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November 2020

www.evercannabis.com

Homebound Holidays Take comfort with virtual possibilities

CONCEPTION QUESTION

Fertility experts talk cannabis

DO YOU BELIEVE IN MAGIC?

Psilocybin mushrooms in the news

‘THE NEW CHARDONNAY’

Book explores rise of cannabis


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Friday, November 6, 2020

The Spokesman-Review


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

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Friday, November 6, 2020


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Friday, November 6, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK

VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 11

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Kathleen Coleman DIRECTOR OF SALES

Dan Fritts

MANAGING EDITOR

Joe Butler

Give thanks for the gift of green

Anne Potter

‘Very Special’ TV shows designed to scare us

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

By Joe Butler

HEALTH & CULTURE EDITOR

Theresa Tanner

ART DIRECTOR, MARKETING

Chris Soprych

Evercannabis magazine is a monthly supplement of The Spokesman-Review. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent of the publisher.

@EvercannaNews on social media www.evercannabis.com Evercannabis@spokesman.com 509-459-5095 PROUD MEMBER OF:

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In the U.S. one year subscription (12 issues)delivered discreetly to your door for just $35. In Canada subscription is $60. For credit card payments please call 509-459-5095 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. For check payments please include your mailing address, email, phone number and mail to EVERCANNABIS magazine, P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210

EVERCANNABIS EDITOR

Welcome to a very special Thanksgiving episode, er, issue of Evercannabis! Let me clarify: I am not welcoming you here in a ’80s TV “a Very Special episode” way. In my childhood, this phrase meant your favorite sitcom was going to have a “message” and maybe a guest star to pound that lesson home. Like, say, former First Lady Nancy Reagan who assured Arnold, Willis and the rest of the “Diff’rent Strokes” household that drugs were bad, and if you do them, you or those close to you will die. And then handed out “Just Say No” T-shirts. In that decade and into the ’90s, many shows, from the “The Golden Girls” to “Full House,” had their cast occasionally pause the wisecracking and focus on tough social topics like racism, sexual orientation, AIDS, drunk driving, and sexual assault. Sure, there were daytime and

nighttime dramas that included this subject matter in more enjoyable terms, but slipping serious stuff into a family-friendly sitcom was a fine way to invite families to discuss these issues with parents awkwardly introducing some touchy subjects. The novelty of these had waned by the later ’90s, and “Seinfeld” co-creator Larry David even declared “absolutely no learning, absolutely no hugging” when asked if his show would ever go very special. This Very Special Evercannabis is more about two things. First, after four-plus years of doing this, I’m still of the mind that every issue we create is very special. We have had – and still have – some amazingly talented writers, photographers, and designers plus wonderful advertisers. We also have great readers who we truly love hearing from, whether it’s a complaint, a compliment, a story suggestion, or all of the above. The second very special lesson comes from my dad. He was fond of encouraging friends and family to treat any occasion as a special occasion. He was of the mind that reserving the good stuff, such as fine wine, until an ideal moment, will only result in regret that you didn’t indulge sooner, and maybe spoiled wine. This universe can be crazy and random and sometimes painful, so it’s wise to celebrate when you

can. So go ahead, declare today “special” and crack a bottle. And if there’s ever been a year for this declaration, it’s 2020. We’re pretty much at the “this is normal” stage of 2020, no “new normal” about it. Take Thanksgiving, one of the few remaining ritual holiday dinners in our Western culture. To some T-Day purists, there is a complex calculus of activities that must be followed to the letter, from getting up before the sun to start cooking the bird to measuring out the perfect amount of seasoning for the pumpkin pie crust to planning a strategy of what zone of the kitchen to tackle first on cleanup duty. There’s always room for family, friends, and even friendly strangers: pack them in if you have to! For better or for worse, these types of “the more the merrier” gatherings are probably going to have to go dark this year, or at least be modified. The CDC has provided guidance for safer ways to travel and celebrate, in accordance with your local regulations, to keep you and loved ones healthy. In this issue, among our usual blend of great stories, you’ll learn useful tips for holiday celebrations, 2020-style, including what types of cannabis can calm the anxieties many of us are feeling. There’s a lot that won’t be the same this year, but very special memories can still be made. Cheers!

EVERCANNABIS CONTRIBUTORS Linda Ball is a freelance journalist based in Washington State who has covered a variety of topics including environmental issues, city hall, arts and entertainment, education, human interest stories and now the rapidlychanging cannabis industry. Joe Butler is a longtime marketing writer and editor at The Spokesman-Review. He’s an enthusiast of Star Wars, commemorative spoon collecting, and the Oxford comma. Tracy Damon is a Spokanebased freelancer who has been writing professionally for 20 years. She has been covering i502 issues since recreational cannabis became legal in Washington. Rob Mejia is president of the

cannabis education company Our Community Harvest and Adjunct Cannabis Professor at Stockton University. He lives in New Jersey and enjoys tennis, cooking and home repair.

Kate A. Miner has a degree

in visual anthropology, and has worked in marketing and advertising for many years. She writes, takes photos and teaches yoga.

Rick Misterly is a Washington resident whose interest in cannabis dates back to the 1960s and has taken him around the world. He’s the cannabis and hashish curator for Green Barn Farms in Addy and writes the “Rick’s World of Hashish” blog.

