced for any reason without permission. Any opinions expressed in Boyd Street are not necessarily that of Boyd Street management.

Spotlights

UnStinkinBelievable

40 by Chris Plank

The greatest Red River Showdown, from the field to the stands.

15 Community Calendar What’s Happening

Gift Guide

50 by Staff

Where to shop for this year’s holiday gifts.

Hudiburg Subaru Moves to 86 Norman

by Roxanne Avery Construction of the new dealership set to be completed in December.

51

Money Smarts

Norman-based financial planner pens second book for financial well-being. sportstalk1400.com

/boydstreetmagazine

by Lindsay Cuomo

66 Sgt. David Watson

Service Spotlight:

by Bill Moakley

70 Buy Now, Pay Later

The Promises and the Perils of

by Shannon Hudzinski - OUFCU

76 by Kathy Hallren - Joe’s Wines & Spirits

by Lindsay Cuomo Campus Corner’s newest eatery features a variety of tacos, spirits and ambiance.

98 by Lindsay Cuomo

What’s Eating Norman:

63 Layers of Protection

Norman Regional Hospital:

94 Yo Pablo Tacos & Tequila

Staff

Viva Espania

81 by Chat Williams - Youth Performance

94

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Training for All Ages

90 Where to Eat in Norman the DINE guide

Staff

Cover photo by: Mark Doescher


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BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 15






COMM U N I T Y

PARENTS HELPING PARENTS

Supporting families facing substance use disorder

U

nited Way of Norman partners with 27 agencies around the Norman community to provide critical services to individuals and families. Each year, the agencies are asked to provide data and share stories to make sure the community’s donations are being spent appropriately and learn how the agencies are making a difference in our community. Parents Helping Parents, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) organization that helps advocate for and support parents whose children struggle with substance use disorder. Through several avenues, such as weekly chapter meetings, community outreach and advocacy, their mission is to provide education, resources, shared experiences and support to parents, no matter their child’s age. Parents Helping Parents began in 2001 with several parents searching for resources and support as their children battled addiction. Since, Parents Helping Parents has grown to serve families all over Kansas and Oklahoma and is the only non-profit of its kind in Oklahoma to focus its mission on parents of people with substance use disorder. They were also early to the Zoom game, establishing a virtual chapter in June 2019. This leap of faith paid off - 1,500 parents were reached by

20 | November 2021

the new virtual chapter within the first three months! Many of these parents reached virtually are in rural parts of Oklahoma and across the country. Their virtual presence is only growing, especially as many community events moved online since COVID-19. Despite the growth online in the wake of COVID-19, Parents Helping Parents’ annual fundraising event, Hopeful Horizons, had to be canceled, but the organization is hopeful for the success of the event in the future. “We will continue to carry on,” said Board Chairman Hugh Benson, in Parents Helping Parents’ 2020 annual report. “I know that Parents Helping Parents was there for my family when we needed help, and we plan to be there for others. “We need to grasp the hand in front of us, extend a hand behind us, and move forward one step at a time. That is what Parents Helping Parents plans to continue to do.” Parents Helping Parents provides even more resources outside of their in-person and virtual chapter meetings. They also offer a 24-hour helpline for parents struggling with their child’s substance use disorder, providing help and advice. One of the reasons this helpline is possible is through the support of the United Way of Norman.


BY: KRYSTYN RICHARDSON

United Way’s relationship with Parents Helping Parents has significantly impacted our community right here in Norman. Dustin Huckabe, a frequent speaker at Parents Helping Parents meetings, is an excellent example of a success. Sober since May 2011, he attended The Center for Collegiate Recovery Communities at Texas Tech University. Upon his wife’s graduation from Texas Tech in May 2018, they relocated to Moore, Oklahoma. Huckabe recently achieved his master’s degree from The University of Oklahoma. He has served on the board for Parents Helping Parents Inc. and was the recipient of the National Collegiate Recovery Student of the Year award in 2019 for his tireless work building a recovery space on campus for students and is a two-time recipient of the Anne and Henry Zarrow Social Justice Award for 2020-2021. The United Way of Norman is honored to have Parents Helping Parents as a Funded Partner Agency and looks forward to all they will continue to accomplish within our community and beyond. If you would like to donate to the United Way so that partner agencies like Parents Helping Parents can continue to impact our community, visit to UnitedWayNorman.org/give. – BSM

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BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 21


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COM M U N I T Y

“Macon” It Happen F

Jill Macon of Precision Grooming in Norman is on the front lines helping those in need through her street ministry

or the past 4 years, Jill Macon of Precision Grooming on Campus Corner has been devoting her life to those in need in her community: people experiencing homelessness.

She hosts her Taco Tuesdays at Andrews Park each Tuesday from 1-3 p.m. with all of her taco fixings prepared and ready for visitors.

It all started as a favor to a friend to help rally some people together and buy food for the homeless. Their first event didn’t go as planned, but it sparked a desire in her to continue helping others. Every first and third Saturday was then devoted to her new street ministry for the homeless in downtown OKC, cutting hair at no cost.

“We go out there and fellowship with people, hang out, laugh, cry, pray and talk,” she said.

When visiting with members of the homeless community, the first thing they often say is: “You see me. You see me as a human,” she shared. “It breaks my heart. It’s hard for me to see someone out there and not be able to help.”

“God turned it around for the good,” she remembered. “My breakdown gave me more insight and compassion for guests of the street. When I came back out in 2021, I felt shameful. I was afraid they wouldn’t receive me or was afraid I’d abandoned them.”

Photos by: Rae Lynn Payton

After moving to Norman, Macon was shocked to see so many “guests of the streets” as she lovingly calls them. The phrase was shared by the husband of a donor, and it immediately stuck with her. “I liked that way better than homeless. We all have a home, whether it’s here on earth or in eternity. We’re just passing by. I was pretty naive in my thinking because I didn’t think homelessness was an issue in Norman because it’s a college town. I was then prompted by the Lord to start up Taco Tuesdays,” she said.

24 | November 2021

Amidst the pandemic and health concerns, Macon’s efforts had to pause in 2020. She left her job of nine years and with a lack of busyness battled mental health challenges she never expected to encounter.

Macon felt led to help Tonya Eastridge start her business and in turn felt the encouragement she needed to begin her journey in building a non-profit organization to support her cause in aiding the guests of the street. “Jill is a very talented, skilled barber with a heart of gold. She cares about people, and it shows with everything she does,” Eastridge, one of the salon owners at Precision Grooming, said. Macon envisions big changes for the community through large


BY: RAE LYNN PAYTON efforts, determining cash flow, establishing emergency savings and offers tips. She is now adding in a “Taste and See” every third Sunday at Andrews Park as a part of her outreach. “They need mentorship, leadership and life skills. The non-profit will help people get not only food but simple things like IDs, social security cards, rides to appointments, learn interview skills, and receive help with basic life skills. “That’s the struggle right now. We take life skills for granted. They don’t have anyone to help mentor them to get them on the right track. The non-profit is an umbrella for different things to help these people. They need compassion and good counseling,” she said. With the donation of an RV in 2020 for a mobile barbershop, Macon intends to serve her guests by giving them a place for haircuts as well as a place to change and prepare for interviews. While on Campus Corner, she is building connections with employers to help employ those in the community. Her future goals include setting up a drivers ed program as well as acquiring a building for them to be able to use as housing. She hopes that the non-profit will be able to help with counseling and drug issues and form good partnerships with groups that focus on those services. “I have insight because I’ve experienced this all around me,” Macon said. “I have bright red hair and tattoos, and I don’t fit into a box. But he (God) still uses me. I came to Christ in ‘07 and have been a fireball for him.” Macon shared about one of the successes that she’s witnessed involving two “street kids” as she calls them. She has aided them in their transition from difficult childhoods and homelessness into stability and the ability to function successfully. They now live in an apartment and are expecting their first baby girl. “I’ve watched them grow through the power of prayer. They’ve learned that they have value. It’s just amazing to me to see where they’re at. Now they say, ‘God’s got me’,” Macon said. Macon, wife of 21 years and mother to six children, started cutting hair in 2005 and got her cosmetology license after the birth of her twins. She came from a background of poverty and was in and out of foster homes and group homes as a child. She was emancipated at the age of 16. Her mother struggled with alcoholism most of her life and lived behind a Walmart in McAlester for a time. “At that time, I didn’t fully understand the conditions of the mind and how someone could choose that,” she said. Her mother has now celebrated 8 years of sobriety. “Despite all that life has tried to hand me, I have been blessed to overcome and continue to persevere,” she shared. The majority of the non-profit’s funds have been donated by Macon and her family. It’s difficult for her to ask for help, but donations are needed. In order to continue properly funding the non-profit, Macon needs partnerships, sponsorships, volunteers, mentors and donations. You can contact Macon at guestsofthestreets21@gmail.com. She accepts Venmo, Cash App and PayPal, with a PO Box coming soon. – BSM boydstreet.com

