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INSIDE: celebrating 90 years as an Association

october 2020

OCTOBER 2020

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OCTOBER 2020


thsca OFFICERS & BOARD OF DIRECTORS - 2020-21

TEXAS COACH - (ISSN 0040-4241) Copyright 2020 Texas High School Coaches’ Association, Inc.

PUBLISHER

TEXAS HIGH SCHOOL COACHES’ ASSOCIATION, INC.

EDITORIAL OFFICES:

2553 S IH 35 • SAN MARCOS, TX 78666 512-392-3741 • FAX: 512-392-3762 web: www.thsca.com Executive Director

JOE MARTIN

joemartin@thsca.com Asstistant Executive Director

GLEN WEST

glenwest@thsca.com

President Rodney Webb, Denton Guyer President-Elect John King, Longview Past President Gary Joseph, Katy Executive Director Joe Martin Asst. Executive Director Glen West

Chris Koetting, Canadian Jeff Lofton, Idalou Adam Cummings, Sundown Greg Winder, Lewisville Mike Fullen, Abilene Ronnie Casey, Stamford Bob Wager, Arlington Martin Kendall Miller, Lakeview Centennial

BOARD OF DIRECTORS COMMITTEES - 2020-21

Director of Publications & Speakers

BECKY ADAMS

beckyadams@thsca.com

PUBLISHING PARTNER

Sports In Action, LLC and Dave Campbell’s Texas Football Ishmael Johnson, Managing Editor Adam Hochfelder, President Kendall Point, Designer Director of Member Services

MARGARET BEYER

margaretbeyer@thsca.com Director of Membership

ALLIE HERRMANN

allieherrmann@thsca.com Director of Administration

SHERYL HONEYCUTT

sherylhoneycutt@thsca.com Director of Finance & Accounting

GORDON MACKEY

gordonmackey@thsca.com Director of Social Media

KAYCI MEEKS

kaycimeeks@thsca.com Director of Hotels & Office Management

CHELSEA MILLER

chelseamiller@thsca.com Director of Exhibits & Awards

MOLLY WOODCHICK

mollywoodchick@thsca.com Subscriptions: Annual subsciption to TEXAS COACH for members of the Texas High School Coaches Association is $20.00, which is included in the $70.00 membership dues. For non-members: one-year subscription price is $30.00; two-year subscription price is $50.00; Foreign: one-year subscription price is $50.00. Single copies are $5.00 per current volume. TEXAS COACH is published monthly except in June, July, and August and is dated the first of the publication month, although it is mailed around the 10th of the publication month. Change of address: Request for change of address must reach us 30 days before the date of issue with which it is to take effect. Duplicate copies cannot be sent to replace those undelivered through failure to send advance notice. Mail change of address notice to: THSCA, PO Drawer 1138, San Marcos, Texas, 78667-1138 or members can go online and make the change in your member portal profile at www.thsca.com. Periodicals Postage Paid at San Marcos, TX & additional entries. “All rights reserved”. (USPS 540-600). POSTMASTER: Send address change to: TEXAS COACH, THSCA PO Drawer 1138, San Marcos TX 78667-1138 Printed by Trend Offset in Carrollton, Texas.

OCTOBER 2020

Chris Gilbert, Lancaster Leroy Mansanales, Princeton Tim Anuszkiewicz, Midland Brian Gibson, Wink Danny Servance, Odessa David Raffield, Bridgeland Ricky Tullos, Pearland Grady Rowe, Bellville Jason Wilson, Dickinson Jack Alvarez, Cuero Jeff Dixon, Alvarado Sam Wells, Troup Abel Gonzalez, Grulla Cody Simper, CC Veterans Memorial Ralph De La Rosa, Harlingen South Mark Soto, SA Johnson Bruce Salmon, Kyle Lehman David Malesky, O'Connor Charles Bruce, SA Wagner

Finance: *Gary Joseph, Rodney Webb, Bob Wager, Mike Fullen, Mark Soto, Ricky Tullos Bylaws: *Kendall Miller, Tim Anuszkiewicz, Ronnie Casey, Danny Servance, Adam Cummings, Leroy Mansanales Ethics: *Greg Winder, Jeff Dixon, Jack Alvarez, Jeff Lofton, Chris Gilbert, Sam Wells Policy: *David Raffield, Bruce Salmon, Charles Bruce, Brian Gibson, Grady Rowe, Ralph De La Rosa Magazine: *Chris Koetting, Cody Simper, Jason Wilson, Abel Gonzalez, David Malesky Hall of Honor: *Mike Copeland, Larry Hill, Bob Gillis, Ronnie Gage

ADVISORY COMMITTEES - 2020-21

*denotes chair

ATHLETIC DIRECTORS R-1 Mike Meeks, Lubbock ISD R-2 Russell Lucas, Hamlin ISD R-3 *Shawn Pratt, McKinney ISD R-4 Jeff Cordell, Crane ISD R-5 Eliot Allen, Brenham ISD R-6 Todd York, Midlothian ISD R-7 Rick Rhoades, Gregory-Portland ISD R-8 Stan Laing, Northside ISD

SOCCER R-1 Irvin Johnson, Palo Duro R-2 *Kyle Riese, Abilene R-3 Matt Zimmerman, Hebron R-4 Thomas Barham, Midland Lee R-5 Joseph Cordova, Chavez R-6 Open R-7 Jerry Wade, CC Veterans Memorial R-8 Bert Atilano, SA Harlan

BASEBALL R-1 Bart Upchurch, River Road R-2 Justin Swenson, Stephenville R-3 Barry Rose, Rockwall R-4 Robert Morris, Andrews R-5 Billy Hardin, Cy-Fair R-6 Open R-7 Robert Valdez, Edinburg R-8 *Chans Chapman, SA Reagan

SOFTBALL R-1 Cay Parnell, Canadian R-2 Jessica Lynn, Brownwood R-3 Kathy Schoettle, Byron Nelson R-4 Mandy Davis, Midland Lee R-5 *Laneigh Clark, Pearland R-6 Rick Waugh, Alvarado R-7 Teresa Lentz, Calallen R-8 Amanda Wolf-Schramm, Smithson Valley

BASKETBALL R-1 Tony Wagner, Estacado R-2 Dean Edwards, Stamford R-3 Donte Wilson, Mansfield Lake Ridge R-4 Lee Scott, Snyder R-5 Glenn Arnold, Klein R-6 Rusty Walker, Hallsville R-7 Brian Molina, Harlingen South R-8 *Lonny Hubbard, Steele

TRACK R-1 Efrain Ramos, Lubbock Coronado R-2 Wyatt Martinez, Abilene R-3 Will McCrary, Rockwall R-4 *Bill Stotts, Andrews R-5 Lloyd Banks, FB Marshall R-6 Darold Turner, Palestine R-7 Brian Swain, JB Alexander R-8 Glenn Gamez, NB Canyon

FOOTBALL R-1 Todd Winfrey, Canyon R-2 Bob Cervetto, Dublin R-3 John Settle, Sunnyvale R-4 Patrick Melton, EP Americas R-5 Eric Peevy, Westbrook R-6 *Scott Surratt, Carthage R-7 David Cantu, Brownsville Veterans R-8 Lance Moffett, Fredericksburg

VOLLEYBALL R-1 *Kelly Lozada, Lubbock Monterey R-2 Katherine "Shay" Douglas, Stephenville R-3 Libby Rodriguez, McKinney North R-4 Heather Archibald, Wink R-5 Pam McRae, Cypress Park R-6 Jill Barkey, Alvarado R-7 Adrian Smith, Gregory-Portland R-8 Yamilet Garcia, O'Connor

GOLF R-1 R-2 R-3 R-4 R-5 R-6 R-7 R-8

WRESTLING R-1 Richard Leal, Lubbock R-2 Open R-3 *Chuck Brown, The Colony R-4 Charlie Paniagua, Pebble Hills R-5 Michael Zito, Bryan R-6 William Warner, New Waverly R-7 Matthew Alexander, Richard King R-8 Lee Miller, SA Johnson

Dustin Schulte, Idalou Bryan Green, Winters Jeff Plemons, Arlington Martin *Cameron Swarb, Monahans Susan Willis, Kingwood Russell Smith, Madisonville Antonio Ocana III, Mission Memorial Brent McCuiston, Alamo Heights

*denotes chair

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OCTOBER 2020

C O V E R S T O RY

DE PA RT M E N T S

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VOL. LXV NO. 2

LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT RODNEY WEBB - DENTON GUYER HS

CELEBRATING 90 YEARS OF THSCA

NOW HEAR THIS

UPDATES & CAREER VICTORIES

WIT & WISDOM

#THSCASTRONG

INSPIRATION & MOTIVATION

F E AT U R E S

THSCWA PRESIDENT'S LETTER

17 18

WIVES ASSOCIATION UPDATES

AROUND THE STATE PHOTOS & FAMILY

FIRE AND THE SWORD

BY NICK BUDD - PRINCETON HS

KICK COVERAGE DRILL

BY DAVID MALESKY - SAN ANTONIO O'CONNOR HS

THSCA MEMBERSHIP

REGISTRATION FORM & INSTRUCTIONS FOR PRINTING YOUR MEMBER CARD ONLINE

THSCA MEMBER BENEFITS

Britni Call Photography

WHAT DOES THSCA DO FOR YOU?

CELEBRATING 90 YEARS

A LOOK AT THE HISTORY OF OUR ASSOCIATION

PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY INSURANCE COVERS YOU FOR LIABILITY IN THE CLASSROOM & COACHING

THSCA HALL OF HONOR

ELIGIBLE NOMINEES AS OF SEPT. 25, 2020

28 44 48 52 58 64

ENHANCING BASKETBALL ABILITY OFF THE COURT BY STEPHEN BRYANT - PERFORMANCE COURSE

BE SIMPLE AND DO WHAT YOUR PLAYERS CAN DO

BY KEITH PAGE - SECOND BAPTIST SCHOOL

THE PERSEPECTIVES OF HS ATHLETICS BY DAVID RUSSELL - CENTRAL HEIGHTS ISD SUPERINTENDENT

MENTORS GROW COACHES BY TYLER HELMS - IDALOU HS

FALL SPORTS IN TEXAS

ACTION SHOTS FROM ACROSS THE STATE

TEACH THE VOTE

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE UPCOMING ELECTION

OCTOBER 2020


OCTOBER 2020

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33 OCTOBER 2020


FROM THE PRESIDENT

Coaches,

October 2020

It is so great to be out on the field competing again! Our fall sports seasons are now in full swing. Football season has started for all classifications; volleyball playoff season is right around the corner, and cross country runners are reaching peak form for district and regional upcoming meets. Our role as “Coach” has become so much more diversified in the past several months. Continue to be the role model your kids need to see every day in the hallways, classrooms and on the field, and don’t forget the importance of making this experience fun for our athletes and coaches. I want to thank all the schools who participated in the “Our Day To Shine” benefit this fall. This is an extremely difficult time to be able to think and act on benefits outside our field house walls, but y’all have done an outstanding job of stepping up to benefit those in need of assistance. If you haven’t participated in “Our Day To Shine”, I want to encourage you to get on board. One hundred percent of the proceeds go to the THSCEF Benevolence Fund, which benefits member coaches and their athletes when catastrophic events happen in their lives. Don’t forget to nominate your athletes for THSCA Academic All-State. Deadlines are November 1 for volleyball and cross-country, and December 1 for football. This is a great way to recognize our kids who excel in the classroom, and it is an honor they’ll cherish forever. This is the 100-year anniversary of UIL Football in Texas. They have created some great ways for our teams to honor this landmark year, with patches, decals and stickers for us to use on our helmets and uniforms to help commemorate this event. Please support our governing body by displaying these items proudly and prominently. Good luck to you and your teams during the remainder of the fall sports’ seasons. Stay healthy, and I hope you win em’ all!!

Rodney Webb THSCA President

OCTOBER 2020

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OCTOBER 2020


OCTOBER 2020

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MARILYN ISBELL JAY

Obituary wife of past thsca executive director donald jay

Marilyn Isbell Jay was born on August 15, 1930, in Iola, Texas. She passed away peacefully in the early morning hours on Thursday, June 18, 2020, at Care Nursing and Rehabilitation in Early, Texas. She was next to the youngest of 9 children born to Clinton Alvin Isbell and Fannie Belle (Grant) Isbell. Her father nicknamed her "Totsy" when she was very young. In 1936 when her father passed away unexpectedly, they moved to Portales NM, and in 1942, moved to Navasota, Texas, where she graduated from high school. She attended the University of Mary Hardin Baylor then Howard Payne University. She met Donald Jay the love of her life there, and they were married for 65 years. She received her Bachelor of Business Administration from Texas A & I in Kingsville. After moving to Austin in 1972, she retired from working for IRS. She loved her church family at Northwest Baptist Church of Austin. Marilyn also had wonderful memories of working as a Caregiver in Austin. She had a great sense of humor, compassionate soul, fun-loving spirit, and an infectious laugh. Some of her fondest memories were vacationing with her grandchildren in Colorado on fishing adventures and playing cards and dominos. Thus, this trait carried over later in life. She was an avid Skipbo & Bingo player at Vicksburg Retirement Community in Brownwood and loved all her sweet friends there.

Obituary

43 Year THSCA Member & THSCA Hall of Honor Member Oscar Cripps was born on June 17, 1942 in Galveston, Texas. He passed away on September 12, 2020 at the age of 78. Oscar grew up playing sports. He was on the Galveston Little League team that played in the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pennsylvania as a left handed catcher. Oscar graduated from Galveston Ball in 1959 where he played football and baseball. He then went to Paris Junior College and then to Stephen F. Austin University (SFA). He played guard on offense and linebacker on defense at 5’9” and 160lbs. He met the woman who would become his wife (of 55 years), Janette, at SFA in a square dancing class. In 1967, Coach Cripps began his coaching career at Hemphill High School as the head coach. He then came to Spring Branch ISD as an assistant coach at Westchester High School from 1968-1973. Stratford High School opened in 1973 where he became the first campus athletic director and head coach there until 2000. He also coached at Houston Christian High School, Northbrook High School, and Elsik High School. More than 100 kids from Stratford went on to play college football, at least six of who continued to play in the NFL. Two of those appeared in Super Bowls. The Stratford Spartans won the 1978 Class 4A State Championship with a perfect 15-0 record. The Spartans played for the 1987 State Championship, 1988 state semifinals, and the 1980 quarterfinals. They won seven district championships. Coach Cripps was twice named the Greater Houston Coach of the Year by the Houston Post and Houston Chronicle. He was named the Texas Coach of the Year by the Texas Sportswriter’s Association. He coached the South Team in the Texas High School All-Star game in 1980 in which they won 7-6. Coach Cripps was inducted into the Stephen F. Austin University Hall of Honor, named the Spring Branch-Memorial Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year in 1978, selected as the Spring Branch ISD ‘Man of the Year’ by the Rotary Club in 1987, inducted into the Greater Houston Coaches Hall of Honor in 1998, the Fellowship of Christian Athletes Ring of Honor in 2004, inducted into the AdvoCare Texas Bowl Hall of Honor in 2016, and the Texas High School Coaches Association Hall of Honor. Coach Cripps was a Deacon at Houston’s First Baptist. Coach Cripps left a lasting impression on everyone he knew. He was always about putting others before himself. It was never about him. Any success he ever had, he would tell you it was because of the players and assistant coaches. He put his faith in the Lord Jesus Christ and there is no doubt where he is today. His purpose in life was for everyone to accept Jesus as their Lord and Savior.