John Nelson is a longtime journalist, having worked at major news operations in Spokane, Memphis and Seattle. He now works as a freelance journalist, writing about outdoors recreation, marijuana and recreational vehicles. Theresa Tanner is the Health & Culture editor of EVERCANNABIS. Born and raised in Spokane, she enjoys good food and drink, pop culture podcasts, and relaxing at the lake. Dan Webster is a former Spokesman-Review staff writer who is a community producer for Spokane Public Radio and a blogger for Spokane7.com. Seattle native Mary J. White is a cannabis chef and the author of two cookbooks. When she’s not inventing new cannabis recipes, she can be found in the garden, on the beach, or playing with a grandkid.


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

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Friday, November 6, 2020

NOVEMBER TABLE OF CONTENTS

19

15

6

ww

om w.ever cannabis.c

10

JUST DESSERTS

SAFETY FIRST

Cannabis retailers adapt to rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

BUSINESS STILL BOOMING

Sales continue to climb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

HAND-TENDED AND HARVESTED

Quincy Green has deep roots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

SCAN TO READ

QR codes useful in industry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

FERTILITY TEST

Does cannabis impact conception? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

CELEBRATE AT HOME

There’s still fun to be had this season. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

SERVE UP RELAXATION

Infused condiments a great addition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

LEGISLATIVE OVERSIGHT

Committee evaluates labels, studies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

DOCUMENTARY DISCUSSION

“CBD Nation” argues cannabis pros . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

22 Evercannabis, The Spokesman-Review and the Cowles Company don’t promote or endorse the use of cannabis products. We acknowledge that marijuana products remain illegal under federal laws. If adults age 21 or older choose to purchase or use them, we encourage them to consume sensibly and at their own risk in legal jurisdictions, in accordance with state and local laws. Some cannabis products have intoxicating effects and may be habit-forming. Consumption of marijuana also may be associated with health risks and impaired concentration, coordination, and judgment. Keep away from children. To learn more, visit the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

CONSOLE YOURSELF

New game systems arrive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

THE NEW CHARDONNAY

Heather Cabot’s new book. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

FAIRWINDS QUALITY

Company focuses on wellness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Q&A: MUSHROOMS

Do ’shrooms have medical benefits? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

COOKING WITH CANNABIS

Glycerin tinctures great with dessert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

STRAIN OF THE MONTH

Where’s My Bike?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23


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The Spokesman-Review

NEWS & BUSINESS

Pandemic protections continue at cannabis retailers By Linda Ball

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

There’s no denying COVID-19 has turned our world upside down. Deemed essential, the cannabis industry has had the good fortune of moving forward, with shops statewide open and business booming. Shops do have to follow Gov. Jay Inslee’s “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” rules, including face coverings for staff and patrons, and there are a variety of other restrictions that budtenders had to learn in a hurry. Jake Whitman, manager of downtown Spokane Cinder, said that initially he and the staff received a bit of pushback from customers about the requirements of wearing masks. Now the shop has disposable masks on hand for those who forget or don’t bring one along. At the beginning of the pandemic, he said Cinder had a senior hour the first hour the store was open, from 8 to 9 a.m. But as the weeks went on it proved to be awkward, because there wouldn’t be any customers in the store at that time, but a line outside of non-senior customers, so the senior hour was scrapped. There were other pandemic-related problems that occurred at other shops around Washington. Green Entrepreneur in Seattle reported a customer coughing at an employee for enforcing the time limit, and another customer was observed spitting in the direction of a supervisor. Kush 21, another Seattle-area store, reported fights at its store when customers were asked to wear masks. Jane Shipman, office manager at Satori, now POM Cannabis, recalled an unusual incident where a customer wearing a mask was very angry because another customer who said he had a medical exemption was not wearing a mask. However,

businesses are not allowed to question a patron about their medical exemption. She said they had more pushback at the beginning of the pandemic. To accommodate customers who don’t want to or can’t wear a mask, many cannabis retailers, including Cinder and POM Cannabis, offer curbside pickup. This previously unallowed policy was approved by the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board in spring. Brian Smith, LCB spokesman, said prevention groups such as the Washington Healthy Youth Coalition were initially concerned about youth access with curbside delivery, especially the possibility that store employees wouldn’t perform adequate ID checks to outside customers. Shipman said POM staff vigorously checks IDs for curbside pick-up. She said no one under 21, even an infant, can be in the car during a pick-up. Leafly, a national cannabis directory, reported that several dispensaries across the country have switched to curbside pickup to limit the amount of people in a store at any given time. Some stores are using infrared thermometers for temperature checks of staff and customers. Since this is still a fledgling industry, adaptability is a core trait, said Sabrina Fendrick, chief public affairs officer at the Berkeley Patients Group cannabis store in California. The group is adapting to this strange new normal. Staffers are discouraged from shaking hands, fist bumps or any other contact. A San Francisco dispensary has added more than a dozen new air purifiers in its store, in addition to staff wearing masks and installing HVAC ultra-violet lights to prevent the recirculating of germs. One concern is the possible transmission of infection through paper money and coins. Since the legal cannabis indus-

PHOTOS BY JOE BUTLER/EVERCANNABIS

Scott Bigelow, above, and Makinlie Jewell, below, from Spokane Valley Cinder, provide frequent surface cleaning as demand for cannabis keeps business booming during the pandemic along with providing curbisde pickup. try is generally locked out of the banking system, cash only is currently the only option. A dispensary in Oakland has begun using trays to transfer money, instead of budtender hands. In Washington, most budtenders wear latex gloves as personal protective equipment. Another interesting part of the new situation is customers wanting to talk more to their budtender when they come to shop. Shipman said many customers consider their budtender as a bartender or quasi-therapist; they just want to talk to someone, and a lot of people are just lonely or not feeling good about the world right now. But if it’s busy, she said most customers are less inclined to stick around and chat because they respect the budtender’s time.