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 25



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NORMANITE IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Dan Quinn

uring his first year as principal at Norman High School, a student told Dan Quinn that he was more like a papa than a principal. Quinn calls the moment one of the greatest compliments he received because one of his goals was to help students identify with and become part of the school. To this day, the former educator and current real estate agent is still sometimes called “Papa Quinn.” Born in Shawnee, Oklahoma, Quinn moved to Warr Acres with his family in the eighth grade. He graduated from Putnam City High School before attending the University of Oklahoma and has lived in Norman ever since. After graduating from OU in 1968, Quinn started working for Norman Public Schools as an athletic trainer and physical education teacher, the start of a 34-year career with the district. Quinn was the first full-time athletic trainer hired by a high school in the state of Oklahoma, and he holds a spot in the Oklahoma Athletic Trainers’ Association Hall of Fame. When Quinn started college at OU, he had no interest in ever becoming a teacher or an administrator. But his life path went in that direction after he became a student trainer as a sophomore. “I had no idea what I was going to do, and it found me rather than me finding it,” Quinn stated. “That’s one of the reasons I felt good about working with kids. I wasn’t the highest achieving kid, but once I set a goal, I wind up reaching it.” Quinn filled a variety of roles for NPS, including as an administrative assistant for Jim Riley, Norman High School’s principal at the time; assistant principal for the high school; district athletic director; and principal at Norman High. In 1997, Quinn served as the first principal for Norman North High School. After five years in that role, Quinn retired and began a second career in real estate. The Quinn family has strong connections with the Norman school system. Marrae, Quinn’s wife of 53 years, was a longtime teacher in the district. Both of their daughters, Katy Powers and Patty Thomason, attended school in Norman. Patty is married to Kelly Thomason, and she serves as the principal of Adams Elementary School. Katy and her husband Michael have five children - Peyton, Sophie, Ella, Cole and Harrison - all NPS attendees, with the youngest, Harrison, currently a junior at Norman High. “The reality is, Norman is a special place,” said Quinn about why he decided to establish his life and career in the community. “When you get a choice of staying or leaving, the choice to leave has got to be stronger than the choice for staying. I had opportunities to go other places, but when push came to

28 | November 2021

shove, this was the best place for me, my wife and my kids … We’ve all just kind of stayed here, and it’s been one of the draws for Norman is that if you get your roots established here, it’s very hard to leave.” Currently, he works for Don Cies Real Estate, Inc., located at 1203 Brookhaven Blvd. in Norman. Quinn started out with Old Town, Realtors, working with a couple of former students of his. Quinn said there are a lot of similarities between working in education and real estate, including working with people and sometimes having to navigate stressful situations. In his current role, Quinn said he most enjoys making people happy as he helps them buy or sell their homes. The aspect of education he misses the most though is interacting with the kids. Quinn wanted to give back to Norman some of what he had been given, so in 2006, he ran for and was elected to the city council. He served in that capacity for six years, and for five of the last six years, he has been the chairman of the Norman Economic Development Coalition (NEDC) Board of Directors. Quinn is also a long-term volunteer for the county election board. “My sense was that while I was athletic director, I felt like we had asked the community for a lot of support. At the time, I did not see a lot of school representation in the community,” Quinn explained. “So I said, ‘I think I’m going to have to do that.’ I decided to join something called Link Norman, which studied some issues with Norman. Then I continued after that. I just felt like we owed Norman something.” While his various roles in Norman have had different expectations, Quinn said his experiences have been very positive overall. “Dealing with people is dealing with people,” said Quinn of his varied community connections. “My feelings were that I would work through whatever came up and do the best I could.” – BSM


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COM M U N I T Y

Merry and Bright

Love for Lions is making Christmas better for students in need

L

ove for Lions, an organized giving effort for local families, helps make for a merrier Christmas at one Norman middle school.

With the goal of providing both Christmas dinner and gifts under the tree, the program named for the school’s mascot has helped an average of 100 Longfellow Middle School students and their families each year. “We take for granted Christmas dinners and presents but they are out of reach for many families,” said Summer Grace, school counselor. Coordinating the program has been part of her job duties for the past six years. Children are pre-selected for the program when a student enters Longfellow. A list usually transfers along with incoming sixth graders, but other factors also help identify students who need help. Families are contacted to ask if they want to participate in the program and the choice to receive food, gifts or both is left up to the adults in the home. All participants who receive items are kept anonymous. Students do not know which of their classmates might be included as recipients.

32 | November 2021

Families who receive food are given the usual items that would make up a Christmas dinner, including a turkey, potatoes and a bag of other groceries. Gifts are included from student wish lists, which students fill out privately at school. Grace reviews how wants and needs are defined, then asks students to write down three wants and three needs for their household. Items requested range from very basic day-to-day items to more specific personal interests, which she always asks them about. “I’ve had kids ask for toilet paper, sanitary items, soap and toothpaste. To think of students without easy access to those basics is heartbreaking but the program does try to meet some of those needs, including seasonally appropriate clothing in the right size,” said Grace. “It’s always amazing to see the variety of items brought in. Bicycles are one of my favorite things because they’re such a staple of childhood.” Items large and small are requested by families. Sponsors can choose a boy or girl recipient and shopping can be streamlined for convenience during the busy holiday season. For example, the option to purchase items on online and have them shipped


BY: CALLIE COLLINS to the school or have Grace shop with a gift card may make the buying process easier for some sponsors. Grace aims to have the wish lists complete by Black Friday so shoppers can take advantage of seasonal sales. Although there are no official income requirements or designated criteria to participate in Love for Lions, families who participate are often living below the poverty line and may qualify for other types of assistance. Overall, about 50% of Norman Public Schools students qualify for free or reduced lunch, according to last year’s data. More than 700 students attend Longfellow Middle School. Community sponsors, local businesses and private individuals make the tradition possible, including teachers and their extended families. From gathering donations to shopping, sorting and preparing for the big day, the effort requires a team of committed volunteers. Boy Scout Troop 792 donates food items. Grace shops at Walmart for frozen turkeys; each year, she applies for a $2,000 community grant from the big box store and usually receives $1,000 or $1,500. Students also support Love for Lions with an annual coin drive, a competition between homerooms that usually raises about $1,000. The winning homeroom receives a donut party to help incentivize student participation. Students can also apply to the school’s leadership program in seventh or eighth grade to lend a hand by repackaging items and helping the school’s teachers and counselors prepare for distribution. The Norman Young Life building serves as the pick-up point

www.bancfirst.bank

for families to receive their items and the gratitude Grace sees each distribution day is beyond words. She sees firsthand the need and the relief when needs are met. When asked about a myth she might wish to dispel about the program, Grace cited the belief that perhaps families are recipients of aid in other places. “There is absolutely need throughout the district, and if what we do contributes to our students having a better Christmas, it’s worth doing,” she said. “Thank you to everyone in our community who makes Love for Lions a success each year. It really is because of people in and around Norman that we can change someone’s Christmas memories for the better.” Longfellow Middle School is located at 215 N. Ponca Ave., between Gray and Hughbert St. If you would like to sponsor a student’s family this holiday season, email Summer Grace at summerg@norman.k12.ok.us. – BSM




COM M U N I T Y

The Benefits of Shopping Small

How local retail supports quality of life in Norman

H

oliday shopping is just around the corner and local retailers are ready for the season. Brick and mortar shops have become more innovative than ever, with online shopping options like brick-and-click and curbside pick-up. Sales tax collected is vital to the City of Norman’s daily operations, supports essential services and makes the workings of community life possible in ways large and small. “Local shopping and the sales tax generated from it is simply the lifeblood of our community,” said Scott Martin, president of the Norman Chamber of Commerce. “Holiday shopping is a great time to start a new way of doing your shopping but in order to have the kind of community you want to have, make it more than once a year. “Start a new habit if you’re not already shopping locally.”

36 | November 2021

Norman sales tax rate is 8.75 cents on every dollar. National data from the Tax Foundation ranks Oklahoma as 12th in the nation for reliance on sales tax to fund city operations, with 33% of total state and local tax collection coming directly from dollars spent locally. The City of Norman’s website reports that about half of the sales tax collected stays directly in Norman, with 4.5 cents going to the state of Oklahoma and 4 cents staying in the City; 0.25 cents fund the Cleveland County jail. The city’s general fund receives 2.3 cents, with 0.7 cents dedicated to infrastructure improvements, 0.5 cents for public safety like police and fire, and 0.5 cents to fund Norman Forward projects that enhance quality of life through parks and recreation areas, public facilities like libraries, art in shared spaces and more.


