Boyd Street Magazine January 2023

Page 1

Family Film Festival Clean Shorts New Furniture Consignment Wunderhaus Annual Giving Campaign Celebrate United January 2023 • Issue 1 • Volume 22 BOYD STREET NORMAN’S OLDEST COMMUNITY MAGAZINE

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JANUARY CONTENTS ISSUE 1– VOLUME 22 2023 what’s inside on the cover /boydstreetmagazine @boydstreet boydstreet.com Cover photo
Williams & Associates 18 42 50 What’s Happening Norman’s community calendar for January. 15 Everything that Tumbles is GOLD Four Sooner senior gymnasts look to add the program’s sixth national title in 2023. 34 Celebrate United United Way celebrates accomplishments of annual campaign. 18 An Investment in Opportunity NPS bond proposition on the ballot for Feb. 14 election. 22 Clean Shorts A film festival for the whole family. 26 Daddy Daughter Dance The annual tradition returns to full capacity. 30 Joe B. Lawson Tournament Images from the fourth annual memorial tournament. 42 Healthy New Year Check List Strategies to navigate a healthier you in 2023. 46 Wunderhaus Furniture Consignment Norman’s newest furniture consignment store. 50 Service Feature Master Police Officer Jenny Bryan 54 What to Buy and What to Skip in January Presented by OUFCU. 58 Chardonnay, Chablis, Champagne Presented by Joe’s Wine & Spirits. 66
by: Shevaun

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PART 1: COMMUNITY PROJECT

Cooperatives are businesses created by like-minded people to address a common unmet need.

Cooperatives come in all shapes and sizes, but they all hold to the seven Cooperative Principles and core values of selfhelp, self-responsibility, democracy, equality, equity, and solidarity. This is what makes the cooperative difference.

ASSIGNMENT: Imagine you are granted $500 to create a project benefitting your community. How would you utilize the funds? Create a project proposal outlining your project using the sample template as a basis.

PART 2: COMMUNITY PROJECT PROMOTION

An event, fundraiser, or community initiative will only succeed if people know and care about it.

ASSIGNMENT: Create a promotional video for your community project*. (Max: 2 min/2 MB)

*Find tips for creating your video at www.okcoop.org/ YouthTour

Scan here to learn more and apply!

PART 3: LETTER TO A LEADER

Oklahoma Youth Tour allows students to see the government working up close. During our day on Capitol Hill, we walk the halls of Congress, visit with members of the Oklahoma federal delegation, and tour the U.S. Capitol. Being an informed and active constituent is an important civic duty.

ASSIGNMENT: Write a professional letter to an elected official about an issue important to you. This could be the issue surrounding your community project or an unrelated issue.

*Find examples of elected officials and ways to contact them at www.okcoop.org/ YouthTour

CALLING ALL JUNIORS YOU COULD WIN A TRIP TO WASHINGTON, D.C.! JUNE 16-22, 2023 ALL EXPENSE PAID TRIP The Oklahoma Rural Electric Youth Tour is an annual, weeklong, all-expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C., that is open to select high school juniors (seniors-to-be) who attend schools located in co-op service areas. LEADERSHIP. FRIENDSHIPS. LIFE CHANGING.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mark Doescher MANAGING EDITOR Lindsay Cuomo PHOTOGRAPHY Mark Doescher CONTRIBUTORS Roxanne Avery | Lindsay Cuomo Kathy Hallren | Shannon Hudzinski Chelsey Kraft | Connor Pasby Chris Plank
Any articles, artwork or graphics created by Boyd Street Magazine or its contributors are sole property of Boyd Street Magazine and cannot be reproduced for any reason without permission. Any opinions expressed in Boyd Street are not necessarily that of Boyd Street management.
A Nice, Normal Neighborhood M u r d e r M u r d e r Feb. 9, 10 & 11, 2023 T i c k e t s $ 7 5 / T a b l e s o f 1 0 $ 7 5 0 The Sooner Theatre Presents Annual Murder Mystery 'FUN'draising dinner and show! A murderously funny, musical fundraising dinner and show for adults only benefiting the programs and productions of The Sooner Theatre of Norman, Inc Tickets on sale now! Sponsored by: Armstrong Bank, Eide Bailly, Norman Pediatric Dentistry, Valiance Bank SoonerTheatre.com | 405.321.9600

ALL OF OUR ACCOUNTS COME WITH Respect.

To truly respect someone, you need to understand who they are—their hopes, dreams, goals, and challenges. Since 1909, the Armstrong Bank family has had the honor of knowing the people of this community and the privilege of serving up financial guidance and accounts to help you succeed. With every solution you’re searching for, know that we’re here for you, and we have your best interest in mind.

Respect helps us do so much more for you.