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NEWS & BUSINESS

David Morgan is the coowner of Lucky Leaf at 1111 W. First Ave. in downtown Spokane.

DAN PELLE/THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW

Marijuana businesses see boost during pandemic By Jim Camden

THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW

While the COVID-19 pandemic has played havoc with the Washington economy and many of its industries, it has boosted at least one: the state’s legal marijuana operations. Marijuana sales at state-licensed stores jumped in March as the state went into its “Stay Safe” restrictions with workers in nonessential jobs told to stay home and many stores and entertainment venues closed, data from the state Liquor and Cannabis Board show. Compared to February, sales and the state’s corresponding tax revenues rose about 28% in March, according to figures presented in a recent legislative committee work session on marijuana. They stayed at near-record levels through July, the most recent month for which the state has records, when nearly $130 million in legal marijuana sales were reported. That was 42% higher than in July 2019. David Morgan, co-owner of Lucky Leaf in downtown Spokane, said marijuana sales typically pick up in warmer weather, but they definitely noticed “a pretty big spike” in March that is continuing into September. While legal marijuana sales have risen steadily each year since state-licensed stores opened in 2015, the jump this spring was larger than that trend. Morgan noticed a spike when local residents received their $1,200 stimulus payments and a drop when the federal govern-

ment’s additional $600 in pandemic unemployment benefits ended. “There was an uptick in sales, definitely, as soon as the lockdown hit,” Carol Erhart, of 4:20 Friendly, said. While the marijuana business has some expected upticks – around the holidays, just before Bloomsday – this one was not so predictable, although in retrospect it was logical, she said. For many people, anxiety levels are up during the pandemic, with worries about catching the virus or whether their job will be affected, if it hasn’t been already, she said. “People are self-medicating,” Erhart said. There had been a downturn in the sales of marijuana vapor products since last fall because of questions over the safety of some chemicals used in them. The sale of “flower” products, or smokable marijuana, stayed steady. “What went crazy were edibles,” Erhart said. “They doubled overnight.” She believes that was because some adult customers were “locked in their homes with their kids” and didn’t want to be smoking around them. Justin Nordhorn, chief of enforcement for the state Liquor and Cannabis Board, had a similar assessment of the connection between sales and the pandemic during a recent work session with the House Commerce and Gaming Committee, which has jurisdiction over marijuana legislation. “I think part of it is how people are managing,” Nordhorn said.

Friday, November 6, 2020


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Friday, November 6, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

NEWS & BUSINESS

SPOTLIGHT

Quincy Green: A gem worthy of discovery

COURTESY PHOTOS

By Kate A. Miner

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Quincy Green, a family-owned, sungrown cannabis farm in Washington’s Columbia River basin, sees 300 days of sunshine per year. Surrounded by the Gorge Amphitheater, apple orchards and golden wheat fields, the flower grown here is hand-tended and harvested, linedried and slow-cured in small batches. “My grandfather moved here in 1907, went to the University of Washington Law School, and then started homesteading this area,” explained co-founder

Mark Olson. “He bought the 70-acre farm in 1921, which means it’s been in my family for almost 100 years. Most of the farm is still commercially farmed, growing wheat and corn, but 3 acres are strictly devoted to cannabis with another 7 acres set aside for future expansion.” Mark started growing cannabis in 2014 with his wife Leslie. Having worked side-by-side to grow their law practice in Seattle, they decided to build on their vision to grow what they hope is some of the best cannabis in Washington. “Our whole focus has been no carbon footprint,” said Mark. “The Quincy Basin

has some of the best soil in the country, and some of the best marijuana in the U.S. grows right here. Our long summers stretch out until the end of October, and we can begin planting as early as May. We even have some plants that come up as volunteers in March.” Leslie and Mark work closely with their partner, Steffen Knightlinger, grow­ er and cultivator. Knightlinger immersed himself in cultivating cannabis 14 years ago, and his passion for the farm, cannabis in general and the entire growing process, is infectious. There are two types of cannabis grown

here. Their full-term, outdoor crop is 100% sungrown and sold under the label Quincy Green. There’s also a greenhouse, with an “indoor” sungrown crop, sold under the label Quincy Reserve; the two labels can be found in about 14 stores throughout the state.