COACH OSCAR STAFFORD CRIPPS

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OCTOBER 2020


OCTOBER 2020 Obituary 31 Year THSCA Member

COACH HUBERT "SONNY" MONROE DETMER JR.

Hubert “Sonny” Monroe Detmer, Jr. passed away on Tuesday, September 22, 2020, at the age of 76, in Jourdanton, Texas. He was born in Beaumont, Texas on September 11, 1944, to Hubert Monroe Detmer, Sr. and Doris Lillian (Bucholz) Detmer. Sonny grew up in Indiana but returned to Texas as soon as he could. He started college at Wharton County Junior College, then attended Florida State before graduating from Texas State, then received his master’s degree from Our Lady of the Lake University. Sonny coached for 52 years and moved 17 times during his career, which took him from South San to Churchill to Somerset to Roosevelt to Somerset to Central Catholic to Laredo Martin to Southwest ISD to Round Valley, Arizona to Mission to Somerset to Cornerstone and back to Somerset. Sonny loved raising his longhorns but loved his family most of all. He is survived by his loving wife of 55 years, Betty Lou Spellman Detmer; sons, Ty Detmer and wife Kim, and Koy Detmer and wife Monica; daughters, Dee Dinkelmann and husband Johan and Lori Steyn and husband Frans; grandchildren, Stevie Dorman and wife Karaline, Hunter Dorman, Kaili Sawyer and husband Kolby, Aubri Jensen and husband Kyle, Koy Detmer, Jr., Mayci Detmer, Katie Detmer, Zadock Dinkelmann, Taylor Dinkelmann, Rylli Detmer, Caleb Green, Koal Detmer, Carson Green, Frans “Buck” Steyn, Emmie Lou Steyn and Sonny Steyn; great-grandson, Kasen Sawyer; sistersin-law, Sue Spellman and Janet Hooper and husband David; brother-in-law, Jon Spellman, and wife Sherrie; along with numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and a multitude of friends.

Obituary

COACH MARVIN ALLEN

Somerset HS Bulldog football coach, Marvin Allen died suddenly on September 23, 2020. He was a longtime assistant coach with his friend, Sonny Detmer, who passed away just one day earlier. Allen coached in Mission with Detmer and also coached his son, Koy Detmer in high school. At Somerset, he was the strength and conditioning coach and assistant football coach for 20 years. He has advanced numerous athletes to regional and state power lifting competitions. Somerset ISD issued a statement by saying, “Allen was loved and respected by so many athletes and his fellow co-workers and leaves a lasting impact in our hearts. Our thoughts and prayers are with his wife Geri, and all of the Allen family.” He was 78 years old. 7 Year THSCA Member OCTOBER 2020

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OCTOBER 2020


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&

SPORTSMANSHIP

“Sportsmanship is not just about being nice. It is much more important than that. It's about realizing that you could not compete without an opponent and that she has the same goals as you.”

BRITNI CALL PHOTOGRAPHY

Stephanie Deibler

I N S P I R AT I O N “Nothing is original. Steal from anywhere that resonates with inspiration or fuels your imagination... Select only things to steal from that speak directly to your soul. If you do this, your work (and theft) will be authentic. Authenticity is invaluable; originality is non-existent. And don’t bother concealing your thievery - celebrate it if you feel like it. In any case, always remember what Jean-Luc Godard said: “It’s not where you take things from - it’s where you take them to."” Jim Jarmusch (Film Maker)

““ONE MAN PRACTICING SPORTSMANSHIP IS FAR BETTER THAN 50 PREACHING IT.” Knute Rockne

By three methods we may learn wisdom: First, by REFLECTION, which is noblest; Second, by IMITATION, which is easiest; and third by EXPERIENCE, which is the bitterest." Confucius

C E L E B R AT I N G 2 0 Y E A R S O F R E M E M B E R T H E T I TA N S "I don’t care if you like each other of not, but you WILL RESPECT each other. And maybe… I don’t know, maybe we’ll learn to play this game like men!"

"ATTITUDE reflects leadership, Captain!" “You got anger, that’s good you’re gonna need it, you got aggression that’s even better you’re gonna need that, too. But any little two year old child can throw a fit! Football is about controlling that anger, harnessing that aggression into a team effort to achieve perfection!” OCTOBER 2020

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ewood_eddie1968

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October 2020

Dear Coaches’ Wives, Happy Fall! (Yes, I know it October, but in Texas it’s often behind right?) Plus, I’m writing to our future October selves. It’s a strange place I keep finding myself because literally NOTHING is predictable these days. NOTHING. We haven’t even had ONE football game yet and normally we would be well into the season. My comfort in this? Knowing that you must be feeling the same pattern of unpredictability as I am. Did we ever think we would cherish getting to play JUST ONE game? Nope. Not in a million years. But yet, here we are. I’m SO thankful that we DID start school and the kids ARE getting to play some sports...but yet, I know that this does not find ALL of you in that place. And quite possibly, all of us a month after I draft this letter to you. So what are our take aways? What are our precious moments? How do we keep on keeping on? These are the moments where we are challenged to rise up and be an example for our community. For example, people keep asking me if my husband is bummed because we are not able to play football (yet) and how are we even functioning? My answer: football is NOT the end all, be all. The game is not the end all, be all. Is it FUN? YES! Do we get our energy and fuel from it? OFTEN, YES. But gosh, as coaches’ wives, we ALL know that our sport is So Much Bigger than the game. It’s learning and growing ourselves and preparing teenagers for the game of life. More now than ever, we have the opportunities to rise up and show the world that our mission is so much bigger than Friday night, Tuesday night, Saturday morning, etc. Whatever our sport is, whoever our athletes are, they are watching us. They’re watching how we respond to CONSTANT CHANGE, how we PIVOT, how we respect others and the rules we must abide by. This is a big deal. I know it’s hard and we all have our moments, no doubt. I implore us to be exactly where we are and make a difference. Don’t wait until we find “normalcy” again. Don’t wait until we can play games again. Don’t wait until next week. Do it now. Make a difference now. We don’t know what the future holds, and we can hope everything goes back to how it once was. We have been gifted with so many things and called to this life with our coach. I want to encourage all of us to stay with the fight and persevere. Encourage one another, as we have been called to do. You are a special breed, coaches’ wives. I’m so thankful to be in this battle with you, alongside you. Join the THSCWA if you haven’t already. www.thscwa.org. Make the plans. Stay plugged in. Don’t give up. Happy Fall. Best wishes for a season filled with hope and time spent focusing on the little things. Jill Johnson, THSCWA President txcoacheswives@gmail.com

THSCWA OFFICERS: 2020-2021 PRESIDENT: jill johnson PRESIDENT ELECT: karyn story SECRETARY: justine palmer TREASURER: SHELBY BLACK-SHELBY PAST PRESIDENT: suzy patterson 16

DIRECTORS: REG 1: Brandy wood REG 2: MIRANDA GARCIA REG 3: connie barnes REG 4: rachel carter REG 5: cynthia griffing REG 6: TRACY SCHAUB REG 7: sheri rhoades REG 8: ASHLEY WILLARD

ASSISTANT DIRECTORS: REG 1: open REG 2: OPEN REG 3: Lori cottle REG 4: open REG 5: erin smith REG 6: MADISOn HUCKABAY REG 7: OPEN REG 8: NICOLE OSBORNE

OCTOBER 2020


metal is going to be you, your mind. When you put that metal into that fire, you’re getting it really hot and allowing that metal to become malleable giving you the opportunity to sharpen it. We are doing the same thing when we enter the weight room. We aren’t just preparing the body for war we are preparing our mind. As you work out, your mind becomes malleable and there are forces constantly battling against you. Voices telling you to stop for a second, you can’t do this, or even asking yourself “why am I doing this?” As hard as it might seem in the moment, that fire is temporary, and the flame won’t last. That metal will eventually cool off bringing you back to your normal state. But if you do the hard thing and start sharpening your sword while it’s hot, while that workout is at its peak, your sword will get sharper. It’ll become more lethal. It’ll prepare you for war. So, the next time you go in that weight room and your metal is red hot, sharpen your sword. Push yourself to new limits mentally knowing that when that fire is out and your metal has cooled off, you’re ready for war.

THE SWORD Preparing your mind for a life after football

This is among the many reasons that football (and every other high school sport) is more than just a game we play on Friday nights. We are constantly sharpening our swords for future battles. Constantly sharpening our minds for when adversity hits us in the mouth. Adversity could be giving up a touchdown, getting dunked on, or giving up a walk-off homerun. It could also be losing your job, getting divorced, or a bad car wreck. Adversity comes in many forms and it’s going to affect every single one of your athletes whether it is now or later. I can only hope to instill this mindset in my guys so when adversity does hit them, their sword will be sharp.

A message to your players. BY: NICK BUDD

For the vast majority of coaches, we chose this profession to impact the lives of the youth and give them tools to be successful once their time is done in high school. One of the greatest feelings in the world I get from being a coach is staying in contact with players I used to coach, them coming back home to watch games, giving me a phone call or shooting me a text. Whatever it might be, we get to impact the lives of the youth day in and day out which is a true blessing. The one thing I try to equip my guys with is a mindset that they can take with them past the game of football and has helped me tremendously throughout my life. Mending the mindset to be the sharpest tool you have, creating a sword.

"Push yourself to new limits mentally knowing that when that fire is out and your metal has cooled off, you’re ready for war."

If you ask some of my former players about my favorite thing about the game of football, it has nothing to do with the game. It’s the weight room. Plain and simple, the reason I love it is because the weight room doesn’t lie. Whether it is, the pace of the workout or the weight on your back there is always something weighing you down. Let's call this the fire. The fire is where the creation of the sword starts. For those of you that don’t know how a sword is created, you get a piece of metal, get it really hot, and hammer it into shape. So, if the fire is our workout then the

OCTOBER 2020

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FRESHMAN THSCA DIRECTOR – REGION 8

FROM THE DESK with

DAVID MALESKY

SAN ANTONIO O'CONNOR HIGH SCHOOL

KICK COVERAGE DRILL We have all heard that the kicking game is one third of a football game. There are three parts to a game: offense, defense and kicking. However, in actuality, the number of kicking plays is not one third of the total number of plays in a game. It is closer to twenty percent of the total. Additionally, if you are like me, you have won some games because of the kicking game and you have lost some. I have always believed that in games that have two similar teams in ability, the team that wins the kicking game phase usually wins the game. Furthermore, I have seen teams that did not have as much talent win a game because they won the kicking game. There are many aspects of the kicking game that you could write an entire book on and still not cover the topic. In this article, I'm going to talk about something that we have used at O’Connor High School for many years. It's not a scheme, but a drill. We call it the Kick Coverage Drill. We begin doing this drill in the offseason during our athletic period. It's a great tool to evaluate our kids on the potential of them being on a kick coverage team or a kick return team. Because of the recent changes in kick return rules, I really like the drill with no pads because this part of the kicking game is more about running with someone or out running them than it is about being really aggressive.

figure 1

The drill is set up with a 10-yard box and a cone at each corner. (Figure 1) You then put another cone five yards away from one end of the box in the middle. The defensive players (X) will start on one side of the box at each corner. The offensive players (O) will start opposite of the defensive players at each corner. You will then have a returner set up about 30 yards away from where the offensive players begin.

DEFENSIVE PLAYER

On the whistle, the player will start down field and try to outrun the block of the offensive player. If he can outrun the block, then he needs to put himself in a position to make the tackle. If he can’t outrun the block of the offensive player, the defender will need to “lock out” the blocker and be ready to shed him depending on where the ball goes. We teach the “lock out” by butting the blocker with our face and then bringing our hands/arms so that we create separation between us. If the defender allows the blocker to get into his body, he is going to be held and unable to separate to the ball. These are two pretty simple concepts to start with. However, once they understand this, then we add the most important aspect of covering a kick. That is “Ball Proximity”. 18

OCTOBER 2020


QUICK FACTS: ON COACH MALESKY

THSCA Freshman Director Region 8 Head football coach of the O'Connor Panthers, David Malesky has coached at O'Connor since 2002. He was promoted to head coach in 2010. He played at A&I from 1984-87, and was a student assistant coach under Coach Ron Harms in 1988 and 1989. David was an assistant coach at King High School in Kingsville (1990), Harlandale (1991), Jay (1992 - 2000) and head coach at Jourdanton (2000-2002).

“Ball Proximity” is simply determining where is the ball/returner in relation to the man that is coming to block me? If the ball/returner is close to the blocker, within 15 yards, I need to “Lock Out” the blocker. (Figure 2) If the ball/returner is further than 15 yards, then we need to AVOID the block. (Figure 2) In addition to seeing the ball carrier and the blocker, it is also important for the defender to see the path of ball off of the tee. To do this, we will have our kickers kick the ball to the returner. We do not add the kicker until we have done the drill many times.

figure 2

offensive PLAYER

As mentioned earlier, the rules have changed. Gone are the days of a wedge blocking against wedge busters and headhunters. Today’s return game is more based upon players running with the defender and then “pushing” him out of the way. For this idea, we need guys that can run. For us, we are going to try and put our fastest players on our return teams regardless if they are an offensive or defensive player.

On the whistle, the offensive player will drop with eyes inside to the cone that is five yards behind him. Once he hits that cone with his outside foot, he will open his hips outside and then run to the defender. The offensive player must judge the speed of the defender and adjust his angle based upon the defender’s speed. (Figure 3) The offensive player can’t allow the defender to outrun him because of a bad angle. Now remember, we are telling the defensive player to outrun the blocker.