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BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 15 boydstreet.com JANUARY 22 LLOYD NOBLE CENTER 6:45PM VS UTAH SOONERSPORTS.COM NORMAN FARMERS MARKET NEW WINTER MARKET! Jan. 14 & 21 - 8am - 1pm SOONER BASKETBALL Men: 1/21 Baylor, 1/28 Alabama Women: 1/21 OSU, 1/31 TCU SOONER CENTURIONS ANNUAL MEETING 18 NORMAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COALITION 6PM COCKTAILS - 6:45 DINNER SELECTNORMAN.COM OU MEN’S GYMNASTICS 28 MCCASLAND FIELD HOUSE 6PM VS AIR FORCE & ILLINOIS SOONERSPORTS.COM SOONER WOMEN’S GYMNASTICS COMING IN FEBRUARY DADDY DAUGHTER DANCE Feb. 4 - Embassy Suites by Hilton 2501 Conference Dr • cityofnorman.thundertix.com BUSINESS AFTER HOURS 17 PRIMROSE FUNERAL SERVICES & SUNSET MEMORIAL PARK 5-7PM - 1109 N PORTER NORMANCHAMBER.COM BUSINESS BEFORE HOURS 25 LANDERS CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE 8-9:15AM NORMANCHAMBER.COM WHAT’S HAPPENING BRIDGES PROM 2.0 Feb. 11 - OU Ballroom bridgesnorman.org/2023-bridges-prom
REAL. LOCAL. SAVINGS. Limitations apply. See geico.com for more details. GEICO & affiliates. Washington, DC 20076 © 2020 GEICO Warren Stowe 405-248-9509 geico.com/okc-south 1500 W I-240 Service Rd Oklahoma City Oklahoma City IN 2023, WE ARE COMMITTED TO MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN OUR COMMUNITY. TOGETHER. OUR SPONSORS #LIVEUNITED Ad sponsored in part by Boyd Street Magazine, Bank of America, and Chris Baker Photography. United Way Sponsor Print Ad-BOYD-bankofamericaFINAL.pdf 1 12/9/22 10:36 AM
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CELEBRATE UNITED

“Change doesn’t happen alone. United Way is the nucleus of 25 nonprofit organizations,” shared Daren Wilson, president and CEO of the United Way of Norman. “Our shared success depends on each other. So many were so generous to get us where we are today.”

United Way celebrates accomplishments of annual campaign.

“If you donated this year, thank you. If you didn’t, there is still time,” encouraged David Goodspeed, campaign co-chair with his wife Jenny.

“Your dollar might change someone’s life.”

18 | January 2023 COMMUNITY
BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 19 boydstreet.com
Monthy non-profit story presented by: Norman Stamp & Seal 110 S University Blvd • normanstampandseal.com Giving Changes EverythingUnited Way’s Impact in 2022 $1,909,914 raised as of Dec. 14, 96% of the $2 million goal 61,123 people received the help they need, roughly 1 in 4 Normanites or 70% of the capacity of Gaylord Memorial Stadium 25 Partner agencies funded by the United Way of Norman 3 Impact areas –education, financial stability and health 89 Cents of every dollar donated goes directly to helping people in our community 803 First-time donors contributed to United Way’s 2022 annual campaign 4 Star rating by Charity Navigator 60 Community volunteers served on Impact Councils to assess needs and ensure financial accountability
Embassy Suites February 4, 2023 All dances are for all ages. Each dance offers the same type of entertainment and amenities, including complimentary snacks, and refreshments. The Red Dance, from 2 to
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AN INVESTMENT IN OPPORTUNITY

22 | January 2023
EDUCATION
NPS Bond Proposition on the Ballot for Feb. 14 Election

The Norman Board of Education voted to approve a $353.9 million school bond proposal, which Norman residents will consider during the Feb. 14 election.

“This bond touches something for every student,” shared Carolina Cunningham, co-chair of Vote Yes for Kids, a community advocacy committee. “When this proposal passes, it will provide diverse opportunities for kids to get plugged in and find their place whether that be in FFA, football, esports, fine arts or aviation – students need to feel like they belong.”

Bond issues are a key funding component for districts, but it is important to note that these funds cannot be used to pay teacher salaries. However, as Kate Vahlberg, Vote Yes for Kids co-chair, pointed out, community investments “make NPS a great place to work and learn.”

“This bond is critical to the future of our schools and our community as a whole,” Vahlberg explained. “A lot of really exciting projects are included that will ensure our schools and kids will continue to be successful.”

“Without bonds like these, we would have rundown buildings with nothing in them,” Cunningham added.

Projects in the bond proposal were identified through demographic studies, facility assessments and input from parents, teachers, staff and community stakeholders.