Sungrown approach

Sungrown advocates say this method is truly the best way to grow, since the sun provides more lumens than electric lights, and it is notably better for the See QUINCY, 9


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NEWS & BUSINESS

QUINCY

Continued from 8 environment. “Quincy Green always tests in the 20s for THC, the terpenes are all present, and it is all handpicked, hand-dried, and hand-trimmed,” Leslie Olson said. “We grow 20-24 strains, with classics like Bubba Kush and Northern Lights, but we are one of only two farms that have Tinkerbell’s Revenge, a sativa-dominant hybrid.” Knightlinger said plants typically go in the ground around May 15, using compost and native dirt. Water and fertilizer, if needed, is delivered through a drip-irrigation system. “At the beginning of the year we till compost into the field, only using fertilizers if the compost starts to weaken. Our fertilizer is applied through irrigation, using earthworm casting teas, which help to sweeten the weed and boost terpene production.” In Quincy, frequent 100-degree days during

the summer make watering a challenge. Knightlinger has perfected a system that starts at 4 a.m. and ends at 9 a.m. There are eight zones, and each zone gets about an hour of watering, utilizing approximately four gallons per plant a day. In the middle of the outdoor grow is a greenhouse where hothouse flowers are hand-tended in a controlled smart-house environment. “The flower is slowcured in our humidity-controlled processing building, slowly extracting all the chlorophyll, deepening its flavor, and refining its aroma during the cure,” Mark said. Quincy Green has blackout curtains that line the interior of the greenhouse that close at 7 p.m. and open at 7 a.m. Computerized monitoring provides real-time temperature, light and humidity levels. “We try to get three rotations per season, and I can operate everything from my office in Seat-

COURTESY PHOTOS

tle,” he said.

Harvest to sale

The real magic occurs during curing in the 3,200 square foot climate-controlled building. “Some outdoor grows use hoop houses or flash dry, but we bring our crop in and hang it on these nets,” Mark said. “The

humidity in here is about 20%, when we get the green in here it spikes to 80%. The perfect drying humidity is about 55%. So, we cycle air through until

we can get it back down, doing that consistently throughout the drying process for the perfect dry.” The plants are taken down and cured in bins for eight or nine days. All buds are trimmed by hand and the refuse is used for composting. “The difference between a hand trim and a machine trim is not just the look,” Leslie said. “If you put the buds into a machine, the little trichomes shake off, and machine trims can’t look for mold. If you handtrim you may not have the efficiency, but you really preserve the quality.” Both Quincy Green, Quincy Reserve and Quincy Gold provide a range of products, including flower, prerolls, dabs, and distillate. Pre-rolls are sold in glass tubes with cork stoppers.

Flower is sold in glass jars with bamboo lids, and fully compostable labels are made from sugarcane and printed with vegetable inks. The infused joints, hand painted with distillate and dipped in kief, are works of art, and pre-ground nugs are sold at a lower price point. “This is a personal passion,” Mark said. “My grandfather was a farmer and the farm has been in operation for three generations. Although I chose law as a profession, this place always tugged at me. We investigated apples and other things, but cannabis made the most sense. Every step we’ve taken has been considerate and cost-conscious for our customers, and the environment. All of us at Quincy Green are about hard work, having each other’s back, laughter, and integrity.”


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The Spokesman-Review

NEWS & BUSINESS

Why QR codes are seeing a resurgence in the cannabis world Other labeling rules apply in Washington By Tracy Damon EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

With all the new technology available today, why are some states reverting to older methods when it comes to the packaging and labeling of legalized marijuana and CBD products? Specifically, QR (Quick Response) codes, or other scannable codes, which are now being required by several states on the packages that marijuana or CBD products come in. QR codes are those two dimensional black and white square labels you occasionally see on products or advertising materials. They were invented in 1994 for use in automotive manufacturing before finding use in other industries, like advertising. The trend hit the peak of popularity around 2010 – when smartphone adoption really took off – before gradually fading away, until recently. When scanned with a smartphone, QR codes redirect users to a website, social media site, or an app download page. There, consumers can find information on cannabis or CBD products that is required to be disclosed by certain states, such as batch identification numbers, batch dates, expiration dates, batch size, total quantity produced, ingredients used, and any certificates of analysis from third party labs. The goal of these codes is to provide information to the public that will help consumers make informed decisions about the product they are purchasing. So far, Utah, Indiana and Oregon all require QR or other scannable codes on their cannabis and/or CBD packaging. More states are expected to follow suit in the near future. While scannable codes are not currently required in Washington and are not even under discussion at this point for the near future, the Washington Liquor and Cannabis Control Board does currently require much of the same information to be included on packaging. The WSLCB allows different formats though.

“Bar code scanners are not required. What is required per 314-55-105 WAC is the lot number of the product – the unique identifier number generated by the board’s traceability system,” said Brian Smith, communications director for the WSLCB. “This must be the same number that appears on the transport manifest. Licensees may use a barcode if they choose to though.” Accompanying materials must also be provided along with marijuana products in Washington, or at least made available to the consumer, according to Smith. Among those materials must be a statement disclosing all pesticides applied to the marijuana plants and growing medium during production, or the base plant used to create a concentrate or the extract added to infused products. A list disclosing all of the chemicals, compounds, additives, thickening agents, terpenes, or other substances added to any marijuana concentrate

during or after production must also be accessible. Washington companies can decide on their own how to do this but some options include using a web address printed on the label, writing it all out, or using a scannable code. Given how much room that information can take up, it’s understandable why some companies would opt for a code that can be quickly scanned to take people elsewhere. This is one reason QR and other interactive codes may be making a comeback. While convenient, there were some key reasons why QR codes initially almost disappeared. Originally, they were often slow at transferring users to target sites. Earlier iPhones didn’t have built-in QR code readers. With newer phones, Apple and Android have both enabled the camera to read codes so there is no need to download a third party app in order to use them.