OCTOBER 2020

figure 3

19


blocking technique

The best way to explain the blocking technique is that we are going to push the defender away from the ball carrier. There really should be no face or shoulder contact. It should all be with the palms of your hand. That is why I like doing this drill in shorts. It prevents heavy contact. Most of my coaching career, I have coached the secondary. There is a lot of terminology that I use when teaching this technique that is similar to teaching man-to-man defense. The first step that we tell our blocker is once they open up to the defender, they must determine the angle to run and meet him. As we approach the defender, we want to get to what we call “trail”. This is simply being a forearm distance from the defender's hip. We don’t want to be too far in front of him because he will run behind you. Conversely, we don’t want to be too far behind him because he will just outrun you. Once you get to the “trail” position, then you just run. This area is what we call the “No Block Zone”. This zone is based upon the depth of the kick. The deeper the kick means that I will have to run further with the defender before I engage him. A short kick means that I will have to engage him pretty quick. This concept of a “No Block Zone” comes from that fact that you can’t expect a player to stay engaged to a defender for 30 or 40 yards down the field.

coaching points

There are several coaching points that we really try to coach hard in this drill. One, if you get beat down the field, don't block him in the back. Keep running and sooner or later he will slow down. When he slows down, you stop on one side of him and put your arms up. The runner will use you as a shield and work off of where you are. The second, is if the defender cuts behind you because you over ran him, speed to turn to get back to him. Don't open your hips to him. This will cause you to slow down and miss him.

coaching organization

We have different coaches that have various kicking game responsibilities. If you are a return coach, then you will be coaching the offensive players in this drill. If you are a coverage coach, then you will coach the coverage players.

last thoughts

Early in the offseason, we will have several of these drills going. This gives us the opportunity to watch a lot of kids so that they get evaluated. Additionally, we make the kids work both parts of the drill. They will go from one side to the next. Over the years, we have discovered kids that were really good at the side they don’t normally play. Another way we have increased participation is to add another offensive and defensive player on each side.

figure 4 Finally, I really haven’t talked about the returners. This is a great drill to see them in space working off of blockers and defenders. We tell the defensive guys to two hand touch the returner. This gives the returner and opportunity to make somebody miss. As I mentioned at the beginning, there are so many things that you can cover in the kicking game. We have felt that is one drill that can cover a lot of techniques in short amount of time. In turn, we take these techniques and apply them to the schemes that we are running. Thank you for taking time to read this and if we can help you at O’Connor High School, let me know. 20

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OCTOBER 2020

Columbus Day (THSCA OFFICE CLOSED) 12 Membership registration deadline to be eligible to nominate for honors or receive honors, including Academic All-State & State Champ rings 15 U.I.L Legislative Council Meeting 18-19

December 2020

FOOTBALL Academic All-State Nomination Deadline 1 LOGIN ONLINE to Member Services at www.thsca.com to nominate!

Volleyball State Tournament (5A-6A) 11-12 Volleyball Advisory Committee Meeting 11 Football State Championship (1A-4A) 16-18 Christmas (THSCA OFFICE CLOSED) 17-1/1

26

THSCA Dates to Remember

FALL 2020

NOVEMBER 2020

1 2020 Texas Coaches Leadership Summit tickets available for purchase at www.thsca.com 1 CROSS COUNTRY & VOLLEYBALL Academic All-State Nominations Deadline LOGIN ONLINE to Member Portal at www.thsca.com to nominate!

11 Veteran's Day Holiday (THSCA OFFICE CLOSED) 17 Team Tennis State Finals 21 Volleyball State Tournament (1A-4A) 23-27 Thanksgiving Break (THSCA OFFICE CLOSED)

OCTOBER 2020


In a UT study of high school athletes recovering post workout:

That’s a net strength difference of 6.7%. OCTOBER 2020

See the research at DairyMAX.org/BUILT

27


ENHANCING BASKETBALL ABILITY OFF THE COURT

BY STEPHEN BRYANT PERFORMANCE COURSE

S

ome of the greatest basketball players have certain qualities that allow them to succeed: extraordinary ball handling, lights-out shooting from anywhere on the court and having the vision to get the ball to their teammates. Today, athletes are spending a great deal of time at basketball and skills camps trying to perfect these qualities. However, everyone else is working on those aspects of the game as well. Eventually, you will reach a ceiling where something else needs to take place for you to continue to grow as a basketball player. If you really want to maximize your basketball ability, you’ll want to get in the weight room. It will elevate you to a whole new level (literally). If trained correctly the following physical qualities will enhance your abilities on the court.

STRENGTH The first thing is getting stronger. Building a solid foundation of strength will lead to enormous amount of improvement. When it comes to building strength, start at the appropriate stage of your development. If you are new to it, simply working body weight and tempo variations will be all you need. From there, as you start to gain control and stability you can progress by adding external loads and more technical lifts. The goal is to eventually be able to lift challenging weights, with perfect technique, in an appropriately set training plan to push your body to adapt and get stronger by having to apply more force. 28

If done correctly and through the appropriate progressions, you will see great improvement in your abilities on the court. Here are some examples of exercises we like to utilize to develop strength for our athletes once they have appropriately developed the movement capabilities through proper progressions. • SQUAT • BENCH PRESS • DEADLIFT • PULL-UPS • ROW VARIATIONS

POWER/RATE OF FORCE DEVELOPMENT While it is extremely important to be able to apply force, regardless of time, when athletes are performing certain tasks on the court it happens quickly. Therefore, while it is important to build strength, it is also important to develop the ability to express that strength as fast as possible, a process known as Rate of Force Development (RFD). With appropriate implementation, we can train our athletes to be explosive. We utilize different ways to build explosive strength and power with our athletes. In the weight room, we use Olympic lift variations such as jump shrugs, cleans and clean pulls. These are utilized obviously after proper technique and base level strength have been developed. Even if our athletes are not ready to use these more technical lifts for power develop, there are other variations that we can use to ensure that we are checking that box so that our athletes are preparing appropriately. Things like jump training, medicine ball throws and kettlebell swings are a great supplement for power OCTOBER 2020


development (we discussed this in a previous article). Using exercises like the ones previously mentioned will ensure that we are training our athletes to be explosive.

Jump training and plyometrics are great for developing an athlete's ability to move fast. However, they are not the end all be all. Take your time and ensure the athletes are adequately progressing.

REACTIVE STRENGTH/PLYOMETRICS

THE PAYOFF

Up until this point, we have discussed the aspects that make up the left and middle portion of the force velocity curve (strength and power). The last piece to the puzzle is the far right of the curve which is speed. This simply means how fast can the athlete get from Point A to point B.

The most important part of all of this is to understand HOW getting in the weight room will enhance a player’s game.

Plyometrics and its variations are greatly utilized during this type of training. Utilizing and enhancing the body's natural elastic qualities (Stretch Shortening Cycle) will enhance our athletes' abilities to move fast.

1. DEVELOPING STRENGTH and the ability to apply force will lead to improvements during acceleration and deceleration on the court. This means getting down the court faster on a fast break and being able to stop on a dime while reacting to a situation.

2. DEVELOPING POWER in the weight room will carry over to the court by improving first step One of the most known explosiveness. This will benefit plyometric exercise is the an athlete in situations such and “ IF YOU REALLY WANT depth jump, popularized by Yuri explosively dribbling off a screen TO MAXIMIZE YOUR Verkhoshansky. This jump has and driving to the basket. Also, BASKETBALL ABILITY, been known to build outstanding being able to rapidly change amounts of reactive strength. YOU’LL WANT TO GET IN directions whether it be on a back However, before you decide to add cut to the basket or defensively THE WEIGHT ROOM.“ depth jumps into your athlete’s staying in front of your opponent. training, a base-level of strength Being able to apply force quickly and general jump training abilities must be developed. has many benefits. Without this, the possibility of injury is extremely high. 3. REACTIVE STRENGTH DEVELOPMENT will We start our athletes off with learning the basic snapdown, a key exercise in teaching athletes to absorb force. An athlete who cannot absorb force will not be able to express it to their fullest capabilities. During the initial learning process, we are also prescribing pogo jumps to our athletes. An exercise that focuses on developing stiffness in the ankle complex, so energy is not wasted when jumping. Once athletes have become competent and mastered the basics, we can start to incorporate more intensive styles of plyometric exercises such as squat jump variations, tuck jumps and hurdle jumps. OCTOBER 2020

improve an athlete's ability to apply force in minimal time with the help of the stretch shortening cycle. This will benefit an athlete in all aspects in the court by enhancing their ability to move fast. Investing time in becoming a better basketball player certainly means working on the specific skill set that’s required for success on the court. However, if your desire is to maximize your potential, find a weight room.

This article was originally published on the Performance Course blog & can be accessed under the "Resources" tab at performancecourse.com. 29


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The annual membership term runs from September 1st through August 31st of the following year, congruent with each school year. A portion of every membership fee goes to the THSCEF as an education fee.

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SELECT OTHER FEES:

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PROFESSIONAL LIABILITY INSURANCE See Eligibility Requirements for THSCA Professional Liability Insurance Coverage to the right**

2021 Leadership Summit Ticket

89

**2020-2021 COACHES LIABILITY INSURANCE CRITERIA:

E-Sports Stadium - Arlington, TX - Monday, February 22, 2021

This policy will be in effect 9/1/2020 - 8/31/2021. Policies purchased after 9/1/2020 will commence coverage as of the payment received date. This insurance policy is not retroactive. Last day to enroll for 20-21 school year is 1/31/21.

2021 Hall of Honor Banquet Ticket

You must be a coach, athletic trainer, or athletic director, including classroom duties, for an accredited secondary school, college, junior college or university within the state of Texas.

E-Sports Stadium - Arlington, TX - Sunday, February 21, 2021

TOTAL AMOUNT DUE OCTOBER 2020

Your THSCA membership must be current for the 2020-21 school year to be eligible to purchase this policy. If you choose to purchase this insurance policy and do not meet the criteria for eligibility, this policy will not be valid. Annual Premium $48.00; State Taxes & Fees (5%) $2.40; Association Administration Fee $3.60. (Total 2020-21 Renewal Premium: $54.00)

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L A T R L O A P T R R E O B P M R E E B M A M E C S M H A T C E S H H T T O E T H -2002211 AACCCCEESSSS TO T 22002200-2 UPDATE YOUR MEMBER PROFILE: 1. Navigate to www.thsca.com and select the gold button at the top labeled THSCA Member Portal.

2. The first time visiting the new portal you will be required to set up a new password, so select the Forgot your Password? option. Your initial username will be the email address we have on file for your member account. 3. The system will email a link/verification code for you to verify your account and set-up a new password. (If you have any difficulty remembering the email address you used for account set-up, or you do not receive the verification email to reset your password, please call our THSCA office 512.392.3741 and we can assist you.)

download and print/screenshot your 20-21 thsca membership card: After careful consideration of technology advancements and pandemic related budget constraints, it will not be feasible for the THSCA to print and mail membership cards for the 20-21 year to all 23,000+ members. Your membership card is accessible through the THSCA Members Portal on our website. You can download your member card at any time and choose to either print it and carry it in your wallet, or screen shot a photo of it on your mobile device and keep it ready when you need it!

To print/screenshot your Member Card:

4. Click on the Round Grey User icon on the top right and select “Update Profile/View My Membership”.

1. Login to the THSCA Member Portal and click on the Round Grey User icon on the top right and select “Update Profile/View My Membership”.

5. Select the blue pencil icon under “My Personal Information” to update your contact data. Choose the blue Update button at the bottom of the screen to save your changes.

2. Click on the Membership tab, and see THSCA is blue under My Membership. Click on the blue THSCA. 3. Scroll all the way to the bottom of the screen and locate the option to "Download My Membership Card" under Membership Tasks. 4. Your membership card should download as a PDF that you can print or screen shot on your mobile device for proof of membership. Please note if you do not see the download you may need to turn off your pop-up blocker first.

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OCTOBER 2020


THSCA MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS

DO FOR YOU?

PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING

Membership in the THSCA enhances your professional growth & gives you an opportunity to contribute to the improvement of this great profession. Opportunities to Serve on the THSCA Board and Committees: Advisory Committee Members and THSCA Board Members are elected by the membership at Regional Meetings. To serve the THSCA in any capacity, you must be a current member and must be present at the time of voting to be nominated.

Straight Line Recruiting #SLR: The THSCA executive staff works as a conduit between high school and college level coaches to champion our Straight Line Recruiting Initiative. We advocate for the prioritization of the high school coach's role in the recruitment of student-athletes and are continually working to provide more tools to educate our coaches and parents on the recruitment process.

BENEFIT PROGRAMS Permanent Disability Benefit Program: Benefits of up to $1,200.00 per athlete, per year, if head coach** of team is an eligible member of the THSCA at time of injury. Memorial Benefit Program: Death benefit of $3,000.00 to parent(s) of athlete when death was caused while participating in a scheduled practice or game, if head coach of team is an eligible member of the THSCA at the time of death. Benevolence Fund: This fund provides aid to hardship cases that extend beyond those covered by the Permanent Injury & Memorial Benefit Program policies.

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATION & ADVOCACY Texas Legislature: Members of the THSCA are represented by a strong State leadership organization, which monitors current legislation and protects the coaching profession's best interest, and strives for the highest possible professional standards, as outlined by our Bylaws, Policies and Code of Ethics. THSCA Political Action Committee (PAC): The purpose of the PAC is to support the Texas high school coaching profession and public-school athletics in Texas, as well as supporting public education as an institution. OCTOBER 2020

LIABILITY INSURANCE Eligible members may purchase an optional Coaches Professional Liability Insurance policy which provides coverage and legal assistance for the Coach both on the field and in the classroom.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Annual Coaching School and Convention: The three-day annual conference offers cutting-edge educational sessions and multiple networking events and exhibits and provides opportunities for members to benefit from a variety of rules meetings and outstanding speakers. It provides new contacts, a line of communication and a forum for 33


the exchange of ideas and information within your profession for a minimal tuition fee. This convention also includes several courses offered to coaches for U.I.L. Mandatory Coaches Certification Program (CCP) credit.

THSCA Weekly E-News: This weekly email service keeps coaches in the loop on headline news stories from across the state, and provides up-to-date information on THSCA events, programs and services.

Professional Development Lecture Series: The aim of this program is to keep our coaches abreast of up-to-date information on key and essential topical matters relating to the health, safety and social issues affecting our student athletes today.