BY: CALLIE COLLINS The recent completion of the Westwood Family Aquatic Center, for example, which opened in 2018, would not have been possible without sales tax funding. A senior wellness center, the renewal of Reaves Park and softball/football complex are next on the horizon through Norman Forward. “The fabric of our cities and towns is woven from a common thread that also helps our friends, family members and neighbors with both employment opportunities and through the ways these businesses give back,” said Martin. “Not only are your tax dollars making city services possible but these are the same businesses sponsoring local sports teams and school activities.” Local shop owner Shelley Cox agrees. Her business, Cayman’s, a lifestyle store featuring clothing, fragrances and decor for both men and women, has been family-owned and operated for more than four decades. Cox started the store with her parents, Caylon and Patsy Coleman, and her brother Curtis, in 1980. In fact, the business is named for her late father, as it uses the first three letters of his first name and the last three letters of the family name. “You can’t just open your doors and not give back to our community,” she explained. “Whether it’s through time or donations or in other ways, it is critical to give. We always make that a priority.” While local involvement is important to business owners like Cox, she also confirmed the essential role small businesses play in that broader sense, from quality offerings and customer service to jobs and critical funding. “Sales tax revenue fixes the potholes and underwrites so much quality of life in Norman, just as it does in so many cities throughout our state,” said Cox. “With COVID, we got a taste of what life on Main Street would be like without any small businesses. People don’t want that. “They want a personalized experience but they also want to know that their choice about where to spend money funds more than just the day’s purchase. It allows us to offer competitive pay and directly employ members of the community. More and more people think about this.”

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Cox has seen the rising popularity of Small Business Sat urday, the newly formed tradition of shopping at locally owned businesses the Saturday after Thanksgiving each year. Although American Express is largely credited with helping implement the concept, it takes the coordination of retailers and local entities to make it a success. Cox is grateful to the City of Norman and the Norman Chamber of Commerce for helping emphasize the importance of shopping small. She has been a member of the Chamber all 41 years of being in business, an organization she chaired in 2018, the same year the Quill Bill [Quill Corp v. North Dakota] made it possible for online retailers to charge sales tax for purchases made online. Although a portion of online sales made with online stores in other states does stay in Oklahoma, local shopping brings the most benefit even if the transaction takes place virtually instead of in-person. “COVID has driven home the importance of having an online presence,” said Cox. “We have already done early purchasing to have items in stock and things are already here. We’ve seen with national retailers that shopping online doesn’t guarantee items are in stock or able to be shipped in time, especially with the recent shortage of manpower.” Through his role at the Chamber, Martin has seen firsthand the ways businesses have continued to adapt. “The portal to the universe is on the world wide web but those local owners, artists and merchants are actually much closer to you with outstanding customer service,” he said. Cox’s passion for retail stands out, a fact less noticeable in interactions with online-only vendors, and it carries over to the way she cares about her customers. “At Cayman’s, we offer more than you would get with an online-only store, like complimentary gift wrapping, delivery and the ability to really help you find the perfect gift. We have spent so much time snapping photos of our merchandise and FaceTime or text with customers. They love that. We’re here for you.” If you would like to increase your support of local businesses, including services as well as goods, find a list of businesses from the Norman Chamber of Commerce’s member directory at business.normanchamber.com/memberdirectory. – BSM BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 37


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S P O RT S

un stinkin believable - Voice of the Sooners Toby Rowland

Oklahoma vs. Texas Cotton Bowl October 9, 2021

Photos by: Mark Doescher

1 st Q 2 nd Q 3 rd Q 4 th Q

40 | November 2021

OU - 7 OU - 20 OU - 30 OU - 55

TX - 28 TX - 38 TX - 41 TX - 48


W

BY: CHRIS PLANK

illiams in the Shotgun, Stoops in motion. Direct snap Brooks… fakes the pitch, bounces it outside… he’s to the 30, he’s to the 25, he’s to the 20. HE’S GONNA GO!! KENNEDY BROOKS…HE JUST WON… HE JUST WON THE GAME. Kennedy Brooks… JUST WON OU/TEXAS. A 33-yard touchdown run by Kennedy Brooks. One year after a four-overtime classic, we may have surpassed it with the greatest game in OU/Texas history. Un-Stinkin-Believable.” Unforgettable, incredible, extraordinary, impressive, EPIC, whichever adjective you chose to describe the 117th edition of the OU/Texas rivalry, they all would fit for fans of the Sooner Nation after the 55-48 win. A game that featured a little bit of everything came down to the wire and ended in dramatic fashion as Sooner running back Kennedy Brooks sealed the win and the greatest Sooner comeback in OU/Texas history. “I’m trying to think of the moments in my career that I’ve been prouder of a team,” Sooner head coach Lincoln Riley said afterward. “If there’s any, it’s not many. ... We were poised, and we all felt like our confidence didn’t change and it didn’t get rocked by the fact that we didn’t play well early.” Oklahoma fell behind by two touchdowns in the game’s opening minutes and saw that deficit grow to 18 by the half. But there was no panic, there were not any heads down as the Sooners tried to regroup in the locker room, just an all-out belief that OU would win the football game. “We’ve been through worse. We were down 28-3 at Baylor my freshman year and that was in the back of my head the whole game,” Sooner receiver Jadon Haselwood said. “We walk up the same tunnel and they (Texas) walked up the whole ramp at halftime like they had won it all already without any enthusiasm. I told our guys, look they think it’s over.” The first half featured two Texas touchdowns in the first two minutes of the game including a 76 -yard touchdown reception on the first play of the game and a score two plays after blocking a punt. A fox ran out on the field and the Sooners made a quarterback change turning to true freshman Caleb Williams midway through the first half. The true freshman looked the part of an experienced veteran. “He came in and he executed,” Marvin Mimms said of Caleb Williams. “He did what he was coached to do and that was a big help for us. The fans were into it, everybody was into it. We just got rolling at that point so that was huge for us and huge for the game.” While Williams was directing the offense, Mimms was making jaw-dropping grabs including the game-tying 52-yard reception that he somehow was able to keep his foot down in bounds. Actually, toe down may be more fitting as the pylon cam shot became as memorable as any play in the game.

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BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 41


“It’s just part of the game plan that we need to get more explosive plays down the field,” Sooner Captain Jeremiah Hall said. “The running game also helped. When you’ve got guys worried about Kennedy Brooks rushing for so many yards every single play, you’ve got to account for that. And then you’re leaving guys one-on-one down the field. At the end of the day, we’re just letting guys go out and make plays.” After opting out during the 2020 season, Brooks made the most of his final Red River Rivalry. With 217 yards on 25 carries, the OU running back paced the Sooner offense for most of the day. His game-winning touchdown run was the second time the Sooners had used that play and, in the mind of Brooks, it was all about just going straight. “I just ran straight and scored,” Brooks said, crediting the offensive line and the receivers blocking downfield. “Just a great call by Lincoln Riley. It’s a great play setup.” “Oh man, epic, that second-half run, the energy in that stadium, one of the best things in our sport,” Riley said. “Our crowd was great. I appreciate our crowd. They stayed into it even as we started to make the run. I think we really kind of both fed off each other — us off the crowd, crowd off of us and that’s why it’s the best rivalry in college football. It was as good as I’ve ever seen.”

THE STORY IN THE STANDS While the Sooners were mounting a record-setting comeback, the crowd was making a difference. Loud and enthusiastic, the Cotton Bowl South end zone was a difference-maker, packed with fans clad in crimson. “Our crowd played a massive role in that comeback. It was insane,” Sooner radio analyst Teddy Lehman said afterward on the post-game show. “Texas could not get out of the south end of the field.” “The crowd for Oklahoma was amazing,” Sooner sideline analyst Gabe Ikard said. “The crowd had as big of an impact on a football team as I’ve ever seen, ever. The crowd deserves some credit.” Longtime Sooner fan Steve York agreed. The Choctaw native has been to many OU/Texas games and had a hard time imagining a game matching what happened in the stands in 2021. “It was ranked as one of the very best,” Steve said. “Years may run together but this year was special. This year was different. When we got down, you had a few people that may have left but I promise you they came back. That place was packed and rocking and rolling at the end of the game. “I know I’ve seen some great games over the years. One minute your cussing, next minute you’re celebrating. It was so up