While many of us haven’t used a QR code in approximately a decade, they are becoming useful again as a quick way to convey information, especially in a hands-free format. In today’s pandemic society, many people prefer not to touch a package if possible but can get complete information on a product just by scanning a code. If you find a product you like, QR codes can make it easier to find it again in the future by allowing customers to re-order the product by scanning the code and going to a website or to sign up for loyalty plans or even watch videos on the most effective way to use a product. But will they stand the test of time in the cannabis industry? QR code payment options are currently being rolled out in many countries that could not only make it easier to find out exactly what you are smoking or eating, but also to pay for it without using cash or a credit card.


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HEALTH & SCIENCE

Fertility experts discourage cannabis use when conceiving By Theresa Tanner

EVERCANNABIS WRITER

Data tracked by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention shows that the highest numbers of births in the United States occur in August and September. Count back nine months and we can deduce that the most popular time of conception is during the winter holiday season. It’s not surprising. The weeks from Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day are a time of celebration for many families, with lots of indulgent food and spirits, good cheer and general merriment. Plus, it gets dark so early and it’s too cold to go outside. What else is there to do? And there will be even less to do this year, with COVID-19 safety measures still impacting plans for travel and events. Some couples might consider the winter holidays as a last hurrah before taking the plunge toward pregnancy and parenthood, preparing for a number of lifestyle changes that may need to take place. Fertility specialists recommend that couples trying to conceive avoid caffeine and alcohol, stop smoking, maintain a healthy body weight and diet, and stay active while avoiding overly strenuous workouts. Refraining from drug use is also on the list, but legalized medical marijuana has led some consumers to see it as a necessary medicine and therefore safe to use. While researchers have linked cannabis use during pregnancy to low birth weight, attention issues, and other cognitive and behavioral issue in children, what are the impacts of cannabis on fertility? Dr. Brenda S. Houmard is a board-certified OB-GYN and Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Specialist at Seattle Reproductive Medicine (SRM)’s Spokane clinic. “The effects of cannabis in pregnancy are better known,” Houmard said in a phone interview. “When it comes to exposures – environmental exposures, social exposures, medications – if there isn’t direct research on those agents in fertility, we fall back to what we know about those exposures in pregnancy. So most of the time, we counsel patients that are seeking fertility to follow the same guidelines that they would follow in pregnancy,” she said. Which means, no

cannabis. And that goes for both male and female patients. One of Houmard’s colleagues, Dr. Thomas Walsh, is a physician at SRM in Seattle and Bellevue with expertise in male infertility. He is also a board-certified urologist at the Men’s Health Center at the University of Washington Medical Center, and a UW associate professor of urology. “If you’re trying to conceive, then cannabis is not something you should be using regularly,” said Walsh in a phone interview. Walsh says that there is evidence that cannabis can impact the amount of sperm a man produces, the quality of the sperm, and its ability to fertilize an egg. “Humans have natural receptors for cannabis, that’s why we feel the effects of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the intoxicating agent in cannabis),” he said, then compared the impact of cannabis on sperm to the pre-flight safety briefing that flight attendants give on airplanes. “In case of an emergency on a plane, a lighted walkway will appear to guide

passengers to the exit. Sperm also have a ‘lighted walkway’ that are, in part, the cannabinoid receptors. If those receptors get overwhelmed with extra THC, the system becomes saturated and the sperm doesn’t know where to go.” In fact, the negative impact of cannabis on sperm was so evident that it has even been researched as a potential form of male contraception. The knowledge that cannabis affects sperm is not new, says Walsh. “Men who use cannabis are higher risk for developing testicular germ cell cancer. We’ve had that knowledge for well over a decade.” “What’s new is we now have the ability to ask patients about cannabis use because it’s legal (in Washington). Past or current use is a common intake question,” said Walsh. “With legalization, there was an assumption of safety. That may be false.” One question researchers want to address is the long-term effects of cannabis use on fertility. While scientists can see a powerful impact on active use, there

are still questions about how previous cannabis use, even years ago, may impact fertility. With statewide legalization, opportunities for more research are becoming available, but there are still limitations. “Since it’s still not federally legal, funding for research is limited,” said Walsh. In the meantime, both Walsh and Houmard recommend that couples trying to conceive attempt to balance their whole health. “The general feeling among physicians in fertility is that cannabis use is not a good thing. People who are trained as OB/GYN and urologists are united in the opinion that the use of cannabis during fertility is not helpful, and it may be harmful,” said Houmard. “If you’re capable from abstaining from cannabis, that’s the best course of action,” Walsh said, noting that sperm production in males is a three-month process, so couples need to plan. “Healthy living, regular exercise, stress reduction – do all those things in advance of when you want to conceive.”


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The Spokesman-Review

Keep calm, carry weed son this season

Pennywise. You can also go to higher CBD strains, such as Special Sauce, Critical Mass, or Critical Cure. For more ideas to suit your exact mood, go to Leafly. com and search strains using the “feelings” filter. Once you’ve made your selections, try ordering online to reduce time in store. If your local shop is offering a strain you crave, try using curbside pick-up. These options will make your shopping experience less stressful, and you will avoid creating crowds or waiting in line. Maybe now is the time to try some new products, especially if you are looking for ways to partake without smoking. Along with exercise, meditation and breathing exercises, CBD oil is said to help alleviate symptoms of stress. Full-spectrum CBD or hemp oil is effective at alleviating symptoms associated with stress, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and you can find it in everything from bath bombs to deodorant.

