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The Maestro's

Grand Finale Spartanburg celebrates Sarah Ioannides


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Volume 68, SPRING 2017

http://spartanburgphilharmonic.org 200 East Saint John St. | Spartanburg, SC 29306

864.948.9020

C O N C E R T S

20 Immortal Beloved Saturday, Feb. 4

43 Blue Mountain Blend Friday, Mar. 31

29 Percussive Percolator Friday, Feb. 24

48 Grand Finale Saturday, Apr. 29

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SPO on the Square Spring Schedule

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Music Sandwiched In Spring Schedule

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Link Up Youth Concert

A R T I C L E S 4

A Letter from Sarah Ioannides Music Director

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Sarah Ioannides: Music Director by Steve Wong

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A Letter from Kathryn Boucher Executive Director

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Community Support New Developments for the SPO

6 About the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra

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Save the Date! Celebrating Sarah Ioannides

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Classical Conversations with Chris Vaneman

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A Musician's Perspective by Brennan Szafron

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Patron Spotlight: Mark & Cheryl Monson

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Thank You! Kurt & Nelly Zimmerli

19 Orchestra Members 2016-2017

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A Parent's Perspective by Gaile Camp

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The Art of Reed Making by Kelly Vaneman

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Volunteer Spotlight: Marsha Moore

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Patron Spotlight: Chris & Erin Strickland

62 Timeline to Our Next Conductor

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The Grand Conductor by Justin Schütrumpf

GRAPHIC DESIGN

CONTRIBUTING AUTHORS

Dr. Peter B. Kay

Gaile Camp Louise Fagan Dr. Justin Schütrumpf Brennan Szafron

PHOTOGRAPHER

Jimmy Gibson

©

2016 Music Foundation of Spartanburg. All Rights Reserved. No portion of these Programs may be reproduced in any form without expressed written permission of The Music Foundation of Spartanburg. All programs and artists subject to change. All performance times are approximate.

Dr. Joella Utley Dr. Kelly Vaneman Steve Wong

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a letter from Sarah Ioannides Music Director Dear Spartanburg family, I have been so immensely proud of the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra’s progress and output during my time on the podium. The last 12 years in Spartanburg have been one of the happiest periods of my life. I will cherish the friendships and carry with me always the bonds that were formed with the orchestra and its community. We have grown immensely during this time, both as an organization and an orchestra. The new developments in our community and education programs are perhaps the single most important gift we have been able to offer. Any non-profit arts organization has to continually fight hard to be recognized, valued, and sustained. It is no wonder that our orchestra has had such an incredibly rich history and a wonderful output the last 68 years. It is due to the immense hard work and great generosity of so many that have held this organization together, when at times many orchestras across the country have had to close their doors through insufficient funding. The flexibility of our musicians and staff, the creative thinking of the board and leaders, and the support of the Spartanburg community has shown that there is great pride in the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. I believe it is a wonderful jewel that the community must hold on to, and I have felt that it has indeed been treasured the last 12 years by you.

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I have appreciated every member of our audience who has taken this journey with me, supported and attended so many concerts. It is hard to relive those experiences in full, but we can look back at those memories thanks to the wonderful radio recordings and videos that we were able to archive and share on the orchestra's online YouTube channel. I hope to be able to share many more of these over the next months as we make more of them available to the public and share the “Best of the SPO with Sarah�! But from me to you - I thank you for your support, your love of music and this orchestra. I believe there are great opportunities ahead for the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra, and I will be there cheering you and the next Music Director on all the way! With fond wishes,

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Sept. 10, 2005

Tchaikovsky, Violin Concerto in D guest artist, Cho-Liang Lin Holst, The Planets featuring the Converse Chorale, Voices of the Upstate, and Wofford & USCU choruses

Nov. 19, 2005

J. C. Bach, Sinfonia, op. 18 R. Strauss, Horn Concerto no. 1 guest artist, Dale Clevenger Mahler, Totenfeier Hermann, Marnie film score suite


a letter from Kathryn H. Boucher Executive Director

Dear Friends of SPO, Many of you have known Sarah since she arrived in Spartanburg in 2005. However, I met Sarah in the fall of 2013 on a cold, rainy afternoon when we enjoyed lunch at Lime Leaf in downtown Spartanburg. Her magnetic personality drew me right in and we became fast friends. We had many things in common between our children, who are close in age, to our shared love of the growth of the arts in Spartanburg. Her passion for classical music was infectious and I was eager to work alongside this inspirational leader. Sarah’s charming character has led her to befriend numerous students, teachers, musicians, artists, donors, and leaders throughout the Spartanburg community. She is generous with her time and willing to help connect people and organizations in an effort to grow and sustain the arts throughout Spartanburg. I am grateful

Sarah has led the SPO through a period of significant artistic growth and increased community engagement. During her time with the orchestra, she has brought diverse, exciting, and innovative programs to Spartanburg, collaborating with world-renowned composers and guest artists. Sarah’s talent has brought the orchestra to a heightened level of success and the SPO has reached national acclaim under her baton. This spring Spartanburg has the unique opportunity to celebrate and say goodbye to Sarah during her final two concerts in

Spartanburg. I hope you will join me and enjoy the shared experience that music so powerfully delivers.

Kathryn H. Boucher EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

I have enjoyed and valued my friendship with Sarah enormously. She is a loyal and trusted friend, and I will miss her. - Sarah Johnson

Jan. 14, 2006

Britten, Four Sea Interludes Debussy, La Mer Tan Dun, Water Percussion Concerto guest artist, David Cossin

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for her friendship and guidance as I have made my way into the performing arts sector. She has made a tremendous impact on my life and I know that many of you share similar stories of your time with Sarah.

Feb. 4, 2006

C o n certm a ster

Shostakovich, Festival Overture Tchaikovsky, Piano Concerto no. 1 guest artist, Olga Kern Prokofiev, Symphony no. 5

Mar. 24, 2006

Orff, Carmina Burana with Converse Opera Theatre and Ballet Spartanburg

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The mission of the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra is to enrich, inspire and educate the Spartanburg community through live performances of high quality music.

BOARD of DIRECTORS OFFICERS:

President Past President President Elect

Rachel Deems Ray Dunleavy Laura Allen Sullivan

Treasurer Secretary

Dr. Thomas Moore Francie Little

DIRECTORS:

Karen Bjelland Lindsey Graham Rosalyn Henderson Myers Ben Burke Howell

Robyn Hussa Farrell Max Hyde Dr. Melinda Moretz Dr. Terry Pruitt

Dr. Justin Schutrumpf Donna Simpson Jeff Tillerson

LIFETIME DIRECTORS:

Dr. J. Sidney Fulmer

Dr. Joella Utley

The Music Foundation of Spartanburg Chartered in 1949 - but with roots dating back to 1885 - the Music Foundation of Spartanburg serves as the presenting organization for the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. The Music Foundation presents over 30 events annually, reaching over 15,000 people in the Spartanburg community and surrounding counties.

STAFF Kathryn Boucher Peter B. Kay

Executive Director Director of Marketing & Operations, Personnel Manager, and Composer in Residence

Louise Fagan Robert Borden

Advancement Director Orchestra Librarian

Second Season May 5, 2006 Pops at the Park!

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Sept. 30, 2006

Goodyear, Caribbeana Ravel, Piano Concerto in G guest artist, Stewart Goodyear Rimsky-Korsakov, Scheherazade


Bestishes W

For Individual Tickets: Twichell Auditorium

864.596.9724

to the Spartanburg Philharmonic for the 2016-2017 season!

Frcie Lile

R E A LTO R

Chapman Cultural Center

864.542.2787

All tickets are also available online through the SPO website.

http://spartanburgphilharmonic.org

864.948.9020

Music Foundation of Spartanburg 200 East Saint John St. Spartanburg, SC 29306

3 4 0 E A S T MA I N S T. S PA R TA N B U R G , S C 29302

864.580.8448

flittle@cbcaine.com R E A L E S TAT E

Lawson Academy of the Arts Celebrating the Arts for 72 Years

These programs are funded in part by The Arts Partnership of Greater Spartanburg, its donors, the County and City of Spartanburg and the South Carolina Arts Commission which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation of SC.

Oct. 28, 2006

Pärt, Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten Schumann, Concerto for Violoncello, op. 129 soloist, Kenneth Law Stravinsky, Pulcinella suite

Learn more! Converse.edu/LawsonAcademy New! International Dance Offerings Individual and Group Lessons in Voice and Instruments HearHERE The Childbloom® Guitar Progam and Musikgarten Classes

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CORPORATE & FOUNDATION PARTNERS The Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra presents a unique opportunity to do business. Our concerts and events provide invaluable exposure to prospective and current clients, educate the public about your business initiatives, offer networking opportunities with clients, and provide benefits for your employees. In turn, by supporting SPO you ensure Spartanburg remains a vibrant cultural community which research has proven is instrumental in attracting and retaining top business professionals. When arts and businesses partner, everyone profits! For full details on our Corporate Partnership packages, contact: Louise Fagan, Advancement Director lfagan@spartanarts.org P R I N C I P A L

P A R T N E R S

F O U N D A T I O N

“We are delighted to stand beside SPO and encourage you to do the same!”

– Allen C. Smith, President/CEO Spartanburg Chamber of Commerce

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S U P P O R T I N G

P A R T N E R S

Media Sponsor:

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SPO LEGACY SOCIETY The JERRIE LUCKTENBERG CONCERTMASTER CHAIR ENDOWMENT

Dr. Jerrie Lucktenberg - former Concertmaster of the Greater Spartanburg Philharmonic, artist, pedagogue, and author - retired from her position during The Music Foundation’s 2002-2003 season. To help ensure the presentation of Spartanburg’s professional orchestra in our community, Dr. Lucktenberg made a generous gift of $50,000 towards the endowment of the Concertmaster Chair. With your help, The Music Foundation has matched this gift, fully endowing the chair as the Jerrie Lucktenberg Concertmaster Chair. We hope you will be inspired to follow Dr. Lucktenberg’s generous lead.

The JOE ROY UTLEY LEGACY SOCIETY We have created the Joe Roy Utley Legacy Society to provide a fund through which friends can make bequests in a number of different ways. The easiest method is an instruction in a Will to leave a specific dollar amount to The Music Foundation of Spartanburg. It is a simple matter to add a codicil to an existing Will, giving the direction to make a gift from your estate to the Society. Gifts may also be made by giving appreciated securities or other assets, by way of charitable trust, through gift of life insurance, or by gifts of retirement account assets.

The HENRY JANIEC SOCIETY The Henry Janiec Society was established in 2001 to honor the distinguished Dr. Henry Janiec - conductor, educator, and pianist. Dr. Janiec conducted the Spartanburg Symphony Orchestra from 1952 to 1995 and served as Dean of the Converse College School of Music from 1967 to 1994. He also served as Director of the Brevard Music Center from 1964 to 1996. Members of the Henry Janiec Society have established permanently endowed chairs in the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra with a gift of $25,000 or more. These chairs and funds help guarantee the future of the Philharmonic.

For information about supporting a SPO Legacy Society Fund, contact Kathryn Boucher, Executive Director: kboucher@spartanarts.org | 864-948-9020

Nov. 4, 2006

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Borodin, Prince Igor: Polovtsian Dances featuring the Spartanburg Festival Chorus Bruch, Violin Concerto no. 1 guest artist, Tatiana Berman Stravinsky, The Firebird suite Dukas, The Sorcerer's Apprentice

Feb. 10, 2007

Nielson, Aladdin suite (selections) Piazzola, Aconcagua Concerto guest artist, James Crabb Bartok, Concerto for Orchestra


SUSTAINING PLEDGE DONORS

Our Sustaining Pledge Donors represent a special group of Spartanburg and Upstate residents who understand the 3 year evolution of our Orchestra and recognize the importance of sustained funding. A commitment to give a pledged amount each year has a tremendous impact on our Orchestra as we head into a new era of music for our community.

Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Baker Mrs. Susan H. Baker Dr. & Mrs. James E Bradof Mrs. Donna Cart Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Cogan Mr. & Mrs. Ray Dunleavy Tim Farrell & Robyn Hussa Farrell Dr. Karen Czuba Gibson & Mr. Jimmy Gibson Mr. & Mrs. Roger Habisreutinger Dr. Lois Hesser & Mr. John Rungo Dr. Leslie Howard, Jr Mr. Ben Burke Howell

Mar. 17, 2007

Sibelius, En Saga N. Rota, Trombone Concerto guest artist, Scott Hartman A. Ioannides, Two Finnish Impressions guest conductor, Ayes Ioannides Respighi, Pines of Rome

Mrs. Joseph W. Hudson Dr. Wilton Kanode Dr. & Mrs. Louis Knoepp, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Michael Kohler, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Lindsay Little Mr. E.T. McLean Mr. & Mrs. Don Miles Mr. & Mrs. Joe Molfenter Mr. & Mrs. John R. Murphy Dr. Joella Utley Mr. & Mrs. Peter Ellis Weisman Mr. & Mrs. Kurt Zimmerli In Memory of W. Gordon Rodgers, Jr, M.D.