“This bond will support the district in its day-to-day operations and provide improvements for our students and staff,” NPS Superintendent Dr. Nick Mi-

KEY PROJECTS INCLUDE:

• ALL-SCHOOLS FINE ARTS PERFORMANCE VENUE

• ANIMAL BARN FOR THE DISTRICT’S FFA PROGRAM

• STAND-ALONE FACILITY FOR THE OKLAHOMA AVIATION ACADEMY AT MAX WESTHEIMER AIRPORT

• NEW TRANSPORTATION BUILDING

• MULTI-SPORT ATHLETIC STADIUM AT NORMAN NORTH HIGH SCHOOL

gliorino said. “These are steps in our long-term plan to maintain and enhance excellent educational opportunities for our students today and into the future.”

The ballot will feature two separate propositions since school transportation bond projects are required by law to be listed as separate propositions on the ballot. Thus, the first proposition, which is for the bulk of the bond projects, is $349.8 million. The second proposition, which is specifically for school transportation items like buses, is $4.1 million.

The bond also includes required updates to meet ADA and other code compliance issues throughout the district. If the bond doesn’t pass, these updates will have to be funded through the district’s general fund.

“I want to thank everyone involved for the collaboration and aggressive, forward-thinking planning that has gone into preparing this bond resolution,” Migliorino said.

If approved by voters, the bond would not result in an increase in the millage rate. Norman voters have approved more than $600 million in school bond funds since 1972.

“The district has staggered the bond proposals so that our millage rate does not increase but that our investment in our schools stays consistent,” Cunningham explained. “For any town, especially the size of Norman, our schools are the backbone of the success for everyone. This bond affects everyone, even those without kids in NPS.”– BSM

• UPDATES TO HARVE COLLINS STADIUM AT NORMAN HIGH SCHOOL.

• MULTI-USE SPACES AT BOTH HIGH SCHOOLS FOR ESPORTS AND OTHER ACTIVITIES

• ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CLASSROOM ADDITIONS

• STEAM CLASSROOMS IN EVERY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

• MAINTENANCE AND UPGRADES FOR EVERY DISTRICT SCHOOL SITE

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 23 boydstreet.com
“Show the love to our kids and teachers on Feb. 14 and vote yes,” Kate Vahlberg encouraged.
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A Film Festival for the Whole Family

26 | January 2023
COMMUNITY

Oklahoma may not be the first location that comes to mind as a center for films from around the world, but one local event is helping raise our state’s profile by highlighting the industry’s next generation of filmmakers. Moore Norman Technology Center’s Clean Shorts Festival will take place on-site at 4701 12th Ave the evening of Friday, March 3 and all day Saturday, March 4.

Free and open to the public, the ninth annual festival features short films that are 30 minutes or less. Dozens of entries will be screened, and organizers plan to show each film at least twice throughout the event.

The festival is open to all ages with content Ben Hlavaty, Digital Cinema & Television Production instructor, describes as “PG-12ish, with limited language.” The Clean Shorts play-on-words theme characterizes the festival’s family-friendly approach.

“We have had films from elementary students to feature filmmakers from nearly every country each year,” explained Hlavaty. “Topics run the gamut.”

Hlavaty initially started the festival as a fundraiser to support student travel to state competitions and SkillsUSA competitions at the national level.

The Oklahoma State Film Challenge, a free filmmaking contest open to all Oklahoma high school and vocational technical students, is also part of the festival. This year’s challenge is held in memory of Charlie Blessington, a student at Eastern Oklahoma County Technology Center who took his own life in December 2020.

Students are tasked with creating “a 30-60 second suicide prevention public service announcement, using the theme ‘You Matter.’ Submissions will be scored by a team at the Clean Shorts Film Festival. The top 10 submissions will be presented to Charlie’s family for final voting and the winning submission will receive a $500 scholarship from the Charles Michael Blessington Foundation.

MNTC began receiving submissions for the festival via an online platform in October. Students have been reviewing and scoring the films to notify winners in early February so they can plan to attend, if possible, since a question-and-answer session with filmmakers is growing part of the festival.

Hlavaty started working in Oklahoma’s energy sector as a mechanical designer but found an affinity for film at Oklahoma City Community College. Instead of finishing an engineering degree, he started night courses.

“I worked on some movies and never looked back,” said Hlavaty. “I never would have thought I’d be a teacher ever but when you find something you’re passionate about, that matters. I love seeing the students have those ‘a-ha’ moments and figure something out. That’s amazing. I get to relive that every day. I don’t have a job. I have an opportunity.”

Part of the festival’s focus is raising awareness of talent showcased through independent films.

“There are so many people who are incredibly talented, and this art is happening without a huge budget,” said Hlavaty. “Not everyone is in Hollywood. Oklahoma is blowing up in the filmmaking world. If you’re a student and you want filmmaking, acting, writing, directing, editing, there’s probably a career tech for your school.

“It takes more than one person to make a movie. We have a lot of the same equipment professional film crews use and everyone works together to make the festival happen.”

Students outside the film program also participate by making trophies, working on graphic design and more.