FREE Recruiting Webinar: Online webinar resource for coaching staffs, counselors and parents which covers topics related to: Scholarship Myths and Facts, NCAA and NAIA Eligibility, NCAA Core Course Requirements, National Letter of Intent, Finding the Right School and Much More!

Starting the Conversation: Online curriculum materials that include videos, conversation starters, role-playing scenarios and personal reflections that help coaches address the growing problem of relationship violence. Designed to help coaches create a positive team culture so that aggressive, abusive attitudes and behaviors in relationships do not occur. The Texas Coaches Leadership Summit: The purpose of this leadership summit is to equip coaches and their staffs with tools necessary to enhance and encourage the lives of their players, especially those who come from fatherless or absent father homes. To help coaches understand the importance of “coaching beyond the game.” THSCA Head Coaching Academy: This workshop is built on our passion to help train the next generation of head coaches. Designed for head coaches who want to brand their program and hone their administrative skills, as well as younger coaches seeking the skills and mentoring it takes to become a head coach in the future. ​ Texas Coach Magazine Subscription: Members receive 9 issues of TEXAS COACH, the primary publication of the THSCA, containing articles on the skills and techniques of the various sports as well as articles on current topics of interest relating to the safety and well-being of our student athletes.

VOTING, AWARDS & RECOGNITION PROFESSIONAL Members (coaches of Texas secondary schools and athletic directors in the public-school system of the UIL who are actively coaching) are eligible to vote in all Association elections, and nominate coaches for Hall of Honor, Board of Directors, Athletic Advisory Committees and other awards. Academic All-State Teams: Eligibility of senior athletes to be nominated for Academic All-State teams, provided the head coach** of sport is a member of the THSCA as of October 15th, each year. THSCA Academic All-State Teams are published in Texas Coach and are posted on the THSCA website. State Championship Ring: Head Coaches** of UIL sports who are members in good standing as of October 15th are eligible to receive a THSCA State Championship Ring from the Balfour Company. Eligible coaches are recognized each year at the Balfour Hall of Honor Banquet and presented with their rings. This includes state champions in both boys and girls sports. 25-Year Plaques: Those members who have completed 25 years of membership in the THSCA are honored with a commemorative plaque for their loyalty. Hall of Honor: Honors members and past members of the Association for outstanding leadership and service to the coaching profession and their contributions to the THSCA. Victory Plaques & Certificates: Given to member coaches in all sports who have reached the required number of wins for that sport. The ROCK Coaches Mentoring Program: Program to provide novice coaches with a

34

OCTOBER 2020


sport specific training, leadership and character development resources and health and safety topics. Discount codes available for members in Texas Coach magazine and our weekly e-news.

structured program where they can share knowledge and receive advice and emotional support from veteran coaches, which in turn will strengthen our profession. Scholarships: Eligibility of your senior son or daughter to receive one of the ten $2,000 scholarships, one $2,500 scholarship (Eddie Joseph Memorial Scholarship) or one $2,005 (Fisher Woodchick Scholarship), being offered by the THSCA, provided you are a current PROFESSIONAL member. ** The THSCA interprets "head coach" to mean the coach who is responsible for the team and is actually responsible for substituting during competition of any of the UIL sanctioned school sports. (i.e., varsity, junior varsity, sophomore teams, freshman teams, 7th & 8th grade teams.) The head coach must be a current THSCA PROFESSIONAL member and be considered in good standing on the day prior to the death or injury.

ONLINE SERVICES THSCA members have unlimited access to the Association's World Wide Web site (www.thsca. com) which includes: Texas Coach Network: Online Career Center for THSCA Members Only, with services for candidates seeking a coaching job and employers looking to hire a coach. Open Dates Bureau: Aids coaches in scheduling of games and scrimmages in all sports.

Parent Meeting Handouts and ScoreBoard PSAs: Download library of content related to Football Safety, Parent Meeting Talking Points, and ScoreBoard downloads supporting and championing the efforts of our Texas coaches.

THSCA PARTNERSHIP BENEFITS MaxPreps: As the association’s “Official Source of Scores and Stats,” MaxPreps collects schedules, scores, rosters and stats, to highlight member school/team information. MaxPreps’ industry leading platform provides coaches with various desktop, tablet and mobile options to keep their team information accurate. Once team information is submitted to MaxPreps it will automatically be made available to the THSCA for publication. Coaches are encouraged to enter their schedule and roster into MaxPreps, and to also update their scores and game statistics immediately after each game throughout the season. Shop for Kids: This fundraising partner works with your school to develop custom mobile apps that parents, athletes and team supporters can utilize to yield income for your team just by shopping online at their favorite retailers! Houston Texans and the Texas Bowl: This partnership helps our members by providing multiple opportunities for coaches to network. They provide networking events at coaching school, discounted tickets to college games at NRG Stadium and access to discounted Texas Bowl tickets at the end of each football season.

Discounts on Camp Insurance: Access to quotes at discounted rates for camp insurance for Accident and Liability Coverage.

SportsYou: The ultimate in Team Management Platforms is now available for FREE to THSCA coaches. Use this website/mobile app software to connect coaches, players and families. Quickly share calendars, alerts, messages, photos, videos, documents and more!

THSCA on CoachTube: Browse our online video library of coaches' educational materials including

Visit www.thsca.com/membership for the most up to date list of benefits.

For Sale Classified Postings: Resource for coaches looking to sell or locate sporting equipment, real estate listings, etc.

OCTOBER 2020

35


Texas High School

COACHES Association Helping Coaches to Help Kids

Our 90 Years History

1929 The idea of starting a Coaches Association of Texas is credited to Johnny Pierce, Jess Kellam and Jimmy Kitts. Before the organization of the association, outstanding coaches of the United States had been coming to Texas and holding their own clinics for several years. This started the three “J”s (Pierce, Kellam and Kitts) to talking about a school run by the coaches of Texas. They talked about it at the Southern Methodist University Coaching School in the summer of 1929 when SMU had Knute Rockne and “Pop” Warner as lecturers.

1933 Johnny Pierce announced soon after his election as president in 1930, that an extensive drive would open to sign up every high school in the state. Plans were formulated for annual meetings to be held in conjunction with the Southwestern Conference Officials Association & Rules Interpretation Meeting. The first big step for the association was made in 1933, when they sponsored the FIRST COACHING SCHOOL, held in San Antonio, with D.X. Bible as the sole instructor. The next year, the school returned to San Antonio with 2 instructors – Doc Spears of Wisconsin & Jack Meagher of Rice University.

1930 The "Texas High School FOOTBALL Coaches Association" was formally organized on November 28th, 1930 when twenty-eight (28) high school coaches gathered to approve and adopt the Constitution & Bylaws for the Association. The Coaches Association began because the coaches of Texas found a need for some organization whereby, they could come together and learn new techniques in coaching. The newly created association was given support and endorsement of the University Interscholastic League by Roy Henderson, League Director. Henderson, as the principal speaker at the organization meeting, urged coaches to maintain the highest standards in their profession. Henderson himself joined the organization and was a charter member. 36

1941 The association dropped the word “FOOTBALL” from its title, opening the doors to all secondary school coaches, including the addition of basketball lectures to Coaching School.

1948 In 1948, ATHLETIC TRAINING & TRACK became part of the coaching school curriculum. The demand for other sports soon became evident and…

1949 BASEBALL lectures were added to the curriculum for the first time in 1949.

1956 The association opened its permanent office in the Perry Brooks Building in Austin & hired the first Executive Vice President, L.W. McConachie, to handle the business affairs of the association. OCTOBER 2020


1960 The association inducted its first class in the newly organized THSCA “Hall of Honor”. This is the highest honor that the THSCA can bestow upon a coach, for outstanding contributions as a Texas high school coach. Members are those whose life and actions have provided a positive role model for our athletes & coaches alike. Also in 1960, the first ever Distinguished Service Award was presented. This award is given annually in recognition of outstanding achievement to a person/ organization that has excelled in their efforts to assist the THSCA & the coaching profession.

1974

1967 Due to continued growth, the Board voted in 1967 to establish the position of Assistant Executive Vice President.

1981 After 10 years with THSCA as the Assistant, Donald Jay took over as the new Executive Vice President of the association and hired coach Eddie Joseph of Wharton as his Assistant.

The Board established the THSCA Advisory Committees. Each region would elect a head coach to represent each of the following sports: BASKETBALL, BASEBALL, FOOTBALL, TRACK, SOCCER & GOLF. The advisory committees provide articles to be published in TEXAS COACH, & meet once a year to discuss rule changes, health concerns & other issues that may pertain to their respective sports.

1985 THSCA undertook their first active role in politics forming a Political Action Committee (PAC). The association monitors any legislation that may positively and/or adversely affect high school athletics and its coaches. (The PAC was dormant for several years and was re-established in 2013 to aid in the THSCA’s growing presence at the state capitol.)

1958 After a meeting with the Texas Sportswriters Association members it was decided that THSCA would annually recognize a sportswriter for their work in sports coverage for the state of Texas. The first ever Putt Powell Sportswriter of the Year elected by the THSCA membership was Herb Owens of the Fort Worth Star Telegram.

1957 The original objective of the association was to improve athletics in Texas high schools, by raising the standards and improving the caliber of its own membership. Thus, the reason for the establishment & publication of its magazine, TEXAS COACH. OCTOBER 2020

1988 Since 1988, the "Curly Hays Officials Award" is given annually to a retired game official that has contributed 20+ years of service to officiating athletics in Texas. The first ever winner of this award was Abilene native, Curly Hays himself.

1990 Selected by the THSCA Board of Directors, the Tom Landry Award recipient must be a member in good standing of THSCA and should have made a significant contribution to the athletes and the game of football in our state. This award is presented annually at the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Banquet in May in Waco, TX.

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1991

1996

Upon the retirement of Executive Vice President Donald Jay, coach Eddie Joseph assumed the role as lead executive of the THSCA, and Eddie Wolski became his assistant..

The THSCA Board of Directors voted to annually recognize a Trainer of the Year .

2003 After serving the THSCA and it’s 16,000 members for 22 years, coach Eddie Joseph retired and it was decided that Coach D.W. Rutledge of Converse Judson would take over as the new Executive Vice President. It was also determined that this prestigious position would be renamed, Executive Director of the THSCA and Coach Joe Martin of Allen was hired as the Assistant Executive Director to serve alongside Coach Rutledge.

2004 The THSCA Benevolence Fund was established to assist with hardship cases outside the realm of our current Permanent Injury and Memorial Death Benefits. Since its inception the fund has provided well over half a million dollars in assistance to athletes and coaches in need. Also in 2004, the THSCA Sponsorship Initiative was created. THSCA Executives started by “ColdCalling” exhibitors and asking for their support. This initiative has since had a fiscal impact of over 9 million dollars for our association's efforts to provide more educational content and expanded benefits to our member coaches.

2006 The association built and opened its new headquarters building in San Marcos, Texas. Home to the executive support staff, and the THSCA “Hall of Honor.” 38

2014 As part of the THSCEF’s mission to support coaches who go above & beyond for their student-athletes & home communities, the Grant Teaff “Coaching Beyond the Game” Award was established to recognize deserving coaches at the THSCEF Texas Coaches Leadership Summit. The first recipients of this award were coach Glen West of Brenham & Andy Evans of Tatum.

2012 The vision for an annual Texas Coaches Leadership Summit came to fruition on May 24, 2012, when 300 coaches, athletic administrators, and school administrators were personally invited to participate in a pilot summit in Coppell, TX.

2008 The THSCA created the Texas High School Coaches Education Foundation (THSCEF) in an effort to develop funds from a range of donors, in support of our professional education programs that strengthen and reinforce professionalism for high school coaches throughout the state. The THSCEF is committed to helping coaches be the best they can be for the benefit of our student athletes. Its success is measured in the young student athletes who, because of their participation in athletics, will develop into responsible and productive citizens, leaders and individuals who hold themselves to high standards in their dealings with family, colleagues, & all those they interactive with daily. OCTOBER 2020


2017

2015 The first annual Head Coaching Academy workshop was added to the Coaching School agenda. This event, designed for current head coaches trying to hone their administrative skills and aspiring head coaches looking for mentor advice, is now lauded as one of the highlights of the convention and a genuine wealth of information.

2018

An advisory committee for ATHLETIC DIRECTORS was established, as representation of our large number of THSCA members serving in Athletic Administration roles. These Athletic Adminstrators make up a cross section of classifications, demographic areas and experience levels. They meet twice annually to discuss solutions to significant challenges that face athletics in this state.

Through our continued efforts to work seamlessly with the University Interscholastic League and to further our mission of coaches’ education beyond the game, the all new Coaches Certification Program (CCP) was established. Coaches were given opportunities at Coaching School to complete mandatory CCP courses onsite for the first time. The professionalism of coaches in this state is elevated by their passion to prioritize safety for their athletes & the continued mastery of their craft!

2019 Advisory Committees for SOFTBALL & VOLLEYBALL were established, and an additional committee for our URBAN ISD schools was also created to generate further ideas on how THSCA can best serve our members. On June 15, 2019 the THSCA membership reached an all-time record number of members at 23,000! Then in July our annual summer THSCA Coaching School & Convention in Houston exceeded expectations and broke an all-time Coaching School record with 13,714 in attendance! Also in 2019, donations to the Benevolence Fund from school participation in the Our Day to Shine Campaign topped $100,000 for the first time in a single school year (2018-2019). OCTOBER 2020

In May 2018, the initiative for Straight Line Recruiting was established and trademarked by THSCA in its mission to promote public awareness of recruiting education and to elevate the high school coach as the primary conduit for communication in an athlete's recruitment. Coaches across the state & the nation have now adopted the protocols of #StraightLineRecruiting! In December of 2018, Coach D.W. Rutledge retired from his executive role. Coach Joe Martin was promoted in to the role of Executive Director of the THSCA, and hired Coach Glen West of Brenham to serve with him as the Assistant Executive Director. They spent the fall of 2018 traveling across the state meeting THSCA member coaches. These trips to visit high school coaches have now been branded as our annual ACC (Association, Communication, Collaboration) Tour.

2020 Faced with the Covid-19 pandemic, THSCA was forced to host Coaching School in an entirely virtual format. With the loyal support of our Texas coaches, we were able to successfully take our coaches education initiative to this new platform, resulting in the 2nd largest number of registered coaches in our history, and over 24,000 CCP courses completed. As we enter the 2021 school year, we proudly reflect on 90 years as an association and celebrate 100 years of UIL football in Texas. We want to thank all or members for their support as we prepare to lobby on behalf of our coaches this spring during the 87th legislative session. 39


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OCTOBER 2020


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COVERAGE A: Up to $2,000,000 per insured per occurrenc/$3,000,000 per occurrence, plus the cost of defense, investigation and legal fees. COVERAGE B: Up to $10,000 per claim per Insured. Coverage for criminal proceedings and /or sexual misconduct limited to $10,000 aggregate per policy term. COVERAGE C: Up to $2,000 premium on bail bonds.