May 19, 2007

Pops at the Park! guest artist, Tim Shew

Third Season Spartanburg

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SYMPHONY LEGACY FUND

We gratefully acknowledge the following donors who made generous commitments to the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. This list reflects gifts received July 2015 through Dec 2016.

B E N E F A C T O R

&

M A E S T R O

$ 1 5 , 0 0 0 +

The Alfred Moore Foundation Mr. & Mrs. William Barnet Mr. & Mrs. James Hudgens Mr. & Mrs. George Dean Johnson Dr. Joella Utley Mr. & Mrs. Kurt Zimmerli P O D I U M

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V I R T U O S O

$ 5 , 0 0 0 - $ 9 , 9 9 9

The Arkwright Foundation Anonymous Dr. Karen Czuba Gibson & Mr. Jimmy Gibson B A T O N

$ 2 , 5 0 0 - $ 4 , 9 9 9

Mr. & Mrs. Ken Deems Mr. & Mrs. Ray Dunleavy Mr. & Mrs. Roger Habisreutinger

F E L L O W

M U S I C I A N S

Dr. & Mrs. Mitchell Hurst Allen Mr. W. D. Bain, Jr. Ms. Karen E. Bjelland Kathryn & Jeff Boucher Dr. & Mrs. Ernest Camp III Mr. & Mrs. Allen Daryl Doyle P A T R O N

Mr. Jim Pangel Mr. & Mrs. Geoffrey Wilson

$ 5 0 0 - $ 9 9 9

Dr. & Mrs. J. Sidney Fulmer Mr. & Mrs. Dean Gaskins Mr. & Mrs. William U. Gunn Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Hyatt Ms. Wallace Eppes Johnson Ms. Ann Karegeannes

Mr. & Mrs. Art McQueen Dr. & Mrs. Mark Monson Dr. Terry O. Pruitt Mr. & Mrs. Peter Sereque

Ms. Rosalyn Henderson Myers Ms. Joann Hoffmeyer Mr. & Mrs. Max Jent Ms. Sarah Johnson Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Johnson Mr. & Mrs. Stewart H. Johnson Mr. & Mrs. Glenn McComas Mr. John N. McNamara Mr. & Mrs. Fritz Mezger Mr. & Mrs. Boyce Miller Mr. & Mrs. Robert Mitchell Ms. Bonnie H. Monson Mr. & Mrs. Charles Morgan Mr. & Mrs. Walter Oates Mr. & Mrs. Dwight F. Patterson, Jr.

Ms. Nancy Rainey Crowley Dr. & Mrs. Nayef H. Samhat Mr. & Mrs. Mortimer R. Sams, III Mr. & Mrs. Mark Simpson Mr. & Mrs. John Supra Mr. Arnold Tuttle Mr. & Mrs. Gregory Wade Mrs. Ted Wagner Mr. & Mrs. William Walsh Mr. & Mrs. Paul D. Weaver Ms. Ruth Cate & Mr. Chuck White Ms. Penny Wright Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Wynn, III

$ 1 5 0 - $ 4 9 9

Mr. & Mrs. Charles Baxter Mr. Robert Borden Mr. & Mrs. Ken Boucher Dr. John M. Bullard Dr. John Burchfield Dr. & Mrs. William W. Burns Mr. & Mrs. Paul Cote Mr. & Mrs. Rich Dent, Jr. Tim Farrell & Robyn Hussa Farrell Dr. & Mrs. Charles M. Fogarty Dr. & Dr. Cedric Gibb Mr. Gerald Ginocchio Mr. & Mrs. Richard Goldman Mr. & Mrs. Chad Graham Mr. & Mrs. Max Hyde 12 HearHERE


SYMPHONY LEGACY FUND

We gratefully acknowledge the following donors who made generous commitments to the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. This list reflects gifts received July 2015 through Dec 2016.

P R I N C I P A L

Ms. Laura Allen & Mr. Roger Sullivan Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Baker Mrs. Susan H. Baker Dr. Barry Bodie & Ms. Laurel D. Johnson Dr. & Mrs. James E. Bradof Mrs. Donna R. Cart Mrs. Elizabeth S. Chapman Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Cogan Mr. & Mrs. Jerome R. Cogdell Mr. & Mrs. Dick Crenshaw Mrs. Betty Dunleavy Mr. & Mrs. David Ellis Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Flynn, Jr. Ms. Joan B. Gibson Ms. Laura Henthorn Dr. Lois Ann Hesser & Mr. John Rungo Dr. & Mrs. David A. Holt Dr. Leslie W. Howard, Jr. Mr. Ben Burke Howell Mrs. Joseph W. Hudson

M E M B E R

$ 1 , 0 0 0 - $ 2 , 4 9 9

Dr. Wilton Kanode Dr. & Mrs. Louis Knoepp, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Michael Kohler, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Paul Lehner Mr. & Mrs. Lindsay Little Mr. E.T. McLean Mr. & Mrs. Don Miles Mr. & Mrs. Joe Molfenter Dr. & Mrs. Tom Moore Dr. Melinda Moretz The Carlos Moseley Trust Mr. & Mrs. John R. Murphy Lib & Rick Orr Ms. Thelma A. Powell Mr. & Mrs. S. Reel Robertson In Memory of W. Gordon Rodgers, Jr. M.D. Mr. & Mrs. Joseph B. Traywick, II Mr. & Mrs. Donald Wildman Mr. & Mrs. Peter Ellis Weisman Mr. William Wilkinson & Mr. Robert K. Bellinger

$ 5 0 - $ 1 4 9

Ms. Phyllis Abele Mr. & Mrs. Tom C. Atwood Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Babb Ms. Eileen Baird Ms. Barbara Barnes Ms. Cissy Barnes Mr. & Mrs. Tom Barnet Mrs. Marjorie Boafo-Appiah Mr. & Mrs. Markus Bollinger Ms. DiAndra Brooks Mr. John Bucher Ms. Rosalind Buda Mr. & Mrs. Paul W. Butler Mr. & Mrs. Brendan Buttimer Ms. Alyson Campbell Mr. & Mrs. John Claggett Ms. Marilyn A. Child Mr. Jay Coffman Mrs. Louise B. Connell Mr. William Cooper Mr. Paul Corden

Mr. & Mrs. Joe Correll Mr. & Mrs. Gardner G. Courson Mr. William Cribb Mr. & Mrs. George Dunn Ms. Susan Ebert Ms. Louise Fagan Mr. & Mrs. Brent Fenderson Ms. Jean Fortune Mr. & Mrs. Steve Fowler Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Garrett Mr. & Mrs. Dean Garritson Ms. Angela Geter Mr. & Mrs. David L. Gowing Ms. M. Donna Gray Dr. & Mrs. Robert J. Haas Mr. & Mrs. Jay R. Harding Mr. & Mrs. Marvin Hevener Mrs. Lucy Hummers Mr. Karl Allison Johnson Dr. Peter B. Kay Mr. Charles Kendrick, II

Dr. & Mrs. Larry Kibler Ms. Jennifer King Mr. & Mrs. George Loudon, Jr. Ms. Florine Lyles Ms. Brenda Lytle Dr. Louis Martin & Dr. Alva Pack Mr. Thorne Martin Mr. Gaines H. Mason, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Hearon McCravy Mr. & Mrs. Boyce Miller Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Miller, Jr. Ms. Bonnie-Lee Mizzell Mr. & Mrs. Wilton P. Myers Ms. Jean B. Nelson Ms. Pamela Nienhuis Mr. & Mrs. Ronald O'Neill Ms. Becky Pennell Ms. Diane Pickens Ms. Tomeka Pierce Ms. April Preston Mr. Wilbur H. Reames, Jr.

Mr. & Mrs. John A. Schwartz Mrs. Macrina Scott Dr. & Mrs. Bertram Sippola The Sherard Family Mr. & Mrs. Chris Strickland Mr. Brennan Szafron Mr. & Mrs. David E. Tate Mr. Akira Terawaki Mrs. Martha I. Tiller Mr. Jeffrey Tillerson Ms. Mary Tolstedt Mrs. Helen Trevathan Mr. & Mrs. Marshall T. Walsh Dr. & Mrs. Douglas Weeks Dr. & Mrs. Clyde Wells Ms. Linda West Ms. Elizabeth Wise Ms. Elizabeth C. York Mr. Steven Zides Mr. Daniel Zongrone

For information about how you can support the SPO Legacy Fund, contact Louise Fagan, Advancement Director: lfagan@spartanarts.org | 864-948-9020 HearHERE

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Sept. 8, 2007

Beethoven, Piano Concerto no. 5 "Emperor" guest artist, Andreas Boyde Shostakovich, Symphony no. 5

Oct. 11, 2007

Monsterworks! featuring Tony di Lorenzo, Dracula Suite with guest ensemble, Proteus 7

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MUSIC is the

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Sarah’s time in Spartanburg has been marked by concerts filled with interesting and engaging repertoire! It is not many regional orchestras that can point to performances of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, or concerts with guest artists such as Evelyn Glennie, Jens Lindemann, and Pepe Romero! The Spartanburg Philharmonic

Rossini, Overture to La Gazza Ladra Haydn, Trumpet Concerto guest artist, Lukas Beno Ioannides Beethoven, Symphony no. 6 "Pastoral"

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Jan. 19, 2008

F. Mendelssohn, Overture in C Weir, Musicians Wrestle Everywhere Tanaka, Frozen Horizon Berio, Folk Songs guest artist, Elizabeth Keusch


Classical Conversations

with host Dr. Chris Vaneman

Join us before each concert at Twichell for an insightful and entertaining talk about the evening's program. Lawson Academy Recital Hall backstage at Twichell Auditorium

6:15 - 6:45pm | Feb. 4 & Apr. 29 hris Vaneman is Head of Converse ...College's Petrie School of Music and Associate Professor of Flute. As flutist of the chamber groups Echo and Ensemble Radieuse, he has played on four continents and all over the country, and premiered dozens of new pieces and original arrangements. He holds three degrees, among them a doctorate, from Yale, as well as a bachelor's from Eastman; and spent a year as a Belgian-American Educational Foundation scholar in

Brussels. He has written program notes and CD liner notes for artists around the country (the Tokyo Quartet used his notes for its cycle of the Beethoven Quartets at Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center) and has spoken at national conferences of the College Music Society. He sings bass in the Episcopal Church of the Advent's Schola Cantorum. His wife Kelly teaches

oboe and musicology at Converse; his daughter Tally and dog Biscuit teach nothing there.

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is a stronger community of musicians because of Sarah’s input and direction over these past several years. Pushing the orchestra to perform at its very best was where Sarah excelled, and I will miss her passion! P.S. The trombone section really liked it when she let her husband "tag along" to her concerts!

- Mark Britt

Pri n ci pa l Tr o m b o n e

Feb. 9, 2008

Beethoven, Violin Concerto guest artist, Vadim Gluzman Sibelius, Symphony no. 1

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PAT R O N

S P OTL I G HT

Mark & Cheryl Monson

Active in many aspects of community life, Mark and Cheryl share a passion for learning. Mark, a retired physician, now instructs at Wofford College as part of the Lifelong Learning program. Cheryl, a nurse is working on her Master’s Degree. Both serve on the Board of Directors for Friends of the Library, for which Cheryl is the President.

We don't remember the exact year when we started attending but we became season ticket subscribers in 1998 – nearly 20 years ago! Initially, we attended to hear live orchestral music that was well performed. Now the entire evening is something we look forward to: the chance to dress more formally, the time to see friends, and an occasion to eat out either before or after the concert. It has become a "date night" with class. When we married, we were combining two households so did not need traditional wedding gifts. Knowing that people might still want to express their good wishes we decided that we would rather have them support organizations we felt strongly about and suggested they make donations to either the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra or the Humane Society. SPO has given so much to us and the community, it was our personal way of saying ‘thanks’. Our best advice to our neighbors who have not yet experienced this community treasure, is that truly you do not know what you are missing until you go. In these fast-paced times this world can be consumed by TV, computers, and cell phones. The SPO offers a chance to break from the everyday, refreshing the mind and spirit. The chance to see quality music played live is uplifting in every way.