“We would love to have the public come out and see these films. This might be your only chance to see the short films because they don’t have a platform as much as feature-length films do,” said Hlavaty.

Find more information at https://filmfreeway.com/ CleanShorts.– BSM

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 27 boydstreet.com
BY: STAFF
“There are so many people who are incredibly talented, and this art is happening without a huge budget.”
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The Annual Tradition Returns to

The Daddy Daughter Dance, one of Norman Parks & Recreation’s premier events, is back on Feb. 4 and tickets are already on sale.

“The 2023 Daddy Daughter Dance is back in person at full capacity this year,” shared Veronica Tracy, recreation manager for the City of Norman.

This treasured tradition at Embassy Suites is attended by over 5,000 dads and daughters, making this one of the largest daddy daughter dances in the state!

“The Daddy Daughter Dance is a true Norman tradition, dads and daughters come from all over the metro to enjoy a fun night,” said Tracy. “Our local business community always looks forward to hosting dads and daughters as they enjoy a night on the town before the dance.”

Stay tuned for more information about partnership packages for things like salon services and flowers.

Fathers and father figures can spend quality time and make memories together with their daughters during a special evening filled with fun at the dance. There will be a DJ, music, refreshments and a photographer to take professional photos.

“New this year is our sensory room,” Tracy said. “We want all dance participants to feel comfortable so we’ve designed a safe, sensory-friendly space for anyone who may want to take a break from the main ballroom and enjoy the dance at a lower volume level.”

Full Capacity

Tickets are $15 per person if purchased early and there are three in-person dances to choose from, which makes it easy for dads to take multiple children and make each feel special.

The dance options available at Embassy Suites, located at 2501 Conference Dr, are:

• The Red Dance, from 2 to 3:30 p.m.

• The Pink Dance, from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

• The Blue Dance, from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

All dances are for all ages and each dance offers the same entertainment and amenities, including complimentary snacks and refreshments. A virtual option is also available.

“We’re keeping the virtual option because we know we have lots of dads and daughters who love to tune in to KREF Radio on 1400 AM/99.3 FM from home and dance in their PJs,” Tracy said.

Tickets and t-shirts can be bought online at cityofnorman.thundertix.com. Ticket prices will go up to $20, and the dances could sell out. Each person must have a ticket to enter a dance.

Extend the fun with an overnight stay! Rooms may be reserved at Embassy Suites on the night of the dance at https://tinyurl.com/3ph9yvsr. Use Code – DDD –for a special rate.– BSM

30 | January 2023
COMMUNITY
BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 31 boydstreet.com
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After claiming their 5th National Championship, the Sooners are ranked number one in the preseason and return a loaded roster injected with talented newcomers. As the Sooners position themselves for the move to the SEC, the challenges will continue to grow in preparation for the toughest conference for Women’s Gymnastics in college athletics, but the expectation now is the same today as it has always been under 17-year head coach KJ Kindlerto compete for the sport’s biggest prize.

The Sooners are the favorites to repeat and they are poised to do just that.

COMPLETING THE DRIVE FOR 5

Going into the 2023 season, it’s hard not to look back on the impressive finish to last season. A year after finishing second to Michigan by less than a tenth in 2021, Oklahoma rallied to register a score of 198.2 which was just enough to slip by the Gators and claim the title.

The Sooners found themselves in last place after the floor exercise in the first round. It would have been easy for the Sooners to hang their collective heads and feel that maybe it was just not meant to be. But OU rallied in a big way and never looked back en route to winning the title.

“We caught fire on vault, and I felt like we kept momentum in our favor from that point forward,” Kindler said. “So proud of the way they just kept feeding off each other. I still get chills to this day thinking about how we finished.”

Now that OU has had the chance to celebrate another championship, the goal is straightforward - do it again. Kindler is not worried about focus or desire.

“The summer helps you refocus… since we’re a winter sport, you’re done in April, and you have that time to revel in the moment. When it was time to get back to business in August, everyone was on board,” Kindler said. “We have a good group of women, a lot of leaders on our team, and I don’t think it was difficult for them to refocus on the next step.”

34 | January 2023
OU SPORTS
Photo by: Shevaun Williams & Associates Left to right: Jenna Dunn, Olivia Trautman, Ragan Smith, Allie Stern

ALL THAT TUMBLES IS

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 35 boydstreet.com GOLD

A DOMINATING SENIOR CLASS

As the Sooners prepare for the next step, they do so with a more experienced group than the squad that took home the title last year. It’s a team that has incredible depth and a talented and accomplished senior class.

The Sooners return eight gymnasts who combined for 20 All-American honors, highlighted by seniors Ragan Smith, Olivia Trautman, Allie Stern and Oklahoma native Jenna Dunn.