42 | November 2021



and down. It was THE loudest that I can ever remember. I’m 66... I can’t remember any game being any louder than that. I can remember some great games, but this will stick in my memory for a long, long time.” Steve has been a Sooner fan since birth. Along with his brother Jim, they are the definition of Sooner Born and Sooner Bred. For both, the biggest day of the year has always been the second Saturday in October. The family is so dedicated to OU/Texas that weddings have been moved to ensure they don’t miss the annual classic. “My niece, my brother’s daughter, had scheduled her wedding for the first week in October since the OU/Texas game was always the second Saturday in October,” Steve recalled. “One year, they changed it. For some reason that year, it was the first weekend. When the Sooner football schedule came out, we had a problem. She had to reschedule her wedding and send out new invitations. It’s a big deal in our family.” Jim attended his first OU vs Texas game in 1969. That season Choctaw Head Coach Bill Jensen took a small group of players to the game and the cost to get in was only .50 cents. The experience not only hooked Jim on the excitement and energy of OU/Texas but also his buddy Delaine Baxter. Jim went back in 1971 and has only missed one OU/Texas game since then. Delaine was a high school football coach so regular trips were challenging to the big game in Dallas. He 44 | November 2021

begun his teaching career at Choctaw High School, but moved to McLoud schools and ended up spending more than 30 years as a teacher and coach with a schedule that allowed him to make the trip consistently. Finally, in 1988, the pair of pals made the trip together again and never looked back. 32 years straight Jim and Delaine have attended OU/Texas together. The pair would go to Dallas on Thursday. Play golf on Friday, attend the OU game on Saturday and sometimes when they were younger, they would sneak in a round on Sunday. But as time passed and they got older the Sunday round went away. “We have been going as a full family since the early 80s. It’s just something that is very special to our family,” Steve said of his family. “We’ve seen good OU/Nebraska games, but this was the game.” For 32 years straight years, Delaine “Dog” Baxter was essentially part of the York family as he and Steve went to the game together. They stayed at the same hotel every year. Delaine loved being around the York family and he and Jim would always sit together at the game. 32 years they never missed… until 2020. In August 2020, Delaine got sick and passed away. He was 67 years old. The popular Choctaw alum, McLoud teacher, coach, and diehard Sooner fan was gone. But the York family was determined to find a way to get Delaine to the OU/Texas game one final time.


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In October 2020, tickets were hard to come by due to Covid-19 and reduced capacity, so the family was unable to attend. It was almost fitting that the first OU/Texas matchup after Delaine passed his gameday companion missed as well for the first time in over 30 years. But in 2021, they not only got tickets but found a way to pay a lasting tribute to Delaine Baxter.

meet. Before the game, after the game, that was our spot. So, we thought what better place.”

Delaine’s brother had given Jim some of Delaine’s ashes. Since the two loved playing golf, some of the ashes were spread at different golf courses that the two enjoyed playing. But the last of the ashes were saved for OU/Texas game.

“He’s gonna help us win the game this year,” Jim said after the small ceremony.

“Delaine loved that game so much,” Steve said. “We had to find a way to pay a proper tribute so that he could and would always be a part of the OU/Texas weekend.”

Despite the area being closed off, Steve and the group talked their way past security and held a small ceremony before spreading Delaine’s ashes.

And as the game progressed and the momentum swung back and forth, the game was exactly everything that Delaine would have loved.

A small group of family and friends set about finding the right place to spread Delaine’s ashes. They thought about doing it on the field, but security was a challenge. Sure, they would do it, but they didn’t want to just spread it on the field and leave. They wanted to pay respect. And then, it clicked. The Pirate Ship.

“Dog (Delaine) would never give up on the Sooners. We could be getting smoked by 20 points or more, but Dog would never give up on them,” Steve recalled. “Even when it was imminent that we were losing he would stay until the very last minute. He was a true believer in Sooner Magic and that they would come back. After the game, everyone was high fiving saying Dog got us this win.”

“There is a spot where the Pirate Ship ride is by the main entrance of the Cotton Bowl,” Steve pointed out. “The pirate ship has been in the same spot for decades. That was our meeting spot. That’s where if our family ever got separated or someone called and said they were coming where could we

The stories are many and the memories will never fade for fans that attended the 2021 edition of OU/Texas. But for the York family, a Sooner win capped a fitting tribute to a fallen friend, making this version of the Red River Rivalry the greatest game ever.– BSM

46 | November 2021



BIG BUNS, REAL MEAT 1429 GEORGE AVE. NORMAN, OK 73072

@405burgerbar 405burgerbar@gmail.com 405-857-7171



GI F T G U I D E

GIFT GUIDE

In this Gift Guide edition of Boyd Street, you will find the best that Norman has to offer to help you shop for all the loved ones in your life. From clothes and shoes to home and destinations, there is something for everyone in the pages to follow. Remeber, if you find something that peaks your interest, get it early before it sells out this season.

50 | November 2021

Betty Lous Flowers & Gifts

Mitchell’s Jewelry

Bloom

Norman Stamp & Seal

Belmar Golf Club

Occasions

MetroShoe Wharehouse

Redbud Floral

International Pantry

Clothing Bar

Christmas Expressions

Browns Shoe Fit

Jimmie Austin Golf Course

The REF Team Store

Michelle’s Destinations


GIF T G UI DE

BETTY LOUS FLOWERS & GIFTS

MITCHELL’S JEWELRY

FLOWERS, GIFTS, FOOD BASKETS AND MORE

HIGHEST QUALITY & BEST SERVICE

Betty Lou’s Flowers and Gifts knows how to dress up any party, including your TAILGATE! Betty Lou’s has flowers shipped in locally and from around the world to create a variety of color and an assortment of typical and unusual designs. Call to order your custom design, or visit their website to order online. They have arrangements made up for drop ins available at the 445 W Gray storefront. Betty Lou’s delivers in Norman, Noble, Moore and S. OKC, so you can send your friends and loved ones flowers, balloons, stuffed animals, food baskets and gourmet chocolate!

Tis the season for gifting! Whether you’re looking for the perfect gifts to dazzle your loved ones or choosing a present for yourself, you can rely on the elves at Mitchell’s Jewelry! They have a tremendous selection of Wish List favorites like stacking bracelets, diamond hoop earrings and diamond studs, plus trendsetting delicate gold necklaces and paper clip chains! And don’t make Santa wonder what you want! Let’s get your Wish List ready! Enjoy ample parking, a spacious and sparking clean showroom plus complimentary giftwrap! Shown: Samuel B. bracelets in sterling silver and 18-karat yellow gold featuring garnets $528.00, featuring white topaz $499 and featuring black spinel $459.

445 W Gray St • 405.364.2400 • bettylousflowers.com boydstreet.com

2201 W Main St • 405.360.2515 • mitchells-jewelry.com BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 51


GI F T G U I D E

BLOOM MEDICAL AESTHETICS

NORMAN STAMP & SEAL

CONFIDENTLY ADDRESS SKINCARE NEEDS

HIGHEST QUALITY & BEST SERVICE

Staffed by experienced, licensed aestheticians and medical professionals, Bloom Medical Aesthetics offers injectables, mirconeedling, hair restoration, laser hair removal, fotofacials and more as well as spa treatments including facials, chemical peels, lash lift and waxing. Bloom is locally owned and operated, with decades of combined experience to help Normanites confidently address their skincare needs. They also have a full line of skincare products including masks, scrubs and serums.

Tis the season for gifting! Whether you’re looking for the perfect gifts to dazzle your loved ones or choosing a present for yourself, you can rely on our elves at Mitchell’s Jewelry!

With a variety of price points and even memberships available, a gift card to Bloom gives your loved ones permission to make self-care a priority this holiday season.

2110 W Main St • 405.366.6270 • bloomaesthetics.com 52 | November 2021

We have a tremendous selection of Wish List favorites like stacking bracelets, diamond hoop earrings and diamond studs, plus trendsetting delicate gold necklaces and paperclip chains! And don’t make Santa wonder what you want! Let’s get your Wish List ready! Enjoy ample parking, our spacious and sparking clean showroom plus complimentary giftwrap.

792 Asp Ave • 405.321.6539 • crimsonproud.com


GI F T G UI DE

BELMAR GOLF CLUB

OCCASION’S

GIFTS FOR THE GOLF FANATIC

FINE STATIONERY, GIFTS AND GOURMET

The Golf Shop at Belmar Golf Club is your one-stop shop for all your golfing needs. They offer a wide variety of men’s and women’s apparel from FootJoy, Peter Millar, Adidas, G/Fore and more. They also provide expert club fitting for Ping, Callaway and Titleist products.

Finding that perfect gift is easy at Occasions! They are well-stocked to meet all your shopping needs with gifts for men, women and babies. Whether you are looking for a new MacKenzie-Childs piece, custom invitations for your holiday parties, gourmet cookies and candies, unique décor like the hard-to-find Holiball seen on Shark Tank and so much more, Occasions has something for everyone! Sooner fans will love their gameday bundles, entertainers can score unique charcuterie boards, foods and picks, and you can wow family and friends with the perfect gift.