Fourth Season Apr. 19, 2008

Brahms, German Requiem guest ensemble, Spartanburg Festival Chorus with soloists, Leigha Pace and Stafford Turner

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May 10, 2008

Pops at the Park! guest artist, Tim Shew and the Palmetto Youth Chorus

Spartanburg

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Sarah Ioannides, Music Director


The

Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra Orchestra Members & Chair Sponsors as of August 2016

Violin I

Bass

Sarah Johnson, Co-Concertmaster Mr. & Mrs. George Dean Johnson Joanna Lebo, Co-Concertmaster Mrs. Donna R. Cart Robin Els Ms. Joan B. Gibson Allison Chetta Ms. Thelma A. Powell Adam Kapfhammer Mr. & Mrs. Ken Deems Sharon Kerr-Lawrence John Malloy Tania Moldovan

Ian Bracchitta, Principal Mr. & Mrs. Jerry Cogan Tim Easter, Assistant Principal Mr. & Mrs. Joseph B. Traywick, II J. Bret Alford Mrs. Betty Dunleavy Jeff Stinson Matthew Waid

Brian Roberts, Principal Dr. and Mrs. James E. Bradof in honor of Dr. Joella F. Utley Dan Kirsop, Associate Principal Mr. & Mrs. John R. Murphy Kenneth Frick Mr. & Mrs. Dick Crenshaw Bruce Cox

Flute & Piccolo Rhea Jacobus, Principal Mr. & Mrs. Joe Molfenter

Trombone Mark Britt, Principal Mr. Ben Burke Howell

Violin II

Tracy Ensley, Principal Mr. & Mrs. Ken Deems Sara Beam, Assistant Principal Mr. & Mrs. Geoffrey Wilson Ann Buttimer Laura Allen & Roger Sullivan Theresa Jenkins-Russ Jessica Martin Dr. & Mrs. David A. Holt Doug Merritt March Moody Michele Tate Mr. E.T. McLean in memory of John Turnbull Emily Wait Rachelle Whitcomb

Caroline Ulrich Mrs. Susan H. Baker Jessica Sherer Mr. & Mrs. Jerome R. Cogdell Oboe & English Horn Ginny Metzger, Principal Mr. & Mrs. Roger Habisreutinger Kelly Vaneman, Associate Principal

Cello

Brenda Leonard, Principal Mr. & Mrs. Stanley Baker Kathy Foster, Assistant Principal Dr. Wilton Kanode Christine Lee Lib & Rick Orr Kevin Leiferman Seth Russell Eric Scheider Benjamin Smith

Rienette Davis Ms. Laura Henthorn Eric Henson Dr. Barry Bodie & Ms. Laurel D. Johnson Tuba

John Holloway, Principal Mr. & Mrs. Don Miles

Mr. William Wilkinson & Mr. Robert K. Bellinger Mary AllyeB Purtle, Principal Eng Hn Mr. & Mrs. David Ellis

Timpani

Clarinet

Percussion

Karen Hill, Principal Dr. & Mrs. Louis Knoepp, Jr. Harry Hill, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. James Hudgens

Viola

Caleb Cox, Principal Endowed by friends and family in honor of Wallace Eppes Johnson Travis Baird, Assistant Principal Mr. & Mrs. Ray Dunleavy Diana Maley Berti Mrs. Elizabeth S. Chapman Chin-Wei Chang John Conklin Katy Martin

Trumpet

Bassoon

Frank Watson, Principal Dr. Lois Ann Hesser and Mr. John Rungo Rosalind Buda Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence Flynn, Jr. Stephanie Lipka Rhyne Horn

Anneka Zuehlke-King, Principal Mr. Jim Pangel Christopher George Mr. & Mrs. Peter Ellis Weisman Andrew Merideth, Assistant Principal Dr. & Mrs. Tom Moore Christina Cornell Jeanette Schlimgen

Patrick Lowery, Principal Mr. & Mrs. J. Michael Kohler, Jr.

Adena McDaniel, Co-Principal Mrs. Joseph Hudson Matt McDaniel, Co-Principal Dr. Leslie W. Howard, Jr Del Burton Dr. Karen Czuba Gibson & Mr. Jimmy Gibson Harp

Emily Waggoner, Principal Mr. & Mrs. Lindsay Little Piano & Organ

Kuo-Pei Cheng-Lin, Principal The Arkwright Foundation Brennan Szafron, Principal In Memory of W. Gordon Rodgers, Jr. M.D.

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FEB

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@7:00 C L A S S I C A L C O N V E R S AT I O N S 6:15-6:45pm

with host

CHRIS VANEMAN

S p a r ta n b u r g

P h i l h a r m o n i c

I M M O RTA L

O r c h e s t r a

BE L O V E D

TWICHELL AUDITORIUM

maestro SARAH IOANNIDES conducts with soloists GINNY METZGER, oboe KAREN HILL, clarinet ANNEKA ZUEHLKE-KING, horn and FRANK WATSON, bassoon and featuring the SPARTANBURG SINGS chorus

Pavane, op. 50 Sinfonia concertante in E f Major, K.297b I. Allegro II. Adagio III. Andante con variazioni

Gabriel Fauré 7 min

Wolfgang A. Mozart 28 min

Intermission Symphony no. 8 in F, op. 93 I. Allegro vivace e con brio II. Allegretto scherzando III. Tempo di menuetto IV. Allegro vivace 20

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Ludwig van Beethoven 26 min

Programs Subject to Change Timings are Approximate


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he music of French composer Gabriel ..Fauré has been described as linking the end of the Romantic period with the modern music of the early 20th century. He began his musical career as a church organist and choirmaster in Paris. In later life he became the Director of the Paris Conservatoire. Among his teachers and friends were Camille Saint-Saëns and Maurice Ravel, who encouraged his work in composition, something he loved to do but had little time to accomplish.

Perhaps it was his great gift for melody that led Fauré to compose Pavane in 1886. Originally intended for orchestra alone, he went on to score it for voices and later, when it made its way to the stage in 1919, he included dance. Fauré also made a piano arrangement in 1889. Fauré’s example with this style later inspired his younger associates including

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onsiderable mystery and intrigue ...surround Mozart’s woodwind quartet, K. 297b. Scholars place the date of this composition in 1778 at a time when the young composer was traveling Europe, seeking new employment. He stopped in Mannheim Germany, which had one of the finest orchestras in Europe. The principal woodwind players of the Mannheim Orchestra, (flute, oboe and bassoon) were soon to travel to Paris and perform with a famous horn player in that city. Mozart wrote to his father that he was composing a concertante for the group of four players, which was to be performed on April 12, 1778. The score was sent to copyists but this original music was apparently lost (set aside?). In its place on the April concert in Paris was a work similar to what Mozart had written, with the composer listed as Giuseppe Cambini. Mozart and Cambini were musical rivals and some believed Cambini stole Mozart’s original work because of an “offence” Cambini experienced. Mozart had been able to

Program Notes

Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel to write in this form. The pavane is a stately dance of the Renaissance era, which originated in Italy. Its rhythm comes from the slow processional Spanish court dance of the same name where the melody ebbs and flows with great elegance. It is often heard in wedding processionals and formal affairs. Fauré’s Pavane remains one of his most popular works. This dreamy atmospheric piece features pizzicato strings with melodies by flute and the supporting the instruments of oboes, clarinets bassoons and horns. Robert de Montesquiou, a cousin of Fauré’s patroness Elizabeth Countess Greffulhe, wrote the lyrics. The work, along with chorus, was first performed at a garden party held by the Countess at her country home at Bois-Boudran.

Pavane Gabriel Fauré (1845-1924)

quote some of Cambini’s music from memory showing off his superior skills. In 1870 a score for this woodwind quartet was found. However this version substituted the clarinet for the flute, which was used in the original version. It was published in 1886 but authenticity could not be confirmed. Even today scholars continue to disagree. The 1982 New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians postulates that the solo parts are original while the orchestral parts were added later. The Sinfonia Concertante was a popular form of composition in Mozart’s day. It resembled a concerto, with the soloist’s part performed by a combo of two or more instrumentalists. This three- movement work is in the key of E-flat major throughout. The themes are passed between orchestra and quartet in the Allegro and Adagio. The final Andante con variazioni contains a theme with ten variations on a folk theme, ending with a coda.

Sinfonia Concertante in E f Major, K. 297b

W. A. Mozart (1756-1791)

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Feb. 4

Program Notes

Symphony no. 8 Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)

Spartanburg Sings Guest Ensemble

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ritten in the middle years of Beethoven's creative life, the Eighth Symphony differs from other works of this "Heroic" period by returning to the classical style. He wrote the Seventh and Eighth Symphonies almost back-to-back in 1811-1812. While the Seventh shows the composer reaching for new horizons with rhythm and power, the Eighth has an entirely different character, going back to the style reminiscent of Haydn and Mozart. It is said that the Eight suffers something of a “Cinderella Complex” as it fits between the powerful Seventh and Ninth Symphonies. Yet this penultimate symphony is not a step backwards, musically or technically. This relatively small-scale work, a jewel of eighteenth century grace, is important because of the balance achieved between form and content. Robert Schuman spoke of the Eighth as "profound humor" containing elements of "tranquility and happiness".

Beethoven also suffered traumatic episodes in his own romantic endeavors.

The Eight is recognized as light-hearted and humorous despite the fact that Beethoven’s life was troubled with many problems. His deafness was worsening and despite the composer’s strong objections, his brother Johann chose to marry a woman Beethoven felt unworthy.

The Eighth Symphony was first performed February 27, 1814 in Vienna. When Beethoven was told that it had been less favorably received than his Seventh he growled, "That's because it's so much better."

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partanburg Sings is an annual event ...developed by the Rotary Club of Spartanburg to bring students from all over the county to perform together on stage. Each year, outstanding young musicians are selected by either audition or appointment by their teachers. Dr. Terry Pruitt, Deputy Superintendent in Spartanburg School District 7 and Chairman of Spartanburg Sings said, “Spartanburg Sings, a county-wide

Sept. 6, 2008

Chausson, Poeme Ravel, Tzigane guest artist, Lara St. John Berlioz, Symphonie Fantastique

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Oct. 11, 2008

Last Night of the Proms! guest artist, Nigel Harvey

The first movement with its two melodic themes ends with a fairly long Coda. The second movement, Allegretto Scherzando, has been described as a musical joke, perhaps on his friend of the time, Johann Maelzel--inventor of the metronome. Beethoven spoke of this movement saying, "Ta,ta,ta the canon on Maelzel. It was a jolly evening when we sang that canon. Maelzel sang the bass and... I sang the soprano." Their friendship did not last. A lawsuit followed when Maelzel was found to be taking credit for some of Beethoven's contributions. The third movement, a symphonic minuet, is characteristic of his earlier years containing a lovely melody with power and rhythmic vigor. The final rondo movement bursts with force and ends in an atmosphere of robust gaiety.

~ Joella Utley

middle school honors chorus has become a tradition in our county and a signature program of the Spartanburg Rotary Club over the past seven years. Having the opportunity to partner and sing with the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra is a wonderful experience for our young musicians and is certainly a fitting tribute to the excellent choral programs and teaching in Spartanburg County public schools.”

Nov. 8, 2008

Haydn, Overture to La fedelta primiata Walton, Viola Concerto guest artist, Miles Hoffman Mendelssohn, Symphony no. 4 "Italian"


Feb. 4

Karen Hill Clarinet Frank Watson Bassoon Ginny Metzger Oboe Anneka Zuehlke-King Horn

Jan. 17, 2009

Saint-SaĂŤns, Piano Concerto no. 2 guest artist, George Li Beethoven, Symphony no. 7

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n active performer, Karen Hill is ...currently the Principal Clarinetist of the Spartanburg Philharmonic, Principal Second Clarinetist of the Asheville Symphony, member of the Arbor Wind Trio, and Lecturer, of Clarinet and Saxophone at Converse College. She has appeared as a soloist with the Spartanburg Philharmonic, Brevard Chamber Orchestra, Calgary Philharmonic, Music Academy of the West Festival Orchestra, the Converse Symphony Orchestra, and has been engaged

Mar. 28, 2009

Sibelius, Finlandia Elgar, Cello Concerto guest artist, Zuill Bailey Dvorak, Symphony no. 8

Program Notes

for orchestral and solo performances in over seven cities in China. In the past she also served as Principal Clarinetist with the Hendersonville Symphony, the Brevard Chamber Orchestra, and the French Broad River Woodwind Quintet. A freelance musician in the area for over 20 years, she also has performed with the Asheville Lyric Opera Company, Augusta Symphony Orchestra, Augusta Opera Company, Charleston Symphony, Charlotte Symphony, Greenville Symphony, North Carolina Symphony and the South Carolina Philharmonic.

Fifth Season Spartanburg

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Feb. 4

Program Notes

Guest Soloists

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rank Watson has long been a fixture ...in the music scene of Upstate South Carolina. A graduate of Furman University, Frank remained in the upstate and built a career as a Middle school Band Director (retiring in 2007 with 34 years’ experience) and a professional musician. Performances include 47 seasons with the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, over 20 seasons with the Spartanburg Philharmonic, and a wide range of local and touring acts ranging from Ringling Brothers Circus to Aretha Franklin and just about anything or anybody in between. Currently, Frank teaches at Converse College, is an active member of both the Arbor Woodwind Trio and the Converse Faculty Woodwind Quintet. An avid golfer, Frank was the 2002 Spartanburg County Senior Amateur Champion, and still aims to shoot his age for 18 holes in the near future.