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As long as the educator is within the scope of his/her professional duties, the policy covers liability for injury to students and others while the educator is conducting visits to industrial and commercial establishments, entertainment centers, outings, picnics and other similar school functions, subject to specific automobile, watercraft, & aircraft exclusions

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The Texas High School Coaches Association offers a Coaches Professional Liability Insurance option to eligible members with coverage beginning September 1, 2020. The THSCA has chosen the John A. Barclay Agency, Inc. to provide this policy to these members. This plan was devised to offer liability insurance and legal assistance to THSCA members. In order to be eligible for this policy you must meet the following criteria: • You must be a Coach, Athletic Trainer or Athletic Director, including classroom duties, for an accredited secondary school, college, junior college or university, within the state of Texas. • Your THSCA Membership must be current for the school year in which the policy is effective – 9/1/20 -- 8/31/21. • PROFESSIONAL, AFFLIATE and LIFE members are eligible only if they meet the criteria above. This insurance is not available to STUDENT members. If you choose to purchase this insurance policy and do not meet the criteria for eligibility, this policy will not be valid. This policy will be in effect September 1, 2020 through August 31, 2021. Policies purchased after September 1, 2020 will commence coverage as of the payment received date. This insurance policy is not retroactive. Payment should be made directly to the THSCA. The total 2020/21 annual premium for the insurance policy will be $54.00 per member. Annual Insurance Premium: $ 48.00 State Taxes and Fees (5%): $ 2.40 Association Administrative Fee: $ 3.60 TOTAL 2019/20 Annual Premium: $ 54.00 Checks should be made payable to: THSCA Mail payment to: THSCA, P.O. Box 1138, San Marcos, TX 78667 DO NOT MAIL PAYMENT to the Barclay Agency. Eligible members will be able to purchase the Coaches Professional Liability Insurance on the THSCA website, or by selecting to purchase the policy on the THSCA membership application form and submitting it by fax, email or mail to the THSCA office with the insurance payment. NOTE: In order to be eligible to purchase the policy your membership must be current for the same year of policy coverage. (9/1/20 – 8/31/21)

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BE SIMPLE AND DO WHAT YOUR PLAYERS CAN DO

BY KEITH PAGE

DEFENSIVE COORDINATOR SECOND BAPTIST SCHOOL

T

his upcoming season will be my 20th in coaching. I have been blessed to coach football for all of those. Throughout my career, much like most other coaches, I have worked my way up from position coach to coordinator. I’ve coached and coordinated both sides of the ball. Probably what’s different than most, if not all others, is that I have only coached at private schools. In some circles, some private school coaches may not be seen on the same level. There are those of us in the private school sector that do things at a professional level. I happen to be one of those. We know the game; we study the game and we take the game seriously. Coaching for me is a calling. I have been extremely fortunate during my career to work with some legendary public-school coaches. I have worked with some coaches who have moved on to be head coaches at high classification public schools I have always loved coaching in private schools, especially Christian schools, and have made it one of my many goals to separate myself and be looked at as a legitimate “ball coach” in the private school ranks. If I get the opportunity to become a head coach, I plan to keep that goal. During the early years of my coaching career I would attend clinics, listen to lectures, listen to coaches, talk with other coaches and hang on every word they had to say. Most conversations were the same. They would talk about their schemes. The defenses they ran, the offenses they ran, what each position needed to look like…it was always the same. This was how it used to be. You run your stuff and you make players fit that. There are some differences that separate private schools from public schools in Texas. First, there are not always full-time, school-employee coaches. You use stipend or adjunct coaches, and your staff can change regularly.

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Second, there are very few private schools that have athletic periods. Weights, film, installs etc. have to be done before school, at lunch, before practice or after practice. Third, some private schools are high school only. They are not being fed by 7th and 8th grade programs that run the same schemes as the high school or have the same coaching staff philosophy, techniques and fundamentals. Some middle schools or junior highs that kids come from don’t even have football. This means that there are players who come in that have never played football until high school. I would come back from listening to these folks and quickly realize that our situation was very different from theirs. There are plenty of good ideas and things that we would, and still do, pick up from different programs but to try and do what others do is sometimes not feasible. What I have found is that our attitude and defensive standard, the way we do things, is most important. My second stint as a defensive coordinator was in 2017. I came to Second Baptist School in 2016 after being an offensive coordinator at my previous stop. That first year at SBS I was an offensive assistant coaching running backs. In 2017 our defensive coordinator left, and our head coach asked me to move and coordinate the defense. Our defensive staff at the time had a lot of knowledge. I mean, our defensive line coach had been coaching longer than I had been alive. So, I wanted to make sure that I listened to their knowledge. At this point in my career, I quickly found out that I didn’t have all the answers. During our first staff meeting, we were discussing setting the front and flipping our defense. It was the only way I had done it. Our linebacker coach told me that the previous year, the defense really started playing well when they stopped flipping and just lined up. Fast forward to the season and our first game defensively was awful. I was doing my morning devotion the following Monday and I asked God for help communicating with our players. He reminded me, as he usually does, of the conversation with our linebacker coach. That’s when the coaching experiment all started. How can we simplify everything that we do, and get the most out of our players? Let’s take the thinking out of it and demand their best. If they aren’t producing OCTOBER 2020


and playing to our standard, then let’s reward the guys who are. Age, talent and status didn’t matter. We went back to our base-odd front defense and played quarters coverage back behind it. We started evaluating our players each week to determine what they did well and growing upon that. We taught our guys fundamentals and techniques then molded the scheme around what we had. People would and still ask, "What do you run?" And our answer is, "We are multiple, we are going to evaluate our players’ strengths and build around those.” We based out of a 3-4 look that first year in 2017. We fired a lot of guys that thought they could play. We took a LB and played him at end. We allowed him to play in a standup position because he was more comfortable that way. We called up a freshman and sophomore corner from the JV midway through the season because those guys were playing the SBS standard of defense. Our last district game to finish the regular season, those guys had developed quite a bit and we jumped into a 4-2-5 look. Our opponent was run-heavy with a big physical running back. We walked up our outside backer to one side because he was great a setting the edge. We had two real good safeties and would keep a two high look and let those guys fill from depth because they were downhill players. Our first playoff game we were facing a really talented QB. We decided to get into a 4-3 and take our best LB and let him spy in the middle. The result was a shutout win for our team. In 2018, we started the first game in a 3-4. Our second game we played a team that was very one dimensional, running the ball. The same outside backer that did a great job setting the edge in 2017 was back so we walked him up again and came out in our 4-3. Our DB’s were really good at playing coverage and staying over the top. We still had the two safeties that were downhill. We tried playing some 2-read or palms, but we weren’t really good at it. We weren’t good at man coverage either. We kept seven in the box and let those guys roam around and make plays. OCTOBER 2020

This past season, we played our 4-3 look because we had seven linemen that all brought something to the table. We rotated those guys through. Instead of walking our backer up, we played true linemen. We primarily played our 2-read coverage, because our DB’s this year could do it. Our 4-3 has been a great defense now for two years. We have simplified our calls and tailored the defense to what the players can do. Our current defensive staff does a great job teaching style of play, fundamentals and technique. We preach our standard which is play with maximum effort, pursue to the ball, play physical between the whistle, bend don’t break and find a way to get the football. Below are some team stats from the past three seasons. 2017: Team record 7-4. Defensive stats: 17 points a game, 9.8 points a game in district, 21 turnovers and two defensive TD’s. 2018: Team record 11-2. Defensive stats: 11 points a game, 9.8 points a game in district, 41 turnovers (31 INT) and seven 7 defensive TD’s. 2019: Team record 12-1. Defensive stats: 9.4 points a game, 8.8 points a game in district, 36 turnovers (21 INT) and eight defensive TD’s. 45


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The Perspectives of High School Athletics thletics have always been and will continue to be a A vital part of campuses and communities across this country. After spending most of my childhood and my early 20s playing sports, coaching at the youth levels as well as more than 20 years at the high school level before finally moving into school administration, I can honestly say that I have been involved with athletics my entire life.

All sports are broken down between team sports and individual sports. In team sports such as soccer, baseball, softball, football and basketball are played, several people are working together as a unit. Individual sports such as tennis, track, golf, wrestling involve competing alone. Although participants may work individually to acquire points for a group, they usually compete on their own. Most of my experiences as an athlete as well as coaching have involved team sports. Each stage of my life has given me many different perspectives in which I have viewed sports and I recently decided to share each of these perspectives with others.

PERSPECTIVE 1 - THE PLAYER Put school and academics first When No-Pass, No-Play first came into effect, there was a lot of opposition from both parents and coaches. At first, the rule didn't allow student-athletes to practice with the teams while academically ineligible. There were concerns that the ineligible athletes would now take to the streets and eventually find trouble if they did not have some type of extra-curricular activity to fill their time After a few changes, I feel that most states have now got it right by allowing student-athletes to still practice, but not participate in contests until regaining eligibility. The players must remember that high school sports constitutes such a short time in the whole scheme of their future. A good education and diploma will last a lot longer.

Trust your coaches As an athlete, I never even thought of questioning my coaches about practices, workouts, game decisions or play calling. I never once heard my mother ask me, "Why did your coach do this or call that?" Maybe she did not understand the game or hopefully she knew that the coaches were there to build me up, work me hard, and make me a better young man for the future. Too often in today's society, players and parents question every move made by coaches.

Be "coachable" As I mentioned above, trust your coaches. Listen to what they are trying to teach you and improve on your skills. If you think that you already know everything, that coach is going to realize that you aren't very coachable. I learned over the years that you could oftentimes take a new athlete to a sport where he or she had not already developed any "bad habits" and the athlete will often surpass someone who was not willing to change.

Work your butt off Every player should ask himself, "What can I do to get better and help this team?" Student-athletes should devote themselves to getting stronger, faster, quicker and more explosive. Work on the little things as much as the big things. Don't just work hard when someone is watching, work hard every day, every practice, and you will start to see favorable results. "Everything you do in life, do with all your might. For anything you do half-way, you will have never done it right". Eric Dickerson's Father

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Find a role All team sports have a set number of starters for each event. Example: Football has 11 on the field at a time; basketball has five; baseball has nine... but good teams go beyond that. It is those players who come off the bench and show great TEAM depth that truly are successful. Your role may be the deep snapper in football, defensive specialist in basketball or base-stealing threat in baseball that makes the real difference in the final score. Not everyone can be the starter, the star player or the leading scorer, but everyone can find a role that contributes to the overall success of the team.

Don't be "high maintenance" Every coach will tell you, "High maintenance gets old fast". Don't be that athlete that is always late or forgetting something. They always have a reason to miss practice or leave early. They make the same mistakes over and over because they are not listening or paying attention during practice. Don't be that athlete who is always "hurt" and can't participate; but miraculously recovers on game day. Be on time, I always preached that "early" was on time, "on time" was late and "late" was unacceptable. Don't be a "prima donna." Oftentimes certain athletes feel that they should be the center of attention. Although this person may be a very good athlete, they are never more important than the TEAM. Ninety percent of all excuses are legit, 100 percent are unacceptable.

Be multi-dimensional Try many different sports before narrowing it down to just one. Oftentimes, young athletes get hung up on just one sport and never experience other opportunities. I have watched many an athlete focus on just one sport at a very young age, and then realize that they have fallen behind in every other sport.

Take advantage of offseasons When I was growing up, everything had a season. Football had the fall; basketball had the winter and baseball/softball had the spring and summer. In today's world, there are literally year-round seasons in just about every sport. I once coached a young man who was very talented in everything that he did. He reported to two-day-practices in July and played an entire football season. The day after the last football game, he reported to the basketball coach in the gym and joined the team whose season was already in progress. The day after basketball was over with, he would join the baseball team and played until school was out. He played summer baseball until the end of July, and then started the whole process over again. One day, I talked to him about off-season workouts and he reminded me that he had never experienced an off-season. As I begin to ponder this, I realized that he had never truly had an opportunity to get in the weight-room and work on improving his body. ***Now, you may ask, "How can I be multi-dimensional, yet take advantage of off-seasons?" My advice would be to let your body rest. If all you do is tear it down and never allow it to recover and build it back up, your body will not last long and you will have a hard time staying healthy.

Set goals and re-evaluate periodically. Be realistic. Every young athlete at one time or another says, "I'm going to be a professional athlete when I grow up". I remember thinking that I was going to be just like Roger Staubach and someday play quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys. Having dreams are great, but one must set goals periodically and work hard to attain those goals.

By David Russell Superintendent, Central Heights ISD

Start small, attain the goal and then set a higher goal. Saying that you are going to be bench-pressing 400 pounds or run a 4.4 40 by your freshmen year is probably not an attainable goal and athletes become discouraged and give up altogether.

You are weing watched in everything you do I constantly had to remind student-athletes that once you put on that jersey or uniform, everyone is watching everything you do. Little kids in the middle school and elementary will begin to try to emulate you and look up to you as a local hero. Your actions off the field will be scrutinized as much as your performance on the field. I always shared a story to my baseball players about a conversation that I had with a former major league scout. He said that they liked to get to games a couple of hours early and watch how a prospect handles himself. He would sit in his car and write down everything that person did up until game time. He wanted to know how this person handled things when they thought no one was watching.

Be committed In today's fast-paced society, it seems that everyone's schedule is so overloaded that they can never fully commit themselves to anything. I always talked to all of our athletes at the beginning of a season and explain the practice schedule and game schedule for the season. I told them that if you were going to be on varsity, you had to commit yourself to be at every practice and every game. If my athletes felt that they could not meet this challenge, they may be better suited for the junior varsity. I knew that there would be circumstances that would come up that the athlete had no control over but planning a hunting trip during football or basketball or maybe a ski trip during spring break might be a problem once you return. What if your replacement or back up has an unbelievable game? How can the coach sit them out the next game just because you are back from your trip? Ever heard of Wally Pipp?

Make the most of the opportunities that you are given Even if you are a back-up or reserve, make sure that you are physically and mentally prepared for the moment that you are needed. Whether it be for one play, one minute or one at bat, try to leave an impression on your coach that you were prepared and ready for the moment.