If you are wanting to fix your slice or need help with chipping and putting, they have two PGA professionals on staff that provide golf lessons and clinics. Their friendly staff can help you look good and play good.

They will gift wrap and deliver locally and will even custom-create a gift basket at any price point. Simply give them a call or stop in and you’ll get a personalized shopping experience that is easy and fun.

1025 E Indian Hills Rd • 405.364.0111 • ilovethiscourse.com boydstreet.com

201 W Main St • 405.217.8467 • occasionspaper.com BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 53


GI F T G U I D E

METROSHOE WHAREHOUSE

REDBUD FLORAL

YOUR ONE-STOP SHOP FOR GIFTS

YOUR FIRST CHOICE FOR FLOWERS

Locally owned and operated, MetroShoe Warehouse is your one-stop shop for holiday shopping. They are so much more than just a shoe store and pride themselves on providing customers with an enormous selection of shoes, apparel and accessories. They have a wide assortment of OU and OSU apparel, bags, outerwear and more.

At Redbud Floral, their dedicated staff creates beautiful, budget-friendly flower arrangements and floral gifts to fit any occasion. Using only the freshest, most beautiful flowers, Redbud expertly hand arranges and delivers in the Norman area and beyond, for that special touch that gets noticed. They specialize in contemporary, traditional and high-style arrangements, and also offer gourmet and fruit baskets, candles, greeting cards and more.

MetroShoe carries popular brands such as Ugg, North Face, ON Running, Vuori, Yeti, Hoka, Marmot, Kuhl and Saks. Shop in-store or online with free shipping on items $50 or more. Find the hottest styles and gifts for everyone on your list! promo code: 9990002

2308 24th Ave NW • 405-321-6544 • metroshoewarehouse.com 54 | November 2021

Redbud is family-owned and operated and is backed by prompt friendly service. Shop conveniently online, over the phone or stop into their shop at 913 N Flood Ave.

913 N Flood Ave • 405.292.0758 • redbudfloralok.com


GI F T G UI DE

INTERNATIONAL PANTRY

THE CLOTHING BAR

DON’T MISS ZWILLING FEST 2021

WHERE NORMAN FINDS STYLE

Super Savers make the holiday season full of the best of the best at the BEST prices at International Pantry! Get a Zwilling Four Star Series 8pc Block Set (Reg. $688.50) for a Super Saver price of just $199.99. Or a Zwilling 8 pc S/S Porterhouse Steak Knife Set for $49.99. Their Ballarini Parma Plus 11” Stir Fry with Lid, regular price $81, is discounted to $49.99. Score a Staub 11“ Deep Fry Pan for $149.99.

From the perfect gift to that much-needed holiday party outfit, The Clothing Bar has all of the most popular styles including cropped sweaters, cardigans, shackets, hoodies, boots, sneakers, graphic tees, jeans, hats, dresses, jewelry, purses and more. Stocked with affordable options, you are sure to find the perfect piece or outfit for any occasion without breaking the bank. They have plenty of gifts for under $25 and Sooner gear, too!

These Super Saver prices are available while supplies last. No other discounts apply. International Pantry always offers free gift wrapping, curbside pickup and free limited local delivery with minimum $25 purchase.

Shop in store, conveniently located in Carriage Plaza Shopping Center, or on Facebook or Instagram! Free gift wrapping and personalized shopping assistance make shopping for your family and friends a breeze at The Clothing Bar.

1618 W Lindsey St • 405.360.0765 • intlpantry.com

2001 W Main St • 405.488.4353 • @shop.theclothingbar

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BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 55


GI F T G U I D E

CHRISTMAS EXPRESSIONS

BROWNS SHOE FIT CO.

ADD SOME HOLIDAY CHEER THIS YEAR

GIVE THEIR FEET SOME LOVE THIS HOLIDAY

Christmas Expressions has been assisting customers in creating and building family traditions and memories for the past 42 years. Celebrating all seasons and holidays along with life’s special milestones is our goal since 1979.

Brown’s Shoe Fit serves customers style, comfort and quality. They carry shoes to meet everyone’s tastes and needs. If you are looking for Hoka for class, they have a wide selection. Searching for sporty? They carry brands such as Brooks and New Balance. Looking for comfort and style? Olu Kai is the standard for sophisticated comfort for both men and women. They also have a great selection of cozy house shoes.

Christmas Expressions is a curated boutique for home décor and accessories, personalized stationery and invitations, tabletop, bath and body, easy to wear apparel and accessories, and sorority gifts. Classic lines include Jon Hart Design, Thymes, Caspari, Ronaldo Jewelry, Foxcroft, Christopher Radko and Old World Christmas along with the up and coming vendors. They make gifts personal with embroidery, printing and painting.

2214 W Lindsay St • 405.360.5211 • @christmasexpressions 56 | November 2021

But style and quality are only part of the customer experience at Brown’s. You’ll also get expert service and knowledgeable advice from experienced staff. Ensuring customers get a proper fit to meet their needs is the most important job they do.

2427 W Main St • 405.329.1863 • normanshoe.com


GI F T G UI DE

JIMMIE AUSTIN GOLF CLUB

THE REF TEAM STORE

DRESS LIKE A SOONER ON THE COURSE

REP YOUR FAVORITE LOCAL RADIO STATION

If you are looking for all things exclusive OU apparel including Peter Millar, Travis Mathew, Lululemon and many more, then come shop at the Jimmie Austin OU Golf Club.

You listen to them on the air. Now wear the same gear T-Row, Plank, Steelman and Teddy wear in the studio and around town. Get your official REF apparel for yourself or your favorite Sooner fan.

They carry the the brands and styles that you are looking for to look your best cheering on the Sooners! The OU Golf Club, where we encourage you to shop like a CHAMPION!!

Hats, t-shirts, sweatshirts and more additional items to come this holiday season. Show everyone in the metro area you are a supporter of the Home of Sooner Fans. Find The REF Team store online on sportstalk1400.com.

4 Ransom Dr • 405.325.6716 • theougolfclub.com

sportstalk1400.com

boydstreet.com

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 57


GI F T G U I D E

LIFE IS SHORT. TAKE THE TRIP. Michelle’s Destinations specializes in destination weddings, honeymoons, anniversary, birthday and babymoon trips. They also do group trips including multi-generational and senior trips. There are also agent-guided vacations available.

• Destination Weddings

They work with multiple cruise lines and tourism boards to provide the best possible experiences available. Big or small, they have a trip, destination or excursion to excite even the most well traveled individual. A resident Disney agent is also available to help you visit the world of the mouse.

• Group Trips

300 W Gray St • 405.360.4482 58 | November 2021

• Cruises • Guided Tours • Disney Agent

travelwithmichelle.com


Make the holidays count with Bedré! Shop Oklahoma-made chocolate gift baskets and more at

BedreChocolates.com bedrefinechocolate

@bedrechocolate

Visit our retail store! 37 N. Colbert Road, Davis, OK 73030 Open 7 days a week from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

@bedrechocolate


SM ALL BUSI NESS SATURDAY NOVEM BER 2 7, 2 0 21


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THANKS FOR LIVING UNITED! A big thank you to all of our community sponsors. We couldn’t do what we do without you!

United Way of Norman

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UnitedWay Norman.org /Give This ad sponsored in part by Boyd Street Magazine, Chris Baker Photography and Meraki Real Estate.

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Hey, baby. Welcome your baby in a hospital with an emergency department specializing in expectant mothers, delivery and recovery rooms designed to maximize bonding time, and a Level 3 NICU (just in case).

Take a virtual tour.

NormanRegional.com/Babies

Getting us all to a healthier place.


BY: LINDSAY CUOMO

H EA LT H

L ayers

of P rote c t ion Local primary care doctor shares about the benefits of vaccines and preventative precautions

V

mittable diseases like COVID-19 and the flu. He recommends staying up to date on vaccinations including your COVID and flu vaccines and utilizing proper hygiene practices.

“Historically, life expectancy was low, at about 40 to 50 years, but today we have doubled that,” shared Dr. Krishna Vedala, an internal medicine primary care doctor with Norman Regional Health System. “Vaccines have contributed to that success and play a significant role in maintaining our health and prolonging life.”

The CDC recently changed its recommendation for a waiting period between getting your COVID vaccine and other vaccinations. You can now get your flu and COVID shots at the same time.

accines are a regular topic of national and international news and likely the source of many household and social media debates as well. As we enter another flu season, paired with the uncertainties of the COVID-19 pandemic, conversations around vaccines are likely to continue.