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irginia Zeblisky Metzger, a native of ...Long Island, holds an M.A. degree from the City University of New York, Hunter College, and a B.F.A. degree from the State University of New York, Purchase College. Her most influential teachers include Ronald Roseman, Joseph Robinson, Joel Timm, and John Mack. Ginny has held the position of Principal Oboe with the Greenville Symphony Orchestra since 1985. In addition to her position with the GSO, she currently holds principal oboe positions with the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Hendersonville Symphony and the Greater Anderson Musical Arts Consortium. She previously

Sept. 12, 2009

Rachmaninoff, Piano Concerto no. 2 guest artist, Jie Chen Tchaikovsky, Symphony no. 2

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Oct. 11, 2009

W. A. Mozart Impressario Overture Flute & Harp Concerto, I. Clarinet Concerto, II. Bassoon Concerto, III. Symphony no. 41

held principal oboe positions with the Asheville Symphony and Brevard Chamber Orchestra, and has performed with many other regional orchestras, including the North Carolina Symphony, Charlotte Symphony, and Charleston Symphony. She has been featured as a soloist with various orchestras, including the Greenville Symphony Orchestra, Hendersonville Symphony, and Brevard Chamber Orchestra.

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nneka Zuehlke-King began her ....tenure with the Spartanburg Philharmonic in 2006. She joined after joining the Greenville Symphony, receiving her Masters of Music from the Yale School of Music, preceded by a Bachelor’s of Music from the Curtis Institute of Music. Her teachers include Sylvia Alimena of the National Symphony Orchestra, Myron Bloom from the Cleveland Orchestra, Jerome Ashby from the New York Philharmonic and William Purvis, of the New York Wind Quintet and Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. Over the years, Anneka has performed with many ensembles, including the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, Reading Symphony, Haddonfield Symphony, Connecticut Virtuosi Chamber Orchestra, Hartford Symphony, Augusta Symphony Orchestra, Charlotte Symphony, and the Charleston Symphony. In addition to being Principal Horn in Spartanburg, Anneka is also Principal horn of the Greenville Symphony Orchestra and Third horn of the Asheville Symphony. She is also the horn teacher at the Governor’s School, Furman University and Converse College.

Dec. 5, 2009

Handel, Messiah guest ensemble, Spartanburg Methodist Choir with soloists Leigha Pace and Stafford Turner Tchaikovsky, Nutcracker (selections) featuring Ballet Spartanburg Christmas Pops guest artists, Pure N' Heart & Daryle Rice


Spartanburg Music Trail Beginning in the spring of 2017, the SPO will be the proud new directors of the Spartanburg Music Trail. The Hub City Writers Project has shepherded the Music Trail for six years as an extension of a book it published, Hub City Music Makers by Peter Cooper. That book, released in 1997, highlighted the extraordinary number of musical artists from Spartanburg who have made a national or international impact in the world of music.

"We started the trail because this story needed a bigger platform," said Betsy Teter, Hub City's executive director. Eighteen musicians have been honored so far on the trail, representing gospel, rhythm and blues, country and folk, jazz, swing and classical music. "We are thrilled that the Music Trail has found its home with the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchesta, the musical heart of our community," Teter said.

https://spartanburgmusictrail.com

Jan. 30, 2010

Mendelssohn, Overture to A Midsummer Night's Dream Marianelli, Atonement suite guest artist, Dario Marianelli Brahms, Symphony no. 4

Feb. 20, 2010

Stravinsky, L'Histoire du soldat featuring Ballet Spartanburg and Spartanburg Little Theatre

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The Art of Reed Making Dr. Kelly Vaneman

Associate Principal Oboe

When my 7th grade band director asked if I’d like to play the oboe, it never crossed my mind I’d spend so much time whittling. You see, all professional double reeders— folks that play oboe, English horn, or bassoon—make our own reeds. The double reeds are two little slips of tiedtogether cane that we blow on to create sound, and we all make those reeds from scratch. About once a year, I’ll get a shipment that looks like a pound of fairly narrow bamboo sections—like fine wine, the best stuff comes from the south of France, though there’s some interesting stuff coming out of China these days. I take those lengths of cane and split them longwise with an instrument that looks like a three-pronged arrow and then cut them to the correct length with a very small guillotine. (Yes, it’s actually called a “guillotine.” Which is also from France. I sense a theme here…) And then I have a gouger, a machine with a curved blade that thins the cane to the appropriate thickness—about .6 millimeters thick.

I usually go through all of this over a few days in the summer on my porch. It’s the mass production phase of reed-making. Once the cane is the right dimensions, though, things get particular and personal. We fold the cane in half, shape its profile, tie it onto a tube that will connect it to the instrument, and start whittling… and whittling… and whittling… and whittling. Parts need to be thicker, parts need to be thinner, and mistakes have to be rectified. Once finished, reeds don’t last very long. The fibers get broken down by vibrations and saliva, so we’re making new reeds constantly. Also, they tend to change a good bit in response to changes of temperature, humidity, and altitude. Reeds are much like snowflakes in that no two are exactly alike—both because they’re made from organic material and because each player has a different mouth and set of lungs. Reeds can even differ by

repertoire! I look for more flexibility in a chamber or solo reed, while I look for more stability and power in an orchestral reed. So, if you show up on the early side to SPO concerts, look closely back at the oboe and bassoon sections. Often you’ll see us engaging in some last-minute whittling, trying to pick just the right reed and make it just a bit better before the downbeat. It turns out my 7th grade band director was right: all that whittling is worth it. You get to play beautiful music on something you made yourself and hear that bamboo come alive and sing!

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PAT R O N

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Chris & Erin Strickland

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“As a student in the Spartanburg District 7 orchestra program I attended a number of SPO events,” says Chris. “Then while studying at Wofford College, I played violin with SPO for a few seasons.” “Chris gets the credit for being the musician in the family, but for me the Espresso concerts are especially approachable” responds Erin. “We like that we can enjoy the happy hour before hand, listen to some wonderful music and then catch dinner out, too --- all without breaking the bank. It makes for a great evening!” Choose to spend a little time with SPO, your life will be richer for it!

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There are lots of options for arts and entertainment in and around Spartanburg - but SPO offers a unique musical experience that showcases both local and world-renowned talent in innovative and inspiring programs. Between the Classic Series, Music Sandwiched In and the Espresso Series, there really is something for everyone.

Sarah's innovative programming has brought a wonderful freshness to Spartanburg. I'll always appreciate the positives changes she has brought to our orchestra, and the role model she has been to all women. We'll miss her!

- Karen Hill

Pri n ci pa l Cl a ri n e t

Sixth Season Apr. 10, 2010

Bach, Suite no. 3 Mahler, Lieder Eines Fahrenden Gesellen guest artist, Becky Turner Agócs, By the Streams of Babylon guest artists, Becky Turner & Kati Agócs Wagner, Siegfried Idyll

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Sept. 18, 2010

Barber, music from Shelley Mendelssohn, Violin Concerto guest artist, Timothy Fain Bernstein, On the Waterfront Bernstein, West Side Story (selections)


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5:30pm 6:30pm

Happy-Hour Reception One-Hour Concert

C HA PMA N 200 EAST

C ULT UR A L

SAINT JOHN

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Featuring the full percussion section of the orchestra, this exciting program will amaze and delight with its thrumming rhythms and foot-tapping tunes. Special Thanks to concert sponsors the Marriot of Spartanburg and Hub City Tap House. Drinks are included with the price of admission, so start your Friday evening with a short shot of live, classical music.

Oct. 14, 2010

Mozart, Don Giovanni Overture C. Schumann, Piano Concerto guest artist, Katie Mahon Beethoven, Symphony no. 5

Dec. 4, 2010

An American Christmas! featuring, Ballet Spartanburg, First Presbyterian Choir, Fayssoux McLean, and Jena Alford

Special Thanks to Concert Sponsors: Karen Czuba Gibson & Jimmy Gibson

Jan. 22, 2011

Berry, The Search for Stephanie Thayn Overture Tchaikovsky, Rococo Variations guest artist, Sara Sant'Ambrogio Schumann, Symphony no. 2

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The Grand Conductor Dr. Justin SchĂźtrumpf NeuroStructural Chiropractor Precision Chiropractic

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f all the arts nothing quite has the ...power to evoke emotion like that of music. It is incredible how hearing a riff of our favorite song can perk up a dreary day, remind us of a loved one, or even the not so good moments. We all perceive certain things differently; we may interpret things at different stages of life The reason why music is so powerful is how it is interpreted by the body physiologically. Everything we experience from moment to moment is a stimulus that is received through the peripheral and/or central

...these actions are what take a compilation of notes and turn them into a sensory experience that elicits the feelings of joy, anxiety, or sadness.

nervous system and then processed by the brain. The way we hear music is by the sound waves traveling through the outer ear canal and causing the ear drum to vibrate, this in turn creates a mechanical action of the bones inside the ear known as the ossiciles. These small bones translate movement to the fluid in the middle ear, changing the mechanical input into an electrical impulse. This impulse is carried by the auditory nerves where it is interpreted by the brain and finally “heard�. To put it into context the brain is like the grand conductor of the body. Just as the brain commands the appropriate coordination of limbs while maintaining organ function and temperature regulation; so does the conductor direct the strings, brass, and percussion sections. The performance of the symphony is not dictated by the actions of the conductor or the chair cellist, it is the complete coordination and communication of all musicians involved to produce all of the individual sounds for a symphony. It is the role of the conductor to recognize the performance of all his players and

compensate as needed, controlling tempo and critical downbeat changes. All of these actions are what take a compilation of notes and turn them into a sensory experience that elicits the feelings of joy, anxiety, or sadness. At this point you are probably wondering who would make such a bold comparison from the arts to the human body. It is my job as a NeuroStructural Chiropractor to take something complex and make it relatable to people every day. All too often chiropractic is perceived as the act of crunching bones in the spine merely to alleviate pain, just as there are many genres of music so are the varying styles of chiropractors.

Seventh Season Mar. 26, 2011

Marianelli, Pride & Prejudice suite Marianelli, Atonement suite guest artist, Dario Marianelli Debussy, Clair de Lune Ravel, Le Tombeau de Couperin

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Sept. 11, 2011

9/11 Commemorative Concert Fuchs, Falling Man featuring James Maddalena, and the Spartanburg Festival Chorus & First Responders Choir


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Oct. 22, 2011

Haydn, Symphony no. 104 "London" Vivaldi, Piccolo Concerto guest artist, Mimi Stillman Borne, Fantaisie Brillante on Carmen Kodaly, Dances of Galanta

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Jan. 28, 2012

Horner, Titanic Medley Bach, Concerto for Two Violins featuring Sarah Johnson & Mary Irwin Sibelius, Symphony no. 2

Feb. 25, 2012

Mendelssohn, Midsummer Night's Dream Mozart, Sinfonia Concertante guest artists, Katherina Schwamm and Teresa Schwamm Poulenc, Sinfonietta

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Sarah Ioannides

Remembering Twelve Years as Music Director of the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra, 2005 - 2017

by Steve Wong

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hen Sarah Ioannides steps down from the podium ...after conducting her final performance at Twichell Auditorium, she will leave a lasting legacy of innovation and inspiration. As the 68th season of the symphony comes to a close, the Maestro will conclude her 12 years serving as Music Director of the SPO. Since 2005, when the orchestra officially changed its name from the Greater Spartanburg Philharmonic (GSP) to the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra (SPO), she has worked with the ensemble to offer creative and educational programs that engaged audience members, young and old. Her signature style of presenting wellknown masterpieces alongside new works of classical

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music helped the SPO to develop an impressive, distinct sound, emerging as one of the most highly esteemed orchestras in the region. The “Grand Finale” concert in April (see p.48) will be sure to delight listeners and fans of Sarah. On the program will be Debussy's Nocturnes, III. Sirènes, a hauntingly beautiful piece that features the Converse Chorale – the ensemble that took the stage with Sarah in her debut performance as Music Director in Spartanburg. The concert will conclude with the spectacular Symphony No. 3 (Organ Symphony) by Saint-Saëns, a piece that she holds dear to her heart. In 2004, Sarah auditioned to be the next Music Director of the SPO, conducting the Saint-Saëns with Brennan Szafron (see p.53) on the organ. The performance was a resounding success and Sarah was awarded the position.


“I’m sure it will be a bittersweet moment for Sarah, as well as for the musicians and the patrons. In many ways, it will be as if Sarah and the Orchestra have come full circle,” Kathryn Boucher, SPO’s Executive Director, said. “Sarah and I were friends before we became colleagues, so I am personally sad that I will not see her on a regular basis in Spartanburg. And yet, I am happy that she is taking a leap of faith for her career by leaving Spartanburg, to be open to other possibilities that may come. She is on a great trajectory, and I am excited to see where she lands!” Sarah’s current home base is in Connecticut, but she travels the world as a guest conductor and teacher. During her years with the SPO, she also served as Music Director in El Paso, TX and now Tacoma, WA. As a world-famous and jetsetting conductor — and one of the very few women in the world to hold the position of Music Director — Sarah has a bright future ahead of her. But as Spartanburg was her first professional conducting job back in 2005, the Hub City will always hold a special place in her heart. HearHERE

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“I will miss most the orchestra and especially performing in Twichell, which is one of the greatest concert halls I know,” she said. “I will, of course, miss seeing very many dear friends on a regular basis, but our relationships will be longstanding, and I certainly hope to be able to come back to visit the orchestra in the future, too. My instincts have guided me on this completely. It was a hard decision to make, but I always felt the time would come when I need to move on to the next phase of my career. With so many positive things in place with the orchestra, staff, and board, it is ripe for new leadership.”