Check your WiFi and plug in

Cannabis products can help life stay festive EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

By Kate A. Miner

Try to relax by practicing mindfulness

Not feeling particularly cheery this year as we approach the holiday season? Wondering how to celebrate during a pandemic? You are not alone. Many find the holidays stressful, but this year will likely be more nerve-wracking. Many are afraid to travel, large social gatherings are pretty much out of the question, and the usual holiday festivities have all been cancelled. Which is why we are offering some suggestions on how to ease the stress of COVID-19 disruptions with cannabis, along with some ideas for making your holiday fun – despite the restrictions.

What is mindfulness? Mindfulness is about bringing your attention to the present moment with an element of nonjudgment and acceptance. Accept that this year will be different and embrace the opportunity to make it unique. It’s a good idea to stock up on some basic stress-relieving weed strains, like Granddaddy Purple (GDP) – considered by many to be one of the best weed strains to create a better outlook on life. GDP is an indica strain that may encourage euphoria and relaxation. A few others in this category are OG Kush, Girl Scout Cookies, 9 Pound Hammer, Mendo Breath, Zkittles, Blackwater, and

Determine what you’d like your holiday to feel and look like this year and set the stage. While the big, in-person gatherings may be out of the question, think of this year as a time when we can all together. Why not set-up a virtual holiday party with friends and family from around the globe? Call that cousin in Australia, include your uncle in Florida. Even your grandmother knows how to video conference by now. Be it Zoom, Google Hangouts, or Skype, encourage everyone to set their table(s) and tunein at a specific time. If events are your thing, discover the new world of virtual entertainment. Crowded concerts are a big no-no, but instead we have a smorgasbord of virtual options from around the world! Search Eventbrite. com, Billboard. com, or type ‘virtual worldwide events’ into your search engine of

Page 13

choice. You can attend virtual conferences, tour museums, attend the ballet, or even past performances of the Metropolitan Opera, right from your living room. Some attractions might include a ticket price, but it’s much cheaper than a traditional performance. Besides, you’re helping to ensure these art institutions are around when we can once again enjoy them in person. One more bonus: No ushers, security guards or fellow patrons to shush you or prevent you from lighting up during the show.

Care for yourself and your community

More than ever, this holiday is about being thankful. Instead of worrying about gifts and elaborate parties, think about ways to give back to your community, to your friends and neighbors, and those less fortunate. Many people have lost their jobs, their homes, and their loved ones over the last six months. This is not the year to be selfish. The cannabis community is all about living a healthy and peaceful life and giving back to the community. If you are involved in the cannabis community, or would like to learn more about it, you might want to explore some of the virtual cannabis conferences and events happening throughout the world. We hope you stay healthy, happy, and high this holiday, no matter how you decide to celebrate. This has been a year none of us will ever forget. Be thankful, be hopeful, and forever grateful for Evercannabis!

HANDLE THE HOLI-DAZE WITH A HOLI-DOSE By Mary J. White

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Can you feel the gradual insidious approach of the holidays? Yup, they’re almost upon us, and no matter what holidays you celebrate, they almost always include some stress. We want to help you relieve that stress with our friend cannabis. But. You might be quarantining or celebrating with relatives that disapprove of cannabis, even in legal-use states. Or maybe you’re feeling down about not being able to see many loved ones. One option is to uplift yourself, and any skeptical dining partners, with a few infused condiments. Condiments are a fine way to get cannabis on your food without medicating the whole table. Set out a few dishes of the goodies below with a note about strain and dosage, and let your guests enjoy or abstain at their leisure on the big day. One thing you’ll quickly discover when cooking with cannabis is the pungent vegetal smell and flavor can be very distinctive. A few people like it, but for the most part making things delicious is one of the challenges of cooking with cannabis. I’ve found adding your infused product toward the end of cooking or as a condiment works great.

Green Spicy Mustard

1 tablespoon cannabis-infused olive oil (or 1 tablespoon kief ) 4 tablespoons ground mustard seed (I like Coleman’s) ¼ cup water 3 tablespoons white vinegar ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon turmeric In a small saucepan, whisk all the ingredients together. Turn the heat to medium and simmer until it’s thick – only about 5 minutes. Remember not to get the heat too high or you’ll lose some THC. Cool it all the way in the pan then store in the fridge – your hamburgers and guests will thank you!

Spicy Sweet Cannabutter

½ cup unsalted butter, softened 6-8 tablespoon cannabutter (I like a 1:1 ratio of plain butter to infused but it’s up to you) 1 Tablespoon gochujang (or Sriracha) hot sauce 1 tsp. agave syrup or honey (adjust to your preference) Pinch of salt Pinch of coriander Mix all ingredients together, chill, and serve with chicken, pork, vegetables or Asian noodles.

Turkey Day Cannabutter

½ cup unsalted butter, softened 6-8 tablespoon Canna butter (adjust to your taste) 1 teaspoon dry sage (or 1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced) ¼ teaspoon dried oregano ¼ teaspoon fennel seed, crushed; and/or ¼ teaspoon celery seed Dash of red pepper flakes Blend all ingredients, chill, then serve with turkey, on mashed potatoes, added to gravy, or just on French bread, especially good for relaxation at Thanksgiving!