Smith has been a star since the moment she stepped on campus at the University of Oklahoma. Smith, a Rio Olympic alternate in her first year at the senior elite level, began this Olympic cycle in 2017 by winning the U.S. all-around title. Smith’s margin of victory — 3.4 points — was greater than Simone Biles’ average margin for her four national titles from 2013-16. But an ankle injury led Smith to decide that she was ready to move to college.

“I felt like my time was done in elite,” said Smith. “I really just wanted to move on with my life and everything.”

Smith enrolled at Oklahoma and has been a constant for the Sooners since.

“I didn’t want to let go of elite because it’s been my whole life and my dream,” Smith said at the time. “But at the same time, my mind was telling me to come to

college and have fun. I’m glad I made that decision because I love it here.”

Smith was the Big 12 Newcomer of the Year during her freshman campaign and has been nothing short of elite for the Sooners during her time in the Crimson and Cream. In fact, she clinched the 2022 National Title for the Sooners, scoring a 9.962 on beam during the final rotation to pull .112 points ahead of the Florida Gators.

Trautman and Stearns are taking advantage of an extra COVID season. When the coronavirus shut down the 2020 sports season, the NCAA allowed an extra year of eligibility for every student athlete. While the shutting down of the post season potentially cost the Sooners a National Championship, it did allow for Trautman and Stearns to return for another year.

Trautman has been a battler, an overcomer. She has been a resilient force for the Oklahoma Sooners during her career.

“Every day you get the same demeanor with her,” Kindler said. “There are no ups, there are no downs. If you’ve got one or the other, you probably know something is going on. She’s very calm, very collected for someone her age.”

Trautman has battled setback after setback but has found a way to still step up in the biggest moments.

36 | January 2023
Photos by: Mark Doescher Jenna Dunn

She has earned All-American honors in three of her four seasons and was named the Big 12 Newcomer of the Year in 2019. The one year she did not earn an All-American honor she scored a perfect ten in the vault. Incredibly, Trautman has achieved this unparalleled success while missing half of the season in three of her four years as a Sooners.

But being on the sidelines only made Trautman better and her focus and passion served as an inspiration to her teammates.

“I think that it does inspire them to take a positive spin on what’s going on, because a lot of times it’s easy to give up,” Kindler said. “With Olivia, she never does that. She’s a great example for the rest of our team.”

Stern has established herself as one of the best vaulters in the country and a leader for the Sooners.

“She does everything right,” Kindler said of Stern. “She is focus and determined and is someone that sets an incredible tone for this team.”

Oklahoma native Jenna Dunn brings the Sooner passion and pride. A graduate of Westmoore High School, Dunn has been a powerhouse on the beam for the Sooners.

“She is all Oklahoma,” Kindler said. “Sooner born, sooner bred… she is all about being a Sooner and is primed for a big season.”

THE NEXT GENERATION

Beyond the talented senior class, the Sooners return a versatile group that has done everything it takes to reach the highest level of college gymnastics.

Jordan Bowers returns after an All-American season on the floor and should factor in all around.

“She grew the most during the season last year,” Kindler said of Bowers. “From the beginning of the year to the end of the year, she was a completely different person - a little more tentative at the beginning of the year and had to talk herself into confidence, at the end of the year she had an abundance of confidence. That elevated her game.”

Returners Danny Sievers, Kat Levasseur, Danae Fletcher and Audrey Davis could all find themselves as competitors in the all-around, a magnification of the depth the Sooners have heading into the season.

“There are so many stars on this team, and they are all really vocal,” Kindler said of her roster. “They all

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 37 boydstreet.com

want it their way which is good. We must learn how to calibrate and bring it all together.”

Freshmen Faith Torrez and Ava Siegfeldt could play major roles for the Sooners as well.

“Faith is someone you will hear a lot about, and she will be an all arounder,” Kindler said. “She trained in Chicago and was a USA National Team member. She is incredibly powerful. She does the most difficult skills on beam in our whole lineup.”

Siegfeldt has already proven herself as a gamer with the way she performed in the preseason intrasquad.

“She kicked it up a notch,” Kindler said of Siegfeldt. “What we saw in practice was good. What we saw in the meet was better.”

PRESEASON NUMBER ONE

When the preseason polls were released in December, the rest of the country saw the Sooners lineup and ranked them as the top team in the country heading into the season.

It’s the fifth time in program history that OU has been picked as the No. 1 team, the 13th straight season ranked in the top five nationally to begin the year and

the 9th straight season in which the Sooners have been ranked in the preseason top three.

“In all of our history, we’ve only been atop the preseason poll five times,” Kindler said. “In seven out of the last 10 years, we’ve either met or exceeded our preseason rankings. It’s a compliment and it’s still a big deal… but it’s all in your hands.”

MOTIVATION

The Sooners are loaded, so competition will be fierce to even make the lineup. For Kindler, that is incredibly exciting, yet challenging to balance.

“You want a competitive environment in the gym, but you want people to trust one another and understand why choices are made,” Kindler said of her deep roster. “No one wants to be on the sideline, but it elevates them every single day to get better.”