"I will, of course, miss seeing very many dear friends on a regular basis, but our relationships will be longstanding" One of Sarah’s closest relationships — both personal and professional — has been with Concertmaster Sarah Johnson. “I have enjoyed and valued my friendship with her enormously,” Johnson said. “Sarah is a loyal and trusted friend, and I will miss her. When the going got tough — and it always does in every organization at some point — she and I could always have frank and candid conversations. At first, I think we were all a little intimidated by her and her fantastic skills and imagination. She challenged the orchestra to aspire to the highest levels of playing and in the most difficult and ambitious repertoire. She has a wonderful and a slightly sly sense of humor, which was greatly appreciated, especially in those moments of high drama.” During her tenure with the orchestra, Sarah conducted over 75 concerts, offering Spartanburg residents an opportunity to hear dozens of world-class guest artists and over a hundred classical masterworks. At the same time, her work with contemporary composers has expanded the repertoire for the symphony, developing the orchestral

Eighth Season Mar. 31, 2012

Tarrodi, Zephyros Liszt, Piano Concerto no. 1 guest artist, George Li Beethoven, Symphony no. 3 "Eroica"

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Sept. 8, 2012

Williams, Olympic Medley Barber, Toccata Festiva featuring Brennan Szafron Elgar, In the South Overture Britten, Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra


canon for future generations. Guest composers include internationally recognized artists Dario Marianelli, Kati Agócs, and Sean O'Boyle. In 2011, the SPO gave the premiere performance of Falling Man by Kenneth Fuchs — a piece that went on to receive national acclaim and was presented by The Julliard School and Steinway & Sons at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in 2016. Sarah’s inventive approach struck upon a formula that not only local concertgoers found engaging, but it placed Spartanburg on the world’s music map as a community that is grounded, innovative, and progressive. “There are many challenging things about being a Music Director as well as working for a non-profit organization — from how to continue to inspire

Nov. 10, 2012

Mozart, Magic Flute Overture Rossini, Theme & Variations Gershwin, Three Preludes guest artist, Anthony McGill Schubert, Symphony no. 8 "Unfinished" Borodin, Polovtsian Dances

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musicians to perform their best from the podium, to managing severe budget cuts in hard times, to finding new, creative, and exciting ways to develop our audiencebase within a limited marketing budget,” she said. “With the commitment that was already in place from many critical cornerstones, during my time I was fortunate to be able to foster growth in the artistic level of our output, develop and try new programs that reached into the community, seek and work with local artistic and educational partners, and bring further excellence to the stage of Twichell Auditorium and Barnet Park while also bringing great world-class soloists,” she recalled. In addition to her inspiring concerts that featured amazing guest artists such as deaf percussionist Dame Evelyn Glennie, trumpeter Jens Lindeman, and guitarist Pepe Romero, Sarah always had a passion for music education. She played a leading role in making a pilot project into a countrywide initiative that garnered widespread respect in both the education and music professions. Link Up (see p.58) is a music education program created by Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute that connects the classroom with the concert hall. Throughout the year, thousands of local students are provided many opportunities to explore music, including learning to play an instrument. At the end of the year, they attend a special concert at Twichell Auditorium and perform with SPO. “I have always had this interest, and I believe I would even without having my own children,” the mother of three said. “I come from a family whose thirst for knowledge is never-ending. Music is a great place to foster that because I believe firmly that music opens doors for people, and of course the earlier that starts, the better! What I love about the Link Up is that the concert is from the audience as well as from the stage, all participatory, fun, engaging and the way educating should be in my opinion.” Currently, the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra is engaged in a worldwide search for a new Music Director. “Sarah has been able to solidify so much about the organization in the past two years so that the next

Jan. 19, 2013

Tarrodi, Lucioles Brahms, Violin Concerto guest artist, Michael Ludwig Brahms, Symphony no. 2

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conductor will have something really good to work with, musically and administratively,” Johnson said. “I anticipate the next conductor will be thrilled with what he or she finds.” Adding to what will be expected of the next conductor, Boucher said, “I believe the next Music Director has very large shoes to fill. From the Board, to the staff, to the musicians, Sarah has been an instrumental guide in moving the SPO forward. The next Music Director will need to be as charming, passionate, and artistic to compare with Sarah.” Of all the many accomplishment that Sarah has made in Spartanburg, working toward the main goal -- the delivery of music -- has always been her focus. “I’ve tried to be a steadfast and reliable Music Director for the orchestra and always supportive of the talents within it. There has been much turnover in staff, which is natural with a highly demanding non-profit organization. Everyone I know who has been involved with the organization over the years has embraced the orchestra with great passion and a commitment to success, worked exceedingly hard, from board to staff members and of course, the musicians, too. I have tried to nurture all segments of our organization,

Feb. 14, 2013

Valentine's Day Pops! Gilliland, Dreaming of the Masters III guest artists, Jens Lindemann and the Spartanburg Jazz Ensemble

Legendary performance. It’s our goal too. We’re proud to support the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra and their commitment to enriching the community through entertainment and education.


all the while, trying to increase the artistic product and visibility of the orchestra onto a national level, and doing my best possible as a conductor to bring fantastic concerts to the stage.”

“Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra has great leadership, staff and musicians,” Sarah said, in looking both back and forward. “It has the capacity to do great things in the future, and to nurture the city’s underserved communities through rich music programs. Through teamwork and partnerships, and most of all, financial support, it can remain a high level performing organization of excellence, that can also touch the heart of the community with free and affordable performances that will continue to inspire hope, greatness and happiness in the community.” Bravo!

And now, Spartanburg’s music community is preparing for that final evening, that final performance, that final note, and that final bow from the woman who made music history. “A special committee has been working over the past few months to create an event during her final week in Spartanburg,” Boucher said. “Everything is still coming together but think ‘Motorcycles and Mozart’ to celebrate our SPO rock star!”

May 4, 2013

Rachmaninoff, Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini guest artist, Wael Farouk Stravinsky, The Rite of Spring featuring Ballet Spartanburg

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Sept. 28, 2013

Fuchs, Discover the Wild Beethoven, Piano Concerto no. 3 guest artist, Cyprien Katsaris Dvorak, Symphony no. 9 "New World"


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SEPTEMBER THEMED SHOW “Love Where You Live” OCTOBER THEMED SHOW Isabel Forbes NOVEMBER THEMED SHOW Members Show DECEMBER THEMED SHOW Karen White

OUR MISSION

WE ARE THE OLDEST GUILD IN SOUTH CAROLINA

To Cultivate, nurture, and grow the visual arts in our community by supporting Local Artists.

Become an Artist Member or a Patron at www. artistsguildofspartanburg.com

WHAT WE DO ANNUAL JURIED SHOW The Annual Juried Show offers a firstrate competition judged by a professional visual arts expert.

PROGRAMS Programs are held once a month, providing educational speakers, presentations by artists, and hands-on participation.

GUILD GALLERY The Guild Gallery provides a professional exhibiting space for members’ work. The gallery maintains a 12 month cycle.

OUTREACH The Guild’s outreach provides art and art education to the community by holding workshops, teaching in schools and in youth and senior centers, and exhibiting members’ work in business and community locations.

FOCUS ON YOUTH Focus on Youth is an annual exhibition and awards show for high school students from Spartanburg county, providing them the opportunity to exhibit in a professional setting.

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ArtistsGuildofSpartanburg.com

200 East Saint John Street

Spartanburg, SC 29306

864-764-9568

The Maestra has made a significant impact on my life and the artistic life of the Spartanburg community. As a long-time member of the orchestra, I was there from the beginning. At the very first rehearsal, Sarah made it clear to the orchestra that we need to come to rehearsals fully prepared and ready to work on ensemble and musicianship not “woodshed” our parts. The expectation of advance preparation has had the effect of upgrading the quality of the orchestra. As a result of her disciplined approach, the orchestra sounds better than ever. In addition, the reputation of the ensemble has grown and is considered amongst

Nov. 24, 2013

Bach, Brandenburg no. 3 Britten, Serenade guest artist, Wayne Hobbs & Anneka Zuehlke-King Tchaikovsky, Serenade for Strings

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Dec. 7, 2013

Bach, Brandenburg no. 5 Humperdinck, Hansel & Gretel Prelude Rimsky-Korsakov, Christmas Eve Suite guest artists, Wayne Hobbs and the Spartanburg Day School Children's Chorus

Mar. 29, 2014

Copland, Appalachian Spring featuring Ballet Spartanburg Prokofiev, Peter & the Wolf narrator, Miles Hoffman


fifty years of excellence STUDIO SERIES

Fire & Passion Celebrating the

an

DANSYNERGY 9

Power of Women

Fri., Oct. 21 7 PM Sat., Oct. 22 3 PM Sun., Oct. 23 3 PM Student $15 Senior $15 Adult $20

Student $18 | Senior $25 | Adult $32 CHRISTMAS IN JULY

Fri., April 21 8 PM Sat., April 22 8 PM

SPECIAL PRICE THE MONTH OF JULY

BalletSpartanburg.org

Fri., Dec. 9 Sat., Dec. 10 Sun., Dec. 11 Chapman Cultural Center Tickets: 542-2787 ChapmanCulturalCenter.org

Twichell Auditorium The Susan Patricia Hodge Foundation

Tickets: 596-9724 BalletSpartanburg.org

7 PM 3 PM 3 PM

Amy and Martial Robichaud

Fri., Feb. 10 6 & 8 PM Sat., Feb. 11 6 & 8 PM Tickets $15 Ballet Spartanburg Studios Tickets: 583-0339 BalletSpartanburg.org

Fri., Oct. 21

THE LITTLE MERMAID 7 PM | Sat., Oct. 22 3 PM | Sun., Oct. 23

3 PM

Fri., Dec. 9

THE NUTCRACKER 7 PM | Sat., Dec. 10 3 PM | Sun., Dec. 11

3 PM

Fri., Fri.,March March2424 8 8PM PM Sat., Sat.,March March25258 8PM PM Student $15 | Senior $20 | Adult $25 Amy and Martial Robichaud

Chapman Cultural Center Tickets: 542-2787 ChapmanCulturalCenter.org

Susu and George Dean Johnson, Jr. Cynthia Moseley In memory of Carlos Moseley

Student $15 Senior $20 Adult $25

Chapman Cultural Center Tickets: 542-2787 ChapmanCulturalCenter.org

The Susan Patricia Hodge Foundation

CELEBRATING THE POWER OF WOMEN: DANSYNERGY 9 Fri., Mar. 24 8 PM | Sat., Mar. 25 8 PM AN AMERICAN IN PARIS Fri., Apr. 21 8 PM | Sat., Apr. 22

8 PM

FIRE AND PASSION: STUDIO SERIES Fri., Feb. 10 6 & 8 PM | Sat., Feb. 11 6 & 8 PM 200 East Saint John St. Spartanburg, SC 29306 864-583-0339 BalletSpartanburg.org

the best orchestras in the state - both to hear and to play in. Sarah has added themed seasons and performances to our series of concerts that catered to youth and new audience members. In one season, she highlighted the musical depth of her family having her father, husband and brother all perform in various roles with the orchestra. This theme was a great audience builder as we, the community, felt that she was embracing us and sharing her family with us. I wish her the best of success in the future and feel honored to have been able to work with her these past twelve years.

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- Ken Frick

Trumpet Former Board President

Apr. 4, 2014

Bernstein, West Side Story (selections) Marianelli, Anna Karenina suite Gershwin, Rhapsody in Blue guest artist, Douglas Weeks Ravel, Bolero

May 3, 2014

Rossini, Silken Ladder Overture Haydn, Cello Concerto in C guest artist, Alan Harrell Mozart, Requiem featuring the Spartanburg Festival Chorus, Tharanga Goonetilleke, Pamela Williamson, Wayne Hobbs, and Jason McKinney

Jul. 11, 2014

Pops at the Park! guest artist, Kaitlyn Lusk

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196 West Main St. Spartanburg, SC (864) 582-0123

Mon.-Fri. 11:00 - 7:00 Sat. 11:00 - 4:00

PROUD SUPPORTER OF THE SPO 42

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MAR

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5:30pm 6:30pm

Happy-Hour Reception One-Hour Concert

C HA PMA N 200 EAST

C ULT UR A L

SAINT JOHN

S T.