Autumn Spice Cannabutter ½ cup unsalted butter, softened 6-8 tablespoon cannabutter 1 tablespoon fresh orange zest 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon cardamom 1 teaspoon ground ginger Optional spiced: Crushed fennel seed, freshly grated nutmeg, and/or ground coriander Large pinch of salt 1 tablespoon honey or agave (add more for extra sweet) Blend all ingredients, chill, and serve with squash, French toast, baked apples, roast pork, or anything that would benefit from relaxing spicy goodness.

Note: Once you get the idea, play with these recipes. Just remember that cannabis needs a lot of help to be yummy, so think spicy, sweet, and citrus when making your own.

Friday, November 6, 2020


Page 12

Friday, November 6, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

Keep calm, carry weed son this season

Pennywise. You can also go to higher CBD strains, such as Special Sauce, Critical Mass, or Critical Cure. For more ideas to suit your exact mood, go to Leafly. com and search strains using the “feelings” filter. Once you’ve made your selections, try ordering online to reduce time in store. If your local shop is offering a strain you crave, try using curbside pick-up. These options will make your shopping experience less stressful, and you will avoid creating crowds or waiting in line. Maybe now is the time to try some new products, especially if you are looking for ways to partake without smoking. Along with exercise, meditation and breathing exercises, CBD oil is said to help alleviate symptoms of stress. Full-spectrum CBD or hemp oil is effective at alleviating symptoms associated with stress, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and you can find it in everything from bath bombs to deodorant.

Check your WiFi and plug in

Cannabis products can help life stay festive EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

By Kate A. Miner

Try to relax by practicing mindfulness

Not feeling particularly cheery this year as we approach the holiday season? Wondering how to celebrate during a pandemic? You are not alone. Many find the holidays stressful, but this year will likely be more nerve-wracking. Many are afraid to travel, large social gatherings are pretty much out of the question, and the usual holiday festivities have all been cancelled. Which is why we are offering some suggestions on how to ease the stress of COVID-19 disruptions with cannabis, along with some ideas for making your holiday fun – despite the restrictions.

What is mindfulness? Mindfulness is about bringing your attention to the present moment with an element of nonjudgment and acceptance. Accept that this year will be different and embrace the opportunity to make it unique. It’s a good idea to stock up on some basic stress-relieving weed strains, like Granddaddy Purple (GDP) – considered by many to be one of the best weed strains to create a better outlook on life. GDP is an indica strain that may encourage euphoria and relaxation. A few others in this category are OG Kush, Girl Scout Cookies, 9 Pound Hammer, Mendo Breath, Zkittles, Blackwater, and

Determine what you’d like your holiday to feel and look like this year and set the stage. While the big, in-person gatherings may be out of the question, think of this year as a time when we can all together. Why not set-up a virtual holiday party with friends and family from around the globe? Call that cousin in Australia, include your uncle in Florida. Even your grandmother knows how to video conference by now. Be it Zoom, Google Hangouts, or Skype, encourage everyone to set their table(s) and tunein at a specific time. If events are your thing, discover the new world of virtual entertainment. Crowded concerts are a big no-no, but instead we have a smorgasbord of virtual options from around the world! Search Eventbrite. com, Billboard. com, or type ‘virtual worldwide events’ into your search engine of

Page 13

choice. You can attend virtual conferences, tour museums, attend the ballet, or even past performances of the Metropolitan Opera, right from your living room. Some attractions might include a ticket price, but it’s much cheaper than a traditional performance. Besides, you’re helping to ensure these art institutions are around when we can once again enjoy them in person. One more bonus: No ushers, security guards or fellow patrons to shush you or prevent you from lighting up during the show.

Care for yourself and your community

More than ever, this holiday is about being thankful. Instead of worrying about gifts and elaborate parties, think about ways to give back to your community, to your friends and neighbors, and those less fortunate. Many people have lost their jobs, their homes, and their loved ones over the last six months. This is not the year to be selfish. The cannabis community is all about living a healthy and peaceful life and giving back to the community. If you are involved in the cannabis community, or would like to learn more about it, you might want to explore some of the virtual cannabis conferences and events happening throughout the world. We hope you stay healthy, happy, and high this holiday, no matter how you decide to celebrate. This has been a year none of us will ever forget. Be thankful, be hopeful, and forever grateful for Evercannabis!

HANDLE THE HOLI-DAZE WITH A HOLI-DOSE By Mary J. White

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Can you feel the gradual insidious approach of the holidays? Yup, they’re almost upon us, and no matter what holidays you celebrate, they almost always include some stress. We want to help you relieve that stress with our friend cannabis. But. You might be quarantining or celebrating with relatives that disapprove of cannabis, even in legal-use states. Or maybe you’re feeling down about not being able to see many loved ones. One option is to uplift yourself, and any skeptical dining partners, with a few infused condiments. Condiments are a fine way to get cannabis on your food without medicating the whole table. Set out a few dishes of the goodies below with a note about strain and dosage, and let your guests enjoy or abstain at their leisure on the big day. One thing you’ll quickly discover when cooking with cannabis is the pungent vegetal smell and flavor can be very distinctive. A few people like it, but for the most part making things delicious is one of the challenges of cooking with cannabis. I’ve found adding your infused product toward the end of cooking or as a condiment works great.