The talent is in place, and concerns over motivation are minimized by one simple message from the fivetime national championship coach… there is still room for more.

“Unless your hands are full. You don’t have enough. Our freshmen only have two rings... there’s plenty of fingers left,” Kindler said.– BSM

38 | October 2022
Danielle Sievers

Joe B. Lawson Tournament

The 2022 Joe Lawson Tournament had a great turnout with high-intensity games, fan engagement and, most importantly, support from people who knew Joe Lawson. Lawson took pride in the game of basketball and helped develop young athletes.

The Joe Lawson Tournament consisted of six well-rounded teams on the girls’ side and eight teams on the boys’ side. The Norman Tigers took home the girls’ trophy, with an impressive win over Classen SAS. Coach Frankie Parks and his team picked up big wins over Lawton MacArthur, Midwest City and Classen SAS in their tournament championship run.

The boys’ side had a tough, entertaining bracket that was loaded with talent. The Putnam City North Panthers surpassed the Del City Eagles in the championship game, which was a back-and-forth game for four quarters.– BSM

Joseph “Joe” Brian Lawson was born in Dallas, TX in 1989. He was taken far too early at the age of 27 in 2017.

Joe was a natural athlete. He took special interest in basketball from an early age watching his older brothers play. He was a three-year starter at point guard for Norman High School, captain his senior season, and graduated from NHS in 2008.

Perhaps more important than being a gifted athlete, Joe was known for being a brilliant, yet caring coach. He truly enjoyed the opportunity to develop the talents of each and every athlete he coached. He served as the head coach of the freshman basketball team at Norman North High School and was an assistant coach for the NNHS varsity team from 2012-2016.

He is remembered by his players as being a good friend, as well as a great coach. Joe was also involved in the Norman community with the Norman Optimist Club as a referee and coach.

Joe was a fun, energetic guy with a great sense of humor and would do anything for his family or friends.

The Joe Lawson Memorial Invitational Tournament was established to honor his memory, benefit Norman athletics and to bring the community closer together.

-Provided by the Joe B. Lawson Memorial Foundation

42 | January 2023
HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS
BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 43 boydstreet.com

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HEALTHY NEW YEAR CHECK LIST

Strategies to Navigate a Healthier You in 2023

New Year’s resolutions often revolve around improving your health. But sadly, the vast majority of us won’t stick with our goals beyond just a couple of weeks.

Dr. Colleen Del Valle, a family medicine doctor with the Norman Regional Health System, shared her best strategies for how to be healthier in 2023 and how to stick with it!

First of all, Del Valle said to shake of your doubts and “focus on moving forward.”

“What happened in the past doesn’t matter,” she encouraged. “Don’t focus on what you should have done, instead look at what you can do from this point on.”

Reset this train of thought as often as need.

Next on her recommended checklist is to schedule a checkup with your primary care physician.

“Your PCP is your teammate, sort of like your health care quarterback – they help you navigate your health care because they get to know you and can address your concerns on a more personal level,” she explained.

If you are looking for a new primary care physician, she recommends talking with your family and friends about who they see and what they like about their doctor. Also consider getting into a health system where you can easily access specialists.

After you’ve seen your PCP, be sure to follow up on any recommended screenings based on your age, family history and symptoms. Preventative screenings like mammograms, colonoscopies and blood

work can catch things before they become a problem, Del Valle advised.

Once you’ve addressed any health concerns, it’s time to move! Del Valle suggested finding something you enjoy and making it part of your routine. She said to aim for 150 minutes of activity a week and that it is okay to start small and work your way up.

Next, it is time to address the way you fuel your body. Del Valle cautioned against strict, fad diets and instead recommends incorporating small changes.

“Instead of cutting out whole food groups, try eliminating one type of sugary drink a month,” she said. “Small changes form new habits.”

She also recommended prioritizing sleep.

“Sleep is incredibly important, it really trickles down to all aspects of your life,” she said. “If you are not getting enough sleep, talk to someone about it.”

Her final doctor’s orders are to give yourself regular check-ins.

“Take the time to acknowledge when something is not working – whether that be a job or a relationship – and address it. That can be hard but there are benefits in the long run.”

Del Valle recently moved to Oklahoma with her husband who is in the Army and their two young children. She specializes in women’s and kids’ health and is accepting new patients. Originally from Minnesota, she is an avid sports fan, particularly college football and the Vikings.– BSM

46 | January 2023
HEALTH
Dr. Colleen Del Valle
BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 47 boydstreet.com
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WUNDERHAUS

Furniture Consignment

Since a young age, Beth Ketchum has loved design. As a child, she was always rearranging her room and creating design boards from the Sears and JCPenney catalogs. Ketchum’s mom could sew and would bring Ketchum’s designs for draperies, bedding and more to life.