Know the difference between playing "hurt" and playing "injured" Playing "hurt" means that your body is being pushed to the limit. Playing "injured" means that something is wrong and continuing to try to play through it may risk further and/or more serious injury. I constantly stressed to athletes that they had to notify the trainers and/or myself if they were injured. If you cannot give 100 percent, then you are probably not going to be effective in your performance.

Be a leader Oftentimes, your best athletes are not your leaders. Leaders stay positive and support their teammates. They give encouragement and lead by example. Leaders earn the respect of their teammates for their actions, not their stats.

It is not your job to question officials Officials are in place to enforce the rules of the contest. You may not always agree with the call, but it is never your job to question, disrespect or show negative emotion toward an official. The coach is the only person who should confront an official, and I will address that in another section.

OCTOBER 2020


TEN THINGS THAT REQUIRE ZERO NATURAL TALENT

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

BEING ON TIME WORK ETHIC EFFORT BODY LANGUAGE ENERGY ATTITUDE PASSION BEING COACHABLE DOING EXTRA BEING PREPARED

WHY ATHLETES WITH AVERAGE TALENT SUCCEED:

- Work hard - Coachable - Practice hard - Do all the little things well - Value their roles

WHY TALENTED ATHLETES FAIL:

- Don't work hard - Not being coachable - Listening to and have the wrong people in their circle - Selfish

PERSPECTIVE 2 - THE COACH Make safety and academics the top priorities It is your top priority as a coach to always give thought to the safety of your athletes. Set protocol for practices, games and travel that ensure for the well-being of all student-athletes. Accidents happen, but you must give due diligence to ensure their safety. Coaches should be certified in CPR, up to date in training for concussion protocol and proficient in recognizing the signs of dehydration. You must also stress the importance of academics. If athletes sense that you do not feel it is important, they will not feel that it is important. Make time for tutorials, check on student progress and follow up with teachers to see which students need extra help in the classroom.

Set boundaries Every athletic program needs rules in place to provide structure and guidance for the student-athlete. Make sure that once you set these rules, you are willing to enforce them with consequences if they are not followed. It would be very simple to make one rule: Do right. But young people do not always know what is "right." It's your responsibility to show them what is " right" by setting an example for them.

Be fair and consistent The first thing that you will have to consider when making decisions regarding student-athletes is what type of precedence is being set. Ask yourself, "how will I handle this again in the future"? If I make an exception for this athlete, what am I going to do with the next athlete in this predicament? Student-athletes are much more willing to accept consequences for their actions as long as they know that you are being fair and consistent.

Show them how much you care Oftentimes you will become a parental figure to your athletes. They will see in you what they may not be able to find at home. You have to be able to balance that relationship between coach and parental figure. The most important thing that you can know about anyone is their name. "They will never care how much you know until they know how much you care"

Be a communicator It is imperative that you are constantly communicating with your athletes, teachers, parents and administrators. Make sure they are aware of practice schedules, game day itineraries and any last-minute changes. Take

OCTOBER 2020

advantage of such resources as apps on cell phones that allow you to send out mass messages to players and parents about up-coming events and announcements. Talk to your athletes about their goals, reminding them of team goals first. Have a conference yearly with athletes to discuss their evaluation and help them set individual goals for the coming year.

Promote numbers in your program and build a program Some think that too many numbers in a program can create problems, but I would rather have too many than not enough. Depending on the size of your district, some schools have "try-outs " or "cuts." If you are one of these districts, make sure that you use some type of rubric or scoring system as documentation. You really need to promote number of participants at your sub-varsity levels to allow students to grow and mature in your sport. Encourage your sub-varsity coaches to provide playing time for all athletes. You have to remember that athletes grow and mature at a different pace. I have seen many young male athletes give up on sports in junior high, only to fill out to 6-foot-4 220 pounds in high school. If you want to build a program that is successful year after year, you have to be able to instill the basics into them at an early age. I have always believed that competition creates success. If you do not have enough depth to create competition at each position, the starters will become complacent and not strive to get better. " Shallow pools will drown you every time"

Parent meetings or conferences I would strongly suggest that you do not have conferences with parents after games. I would make your conference period times available to parents and set up a meeting later. Too often parents want to discuss a private matter with a coach after a game when emotions are high and too many people may be around. This allows both of you to gather your thoughts and possibly settle down prior to the meeting. I would suggest being a good listener during the meeting, but make sure that they understand that you will in no way discuss any other athletes at this time nor will you discuss "playing time." You should do all that you can to keep the meeting positive, and if you feel that the meeting may get heated, ask your principal or athletic director to sit in as an intermediary. *** Parents need to understand that the game dictates the situation in which a coach can get subs involved in the contest.

Handling a player who wants to quit The first time I had an athlete say that he wanted to quit, I told him that he was not allowed to quit. I said that the season started, and he would have to wait until the season was over to quit. Although I was only kidding, I was still trying to prevent him from quitting. I made it my own personal policy to never let an athlete quit on the spot. I would tell them to go home and discuss it with their parents and then let me know tomorrow. In most cases, the student would return the next day with a new attitude.

hire field maintenance crews, but in most smaller districts, the coach is responsible for keeping the venue in tip-top shape. Keep the trash picked up, the grass mowed and the fields green and your players will begin to take more pride in the facilities.

Promote good health Discuss proper nutrition, hydration and proper training techniques with your athletes. It is your responsibility to discuss the effects of steroids and supplements. When athletes start to see the positive effects of good nutrition, it is often rewarding to see how much improvement can follow.

Be organized Don't be that person that does everything at the last minute. Keep your office neat and organized. You cannot expect your athletes to keep the locker room clean and tidy if you cannot keep your area clean. From practice schedules to game schedules, take care of things in advance. Keep inventory of equipment and uniforms. Take care of bus requests, officials schedules and purchase orders prior to the beginning of your season. Call officials the day of the game to confirm starting times. By being organized, this will allow you more time to work on skills, drills, technique and fundamentals.

Report scores to the local newspaper Win or lose, make a habit of writing up a game summary after each game and send it in to the local newspaper if you have one. Most newspapers will send out writers and photographers to cover varsity contests, but you will need to take care of sub-varsity and junior high games. Athletes love to see their names in print as much as their parents do. This is an easy way to recognize athletes for their accomplishments and hard work.

Coaching your own child I considered myself lucky to say I was able to coach two of my own children in high school. This can be a difficult task if you do not prepare yourself first, people will always say that they are only out there because you are the coach. I explained to my sons that they had to always hold themselves to a higher standard because they were being watched for every move they made. They, like every other player, had to earn their role and accept it on the field. Most parents don't realize that your child is usually getting dragged to the ballpark hours ahead of every other player, or that they are still there after games and practices while you are still working. During my middle son's senior year of baseball, he earned the deciding victory on the mound in a regional final game. That game sent us to the state finals the following week. He never got in to pitch during the state championship game because the game did not dictate that decision. Not once did he ever ask me why he did not get into the game. I was proud as a coach that he knew his role on the team, but even more proud as a parent in the way that he handled himself.

Learn to share athletes

Study the game and know the rules. It is your responsibility to be aware of all regulations and limitations related to your sport. Each state has a governing body that distributes contest rules. Make sure that you have a copy and read it periodically.

I have coached in both a large district as well as a small district, but the one thing that was common in both was that coaches had to learn to share athletes. If you as a coach try to force a player into making a decision between your sport or another, oftentimes you will lose them all-together. Many seasons overlap, and athletes cannot be at two places at one time. Work with these athletes and be careful that they are not overextending themselves to exhaustion.

Take care of your venue

Relationships with officials

I would always give basketball coaches a hard time because all they had to do to take care of the court was to sweep it and turn off the lights. Outdoor sports' venues require a lot more time to mow, manicure, line and fertilize. Large districts may have the resources to

One of the hardest things for young coaches to have to learn is how to deal with officials. Having worked as an umpire in college, I know how hard it is to try to be perfect in every call. I once had a coach tell me that I missed a call. I responded to him that I may not have gotten it right,

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but I did not miss it! As a coach, I could not ever ask an official to be perfect, I could only hope that they would put themselves into the best position to see the play and be professional around young athletes. In over 20 years of coaching high school sports and numerous other years of league sports, I can gladly say that I have never been ejected, penalized or reprimanded by an official. This may have been because of my upbringing, but I always approached an official after a questionable call and asked, "What did you see"? If they saw something different than I did, I knew that I was probably never going to convince them otherwise. If it was a rule interpretation, then I tried to make sure that I knew the rules as well or better than they did. In my last year of coaching, I had a young man ground out on at bat. He was surprisingly upset and I pulled him aside to ask him what was wrong. He said that the umpire had told him to "Shut the hell up and get in the box" while at bat. I approached the umpire asking for an explanation and was basically told the same thing. I do not and will not curse in front of players. I recall this story to say that I expect players and coaches to respect officials, but I also expect officials to show professionalism in front of young athletes.

Playing time for athletes One of the things that coaches struggle with the most is trying to get all of their athletes involved into the games. If you are truly trying to build a program, wins and losses should not be your biggest concern at the sub-varsity and junior high programs. Many players give up on sports at an early age due to lack of participation. Be creative in your scheduling; play a fifth quarter in football or basketball and designate this as a time to get in substitutes that do not see much action. One year while coaching junior high football, we came up with the "Jet" squad. This group consisted of back-up players that concentrated on three or four plays all week during practice. At opportune times, we would yell "Jet Squad" and they would sprint onto the field and run their three plays without ever huddling up. This often created a problem for the opposition and the players took pride in being a part of it. When it comes to varsity teams, I have already discussed players finding their role on the team. I felt that it was important to try to get everyone into the game in some manner, but always had to remember that the game dictated the situation.

Keeping statistics As a coach, I always felt that it was important to keep game statistics at the varsity levels. This allowed me to look at numbers and tell me where individuals as well as the team needed to improve in certain areas. I also came to realize that statistics are not everything. Often times, players would become wrapped up in individual statistics instead of what was best for the team.

Keep your family first. So often, young coaches get so caught up in all of their duties that they forget to keep their family at the forefront of their lives. Probably the most important piece of advice that I could give to any young coach is to make time for your family. This can often times be a struggle to balance between practices, games, scouting, field work, etc..... Do not get so hung up in raising everyone else's children that you forget to raise your own.

Be professional This can include many things, but a few that come to mind are: - Never intentionally try to embarrass an athlete. - Never try to embarrass another team by running up the score. - Meet deadlines. "A COACH'S WORTH ISN'T FOUND IN THEIR WIN/LOSS RECORD OR THEIR RESUME' BUT IN

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THE IMPACT MADE ON THE GAME AND IN THEIR PLAYERS' LIVES."

and if you condone it, you better get used to it.

PERSPECTIVE THREE - THE PARENT

Do you really think that a coach is ever trying to lose on purpose? The vast majority of high school coaches are hired to be classroom teachers first. Their salary is based around their teaching position, and they receive a stipend for the coaching duties. There is not a degree in colleges or universities called a coaching degree. They are professional educators, not professional coaches.

First of all, let me say, "every child needs an advocate and there should be no greater advocate than the parent". As a parent, I required each of my children to be involved in some sort of athletics. I feel that athletics not only helps build character, but it also reveals character. As mentioned earlier, I would have been horrified if my mother had ever gone to talk to one of my coaches about a problem. The only time I ever complained to her about a coach, she replied" Don't whine to me about it, if you don't like how things are going, you better work harder." She also said that I better not even think about quitting. I had made a commitment to this and I was going to stick it out. Not that I had ever considered quitting; but I now knew where she stood on the whole thing. "Prepare the child for the path, not the path for the child"

Don't be "That Parent" More often than not, it seems that every team has "That Parent" that always wants to complain about the coach, the amount of playing time that "little Johnny gets or wants to talk bad about someone on the team to make " little Johnny" look better. If you want to discuss something with a coach, set up a designated time and be prepared to discuss only things that may pertain to health/safety concerns, academic problems or advice on what they could do to get better. Never approach a coach while you are upset. This is not a good situation and usually ends up embarrassing the athlete. Parents should not approach a coach to discuss playing time, game decisions, or other athletes.

Be careful with whom you get associated with Don't let yourself get caught up in being "that parent's" sounding board. Even though you may not agree with what they are saying, they will perceive that you do and look to you as an ally. They will include you in their conversation as they go to the next parent and tell them that you feel the same way.

Quit talking about little league Too often I hear about how well " this group of kids" did in little league, summer league or Pop Warner. Newsflash, those days are over. When was the last time you heard of a little leaguer not being eligible to play because they were failing chemistry or calculus? You hear how their summer team won the World Series or National Championship but never actually played anyone more than 60 miles away. High school coaches compete with a completely different set of rules and guidelines, and their job is on the line if they break those rules.

Be realistic I know that once every little boy or girl puts on that first uniform, every parent dreams of them one day playing professionally. Every sport has its own percentages of making professional teams. But I can tell you this, in over 20 years of coaching high school baseball, about forty of my players received college scholarships and many more walked on to college teams. One of those players even went on to win the Dick Houser Award as the best Collegiate Baseball player in America. About a dozen got drafted, a few went as high as the second or third round of the Major League Baseball Draft. Out of all of these players, only one made it to The Show, and he was only there for a very short time. I bring all of this up to let you know that it takes a special type of person to be a professional athlete.

Coaches are people too

"UNCOACHABLE KID BECOME UNEMPLOYABLE ADULTS. LET YOUR KIDS GET USED TO SOMEONE BEING TOUGH ON THEM.IT'S LIFE, GET OVER IT." "Your child's success or lack of success in sports does not indicate what kind of parent you are. But, having an athlete that is coachable, respectful, a great teammate, mentally tough, resilient and tries their best IS a direct reflection of your parenting." PERSPECTIVE FOUR THE ADMINISTRATOR (Superintendents, Principals and Athletic Directors) After my 22nd year in education, I hung up my whistle and took the position as a high school principal. I had previously served 11 years as both an assistant principal as well as athletic director during four of those years while still coaching. Having served as an athletic director and now as a principal, I can now offer a perspective from an Administrative viewpoint.

Do not micro-manage It is your role to know everything that is going on, just not to decide everything that is going on. I believe in hiring good teachers who are also good coaches and allow them to do their jobs. Yes, there are times where you will have to make decisions that affect athletics, but those decisions should be based on what is best for the entire program, not just a select few. Keep in mind that it is not always about wins and losses. Be patient with new coaches and allow them to build a program.