To date, nearly 200 million Americans are fully vaccinated against COVID-19 and during the 2020-2021 flu season a record 193 million influenza doses were distributed in the United States. “The statistics clearly show that vaccines are effective in guarding against disease,” Vedala said. “We are not yet out of the pandemic, and it is difficult to say if there will be another surge, but we know that every year, except for last year, there is a rise of flu and pneumonia cases.” While efficacy varies, studies show that flu vaccines prevent tens of thousands of hospitalizations each year. In fact, the CDC reported that an estimated 105,000 flu-related hospitalizations were prevented during the 2019-2020 season. However, only about half of Americans get an annual flu vaccine. “There is a hesitancy with people getting vaccines and that is unfortunate,” Vedala said. “Those of us in the health care field, we have a higher calling to help save lives. When we recommend vaccinations, it is because we care.” Vedala sees patients at a primary care clinic in south Oklahoma City, but he previously worked in public health. His combined experience gives him unique insight into a wide variety of illnesses as well as community health trends. Vedala points to layers of protection as the best method for preventing transboydstreet.com

“Influenza rates were low last year as a result of COVID precautions. We were doing all of these things to guard against COVID and that helped keep people from getting the flu,” he said.

“The CDC used to recommend a two-week waiting period, but they have changed that,” Vedala confirmed. “If you are someone who is sensitive to vaccine reactions, I would still recommend waiting, since everyone reacts differently.” At the time of press, the Oklahoma Department of Health reported 25 cumulative influenza-associated hospitalizations since Sept. 1, 2021, a number Vedala expects to increase. “We are concerned that flu rates will return this year,” he said. If you do contract COVID-19 or the flu, Vedala urges you to contact your primary care provider as soon as possible. “If you do end up getting sick, call your doctor’s office to let them know,” he shared. “Norman Regional has a monoclonal antibody treatment center that has shown to help reduce symptoms especially for patients that are at high risk for complications from COVID-19. “People tend to underestimate the flu, but the key is to get in as soon as possible so you have a better chance of feeling better sooner.” Flu vaccines are available for established patients at primary care clinics throughout the Norman Regional Health System and COVID-19 vaccination clinics are held at select locations. Dr. Vedala is accepting new patients at Primary Care – South OKC, located at 2605 SW 119th St, Ste A. – BSM BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 63




S ERV I C E S P OT L I G H T

BY: BILL MOAKLEY

Service Spotlight: Sgt. David Watson

L

ike most high school juniors, Norman Police Department Sergeant David Watson wasn’t sure what he wanted to do after high school graduation. That would change one day while he was walking the halls of Carl Albert High School in Midwest City. “I saw a flyer on the wall that was advertising a cadet lawman academy sponsored by the Oklahoma Highway Patrol,” Watson recalled. “I was kind of directionless at the time and decided on a whim to apply for it. I was selected to go and spent a week in Burns Flat at Oklahoma Highway Patrol Academy.” The one-week experience hooked Watson on a future in law enforcement. “I fell in love right then and there,” he admitted. Needing to be 21 years old to be hired in law enforcement, Watson came to Norman and earned his bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and law enforcement administration. During his senior year at OU, he applied for positions with police departments in Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Dallas and Norman. Having begun to lay down roots in Norman, he accepted an assignment to the Norman Police Academy in 1991. After graduating from the academy in early 1992, Watson eventually hit the streets as a patrol officer. What makes his career somewhat unique is he has remained, for the most part, in patrol for some 31 years. “Along the way, I’ve done a variety of things in the department,” Watson said. “I’ve been an instructor, an academy mentor. I’ve bounced around the different patrol shifts. I’ve seen the day and night versions of what our city has to offer. I’ve been a training officer. I was a physical fitness instructor and background investigator for a while.” But for Watson, it’s patrol that allows him to fulfill his passion. “My passion, kind of where my heart lies, is in dealing with people in crisis,” he explained. “I have a soft spot for people that for whatever reason in their lives tap out their coping skills. Life and their circumstances derail them, and they end up in crisis of one form or another. So, I like to reach out to people and when they’re in that kind of place in life or that frame of mind.” That heart of service and assisting people in crisis has made Watson a valuable asset for the NPD. He serves a number of different roles that tap into his compassion. He’s been trained as a crisis intervention team member and serves as a negotiator with the department’s SWAT team. “They call it a hostage negotiator, but we deal with people that might not be hostages, but are in crisis,” Watson said. “We help people who need some form of intervention and de-escalation. I’ve done a lot of things over the decades, but it’s really those moments where I help someone that’s on the edge in their lives and their thinking about desperate things that I live for. “When I can intervene in somebody’s life with compassion and maybe get them to reconsider those desperate options, those are the victories that keep me going from day to day.”

66 | November 2021

Watson pointed out that no one is immune from crisis in life and that’s part of what drives his desire to serve. “What may be a crisis for one person who is facing an implosion of a relationship and they’re suicidal, that’s certainly a crisis for them,” Watson said. “But then you have somebody who was texting and driving and had a fender bender, and that’s their first-ever accident. They’re in crisis as well. For them, that’s a new experience, and they’re scared and even in those moments, there’s room for enforcement, yes, but also education and compassion. “Whether it’s a crash or whether it’s a domestic disturbance or something else, there’s room to apply these skills pretty much across the board.” When he isn’t applying those skills in uniform, Watson spends a lot of time in the air, literally. In addition to a love of travel, he holds a pilot’s license and can be seen in the skies around Norman in his powered paraglider. Add in scuba diving and Watson points out he enjoys a unique view of creation. “I do a lot of different things,” Watson concluded. “But it kind of hinges around traveling, seeing new things, having new experiences, seeing God’s creation. That’s why I like camping in the outdoors so much or scuba diving for that matter. I just like to see God’s creation perspectives and lately, since I started flying, seeing it from a bird’s eye perspective is just a whole new way to see those things.”– BSM This is a continuation of our series on public servants in Norman.




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O U FC U

B

BY: SHANNON HUDZINSKI | PRESIDENT/CEO OU FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

The Promises and the Perils of Buy Now, Pay L ater

uy now, pay later (BNPL) programs almost seem too good to be true. You can actually walk away with that overpriced exercise bike, entertainment system, sectional sofa or anything else that caught your eye without having the money to pay for it now. And there are almost no eligibility requirements to qualify. However, upon closer inspection, BNPL isn’t really as great as it may appear. Let’s take a look at these programs, how they work and what to be aware of before you sign up.

HOW BNPL WORKS Gotta have it but don’t have the cash right now? You’re not alone. It’s the reason you’ll find a buy now, pay later button when checking out at most online retailers. Usually, the option will link you to a BNPL app, such as Afterpay, Affirm or Quadpay. Similarly, a brick-and-mortar store may offer you this option at checkout as well. Here, too, you’ll pay up through an affiliated app. If you choose to go with a BNPL option, you’ll first need to get approved. Eligibility is easy; apps will usually run just a soft credit check to confirm your information. Once approved, you can choose to link your debit card, checking account or credit card so the app can collect the payments when they’re due. Next, you’ll generally make a 25% deposit on the purchase, and the item is yours! Most BNPL plans require you to pay off the rest in three fixed installments, but payment schedules can vary. On the surface, BNPL is a win-win: By spreading out the cost of an expensive item, the consumer can purchase what they can’t afford at the moment, and retailers can make more sales by getting these expensive items into the hands of more consumers, often regardless of income levels. It’s important to note, though, that BNPL programs don’t work like credit cards. There are no interest charges for paying via BNPL, no fees for using the service and no credit checks to qualify.

WHEN TO CHOOSE BNPL The primary advantage of paying for a purchase through a BNPL service is obvious: You can purchase an expensive item even if you don’t have the cash on-hand at the time. This can be convenient when the item is on sale but will be full priced by the time you’ve saved up for the purchase. BNPL programs can also be a good choice to use for items you urgently need but can’t afford right now. For example, you may be in need of medical equipment that is not covered by your insurance. 70 | November 2021

Finally, spreading out the cost of a purchase can be ideal for workers with an uneven income flow, such as independent contractors and freelancers, who may have lean times of year, but know that better times are coming.

WHY BNPL CAN BE A BAD IDEA Before you click on the BNPL option when making your next purchase, it’s important to be aware of the many pitfalls: It encourages overspending. Perhaps the biggest danger of embracing the BNPL life is that it makes it too easy to overspend. After all, if you’ll only be paying a small part of the purchase price today, why not buy it now? Missed payments are penalized. If you miss a BNPL payment, the honeymoon is over. Some services will slap an interest charge on your outstanding balance, with rates as high as 40%. Other programs will charge a one-time late fee, which can be as high as $39. Still, others will tack on an extra fixed fee to all subsequent payments. It can kill responsible financial habits. For many people, falling into the trap of BNPL can mean the beginning of the end of their financial responsibility. For one, if a consumer has purchased multiple items through BNPL programs, the monthly payments will not be so minimal. The payments will need to be factored into a budget and can eat into other categories, like savings. In contrast, when a consumer saves up for a purchase, the money generally comes out of their monthly budget for short-term savings and does not affect other categories. Buy now, pay later programs can be super-convenient, but they also present risks for the uninformed or distracted buyer. Use with caution!