CENT E R

S PA RTA N B UR G ,

SC

A compelling blend of music performed by both the SPO’s Brass and Woodwind Quintets. The program will be sure to delight audiences with its mix of classic and modern pieces, including the premiere performance of a new work by Spartanburg's own Peter B. Kay. Special Thanks to concert sponsors the Marriot of Spartanburg and Hub City Tap House. Drinks are included with the price of admission, so start your Friday evening with a short shot of live, classical music.

Tenth Season Spartanburg

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Sept. 13, 2014

Nielson, Helios Overture Smetana, Die Moldau from MĂĄ vlast Tchaikovsky, Piano Concerto no. 1 guest artist, Charlie Albright

Dec. 6, 2014

Handel, Messiah Traditional Holiday Selections featuring Emma-Brooke Alley, the Spartanburg Day School Chorus, the SHS & Dorman Choruses, and the Wofford Chamber Singers

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Community Support A New Outreach Program Duke Energy Foundation

This past fall, the SPO received a $9,000 grant from the Duke Energy Foundation to launch a new music education outreach program called Peanut Butter & Jam. This family-focused series of concerts has been designed to strengthen music education in our area, and with the help of this grant, all concerts will be offered with free admission at various locations throughout Spartanburg County. Duke Energy’s Peanut Butter & Jam concerts pair literature and music, inviting the audience to participate in fun and instructive ways. Each 45 minute program uses storybooks and musical entertainment to teach children about musical concepts such as beat, rhythm, melody, and harmony. “Arts and culture truly have the power to enhance community vitality,” said Linda Hannon, government and community relations manager for Duke Energy. “This is why Duke Energy invests in philanthropic programs and initiatives like Peanut Butter & Jam that provide access to and encourage an appreciation of the arts and culture.” Thank you, Duke Energy for your passion for the arts!

Feb. 14, 2015

Liszt, Les Preludes O'Boyle, Portraits of Immortal Love guest artist, Dame Evelyn Glennie Khachaturian, Adagio of Spartacus & Phrygia Tchaikovsky, Romeo & Juliet Fantasy Overture

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Mar. 28 2015

Mozart, Eine Kleine Nachtmusik Dorff, Goldilocks and the Three Bears Narrator, Miles Hoffman O'Boyle, Snapshot Concertos Prokofiev, Peter & the Wolf

Apr. 11 2015

Grieg, Wedding Day at Troldhaugen Tchaikovsky, Violin Concerto guest artist, Vadim Gluzman Mussorgsky, Pictures at an Exhibition


A New Website

Spartanburg County Foundation Grant On Monday, November 7th, the SPO was honored along with other grantees at The Spartanburg County Foundation's Fall Grants Award Ceremony. The SPO received a $7,960 grant to build a new website. Not only will the new website have advanced technologies for the possibility of streaming concerts in the future, but we will also have the capability to engage the Spartanburg community in our conductor search during next season. Stay tuned for more details! We are so thankful for The Spartanburg County Foundation, its Staff and Board of Trustees for this investment in the SPO’s future!

T

S. REEL ROBERTSON

Certified Public Accountant 721 E. Main Street Spartanburg, SC 29302

(864) 583-2450

Fax: (864) 582-7332 reel@sreelrobertsoncpa.com

Eleventh Season May 25, 2015

Pops at the Park! featuring Emma-Brooke Alley and Tish Oney

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Sept. 12, 2015

Verdi, La Forza del Destino Overture Tchaikovsky, Piano Concerto no. 2 guest artist, Andreas Boyde Beethoven, Symphony no. 7

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M A E S T R O, M OZ A R T, & M O T OR C YC L E S

Monday, April 24th

|

5:30pm - 8:00pm

Azalea Room, Spartanburg Marriott

a Far ewell Celebr ation Cigar Lounge

Moonshine Tasting Prosecco & Champagne Tasting Heavy hors d'oeuvres

$75/person Contact Louise for further information and to reserve your tickets

lfagan@spartanarts.org

Nov. 14, 2015

Theofanides, Dreamtime Ancestors Sibelius, Violin Concerto guest artist, Kristin Lee Elgar, Enigma Variations

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864.278.9671

Feb. 13, 2016

Valentines Day Pops! guest artists, Jens Lindemann, Tish Oney, and the Spartanburg Jazz Ensemble


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APR

29 @7:00

C L A S S I C A L C O N V E R S AT I O N S 6:15-6:45pm

with host

CHRIS VANEMAN

S p a r ta n b u r g

P h i l h a r m o n i c

G R A N D

O r c h e s t r a

FI N A L E

TWICHELL AUDITORIUM

featuring

maestro SARAH IOANNIDES conducts BRENNAN SZAFRON, organ and the CONVERSE CHORALE

Carmen, Suite no. 1 I. Prélude & Aragonaise II. Intermezzo III. Seguedille IV. Les Dragons d'Alcala V. Les Toréadors

Nocturnes III. Sirènes

Georges Bizet

12 min

Claude Debussy

10 min

Intermission Symphony no. 3 in c minor, op. 78 Part I. Adagio Allegro moderato Poco adagio Part II. Allegro moderato Presto Maestoso Allegro 48

Camille Saint-Saëns

26 min

Programs Subject to Change Timings are Approximate


Apr. 29

F

rench composer Georges Bizet, an .outstanding organist and pianist, won the distinguished Prix de Rome as a student at the Paris Conservatory. Franz Liszt proclaimed that he could make a career as a piano virtuoso if he desired, while Berlioz wrote, “He will have to be recognized as a composer in spite of his rare talent as a pianist.” Over his short career he composed some twenty operas – not all of them performed – the final being Carmen.

The premiere at the Opera-Comique in Paris on March 3, 1875 brought a lackluster reception. The conservative audience of the 19th century was critical of the sensual story and they were unprepared for the heroin to die at the end. Little did this audience know that they had just witnessed what was to become one of the world’s most popular operas. Bizet did not live long enough to witness the opera’s worldwide success. The composer died just three months after its premiere at age 36, probably of a heart attack.

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laude Debussy, one of the greatest of ..French composers, was considered an extreme radical who threw out most all of the rules during his days at the Paris Conservatory. He had the strength of his convictions to stand up to the criticism he received as a youth and during his time at the Conservatory. Today, to modern ears, his music seems familiar and natural, painting scenes for our mind's eye with his music.

Debussy was at his most productive between the ages of twenty-eight and thirty-eight. It was during this period that he wrote Nocturnes, a set of three pieces: Nuages (Clouds), Fêtes (Festivals), and Sirènes (mermaids). He composed these works between 1897 and 1899. The first two were heard in Paris in 1900 and the third was performed a year later. The three movements were inspired by a series of impressionistic

Program Notes

In October 1875, six months after the composer’s death, Ernest Guiraud, a dear friend of Bizet and a fellow classmate at the Conservatory, took the original spoken dialogue of the opera and replaced it by sung recitatives. In turn the music was collected into two orchestral suites, No. 1 and No. 2, which include the recitatives as well as several of the arias, with instruments now playing the vocal lines. In Suite No. 1 the Prelude presents the fate motive, heard throughout the opera, which signals the tragic ending. “Aragonaise” depicts the mood of the excited crowd before the start of the bullfight. “Intermezzo” expresses the love of Don Jose for Carmen while “Seguedille” brings us the song and dance Carmen uses to seduce Don Jose into releasing her from prison. Les Dragons d’Alcala, a military march, is followed by the concluding music “Les Toreadors,” portraying the excited crowd after the bullfight and the tragic ending of the opera.

Carmen Suite no. 1

Georges Bizet (1845-1924)

paintings, entitled “Nocturnes” by James Abbott McNeil Whistler. Whistler, wanting to emphasize the tonal harmony of many of his paintings, described them as “arrangements”, “harmonies”, and “nocturnes”. Debussy seldom spoke about the meaning of his works, but of the Nocturnes he wrote: "The title “Nocturnes''... is not meant to designate the usual form of the nocturne, [In the days of Chopin nocturnes were called 'night music'] but rather all the various impressions and special effects of light that the word suggests. … Sirènes depicts the sea and its countless rhythms and presently, amongst the waves silvered by the moonlight, is heard the mysterious song of the sirens as they laugh and pass on." Sirènes calls for a wordless female chorus.

Nocturnes III. Sirènes

Claude Debussy (1862-1918)

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Apr. 29

Program Notes

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amille Saint-Saëns, the French ...composer, virtuoso pianist and organist can be given several other titles based on his wide spread interests and accomplishments. These include archaeologist, astronomer, botanist, dramatist, philosopher, poet, music critic and writer. This gifted man who lived until the ripe old age of eighty-six did much to bring French instrumental music to the attention of the world with his witty and pointed journalistic style.

Symphony no. 3

(Organ Symphony) Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

As a musical prodigy, Saint-Saëns began writing music at age three. He had perfect pitch and amazing musical sight-reading abilities. He was given piano lessons at an early age. He delighted audiences with his technical skills playing the works of Bach, Handel and Mozart as early as age seven. This precocious ability caused him to be compared to Mozart as a young child. The styles of his compositions include opera, sacred and secular choral works, songs, orchestral and keyboard music and film music. The London Philharmonic Society commissioned the Third Symphony of Saint-Saëns, which the composer dedicated "to the memory of Franz

Converse Chorale Guest Ensemble

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urrently lead by Director Keith Jones, the Converse Chorale has been in a long-standing partnership with the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra since the very beginning of the symphony. The organizations, in their various forms over the years, have worked together to present beautiful, festive, and dynamic works of classical music. In fact, the two have been

Liszt". The two composers thought highly of each other. Saint-Saëns revered Liszt as a great French composer and one of the greatest piano virtuosos of all time. Liszt once described Saint-Saëns as "the world's greatest organist." Symphony No. 3 carries the subtitle the "Organ Symphony" because the score includes an organ. The symphony also requires a piano and a large orchestra. This four-movement work is divided into two sections. The first contains an allegro and adagio in which we hear the first entrance of the organ. The second portion contains a scherzo and finale. Again the organ marks the beginning of the finale. A common theme is heard throughout the sections. There is also a unique rhythmic style that unifies the movements. Sometimes the tune is heard with the beat and sometimes against the beat. The London audience who heard the premier on May 19, 1886 gave this symphony a resounding ovation. A similar welcome was given after its first performance in Paris the next year. This spectacular showpiece has continued to grow in popularity over time. ~ Joella Utley

collaborating since long before Debussy penned the Nocturnes they will be performing on April 29! This lasting relationship is celebrated tonight as Sarah Ioannides performs her grand finale with the SPO, ending her 12 year tenure alongside the ensemble that first welcomed her to the Twichell Auditorium stage in 2005.

Twelfth Season Apr. 30, 2016

Mozart, Don Giovanni Overture Villa-Lobos, Sinfonietta no. 1 Rodrigo, Concierto de Aranjuez guest artists, Pepe Romero de Falla, Three-Cornered Hat

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Oct. 15, 2016

Copland, Fanfare for the Common Man Fuchs, Piano Concerto "Spiritualist" guest artist, Jeffrey Biegel Brahms, Symphony no. 1

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As a member of the Search Committee that brought Sarah to SPO, I have enjoyed watching her musical and organizational skills grow as she has led us and built SPO into a fine Orchestra. Thanks Maestra, for your guidance and friendship. Best wishes on your career journey.

Faure, Pavane featuring Spartanburg Sings Mozart, Sinfonia concertante Beethoven, Symphony no. 8

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Pri n ci pa l Ba ss o o n

Apr. 29, 2017

Bizet, Carmen suite no. 1 Debussy, Nocturnes, III. Sirènes featuring the Converse Chorale Saint-Saëns, Symphony no. 3

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A Musician's Perspective Brennan Szafron Principal Organist

The Symphony No. 3 (“Organ”) in c minor by Camille Saint-Saëns is not only one of the composer’s best known works; it’s one of the best known orchestral compositions of the 19th century. The term “organ symphony” is confusing, since several composers in France were using that term to denote multiple movement suites for solo organ which were inspired by sounds heard in an orchestra typical of that era. By the 19th century, the pipe organ in France was conceived as a large wind instrument capable of imitating an orchestra, but Saint-Saens clearly was able to separate the orchestra from the organ; hence we have his “organ” symphony. The Symphony No. 3 uses the organ in two out of its four sections. In doing some research, I didn’t find any concrete reason why Saint-Saens chose to include an organ in the symphony’s instrumentation, but I do know that by 1886, the year of the symphony’s premiere, he was already an accomplished organist and that he wrote the work for the Royal Philharmonic Society in London,

England. St. James’ Hall, where the work was first performed. English composer Ebenezer Prout, whose first organ concerto was premiered also at St. James Hall described its organ as “that terrible box of whistles”, but nowhere is it written that the organ there bothered Saint-Saens. There are many recordings of the Symphony No. 3, often featuring great organists of the 20th century. Admittedly, the organ part isn’t technically difficult. The second section of the symphony features soft and low sounds from the organ and the last section is filled with big, low and grand sounds. What’s really challenging more than anything else is playing at the right time following extended periods of rest! For me as an organist, the Saint-Saëns 3rd symphony is a truckload of instant

gratification. It’s really not at all difficult for the organist, but he/she gets tons of accolades for playing big, loud, and primarily exposed chords. Conductors may tell organists to play softer, but they’ll sure encourage them to play out a lot in this piece!