Chain of communication I am a big believer in the ladder of communication. If I receive a call from a parent, I like to know if they have contacted the coach first. If they have and are not happy with that decision, have they contacted the athletic director? From there it goes to the principal, then to the superintendent. This is not to put a parent off, it is to allow the process to play out and hopefully resolve the issue. If needed, administrators may need to sit in on parent meetings to keep the topic focused to the situation at hand, especially for young coaches who may need guidance in these situations.

Proponent for All Athletic directors, principals and superintendents have to be proponents of all activities, not just sports. Be visible, go to practices, games, events, performances, etc... Make sure that the students see that you are in support of all programs.

Being "on duty" Most high schools require that an administrator be on duty for home contests. Make sure that your fans understand what is expected of them while in attendance at any game. Do not allow hecklers that are only there to draw attention to themselves.

Hold your child responsible Always encourage your child to stick it out. Don't let them quit. Quitting becomes easier and easier for them

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DIRECTOR PICK WRITTEN BY TYLER HELMS

HEAD GIRLS BASKETBALL COACH - IDALOU HIGH SCHOOL

MENTORS GROW

COACHES I

n my short high school coaching career, which I consider to be one of the luckiest that exists, I have been in situations (both directly and indirectly) to learn from some of the best high school coaches in the state. As I reflect on my first 13 years in this great profession, there are several mentors that stick out that have helped build my foundation and philosophies. Allowing these coaches to "coach" me has been instrumental in my growth, and I look forward to the continuous process of learning from others as I continue my coaching career. The opportunity to coach boys (seven years) and girls six years), has provided me the unique experience to find counsel on both sides of the aisle. Working in a small school setting (2A-3A) the entire time, I’ve been able to interact with male and female athletes in numerous sports (football, basketball, baseball, track, and cross country). As a young coach, my goal has been to learn as much as possible as fast as possible. In my second year, I started writing down advice/ideas that I heard from fellow veteran coaches that I respected because how successful their programs had been. I’m sure at the time these coaches had no idea the impact they were having on me, but I appreciate them immensely for helping my development. When looking back through my notes I found many thoughts ranging from motivation, to specific game/ practice situations, to knowing how to run your own program, and many more. I’ve picked some memorable quotes or ideas that have had a lasting influence on me as a coach, as well as a description of the coach that shared the knowledge with me. 52

JOHNNY TAYLOR (Former Idalou AD) *Over 200 career wins and head coach for the football state championship team in 2010 “A good coach always has his whistle and keys.” “Don’t allow someone to distract you while practice is going on, you should be coaching 100 percent of the time.” DON LONG (Former Idalou AD) *Served as defensive coordinator for the football state championship team in 2010 In reference to me pointing out to him that our weak side linebacker was often freelancing outside of our scheme...“I’m giving him freedom to make plays because he can do things our other kids can’t.” “What do you think?” (he asked me this question many times about various situations, which as an assistant coach gave me buy in because my input was being genuinely valued) OCTOBER 2020


RUSS REAGAN (Former Idalou track coach) *Served as the quarterbacks coach for the football state championship team in 2010

“It’s important to work with your middle school kids as often as possible because they are the key to keeping positive momentum in your program.”

In reference to me working with the pole-vaulters during track season, “Can you get all of them over opening height? We need those points.” (when a coach is counting on you to do your job well it’s a great motivator!)

RAY MORRIS (Former Shallowater head boys basketball) *599 career wins and a State Championship In reference to me asking him what to say to a team that has a target on their back because of previous success...“Put it on the team’s shoulders. Tell them you are just the coach, this is their team. Express to them you can want it for them, but you can’t do it for them.”

I learned a lot about quality trash talk in Coach Reagan’s goal post throwing contests before varsity football games every Friday night. MARK TURNER (Former Idalou baseball coach) *Served as the offensive line coach for the football state championship team in 2010 Coach Turner had a huge impact on me with his consistent example of professionalism and unselfishness. Watching him turn Idalou’s offensive line (regardless of talent) into a cohesive successful unit year after year was impressive.

In reference to me asking him what to tell a team at halftime if we weren’t winning...“Calmly and confidently tell them what they need to improve on, don’t put pressure on them, reiterate to them they don’t have to do anything special.” KARY HELMS (My dad and first coach) “There’s a lot of other things you can go do with your life, but you shouldn’t ever get out of coaching because you love it and you’re in it for the right reasons.”

CHRIS BRATTAIN (Assisted him for two years and played basketball under him in high school) In reference to my first year as a head basketball coach..."You aren’t going to out coach the legends you are going against, but you can out work them.”

As coaches we have numerous responsibilities and leave impressions on many individuals during our careers. The focus on athletes (as players and individuals) is a noble cause and one that shouldn’t be taken lightly.

“Demand more of your team on defense than any other coach in the district.”

However, it is also important for coaches to realize we have a tremendous impact on our colleagues as well. I consider myself the very definition of being in the right place at the right time due to the mentors I have been able to learn from.

Playing and coaching under Coach Brattain allowed me to start understanding if you want to separate yourself from others, there aren’t any short cuts, only hard work. WAYNE JOHNSON (Aspermont head girls basketball) *Over 600 career wins, 13 regional tournaments, one state tournament In reference to the best game plan philosophy… “Simplicity with execution.” NEWT WHEELER (Former Idalou assistant coach) “The details are what is going to separate us Buck, I guarantee it.”

Thank you for allowing me to share some of my memorable experiences. I want to give encouragement to each coach that is in a position to advise, it is an important job! Equally important, if you’re at the stage of your career in which you are seeking mentors who you choose is vital to your growth!

NICK MARTIN (Former head basketball coach at Littlefield and my assistant basketball coach for two years at Idalou) OCTOBER 2020

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12th Annual Next Level Athlete Texas Top 100 a Huge Success By Greg Powers, Next Level Athlete

I

n January, Next Level Athlete concluded its Texas Top 100 Showcase held in association with Dave Campbell's Texas Football, attracting some of the finest up and coming prospects across the Lone Star State. The student-athletes in attendance were among a select few invited to participate in position-specific drills and one-on-one competitions. Every rep is filmed and a video highlight is produced for each athlete. These videos, along with a collegiate rating and a written evaluation, were posted into Next Level Athlete's college scouting system and made available to college coaches across the United States. The Next Level Athlete scouting platform was designed to allow colleges to evaluate a higher number of Texas prospects in less time. This, in effect, creates greater exposure and increased scholarship opportunities for Texas-based athletes. "One of the primary purposes of our events is to capture video of each athlete in a format that best demonstrates his overall athletic ability," said Justin Simons, Founder and CEO of Next Level Athlete. "By capturing this content in January, we are giving colleges a glimpse at the top athletes in Texas before the NCAAmandated Spring Evaluation Period." Currently, over 500 athletes that have participated in the Next Level Athlete are playing Division I football while countless others are furthering their playing careers and educations at lower divisions. "The NLA Camp is great for our players because they get to compete against good competition and they get great exposure," said DeSoto Head Coach Claude Mathis. "We love to compete and that’s the camp to get it at." Ask any member of the Next Level Athlete team, and they will tell you that the critical factor in the success of the organization is directly attributable to the support of the company by high school coaches across Texas.

Upcoming Software Will Be a Game Changer for TXHSFB Coaches Next Level Athlete's track record of working in coordination with the Texas high school football community powered a relationship with the Texas High School Coaches Association and a partnership with the Straight Line Recruiting initiative. Through its partnership, Next Level Athlete is set to launch its 'Prospect Portal' to high school coaches across the state.

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The 'Prospect Portal' is a FREE online tool designed to replace the traditional 'prospect sheet' method of maintaining and delivering athlete data to colleges. "We created the Prospect Portal for several reasons, but paramount among them was to provide high school coaches with a more secure way of delivering personal information on their athletes to colleges," Simons said. "Another benefit of the system will be that of putting greater control in the hands of the high school coach regarding what and when information is transmitted to colleges. We hope that the system will make it easier for high school coaches to send information to colleges and reduce the need for street-agents and trainers that currently make a living on filling this gap. It won't be easy, but if high school coaches get behind this system, we can truly eliminate a lot of the improprieties that exist in recruiting today." Email Info@NextLevelAthlete.com if you would like your program to be first in line to test and utilize the FREE Prospect Portal. Best Regards, Greg Powers

NLA's 2020 Texas Top 100 MVPs Houston QB: Seth Ford (Round Rock) RB: Rueben Owens (El Campo) WR: Dylan Goffney (Cypress Bridgeland) TE: Dylan Crippen (Cypress Bridgeland) OL: Kelvin Banks (Summer Creek) DL: Tyler Onyedim (Richmond Foster) LB: KC Ossai (Conroe Oak Ridge) DB: Blake Smith (Pearland Dawson) Dallas QB: Kaidon Salter (Cedar Hill) RB: DQ James (Lancaster) WR: Majik Rector (Lancaster) TE: Jasper Lott (Argyle) OL: Jack Tucker (Argyle) DL: Peter Melle (Dallas Jesuit) LB: Jackson Bailey (Red Oak) DB: Jalon Rock (Mansfield Summit)

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As you continue your athletic endeavors, “leveling up” takes a lot of work and discipline. Whatever sport you’re playing, you have to stay focused on those skills and be prepared to take advantage when a door opens for you. But in order to take advantage of those opportunities, you have to be academically on task and committed to leading a positive lifestyle, including practicing good nutrition, being a leader in your home and the community, and setting ambitious goals. More Than Talent Our defensive coordinator always told us that we had to have two things to be successful in football: our reputation and our film. For example, if you’re getting in trouble in high school, but your film is great, it doesn’t matter because your reputation has to match your film. He really emphasized that you can’t just be a talented player; you have to be a well-rounded person – someone that’s focused in school, supports their teammates, practices healthy eating habits, respects others and has a good attitude. That’s where I almost made the biggest mistake of my life. In high school, I was not focused on my studies and didn’t prioritize fueling my body with the best foods. My leveling process took four steps because I went from high school to a junior college to a university and then to the NFL. It was something I needed because of the situation I put myself in, and I had to take smaller steps on the path to my goal. Yes, it worked out for me, but a lot of other guys derailed themselves before they got to the next level. Sacrifice Over Regret There are two types of pain: the pain of sacrifice and the pain of regret. You never want to regret anything during the process of leveling up. You want to sacrifice everything that’s not helping you achieve your goals, so you can make it as a player or a coach or any career choice. In college, I had to live with the choices I made in high school. It meant additional sacrifices I

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had to make – like studying harder and choosing better foods, such as dairy, vegetables and whole grains – as I continued down the road. But I can live with the pain of sacrifice because I’d never want to live with the pain of regret. Sure, I could’ve had more fun doing things other than studying, practicing, training or eating healthy, but there were greater things that I wanted to accomplish. Setting the Bar And while I wouldn’t say I doubted myself, I should have set my expectations higher. My mindset was on making it to the Canadian Football League (CFL) coming out of high school. Then going into junior college, my mindset was to make it to a university and get an education before going into the CFL. I didn’t start thinking about the National Football League (NFL) until the second game of my senior year at Boise State University. When I set my mind on the NFL, I thought, “Boy, it would be great if I could get a couple of years in the league then go to the CFL and play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats,” which is near my hometown of Windsor, Canada, or maybe play for the Montreal Alouettes because my cousin, Daryl Townsend, played for that team. But you can’t limit yourself because down the line you’ll regret not striving for greater things. Limiting yourself is closing the door to those opportunities. Strive Higher Set your goals higher than the ones I originally set for myself. It took extra steps for me to get to where I am now, but your path can be smoother. To level up, you’ve got to stay on track in school, remain positive, maintain a good reputation, work hard on your skills, eat foods that will fuel your body and, most importantly, know that the sacrifices you make today outweigh the pain of regret.

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Photo Credit: Dan Sherrard Photography

Photo Credit: Britni Call Photography

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Photo Credit: Dan Sherrard Photography

Photo Credit: Dan Sherrard Photography

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hy Photo Credit: Britni Call Photography

Photo Credit: Dan Sherrard Photography

Photo Credit: Britni Call Photography

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LET US TAKE IT FROM HERE.

YOU SHOWED THEM THE STRENGTH THEY HAVE INSIDE. YOU TAUGHT THEM ANYTHING WORTH DOING IS HARD. YOU INSTILLED HONOR, RESPECT, AND INTEGRITY. LET US TAKE THEM THE REST OF THE WAY. IN THE TEXAS ARMY NATIONAL GUARD, YOUR STUDENTS WILL HAVE ACCESS TO COLLEGE TUITION, JOB TRAINING, PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS, AND MORE. ALL WHILE SERVING AT HOME. CALL US TODAY: 1-800-GO-GUARD OR VISIT WWW.NATIONALGUARD.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION OCTOBER 2020

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HALL of HONOR NOMINEES AS OF SEPTEMBER 25, 2020

Below is a current list of nominees for the THSCA Hall of Honor. Deadline for nominating a coach for the Hall of Honor is FEBRUARY 1, 2021. For guidelines on nominating candidates for consideration and the criteria for entrance into the Hall of Honor please see rules on THE adjoining page. Once a candidate is nominated they will remain on the list and are considered every year and do not have to be “re-nominated”. For those already nominated, we advise sending letters of recommendation. ACREE, JIM ADAMS, JOHN R. "Sparky" ALEXANDER, DENNIS ALLEN, BILL ANDERSON, HENRY ANDERSON, JAMES BARLOW ASHMORE, LEE ROY AYMOND, DAVID BAKER, DALE BALDRIDGE, HARLAN W. BARBAY, CURTIS BARRETT, HAROLD BARRON, BILL BATEMAN, JIM BATES, DEAN BATES, MARION CLIFFORD "Bull" BAUCOM, JACK BAUGH, DAVID BENSON, CARROLL "Skip" BICKHAM, RONALD BIRKELBACK, BERNARD BLOOMER, BEN BOOMER, LEWIS BORCHERT, MELVIN BORTH, NORMAN BOTTOMS, SHERRILL BOURQUIN, DAVID BOYD, BOB BOYD, LEONARD RAY BROOKS, DON BROOKS, WILLIE BROWN, BOB BRYAN, JOHN D. BUCHANAN, TIM BURCH, TROY DON BURLESON, EDD BYRD, ROBIN CAMPBELL, DEAN CAMPBELL, GID *CAMPBELL, STEVE CANTER, JIM CAPELLO, ROBERT 62