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BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 71



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L I FEST Y L E

BY: KATHY HALLREN | JOE’S WINES & SPIRITS

Viva Espania

O

n my recent travels through Spain, I have realized Spanish wine needs exploration and respect. Although there is, of course, Sangria (a wine cocktail), there are also many indigenous varietals and an expanding number of standard European wines. While sherry is the classic to end every Spanish meal, Cava is a sparkling star of the show, whether with breakfast (too early for me), lunch (at 3 p.m.) or as an aperitif or accompanying dinner. Cava is made with a mixture of indigenous grapes, generally Macabeo, Parellada and Xarel·lo. It may be white or rosé. Juvé & Camps Rosé is a favorite of mine. Cava will give you great sparkle and flavor at a price point well under a comparable French champagne or Cremante. Macebeo is my new favorite white wine. Crisp and a little salty, it is a great wine to accompany seafood or pork. Verdejo is the workhorse of Spanish white wine. It is on every menu, by the glass and by the bottle. Pleasant and a little fruit forward, it is good food wine for tapas, too. Albarino is Verdejo’s grown-up brother and is similar in style to French Sauvignon Blanc. It compliments

76 | November 2021

fish and chicken dinners. Tempranillo is a light red wine, great with tapas and light fare. It is slightly fruity, with light sweetness. Granache experienced a brief period of popularity a few years ago then seemed to drop off everyone’s radar. It is more full-bodied than tempranillo and is particularly good in blends with monastrella, mencia or cabernet sauvignon. Monastrella is also produced as a single varietal and is a full-bodied earthy wine. Spanish red wine is sold young or aged, but no indication is aged less than two years. Crianza is minimum of two years, six in barrel. Reserva is aged 36 months, 12 months in barrel. Gran Reserva is aged minimum 18 months in barrel and minimum 48 months. There are categories for white and rose with slightly less time involved in each category. So whether you are going to travel to Spain in person or at your own dinner table, give Spanish wines a try. Have fun, be safe, Kathy


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BY: CHAT WILLIAMS | YOUTH PERFORMANCE

F

Training for All Ages

our years ago, Youth Performance open morning hours to adults who want to improve fitness and performance, opening the facilities’ age range to up to 85 years old. Strength and conditioning professionals that incorporate a properly designed and supervised training program can help young athletes train, compete and reduce the likelihood of injury. Most importantly, they can provide the young athlete with the tools necessary to maintain a healthy and active lifestyle into their adult years. The LTAD model is an excellent representation of developing and training youth from early childhood into adulthood. It also provides useful information on how to design programs that have proper progressions for their age and skill level, as well as realistic progressions to maximize performance level as athletes get older and more competitive.

LI F EST Y L E

still on skill, speed and strength • Periodization can be incorporated slowly • Focus may shift to only two sports

STAGE 4: TRAIN TO COMPETE (MALES 16 – 23 AND FEMALES 15 – 21) • Participate in highly structured activities with the focus shifting to performance • Start specializing in one sport • Begin training year-round and at a high level of intensity with proper progressions and adequate rest • Develop high-level competition by modeling high-level practices

STAGE 5: TRAIN TO WIN (MALES 19 AND OVER AND FEMALES 18 AND OVER)

STAGE 1: FUNDAMENTALS (MALES 6 – 9 AND FEMALES 6 – 8)

• Very skilled athletes and very high dedication • These athletes are working with highly-qualified coaches • Training is highly specialized with periodization making sure the athlete is getting proper training, recovery, tapering and peaking at perfect time

STAGE 2: LEARN TO TRAIN (MALES 9 – 12 AND FEMALES 8 – 11)

STAGE 6: ACTIVE FOR LIFE (ALL AGES)

• Participate in less-structured activity with a focus on physical literacy • Encourage physical activity classes in school • Focus on multiple sports that include running, jumping, kicking and other activities that challenge balance, coordination and speed • Low to moderate structure and focus on technical competency • Maintain multiple sports plus unstructured play • Learn proper bodyweight training • Balance practice time and actual game time

STAGE 3: TRAIN TO TRAIN (MALES 12 – 16 AND FEMALES 11 – 15)

• Moderate structure with focus on technical skills and secondary focus on performance outcomes • Aerobic training becomes a little more important, but the focus is

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• Maintain lifelong physical activity participation • Participate in familiar sports or activities • Avoid going from an active childhood to a sedentary adult lifestyle • Participate in less-intense recreational activities • Pursue a career or volunteer coaching in fitness or sport related activities AGE Chat Williams, MS, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D, CSPS*D, FNSCA chat@youthperformance.net • www.youthperformance.net • 701-3416

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 81



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B U S I N E SS

BY: ROXANNE AVERY

Hudiburg Subaru Moves to Norman

Construction of the new dealership set to be completed in December

H

udiburg Subaru is building a new, state-of-the-art facility at I-35 and Tecumseh Road, across from the Norman Regional HealthPlex. Built on six acres at 3305 Corporate Center Drive, the new dealership will open in December. The dealership is being built as a 45,000 square-foot facility featuring an airy, open show room, business offices, a children’s area as well as parts and services departments. 30 climate-controlled service bays add to the dealership’s efficiency and the new Hudiburg Subaru location will also feature a state-of-theart Subaru carwash. “Subaru owners are known as special people and Hudiburg Subaru owners are very special people,” said Brad Smicklas, general manager and Norman resident. “We want to provide the absolute best experience for our existing and future customers and that’s why we are building this state-of-the-art Subaru facility. “Hudiburg is proud to be associated with a quality product like Subaru,” Smicklas said. “It was Kelley Blue Book’s ‘Most Trusted Brand’ for seven years running and the winner of the JD Power Overall Brand Loyalty award for three years in a row.”

86 | November 2021

As the newest Subaru dealership in Oklahoma, the company has been able to build in and integrate all the latest technologies and innovations available today. “Whether a person is purchasing a vehicle, coming in for service, or just needs information, our goal is to make their experience seamless,” Smicklas said. The dealership will also offer service loaner cars and rentals. “Another innovation in the service sphere will be drop-off, courtesy rides and vehicle delivery right to the customer,” Smicklas said. Complementing the dealership itself, the property will include an outdoor event area and a dog park with watering stations, AstroTurf and seating areas. The Smicklas family has supported animal rescue and adoption charities for several generations and Subaru is famous for its’ support of pet adoptions and shelters. The Hudiburg organization, founded in 1957, is not only locally and family-owned, but also is focused on the community where it has supported local initiatives for the last 64 years. “We look forward to being a part of Norman and giving back to this awesome community,” Smicklas said.– BSM


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THE DI N E G U I DE

the DINE guide

90 | November 2021

Legends Restaurant & Catering

Sauce It Up

Legends has served the Norman community and

Sauce It Up serves high quality pizza, pasta and

the University of Oklahoma for over 50 years.

subs that can be grabbed fast, on the go, or enjoyed

Legends is a stunning, intimate, casually up-scale

while watching your favorite sports in restaurant.

family owned restaurant that is perfect for business

With an extensive appetizer, salad, pizza, sub and

meetings, gatherings, romantic dinners or casual

pasta menu, Sauce It Up has something delicious

meals. Private dining rooms and catering available.

for everyone in the family.

1313 W Lindsey St. • 405.329.8888

2627 Classen Blvd Ste. 104 • 405.857.7795

The Turn Grill @ Westwood Golf Course

Gringo Girl Tamales & Southern Eatery

Located at the Westwood Golf Course on the SE

Evolving from selling Tamales at central Oklahoma

corner of NW 24th and Robinson, The Turn Grill

farmers markets, Gringo Girl Tamales & Southern

offers a good meal at an affordable price to keep

Eatery has grown to a full scale restaurant serving

your energy up for your next round. Check out their

a diverse menu of home cooked favorites. From

Launch & Lunch special including $2 range tokens

nachos and loaded fries to chiken fried steak,

and Happy Hours every weekday.

tamales and fresh made pies, they have it all.

2400 Westport Dr • 405.360.7600

924 W Main St • 405.857.2202

Gaberino’s Homestyle Italian

Scratch Kitchen & Cocktails

Gaberino’s is a family-owned Italian restaurant

Scratch’s menu is crafted entirely from scratch and

located on Ed Noble Parkway. They feature

features smokehouse bacon, pan-seared fish, farm

homestyle recipes made from scratch, with gluten-

gresh veggies and slow roasted meats.They have

free, vegetarian, vegan and low-carb options.

a plethora of custom cocktails that will leave you

Gaberino’s provides in house dining, patio dining,

wanting more. Come taste the difference a true

delivery, on-line and takeout services.

fresh, from Scratch, experience can make.