That childhood love blossomed into a 20-year career in the furniture and drapery business. Ketchum’s latest venture is Wunderhaus (pronounced Wonder House) Furniture Consignment, located at 1284 N. Interstate Dr. in Norman.

Norman has several well-established furniture stores but not a consignment store. While researching prior to opening the business, Ketchum said many people told her this type of store is “exactly what Norman needs.” Wunderhaus Furniture consignment opened in September 2022, and Ketchum has “been blown away” by the support that Norman has shown her and the business.

“I’ve always said Norman takes care of their own, and they do,” Ketchum shared. “I’m very overwhelmed with the support. We’re growing a little more every month, and I’m just really pleased.”

In addition to selling furniture, Wunderhaus offers artwork ranging from high-end pieces to more affordable mass-produced ones, as well as chandeliers and draperies. Some artists currently in the store are Ovanes Berberian, Beverly Jamison Carrick, Anthony Casay and David Dalton. Customers can also purchase pieces from Oklahoma artists Lana Lopez and Jamie Nickels.

Ketchum said her passion is drapery, adding she thought the consignment piece of the business would be what kept her busy but so far, draperies have. She offers a range of drapery panels and shades, upholstery for furniture, custom bedding and pillows and more. Additionally, Ketchum has an interior designer, Julie Johnson, on staff who can provide that service

50 | January 2023
BUSINESS

Norman’s Newest Furniture Consignment Store

to customers. The latest addition to Wunderhaus’ offerings is Wunderhaul, which offers pick up, delivery and moving services for not just furniture but also other large items.

“We are a one-stop shop,” Ketchum said.

In addition to Ketchum and Johnson, the team also includes Issac Stewart, who was originally hired as a delivery person but has turned into Ketchum’s righthand man, and a part-time delivery person.

For the Wunderhaus team, the goal is to create an experience, always offering lattes or mimosas to customers while they shop, and to help customers feel at home in the store. Recently, an interior design client told Ketchum that what he thinks makes Wunderhaus different is that it is a high-end consignment store with a very upscale feel and shopping experience.

Customers interested in consigning with Wunderhaus can text 405-831-5908 or email info@wunderhausfc. com with pictures of the furniture to start the process. If the furniture is accepted by the store and then sells, there is a 50-50 split of the profit, Ketchum said.

To learn more about Wunderhaus Furniture Consignment, visit wunderhausfc.com or follow the store on Facebook, Instagram and TikTok.– BSM

BOYD STREET MAGAZINE | 51 boydstreet.com
Prior to opening Wunderhaus, Ketchum worked for some of the big furniture stores in the area. Some of her roles include designer for Mathis Brothers and director of visual merchandising for Bob Mills. Most recently, she worked in a store similar to Wunderhaus in Oklahoma City.
52 | January 2023
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SERVICE SPOTLIGHT: MASTER POLICE OFFICER JENNY BRYAN

Born and raised in Norman, Master Police Officer Jenny Bryan graduated from Norman High. Growing up with her mother working in the Cleveland County Courthouse, Bryan always wanted to do that too.

Choosing to have a family first, after her four kids were born, she decided it was time to do what she wanted in her career and in 2016, began working at the Norman Police Department.

Byran says she loves her job, loves to go to work and loves the people she works with.

“I’ve been through a lot in life and so I love to help others in similar situations,” she shared. “I treat every call as if it’s one of my family members.”

Armed with empathy because of situations she has personally gone through helps her do her job even better.

“I may be small, but I’m mighty,” Bryan said. “I’ve been through a lot in life. Our family has been through a lot.”

Her least favorite part of her job is the paperwork.

“Nobody likes doing that,” she says. “It’s no fun and it makes me have to sit still and I don’t like to sit still. I’d rather be out there doing the physical part of my job.”

Bryan also said working scenes involving abuse or death of kids is another difficult part of her job.

“We’re not called to birthday parties and family gatherings,” Bryan said. “We respond to the ugly parts of life including domestic issues, fights and shootings.”

She said she doesn’t let people get under her skin and she usually just listens and lets them vent.

“They’re so excited and worked up when they call us and sometimes, they just need someone to listen to them,” she shared.

Living life with positivity and a good attitude is what Bryan attributes to making or breaking a person and she said, “You get out what you put in.”

Living the last several years with a major health issue, Bryan said she’s not a depressed or negative person.

“I don’t let anything define me. I don’t miss work. I go to the gym and work harder than I ever have,” she said. “It doesn’t slow me down either. I’m not one to sit around and think ‘woe is me’.”

In her spare time, Bryan loves going to the gym and doing stuff with her kids.

“We’re always busy attending basketball, football, cheerleading, wrestling and volleyball games for my kids’ sports teams.”