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Mondays 12:15-1:00pm

March 27 April 10 April 24 May 8 May 22 SPO on the Square is a lunchtime concert series in downtown Spartanburg, featuring musicians from the symphony in roles you won't get to see in the concert hall! All events are FREE and open to the public. Bring a lunch or grab something to-go from one of the nearby restaurants downtown.

https://spartanburgphilharmonic.com/on-the-square

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Music Sandwiched In is a lunchtime concert series in downtown Spartanburg, featuring local, regional, and even national talent! All events are FREE and open to the public. Lunch is available for purchase, prepared by one of Spartanburg's finest, Chef Bill McClellan!

Spartanburg County Public Library Headquarters, Barrett Room 151 South Church Street Spartanburg, SC

Wednesdays 12:15-1:00pm

S P R I N G

2 0 1 7

S C H E D U L E

Jan. 11

Spartanburg Little Theatre

Ring of Fire preview

Jan. 25 Trillium Performing a rare Mozart string trio Feb. 8

Laurel & the Lads

Irish Folk Music

Feb. 22 Arbor Wind Trio

Delightful classics for woodwind trio

Mar. 8

Bright and brassy fun!

Sparkle City Brass Quintet

Mar. 22 Philharmonic Flutes

Lovely music for two flutes and piano

Apr. 5 Scottish Pipes A Tartan Day celebration! Apr. 19 Converse Opera Theatre

A mix of Opera Favorites

May 3 Fayssoux McLean Folk music with an elegant voice May 17 Spartanburg District 7

Sister Act preview

May 31 Rutherford Chamber Consort

Performing the music of Beethoven

https://spartanburgphilharmonic.com/music-sandwich HearHERE

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LUNCH

Monday – Friday 11AM – 3PM DINNER

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THANKS Recognizing Kurt and Nelly Zimmerli

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elebrating our one le g a c y ..season began with Music Director Sarah Ioannides yet quickly grew to include the extraordinary community who embraced, nurtured and supported Sarah’s creative and personal journey these past 12 years. Central to her success in Spartanburg and beyond has been the relationship she and her family have with Kurt and Nelly Zimmerli. Kurt and Nelly were great supporters of the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra before Sarah arrived, believing that a vibrant Spartanburg included a first rate Orchestra. They have been our Orchestra’s most ardent ambassadors, playing an important role in the development of SPO to include world class concerts, education and outreach programs. It seems the friendship between Kurt, Nelly and Sarah created the foundation for some of the most joyful seasons of SPO! When asked about their fondest memories the Zimmerli’s reminisce about many performances however it is the personal stories that carry the deepest impact. Greeting Sarah on her arrival to Spartanburg, be-friending her then fiancé Scott, family gatherings at the beach when Sarah and Scott’s children were born, impromptu recitals in the living room by the children, all speak to a relationship that bridges friends to family.

Sarah was asked for her reflections on the Zimmerli’s and, perhaps not surprising, shared similar memories.

important to my growth and continuing development both with work and family life."

"It is hard to find words to describe the people you love. When I think of Kurt and Nelly Zimmerli, the first feelings that come to me are that of great warmth, thankfulness and respect. I feel lucky to know a lovely, kind couple who have graced our community with such generosity and passion for the arts. Kurt and Nelly befriended Scott and I on Day One of my becoming Music Director, and now I feel that they are like close family to us. I have many memories of joyful times together from Spartanburg to El Paso, and Brevard to Edisto and of my children playing in their garden, bouncing on their laps, devouring delicious bites….

SPO has grown and evolved over the past 12 years, but what has remained constant is the kindness of the Zimmerli’s as with many others in the community. Their leadership in supporting the cultural life of Spartanburg is inspiring but their friendship is the true lasting legacy. We Embrace Kurt and Nelly Zimmerli with Great Thanks for their Support and Love of the Gift of Music! ~

the

SPO

But most importantly, they have been such wonderful listeners, participators and leaders in the success of the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. Their supportive encouragement to me personally has been extremely

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The J M Smith Foundation is generously supporting the 2017 Link Up concert through a matching gifts initiative! These funds allow the SPO and the Schools to move forward with confidence in the early planning and implementation of the classroom program. Since the first Link Up program in 2011, Duke Energy has been a sustaining corporate partner. We are grateful for the support in our early years and their ongoing belief in the importance of arts education. Thank you, Duke Energy, we couldn't do it without you!

Due to exposure by programs like Link Up, District 7 numbers continue to grow in terms of students joining orchestra and band. This is wonderful for D7 because students involved in orchestra and band have higher SAT scores than students who are not in arts education. - Dr. Terry Pruitt Deputy Superintendent, Spartanburg County School District 7

Link Up: Annual Youth Concert F E B RUA RY 2 0 1 7

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ince 2011, every 4th grade student ..attending Spartanburg County Schools has been given the opportunity to join the Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra (SPO) in the highly engaging, participatory program Link Up. In an effort to reach as many young people as possible, the SPO offers the Link Up program at no cost to the students. For many students and their families, Link Up provides their first exposure to live classical music performance, providing an experience that influences these young minds and thus the community, for a lifetime. The SPO’s Link Up program is the ultimate educational opportunity for music teachers, students and their families. For the Orchestra, this provides important collaboration and partnership with schools, students, 58

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teachers and community fulfilling a fundamental component of our mission. Link Up is a music education program created by Carnegie Hall's Weill Music Institute to unite the classroom with the concert hall, giving students the opportunity to explore music through a yearlong curriculum of classroom activities and a culminating concert in which students perform with a professional orchestra. Through the 2016–2017 season’s curriculum, The Orchestra Sings, students will explore orchestral repertoire through a hands-on music curriculum. The yearlong program of skills-based and creative work in the classroom will culminate in a lively interactive concert at Twichell Auditorium at Converse

College, giving students the chance to demonstrate what they have learned by singing and playing recorder or violin with the Spartanburg Philharmonic from their seats in the audience. Guided by conductor Sarah Ioannides the hour long program of music making and “listening challenges” will also incorporate some of the students’ original compositions, as well as lighting and visual effects. To make a contribution to the one le g a c y year of Link Up and for more information about the SPO’s education initiatives please visit website:

spartanburgphilharmonic.org or contact Louise Fagan, Advancement Director: lfagan@spartanarts.org


A Parent's Perspective Gaile Camp

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usic is defined as the following ...according to dictionary.com:

a. vocal or instrumental sounds (or both) combined in such a way as to produce beauty of form and harmony, and expression of emotion b. the written or printed signs representing vocal or instrumental sound.

Reading this definition, it just seems like a combination of different words that quite honestly didn’t mean much, until a few years ago when we (my daughters and I) began attending the program Link Up: Orchestra Sings and Orchestra Moves. This experience changed how I looked at music. I have two daughters, Emily, 13, currently in 8th grade at R.P. Dawkins Middle School and Makenzie, 10, currently in 4th grade at Woodland Heights Elementary School. Woodland Heights Elementary School is an ABC school, Arts and Basic Curriculum. We focus on integrated arts in our classrooms. It also gives our students different opportunities to perform on stage or have special guests come into our school and perform for our students. It has given my daughters experiences and opportunities that I never dreamed they would have. Emily and Makenzie have always loved music, when they would hear it they would dance or sing. When Emily and Makenzie were in second grade they were recommended to test for a gifted and talented program called Music Visions. Looking back on our decision to get them tested I never dreamed what experiences that would give them. That was the year that I realized just how life changing music can be for our students, both in the classroom and outside the classroom. They both started Music Visions in third grade and started on the recorder. I realized quickly that I wasn’t a fan of that instrument, but they were both so excited when they learned to play “Hot Cross Buns” for the first time. They had smiles that went from ear to ear and they beamed with pride. During Emily’s first year in Music Visions she continued

to learn different songs on her recorder. I remember one afternoon she came home with her new music book that said, “Link Up” on the cover. I asked her what it was and she responded, “We get to go to Converse College and play our recorder with the Spartanburg Philharmonic.” First I was thinking she must have misunderstood what her music teacher, Dr. Doyle, had said. A few days later I received an email asking if I could chaperone the Music Visions students on this event to Converse College. I remember thinking absolutely, I needed to see what this is actually about. We arrive at Converse College and get our students seated. We are in an auditorium that wasn’t even close to being filled at the time of our arrival, but within minutes that sure changed. As I stood there listening to my daughter Emily and her friends practice their recorders, I was in awe and amazement. Some students had recorders and others were ready to sing along. I looked around the room and there were so many different cultures in that one room sharing one common thing…Music. I was still a little unsure about what was about to happen, then it began. I sat through the whole program with a smile and thinking, “I love our district.” Link Up was an experience I will never forget attending for the first time. I have attended Link Up now for four years, 3 years with Emily and 1 year with Makenzie. Emily still remembers playing on stage with

the Spartanburg Philharmonic when she was in fifth grade. I remember watching Emily while she was on stage as she watched the orchestra play. It was like she drifted away and it was her and them. (Makenzie looks forward to playing with them next year when she is in fifth grade.) It was that moment Emily realized that she really did want to learn to play the flute. She has been playing the flute for almost four years and is amazing to listen to (of course I am probably a little biased). Because of programs like Link Up my daughters have learned to experience music and arts in a different way. Emily represented Woodland Heights Elementary School at the South Carolina State Elementary Choir in Charleston, SC in February 2014. Emily and Makenzie have also attended multiple live theater performances and a few ballets, such as Ebenezer, Beauty and the Beast, Rapunzel, Charlotte’s Web, The little Mermaid, and The Nutcracker to name a few. Emily also saw the Spartanburg Philharmonic at Converse College. They both dance many hours a week performing in genres such as Lyrical, Ballet, Jazz, Tap, and Musical Theater. I have seen them grow into these amazing young ladies. Their confidence has grown. Music and Arts have and will continue to give them opportunities as they become young adults. Programs, such as Link Up joining with our schools is giving our children opportunities to see that music doesn’t have to be one type. Thank you to those involved in providing such an amazing program for my daughters and so many other students. I am one grateful parent.

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United Arts Fund Donors July 1, 2015-June 30, 2016 When you support the Chapman Cultural Center you are supporting our mission of providing cultural leadership for Greater Spartanburg by developing, strengthening, and promoting the scope, excellence and educational role of the arts, humanities and sciences, and to further their significance in the life of our community and all of its citizens. We have a vision for Spartanburg to be nationally recognized as a unique and vibrant cultural community that inspires creativity and collaboration. Corporate Donors

Corporate Public Grants National Endowment of the Arts City of Spartanburg County of Spartanburg South Carolina Arts Commission Corporate Visionary American Credit Acceptance, LLC Anonymous Duke Energy Foundation Inman-Riverdale Foundation JM Smith Foundation Milliken Foundation Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System Corporate Founders’ Circle BMW Manufacturing Company, LLC JM Smith Corporation Johnson Development Associates Longleaf Foundation Mary Black Foundation OTO Development Phifer Johnson Foundation Toray Carbon Fibers America, Inc. Wells Fargo Foundation Corporate President’s Circle Bank of America - Spartanburg Coca-Cola Bottling Company United, Inc. Contec, Inc. Denny’s Corp. McAbee, Schwartz, Halliday and Co. Metromont Corporation SEW Eurodrive, Inc. Shurburtt Group, LLC Southern States Packaging Co. Southeastern Printing TD Charitable Foundation White Oak Management, Inc. Corporate Pacesetter Advance America Blue Cross and Blue Shield of South Carolina Budweiser of Spartanburg KapStone Paper and Packaging Corporation Kohler Company Marriott at Renaissance Park Michelin North America, Inc. Spartanburg Piedmont Natural Gas Security Finance Corp. SunTrust Bank Waldrop Inc William Barnet & Son, LLC Corporate Leader BB&T Bank Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate, Young & Company Blackwood Associates Inc. Carolina Alliance Bank Duer/Carolina Coil, Inc. Dunbar Construction Company, Inc. Hodge & Langley Law Firm International Festival Society Johnson Smith Hibbard and Wildman Leigh Fibers Inc. Martex Fiber Southern Corp. NAI Earle Furman Pacolet Milliken Enterprises Parker, Poe, Adams & Bernstein, L.L.P.