400 Ed Noble Parkway • 405.310.2229

132 W Main St • 405.801.2900

Spare Time Sports Grill

The Mont

Spare Time Sports Grill is inside Sooner Bowl and

You won’t find a better spot for lunch, dinner,

features delicious food beyond what you’d expect at

or drinks than The Mont’s famous patio. Enjoy

a bowling alley. Great burgers, salads, sandwiches

enticing entrees, burgers, mexican delicacies and a

and appetizers enhance the bowling experience or

world famous swirl. Is it your birthday? The Mont

provide a great lunch or dinner spot. Carry out or

is the perfect place for your big birthday blowout

dine in available.

party with all of your friends.

550 24th Ave NW • 405.360.3634

1300 Classen Blvd • 405.329.3330


Service Station

Bad Daddy’s Burger Bar

The Service Station has been Norman’s favorite

Bad Daddy’s Burger Bar specializes in preparing

neighborhood restaurant for 43 years. Stop by and

simple foods - such as the quintessential hamburger

try one of thier famous burgers, sandwiches, salads,

- with a culinary passion to satisfy restaurant-goers’

steaks or seafood and grab a drink from their full

cravings like never before. The bar features an

bar. Enjoy a nice meal on the patio, inside the

ever rotating selection of regional draft beers and

historic dining room or grab your food to go.

cocktails that are well beyond ordinary.

502 S Webster Ave • 405.364.2139

2050 24th Ave NW Ste 101 • 405.561.1067

Interurban

Penny Hill Deli Bar & Char

Interurban is a casual and fun concept featuring a

100% fresh meat. Handcrafted sandwiches. All

wide variety of menu items catering to families, busy

natural ingredients. That’s what customers will

business professionals and baby boomers of all ages.

find when visitng Penny Hill Deli. Voted Norman’s

Their commitment to customers back in 1976 is the

favorite Deli for 14 years. The menu extends far

same today: good, fresh, quality food; reasonable

beyond normal deli offerings, with a full bar and

prices and friendly and attentive service.

multiple grilled entrees to entice all patrons.

1150 Ed Noble Dr. • 405.307.9200

1150 W Lindsey St. • 405.366.8767

Legends Restaurant & Catering

Thai Thai Asian Bistro

Mr. Sushi believes in quality and consistency, using

Thai Thai is a family run restaurant serving

only the freshest ingredients to prepare and present

delicious, authentic Thai food in Norman for over

every dish with care. From Yellowtail Sashimi

a decade. Everything on their menu is made fresh

to their creative Captain Crunch Roll, there is

daily. Join them for dine in at their location on 24th

something on the menu for everyone. Dine-in, take-

Ave NE near Tecumseh or take home a meal for you

out and delivery options are available.

or the enitre family.

1204 N Interstate Dr. Ste 130. • 405.310.6669

3522 24th Ave NW Ste 100 • 405.310.2026

The Meating Place

405 Burger Bar

Located on Main St just East of the railroad tracks,

Do you like big buns and real meat on your burgers?

The Meating Place’s permanent location serves

Then 405 Burger Bar is the place for you and you

delicious high-quality barbecue, local beer, craft

family. Featuring an extensive burger menu, full bar

cocktails all in a lively atmosphere. Join them for

and multiple TVs to catch the game, all just a short

trivia night or stop by their food truck when you see

walk from OU’s stadium, 405 Burger Bar is perfect

it out and about around town.

for both pre and post game celebrations.

121 E Main St. • 405.857.7431

1429 George Ave • 405.500.6750

Want to be included in our monthly Dine guide?

Call 405.321.1400 or contact us at sportstalk1400am@gmail.com

for more information on how you can be included every month! boydstreet.com

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 91




B U S I N E SS

Photos by: Mark Doescher

What’s Eating Norman

Yo! Pablo Tacos & Tequila

94 | November 2021


A

fter nearly two decades in hospitality, mostly working in bars and nightclubs, Jeff Rogers entered the OKC food scene. After working his way up from frontline service jobs like security and bartender, Rogers now owns and operates several bars, night clubs and restaurants around the metro. “I started working in hospitality when I was in college and just loved everything about it, the people, being in the mix of it all,” he said. “I planned on being a teacher and coach, that’s what my degree is in.” But in the end, hospitality won out. Since his transition four years ago, Rogers now has four restaurant concepts including Yo! Pablo, a new taco shop on Campus Corner, at 747 Asp Ave. Why tacos you might ask, well the answer is simple, he likes tacos. “I love tacos,” Rogers said. “I wanted to make

high-quality tacos with fresh ingredients.” A bit of fortune led him to open the first Yo! Pablo a little over a year ago in Oklahoma City. “I looked into a bar space and the kitchen equipment was still there and it all started from there,” he said. That first Yo! Pablo location opened in October 2020, and by October 2021 Rogers Concepts opened their fifth location in Edmond. “We’ve had a good response,” Rogers said. But the year has come with ample challenges. “It’s hard to be in the restaurant industry right now,” Rogers admitted. “Everything is three times the price, the staffing issues, it’s hard.” But Rogers isn’t letting the current climate cloud his view. He knows the potential a wellloved restaurant can have.

boydstreet.com

BY: LINDSAY CUOMO “There is longevity in food, if you do it right, it can last forever,” he said, which is a contrast to owning other businesses in hospitality. Yo! Pablo serves up fresh tacos, appetizers, desserts and drinks, but with Rogers’ background in the social scene, a fun atmosphere was crucial too, especially at the Campus Corner location. “I wanted to make sure there was no bad seat in the house for game days,” he said. On game days, Yo! Pablo serves up a special simplified menu, including breakfast tacos for early kickoffs, to make sure diners have their food fast and that the food is top notch. With 50 seats at the bar, two patios and TVs all around, Yo! Pablo is a fun place to grab a bite to eat on your way to a game or to stay and watch the Sooners. Rogers even recently installed a champagne vending machine, perfect to toast a win.

They also stay open late on Fridays and Saturdays to quench any late-night cravings. Their most popular menu items are the quesabirria, carne asada and sweet chile shrimp tacos, but don’t sleep on their carne asada cheese fries that are topped with grilled steak, black bean corn salsa, lots of cheese and a red pepper puree. To round off the menu, Yo! Pablo has vegan options and an off-menu power bowl with your choice of protein. Rogers carried over a feature from the previous tenant, a private dining space called The Vault that seats 20 and is available for reservations at no additional cost. Rogers said he is planning special events throughout the year such The Lost Ogle Trivia Nights, UFC fight nights, NFL watch parties and Cinco de Mayo. Stay up to date on special events, their taco of the month and more on social media, @yopablookc. – BSM BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 95


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B U S I N E SS

BY: LINDSAY CUOMO

Money Smarts Norman-based financial planner pens second book for financial well-being

P

eggy Doviak, the mastermind behind the Ask Peggy column, has written a second book to help individuals better understand their financial situation. This second book, titled “52 Weeks to Well-being: What a woman needs to know to become queen of her finances”, offers straightforward advice on how women can reach their financial goals, no matter what life stage they are in. Doviak tackles topics such as prospering in the workforce, starting a small business, juggling caring for kids and adult parents, divorce, widowhood and general topics like identity theft. “I feel that a lot of books about money can feel a little bit pandering towards women, not all, but a lot,” Doviak said. “The resources out there don’t really address what women have to go through.” Her new book is structured like her first, titled “52 Weeks to Prosperity: What your accountant, banker, broker and financial adviser may not have told you.” Each short chapter addresses the terms and tools you need to establish and reach your financial goals and ends with practical steps to put into action. “Finance can seem like a different language and this book is designed to introduce those important terms,” Doviak explained. “There is so much fear historically for women when it comes to their finances. At the end of the day, people want to be alright, more than they want to be rich.

98 | November 2021

“This is a rubber-meets-the-road kind of book. The activities in the book give practical ways to apply what you’ve read.” For example, the book walks you through determining cash flow, establishing emergency savings and offers tips and offers tips and tricks to make it easier. Demographic characters interact with the information at different points in their lives. “We are afraid of what we don’t understand and when we avoid it, it gets worse,” she shared. “Maybe they didn’t make the best choices in their 20s and 30s and then they’re in 40s and what do they do now?” Doviak said that while the book focuses on situations common for women, there is applicable advice for men too. “During COVID, we watched good jobs go away overnight. I want to help create an environment where people are not afraid of money because if they are not afraid, they can accomplish anything.” The new book, released on Nov. 16, is available at local bookstores and online. Doviak’s website, AskPeggy.com, also has a wealth of resources. –BSM



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