To anyone thinking about joining the police force, Bryan said, “I get paid to help people and that’s what I love to do. I say, ‘You have a chance and a choice every day; it’s all up to you.’”– BSM

54 | January 2023
This is a continuation of our series on public servants in Norman.
SERVICE SPOTLIGHT BY: ROXANNE AVERY
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WHAT TO BUY AND WHAT TO SKIP IN JANUARY

What’s your January shopping style–all shopped out, or ready to hit the mall again as soon as the last guest leaves? Whatever it is, we’ve got you covered! January begins with a bang, but there are no major shopping holidays once the new year gets underway.

Of course, you can still pick up great bargains this month, or find that you’ve overpaid on items that get price drops just weeks after you’ve purchased them. Here’s what to buy and what to skip in January.

BUY: WINTER CLOTHING

Were you given a ton of gift cards to retailers over the holidays? If so, you’re in luck! Prices will start dropping on all winter apparel this month so retailers can make room for the new spring line. You can pick up warm-weather wear that’s discounted by as much as 85% and still have lots of time to enjoy it this season.

SKIP: SPRING CLOTHING

The worst time to purchase an item is generally right before it’s in hot demand. With spring wear landing in inventory this month, prices will be high, so don’t plan on picking out a springtime wardrobe just yet. You’ll start seeing the first round of discounts on spring clothing in April. And of course, as the season deepens, so will the discounts.

BUY: FITNESS GEAR

The new year is here and it’s time to make good on that resolution to shed some holiday pounds. Retailers know this well, so they’ll slash prices on yoga mats, fitness balls, resistance bands, weights and more. You can also find athletic wear on sale this month, and sometimes exercise machines as well. Shop multiple retailers to score the best deals.

SKIP: MATTRESSES

Is your deep winter sleep getting disrupted every night by a lumpy mattress? Hold on just a bit longer before springing for a new one. Online and brickand-mortar mattress retailers will be dropping prices on their merchandise by as much as 60 percent next month during Presidents Day sale events. As always, look up prices at several online and in-store retailers for the best deal.

BUY: LINENS AND SOFT GOODS

While you’ll want to skip the new mattress this month, you can still upgrade your night’s sleep without spending a bundle in January. The first month of the year is famous for its white sales, with soft home goods like blankets and pillows seeing discounts as deep as 70%.

SKIP: SNOW GEAR

While winter apparel will see slashed prices this month, snow gear, which includes skis, skates, snowshoes and the like, tend to retail at full price until the end of the season. Wait just a few more months for steep discounts on all things snow.

BUY: TVS

The football post-season is the perfect time to give your flatscreen an upgrade. Retailers will be competing for your business and offering up promotions on their TVs with discounts that rival those of Black Friday.

SKIP: A NEW CAR

Car prices tend to rise and fall throughout the year, so you usually don’t have to wait long for a discount on a new set of wheels. But, if you are shopping for a new car, you don’t want to finalize your purchase in January. According to Edmunds.com, January is the least discounted month of the year for car prices. If you’re not in a rush, you can wait for the big sales that run from fall through the end of the year. Otherwise, the next time you’ll see discounts on cars will be on Presidents Day next month.

BUY: HOLIDAY DECOR AND GIFT BASKETS

The bargain-priced holiday leftovers you found on the shelves at the end of December will be selling at even lower prices this month. Get started on next year’s holiday prep by stocking up on wrapping paper, decor and even small gift baskets for those last-minute presents you frantically shop for each year. You can also pick up these small gifts to have on hand whenever you need one for any reason throughout the year.

58 | January 2023
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Chardonnay, Chablis, Champagne

The chardonnay grape is one of the most versatile grapes grown. Although it’s not the most commonly planted grape, it comes in among the top five around the world. It’s a neutral green grape that gets most of its characteristics from the soil and climate where it’s grown, and the methods winemakers use.

The exclusive use of stainless steel for fermentation and aging produces a very fruit forward flavor while the introduction of oak mellows the wine.

Chablis is a chardonnay wine originating in the Chablis region of France. In countries that are not within the European Union, the name is used to denote a dry white wine. Chablis is slightly more acidic than white burgundy, both of which have fruit notes.

Chardonnay is also the backbone of French white burgundy, which must originate from the Burgundy region of France.

Chardonnay wine produced in the United States comes in a broad range of styles as well. After first winning the Judgment in Paris in 1976, with a Chardonnay styled very much like white burgundy, U.S. winemakers struck off in new directions. Delayed harvests created wines with higher alcohol content, and the addition of oak during fermentation or in aging added toast flavors to fuller bodied wine. Malolactic fermentation creates a buttery flavor that wine drinkers seem to either love or hate.

Winemakers in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa have all created chardonnay with their own unique characteristics resulting from climate and methods. So, on a cold night, splurge for one or two bottles of chardonnay that you have not tried before and enjoy the journey.

Happy New Year, Kathy

66 | January 2023
KATHY HALLREN | JOE’S WINES & SPIRITS
LIFESTYLE