Pacesetter Mr. & Mrs. Charles J. Bradshaw Mrs. Donna Cart Ms. Beth C. Cecil Mr. & Mrs. Martin S. Cornelson Mr. & Mrs. Christopher M. Crowley Mr. & Mrs. T. Alexander Evins Mr. Jimmy N. Gibson & Dr. Karen M. Czuba-Gibson Ms. Joan Gibson Mr. & Mrs. D. Benjamin Graves Mr. & Mrs. William Lowndes III Mr. & Mrs. Barry B. McNaughton Mr. & Mrs. Corry W. Oakes III Mrs. Edward P. Perrin Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin R. Wall Mr. & Mrs. Kurt Zimmerli Leader Dr. & Mrs. G. Ashley Allen Dr. & Mrs. Mitchell H. Allen Dr. Thomas Ashley & Dr. Juliette Saad Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Atkins Mr. & Mrs. Andrew M. Babb Mr. W. D. Bain, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Stanley W. Baker Mr. & Mrs. John P. Barber Mr. & Mrs. Thomas G. Barnet Mr. & Mrs. Bert Dixon Barre Mr. & Mrs. H. Walter Barre II Mr. & Mrs. John E. Bauknight IV Mr. Kyle Riser & Ms. Virginia Benintende Mr. & Mrs. William D. Blackford Mr. & Mrs. Glen B Boggs II Mr. & Mrs. Pascal S. Boyd Dr. & Mrs. James E. Bradof Mr. & Mrs. George Brandt III Mr. & Mrs. Walter M. Brice II Mrs. Mellnee G. Buchheit Mr. & Mrs. Ethan R. Burroughs Mr. & Mrs. William H. Burton III Dr. & Mrs. Henry Frederick Butehorn III Dr. & Mrs. Louis Buttino Dr. & Mrs. B. Brant Bynum Mr. & Mrs. Jason D. Bynum Mr. & Mrs. William A. Caldwell Dr. & Mrs. Ernest Camp III Mr. & Mrs. Christopher L. Cannon Mr. & Mrs. Harold McMillan Cannon Mr. & Mrs. William Z. Cannon Mr. & Mrs. Terry L. Cash Ms. Kathleen M. Cates Mr. & Mrs. MacFarlane L. Cates, Jr. Mr. Douglas M. Cecil & Individual Donors Dr. Julie J. Cecil Founders’ Circle Mr. & Mrs. Randall K. Chambers Anonymous Mr. & Mrs. Norman H. Chapman Mr. Frederick B. Dent, Sr. Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Chapman III Mr. & Mrs. Jimmy I Gibbs Mr. & Mrs. William Cobb Mr. & Mrs. George Dean Johnson, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Jerry A. Cogan, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Thomas P. Nederostek Mr. & Mrs. William M. Coker Mr. & Mrs. Geoffrey Wilson The Honorable & President’s Circle Mrs. J. Derham Cole, Sr. Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Allen Mr. & Mrs. Justin Converse Mr. & Mrs. William Barnet III Mr. & Mrs. Paul J. Coté Mr. Charles Cauthen Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth R. Couch Mrs. Elizabeth S. Chapman Mr. & Mrs. Julian Crawford Mr. & Mrs. J. Michael Kohler, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. E.Dixon Crenshaw, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Walter S. Montgomery, Jr. Mr. T. Kenneth Cribb, Jr. Peterson Family Fund Mr. & Mrs. Daniel E. Cromer Mr. & Mrs. Peter Weisman

Polydeck Screen Corp Publix Supermarket Charities Pure Barre Corporation Spartanburg County Foundation Tate Metalworks, Inc. Tricor Construction United Community Bank RS Holdings White’s Pine Street Exxon Young Office Corporate Patron George Johnson Insurance, Inc. Corporate Partner Atchison Transportation Services Colonial Trust Company CWS Insurance Agency Inc. Hodge Floors Jeff Horton Insurance, Inc. Johnson Smith Hibbard and Wildman Merit Distribution Group QuikTrip Corporation Sage Automotive Interiors Target The Piedmont Club Corporate Supporter BWANA, LLC Caroline’s Cakes ComFab Inc. Event Rentals IT Pros McCutchen Engineering Assoc, PC Stone Lighting Corporate Associate Action Instant Printing, Inc. Bank of America Matching Gifts BPW Of SC Comfort Keepers Girls for Steam Griffin Gear, Inc. IBM Matching Grants Program Law Insurance Agency Mezger, Inc. Papa’s Development Corporation QCS, Inc. Re/Max Realty Associates Corporate Friend Amazon Smiles Estes Enterprises and Interiors Nash Electric Supply North American Flags RCS Enterprises Riffenburg Insurance Services, LLC Roebuck Advertising Co.

Mrs. Earlene G. Cyrill Mr. & Mrs. Chris A. Dorrance Mrs. Ysabel Dulken Mr. & Mrs. Raymond A. Dunleavy Mr. & Mrs. Allen W. Edgerton Mrs. Angelina Painter Eschauzier Mr. & Mrs. Andrew J. Falatok Mrs. John S. Featherston Mr. Michael Ferguson Dr. Elizabeth A. Fleming & Mr. Edward I. Weisiger Mr. & Mrs. A. Gordon Floyd Mr. & Mrs. W. Russel Floyd Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence E. Flynn, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Caleb C. Fort Ms. Elaine T. Freeman Mr. & Mrs. H. Laurence Fritz, Jr. Dr. & Mrs. J. Sidney Fulmer, Sr. Mr. & Mrs. James S. Fulmer, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. John W. Gandy Dr. & Mrs. Ernest Gardner Mr. & Mrs. William P. Gee Mr. & Mrs. Barney G. Gosnell Mr. & Mrs. D. Benjamin Graves Mrs. Cindy C. Grier Mrs. J. Thomas Grier Mr. James H. Grier Mr. & Mrs. John D. Groves Ms. Barbara L. Haaksma Mr. & Mrs. Roger Habisreutinger Mr. & Mrs. Troy M. Hanna Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Hannah, Sr. Dr. & Mrs. John A. Harrill, Jr. Miss Elisabeth E. Hayes Mr. & Mrs. R. Scott Heath Mr. & Mrs. J. Howard Henderson Mr. William C. Hightower & Dr. Mary Lou S. Hightower Dr. & Mrs. Michael W. Holmes Dr. Leslie W. Howard, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Michael Hrubala Mr. & Mrs. James W. Hudgens Mrs. Elsa P. Hudson Mr. & Mrs. James D. Hunt Henry & Betty Jackson Ms. Sarah Chapman Jackson Dr. William A. James Mr. & Mrs. David G. Johnson Mr. & Mrs. George Johnson Mr. & Mrs. Stewart H. Johnson, Sr. Ms. Wallace Eppes Johnson Dr. & Mrs. Julian C. Josey, Jr. Dr. Joseph Kavanagh & Dr. Julie Kavanagh Mr. & Mrs. Christopher D. Kennedy Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Killoren, Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Harry W. Kinard Dr. & Mrs. Sonny King Dr. & Mrs. Wood N. Lay Dr. & Mrs. W. Brownlee Lowry Mr. & Mrs. William Alan Lyles Mr & Mrs. Jason C. Lynch Mrs. Nancy T. Lyon Mr. & Mrs. Edward Mabry Mr. Zerno E. Martin, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. William Mayrose Mr. & Mrs. John S. McBride, Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Thomas R. McDaniel Mrs. Sonia B. McDuffie Mr. Thomas P. McMeekin Mr. Stanford M. McMillan Mr. & Mrs. Michael L. Menard

Don & Mary Miles Mr. & Mrs. D. Byrd Miller III Mr. & Mrs. William H. Mitchell Mr. & Mrs. Joe Mize Mr. & Mrs. John D. Montgomery Mr. & Mrs. Walter S. Montgomery IV Mr. & Mrs. William James Montgomery Mr. John Kenneth Moore & Ms. Susan Bridges Mr. & Mrs. Thomas F. Moore Mr. & Mrs. King Mueller Mr. & Mrs. Douglas B. Nash Mr. & Mrs. George Nixon Mr. & Mrs. J. Patrick O’Shaughnessy Mrs. William W. Old III Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Parrott Mrs. Thomas P. Pennell Mr. & Mrs. Craig M. Phillips Mr. & Mrs. John S. Poole Ms. Thelma A. Powell Mr. & Mrs. Norman F. Pulliam, Sr. Ms. Nancy Freeman Rainey Mr. & Mrs. John F. Renfro, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Robert P. Richardson V Dr. & Mrs. Regis H. Robe Mr. & Mrs. C. Leslie Roberson Mr. & Mrs. Randy Romberger Dr. & Mrs. Nayef Samhat Mr. & Mrs. G. Garrett Scott Mrs. Prudence S. Scott Mr. & Mrs. Marvin Siegel Mr. & Mrs. Warwick F. Spencer Mr. & Mrs. Roland A. Stebbins Mr. & Mrs. Eliot Stone Mr. George E. Stone Mr. & Mrs. David E. Tate Mr. & Mrs. George C. Todd, Jr. Dr. Joella F. Utley Mr. & Mrs. Manuel Vallarino Mr. & Mrs. Gregory H. Wade Mr. & Mrs. Benny E. Waldrop Mr. & Mrs. John T. Wardlaw Ms. Lindsay L. Webster Dr. Charles White & Ms. Ruth Cate Mr. & Mrs. John B. White, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Donald B. Wildman Mr. William Wilkinson & Mr. Robert K. Bellinger Mr. & Mrs. William G. Willard III Mr. & Mrs. James C. Wilson, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Donald P. Woodward Mr. & Mrs. Michael K. Young Mr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Young III

Thank you to the businesses and individuals that participated in the 2015-16 United Arts Fund Campaign by making corporate donations. We truly appreciate Greater Spartanburg’s support of one of our most treasured resources, Chapman Cultural Center and the arts, sciences, history and humanities here and throughout our community. Strong Arts. Strong Spartanburg.


S P OTL I GHT Marsha Moore

Volunteer

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tep into the SPO offices on a ...Thursday morning and you’ll likely run into Marsha Moore. Most people know Marsha for her warm smile and countless hours of community service in Spartanburg County. For the SPO, Marsha is a consistent, reliable volunteer who buckles down to help with anything from data entry to stuffing envelopes. Marsha is a true gem for the SPO office and we are thankful for her commitment to the SPO.

AL, and Rock Hill, SC, before moving to Spartanburg in 2011. Marsha worked in various positions in industry, churches, and schools while raising two sons, Charlie, 36, a dentist in Charleston, and Kirk, 32 who works in retail in Asheville.

Marsha grew up in Moultrie, GA, as the oldest of three children. She attended Huntingdon College in Montgomery, AL with majors in psychology and sociology. In 1975, Marsha married Dr. Tom Moore and lived in Columbia, SC, Birmingham,

In Spartanburg, Marsha serves on the Board of Directors of Healthy Smiles, The Children’s Security Blanket, Hope Center for Children, and is Chair of Women Giving for Spartanburg. An active member of Spartanburg Chapter of BPW,

Farm

Marsha also enjoys singing in the choir at Trinity United Methodist Church. Marsha, please know that we genuinely appreciate and value your commitment of time to volunteering with our organization and for this we thank you. See you on Thursday morning!

Factory

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the

SPO

Family

From Farm to Factory to Family — Provider of traceability and manufacturing software solutions for industry, agriculture and the supply chain for 20 years. We are proud to call Spartanburg home and are delighted to support the Spartanburg Philharmonic.

Manufacturing Management • Warehouse Management • Traceability and Recall • Integration 101 North Pine St, Suite 400, Spartanburg, SC 29302 www.willdynechord.com

864-483-2342

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TIMELINE TO OUR NEXT CONDUCTOR

August 2015 Maestro Sarah Ioannides announces that she will step down from the podium after two more seasons.

November 2015 Music Director Search Committee formed consisting of 4 Board Members, 8 SPO Musicians, 4 Community Members, and 2 Staff Members. May - August 2016 Solicitation of Candidates through League of American Orchestras, Musical Chairs, and Conductor’s Guild. August - December 2016 Search Committee reviews over 123 applications, performing multiple rounds of interviews, reference checks, and video assessments. The field is narrowed to approximately 15 potential candidates.

December 2016 Potential Candidates are interviewed via Skype from which four are chosen to present to the Board.

January 2017 Upon approval, the final four Candidates are announced to the public. April 2017 The schedule for the Audition Season is announced and season tickets go on sale. September 2017 - March 2018 Each of the four Candidates will spend a week in Spartanburg, culminating in a performance, conducting the SPO in a signature Classics concert. April 2018 The new Music Director is announced.

2018 - 2019 The Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra celebrates its 70th Anniversary Season with the new Music Director at the healm!

Stay Connected

@ facebook.com 62

@SPOorchestra

@SPOmusic

@spartanburgphilharmonic

For detailed information about our concerts, visit us online:

http://spartanburgphilharmonic.org

Email Newsletter Text: SPO to 22828


$5 Mimosas & Bloody Marys

now serving

Join us every weekend as we host brunch at Sparks Fire-Inspired Grille. Buffet includes coffee, juice, fruit, cereals, hot breakfast, pastries, eggs cooked to order, omelets, pancakes, waffles and french toast All for $14

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be more EDUCATION FOR LIFE

3K through twelfth grade

1701 Skylyn Drive, Spartanburg, SC 29307 864.582.7539

admissions@sdsgriffin.org spartanburgdayschool.org


SPO - HearHERE, Spring 2017