CARTER, BILL CARTWRIGHT, JOE G. CAVALIER, DENNIS COBB, NORMAN CODY, JEFF COOK, MAURICE COURTNEY, RONNIE COURVILLE, KERMIT CRAWFORD, JOHN CRON, TERRY CUMMINGS, JESSE L. *CUMPTON, DON CURRY, W. E. "Doc" CURTIS, CHARLES DAVENPORT, GARY DAVIS, BILL DAVIS, JOHN THOMAS (J.T.) DAVIS, KEN AUTRY DAVIS, RALPH (BEN) DAVIS,THOMAS (Tommy) WILLIAM DAWS, BILL DENBOW, DONNIE DERRICK, WALTER DODGE, TODD DOEGE, RANDY DOWLING, RUSTY DOZIER, BROOKS, JR. DRENNAN, W. B. "Pappy" DUBOSE, WILLIAM T. EDDINS, JIM EDWARDS, JOEL EDWARDS, RANDALL EMLER, BUFORD EMMONS, WOODROW "Red" ETHEREDGE, BOBBY EUDY, QUINN EVANS, JOE FAITH, DENNEY FARDA, MIKE FARRINGTON, BILL FAWCETT, LEONARD J. FEWELL, VERNON

FILOTEO JR., JOE FINLEY, MICKEY FLANAGAN, ROBERT FLEENER, MARSHALL FORD, BUTCH FOWLER, MALVIN FOX, JOE BILL FRANKIE, JOHNNIE FROMAN, BILL GAMBILL, TERRY GANDY, DAN GARDNER, WAYNE A. GARRISON, JOHN GAYLOR, LONNIE GEORGE, LEONARD GIBSON, JACK GIESE, JAMES GIPS, PAUL E. GONZALEZ, J B GRANGER, DON E. GRAY, DWAYNE GRIFFIN, ANDY GROSECLOSE, BOB GUICE, JOHN E. GUSTAFSON, CLIFF HARPER, SAM HARPER, WILLIAM “BILL HECKATHORN, MIKE HEISER, JAMES E. HENDERSON, BUTCH HENDERSON, JOHNNIE HESS, JIM HESS, ROD HICKMAN, FRED W. HILL, F. L. “Smitty” HILL, HAROLD HODGES, W. C. HOOKS, DAN HOOKS, WILLIAM “WAYNE” HUDDLESTON, FIELDING HUDSON, RODNEY HUNTER, BILL

HUTCHINS, ROY A INGRAM, BILL IRLBECK, CARL WAYNE JACKSON, KENT JOHANSON, DALE JOHNSON, FRED JOHNSON, GLENN JOHNSON, LES JORDAN, THOMAS E. KENNEDY, TROY KETTLER, ELWOOD KIMBROUGH, TOM KRUEGER, BILL LAMBERT, HAL LAPRADE, BENNIE JOE LEACH, DON LEBBY,MIKE LE FEVRE, GEOFFREY LEHNHOFF, FRITZ LEHNHOFF, ROBERT LITTLETON, BILL LONGHOFER, JESSIE LUCAS, RUSSELL MALESKY, GARY MARTIN, ROBERT L. "Bob" MARTINEZ; HOMER MASSEY, JR., HUGH MCCANLIES, GENE MCCOLLUM, JOHN MCGALLION, RAYMOND MCGEHEE, RONNIE MCGONAGLE, BILL MERCER, M. K. METCALF, EDDIE MICKLER, JR., ROBERT MILLSAPPS, JERRY MOFFATT, JAMES MONZINGO, MATT MOODY, RICHARD MOSLEY, SAM MOUSER, JIM MURPHY, JACK OCTOBER 2020


MURPHY, MIKE MYERS, J. FENNER "SONNY" NARRELL, WILLIAM NEILL, MARION NELSON, CLARK “CORKY” NEPTUNE, EVERETT “Ebbie” NEUMANN, LARRY NEWCOMB, BILL NIX, C. L. NOLEN, TOM NORMAN, JIM ODOM, JAMES D. OZEE, KEN PADRON, DANNY PARKER, LAWRENCE “Ace” PARR, STEVE PATTERSON , JOHN "Jay" PEARCE, BILL PEARCE, JOHN PENSE, PETE PEOPLES, JOHNNY PEVETO, ED PHILLIPS, SCOTT POE, DON POOLE, KENNETH PRIDGEON, KEN PRICE, JOE WILLIE SR. PRIEST, H. O. "HOP" PROFFITT, GARY PUFAL, JIM PURCELL, KEN PURSER, BILL PURSER, BOB QUARLES, JACK D. RAPP, RAYMOND RAVEN, TRAVIS RAY, REX G. REDDELL, JOHN C. REID, DOUG REYNOLDS, EVERETT “Sleepy” RICHARD, JOSEPH RINGO, JOHNNY ROBINSON, EDWARD ROBINSON, MARSHALL "Cotton" ROTEN,WILLIAM “WILLIE” SALAZAR, VIC *SAMPLES, REGINALD SANCHEZ, DAVID SANDERS, REX SAN MIGUEL, ARMANDO SCHULTZ, CARROLL SCOTT, GEORGE W. SHAFFER, JERRY SHARP, EUGENE OCTOBER 2020

SHAVER, A. D. *SHEFFY, JOE SIMMONDS, LEW SIMMONS, T. J. "Dusty" SKIDMORE, KENNETH SMITH, BROWN L. SMITH, DRU SMITH, HULEN "HOOT" SNEED, MIKE SNOW, PAUL W. STARNES, RALPH STEWART, BILLY STUECKLER, PAUL SWANN, HOWARD HUGH TAYLOR, RADFORD TEYKL, TIM THOMPSON, ELMER M. THOMPSON, MIKE THOMPSON, PRESTON TIMMONS, RAYMOND TRAHAN, WARREN TUCKER, CALVIN TURNER, CHARLIE TUSA, JOHNNY VANCE, JERRY VICTORIC, DONNIE WAGGONER, JACK WALKER, JESSE WALKER, THOMAS E. WALLACE, JEWELL WARREN, JIM WARREN, STEVE WASSERMANN, LLOYD WATSON, JIMMY WEATHERSPOON, LLOYD“SPOON” WEIR, BOB WEST, GRADY WHATLEY, VAN TOM WHITEHURST, DAYLON WIGINTON, KEN WILLIAMSON, AL WILLINGHAM, JAMES L. WILLS, JOHN C. WILSON, TOM WINSTON, HENRY WINTERS, ALLEN WOODARD, CHARLIE WOOLLS, CLAYTON "Butch" YORK, TOBY *YORK, TODD

*New Nominees

THSCA HALL OF HONOR RULES OF ENTRANCE 1. Anyone considered for the Hall of Honor shall have been an active member of the THSCA in the following brackets: A. 1930-35 - must have been a member for any one year. B. 1936-45 - must have been a member for any five years C. 1946-present - must have been a member for a min. of 15 years. 2. Should have contributed to the association. 3. Should have contributed to the coaching profession. 4. Any coach who is a member of the THSCA or retired coach who is an ex-member of the THSCA may submit a coach for consideration by sending a letter to the Texas High School Coaches Association. Once an individual is nominated, THEIR name will remain on the list with the committee for consideration. The committee meets IN MARCH so all letters should be sent to the THSCA by FEBRUARY 1st. The tentative date for the Hall of Honor Selection Committee meeting is MARCH 28, 2021. Send your letter of nomination plus a short biography of the nominee (Please provide as much information on your nominee as possible) to:

THSCA ATTN: CHELSEA MILLER P.O. Drawer 1138 San Marcos TX 78667-1138 2021 HALL OF HONOR Selection Committee members are: Larry Hill, smithson valley hs (Term ends 2021) Bob Gillis, El Campo HS (Term ends 2022) RONNIE GAGE, lewisville HS (Term ends 2023) Johnny Taylor, idalou hs (Term ends 2024)

ch Shawn Pratt McKinney ISD Athletic Director - Coa ctor in Former Head Coach & Athletic Dire

brough Plano for 50+ Years - Coach Tom Kim Joe Martin THSCA Executive Director - Coach

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TEXAS EDUCATORS CARE ENOUGH TO VOTE RESOURCES PROVIDED BY WWW.TEXASEDUCATORSVOTE.COM CREATING A CULTURE OF VOTING IN TEXAS PUBLIC SCHOOLS | CONTENT BY LAURA SUBRIN YEAGER | INFO@TEXASEDUCATORSVOTE.COM

BACKGROUND: Texas Educators Vote (TEV) was created in the fall of 2015 under the auspices of the Texas Association of Community Schools (TACS). The program has grown to include rural superintendents, pastors, principals, current and retired teachers, special education administrators, school board members, and many others. The League of Women Voters of Texas joined us in 2017 and brings valuable information and tools to the group. MISSION: To create a culture of voting in TX public schools. 1. Encourage educators to become engaged citizens and model civic engagement for students. 2. Improve educator voter turnout and strengthen democracy. 3. Support Article 7 of the Texas Constitution, state laws requiring principals to register students and staff to vote, and SBOE-written social studies TEKS requiring educators to teach about voting, citizenship and participatory democracy.

REGISTER TO VOTE: You can’t vote if you’re not registered.

https://www.votetexas.gov/

GET VOTING REMINDERS: Text TXEDVOTE to 40649

2020 GENERAL ELECTION Last day to register: October 5, 2020 Vote by Mail Applications Due: October 23, 2020 Early voting: October 13-30, 2020 ELECTION DAY: TUES. NOVEMBER 3, 2020 7 AM - 7 PM

EDUCATORS DO'S & DON'TS: DO's: •

Encourage students, staff, parents and community members to vote.

Share factual information about voter registration, polling locations, dates, and hours of voting.

Teach about civics, citizenship, and voting. Register voters, hold non-partisan candidate forums, and make sure staff and students have time to vote.

Advocate for the interest of Texas public education, as long as the advocacy does not use public resources or time to campaign for a specific candidate, political party, or ballot measure.

DON'T USE PUBLIC FUNDS (INCLUDING

SCHOOL DISTRICT RESOURCES AND TIME) TO SUPPORT OR OPPOSE A SPECIFIC CANDIDATE, PARTY, OR BALLOT MEASURE.

MORE INFORMATION: TexasEducatorsVote.com twitter.com/TxEdVote facebook.com/TexasEducatorsVote

SCAN HERE TO SIGN UP FOR VOTER UPDATES VIA EMAIL.

Txedvote 64

OCTOBER 2020


WHAT CAN LEADERS DO TO INCREASE AWARENESS & VOTING PARTICIPATION Despite being possibly one of the greatest civic responsibilities, voting is the least exercised. Voter turnout is low – alarmingly low among Texans. Texas had the lowest voter turnout in the nation in 2014. Educational leaders, teachers, staff and all auxiliary workers involved in the community need additional information and knowledge about the process. When citizens do not vote regularly, elected officials may not be held accountable. By keeping all citizens informed about the process and emphasizing the civic responsibility of voting, participation in this constitutional right may increase. Texas has almost 27 million residents, all of whom are affected by the outcome of political elections. Of those, some 19.3 million residents are eligible to vote. Texas voter registration documents have some 15 million registered voters. This suggests that about 78 percent of eligible voters are registered to vote. According to the Texas Education Agency, Texas has 335,000 teachers, plus another 322,000 on staff such as principals and central office administrators, and other school employees – about 657,000 prospective voters serving more than 5 million students.

Only about 34 Texas turned out to in November 2014. 2018 increased to

percent of registered voters in vote in the gubernatorial election Voter turnout between 2014 and 53 percent of registered voters.

However, among ALL those eligible to vote in Texas, 46 percent voted, 41.4 percent registered but did not vote, and 12.6 percent were eligible but did not register. (That means 54 percent of the Texans are not exercising their civic right to vote!)

WHAT'S ON THE BALLOT Be an informed voter and make the commitment to do some research about candidates and their positions on public education. Remain indifferent to party lines and vote for those that avidly support public education. It can be helpful to see which groups, news organizations, and political action committees are endorsing or opposing specific candidates. A great deal of information can be found online by accessing candidate web pages and recorded interviews. Candidate responses to questionnaires about education are available at:

www.teachthevote.org www.vote411.org OCTOBER 2020

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OCTOBER 2020


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Next Level Athlete................. 5

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Performance Course........... 60

Athletic Supply..................... 1

Portaphone......................... 21

Balfour.................................. 6

Promaxima.......................... 57

BSN...................................... 46

Pure Sport........................... 66

Clell Wade........................... 51

Riddell................................. 43

CoachComm....................... 25

Rogers Athletic...................... 9

Dairy Max............................ 27

Spectrum Scoreboards........ 40

Fox Sports............................ 30

sportsYou........................... IBC

Gamebreaker...................... 68

Team Issue............................. 8

Gilman Gear........................ 12

Texas Army Nat’l Guard..... 61

Hammer Strength............... 43

Waterboy Graphics............. 67

Houston Texans/Texas Bowl.... 54

Visit San Antonio................. 18

Congratulations to THSCA Past President and current Head Football Coach at Highland Park HS, Coach Randy Allen on his 400 career football victories.

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Download the app and enter the group code to join your thsca region!

The Ultimate FREE Team Communication App

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A new season. Get your teams/groups on sportsYou to save time. Connect coaches, players, and families on one platform. The smart and easy way to coach!

“sportsYou is an amazing communication tool that we utilize within our basketball family. Our staff seamlessly connect with all team members via the “Team” feed, chat, calendar, and files. We are thankful for this simple yet dynamic method of correspondence with all members of our program!” Matt Farmer, Head Boys Basketball Coach, New Caney High School

Save everyone time with these core features: TEAM/GROUP POSTS

CHAT

Post messages, files, media and polls privately to all teams/groups in your program.

Chat directly with specific people within your team/group.

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MEDIA

Provide practices, games and other events for your team/group to see.

Organize files, images, and videos to share with your teams/groups.

Get started at sportsYou.com or in the app stores to learn more and join for free!

OCTOBER 2020 69

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PARTNERS IN TEXAS HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS

THSCA is proud to have MaxPreps as the “Official Source of Scores and Stats of the THSCA” automatically providing game results to power THSCA stat leaderboards, scoreboard, team rankings and various media publications. In addition to the MaxPreps partnership with the THSCA, MaxPreps is also the sponsor of Scores and Statistics to the UIL.

Texas coaches have a single platform for entering game results and stats. Manage your schedule, roster, scores & more with the free app, Teams by MaxPreps.

ADs and Coaches can directly contact MaxPreps’ UIL and THSCA Representative Joshua Taylor at jtaylor@maxpreps.com with any questions. 70

OCTOBER 2020

Profile for Sports In Action

Texas Coach Magazine - October 2020  

Texas Coach Magazine - October 2020