Green Spicy Mustard

1 tablespoon cannabis-infused olive oil (or 1 tablespoon kief ) 4 tablespoons ground mustard seed (I like Coleman’s) ¼ cup water 3 tablespoons white vinegar ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon turmeric In a small saucepan, whisk all the ingredients together. Turn the heat to medium and simmer until it’s thick – only about 5 minutes. Remember not to get the heat too high or you’ll lose some THC. Cool it all the way in the pan then store in the fridge – your hamburgers and guests will thank you!

Spicy Sweet Cannabutter

½ cup unsalted butter, softened 6-8 tablespoon cannabutter (I like a 1:1 ratio of plain butter to infused but it’s up to you) 1 Tablespoon gochujang (or Sriracha) hot sauce 1 tsp. agave syrup or honey (adjust to your preference) Pinch of salt Pinch of coriander Mix all ingredients together, chill, and serve with chicken, pork, vegetables or Asian noodles.

Turkey Day Cannabutter

½ cup unsalted butter, softened 6-8 tablespoon Canna butter (adjust to your taste) 1 teaspoon dry sage (or 1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced) ¼ teaspoon dried oregano ¼ teaspoon fennel seed, crushed; and/or ¼ teaspoon celery seed Dash of red pepper flakes Blend all ingredients, chill, then serve with turkey, on mashed potatoes, added to gravy, or just on French bread, especially good for relaxation at Thanksgiving!

Autumn Spice Cannabutter ½ cup unsalted butter, softened 6-8 tablespoon cannabutter 1 tablespoon fresh orange zest 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon cardamom 1 teaspoon ground ginger Optional spiced: Crushed fennel seed, freshly grated nutmeg, and/or ground coriander Large pinch of salt 1 tablespoon honey or agave (add more for extra sweet) Blend all ingredients, chill, and serve with squash, French toast, baked apples, roast pork, or anything that would benefit from relaxing spicy goodness.

Note: Once you get the idea, play with these recipes. Just remember that cannabis needs a lot of help to be yummy, so think spicy, sweet, and citrus when making your own.

Friday, November 6, 2020


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Friday, November 6, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

HEALTH & SCIENCE

WSU cannabis studies considered in possible updates to state rules Legislative committee evaluates labels, studies By Jim Camden

THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW

With Washington’s legal marijuana sales seeing a boost during the pandemic, a legislative committee that oversees the industry is studying whether to increase the amount of information on product labels and keeping track of the growing number of studies that taxes from those sales support. At a recent “work session” to study issues while the Legislature is adjourned, the House Commerce and Gaming Committee gathered information on whether to provide greater descriptions for consumers of the main chemical compounds. Two main compounds, THC and CBD, along with the precursors that exist in cannabis plants before they are heated, are measured. THC provides the psychoactive euphoria associated with marijuana, while CBD can relieve anxiety and pain, along with aiding sleep. But it’s not just the percentages found in samples of marijuana products that are sent to the labs for testing, said Justin Nordhorn, chief of enforcement for the Washington Liquor and Cannabis Board. How a product is consumed can provide a different result. The committee also is looking at current limits on potency for certain products. Washington limits the amount of THC

in a single serving of any edible product to 10 milligrams, with no more than 10 such servings per package. Next year the Legislature could consider limiting the percentage of THC in cannabis concentrates to 10%, although a bill on that subject failed to make it out of committee in this year’s session. Part of the taxes collected on legal marijuana sales are set aside for research, and Washington State University has a range of studies that include health research, crime, economics and agriculture, the committee was told. To study the effects of marijuana on pregnancy and adolescence, WSU researchers have developed an innovative way to use rats, said Ryan McLaughlin, of the Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience. Researchers have traditionally injected chemical compounds from cannabis into rats, but that doesn’t really correspond with human use because people don’t typically inject marijuana. WSU uses a system in which a rat is placed in a small chamber with the ability to push its nose through an opening that will trigger the release of vapor that includes cannabis extract into the chamber. The system tests adolescent rats to see if they develop a preference for extracts heavy with THC rather than CBD, and how the use affects

CODY COTTIER

A rat sniffs at marijuana fumes flowing into his tank as WSU researcher Jon Davis vaporizes more cannabis in this April 2017 photo. Researchers at the university are using rats in other studies on the drug, including research on potency. changes in the brain when they are grown, McLaughlin said. It also is being used to measure the effects of marijuana on pregnant rats and their offspring. Celestina Barbosa-Leiker, vice chancellor for research at WSU Health Sciences Spokane, said marijuana use by pregnant women doubled between 2002 and 2017, and one survey showed 70% of women believed there was little or no risk to using it one or two times a week during pregnancy. Previous studies

have indicated that it can be associated with low birth weight, decreased IQ scores, attention disorders and decreased academic ability, although it’s difficult to “disentangle cause and effect,” she said. Because THC levels have increased in recent decades, the research needs to be updated for newer levels and newer products, Barbosa-Leiker said. National guidelines say no woman should use marijuana during or right after pregnancy because studies show THC can cross the placenta and

be transferred during breast-feeding, she said. But interviews with a group of pregnant women who said they regularly smoke marijuana told researchers they used it for morning sickness, pain management and as a sleep aid, and considered it safer than opioids or ibuprofen. They were getting mixed messages from health care providers, Barbosa-Leiker said, and were doing their own research. “They’re relying on budtenders for their scientific and medical informa-

tion,” she said, referring to employees at licensed marijuana stores. In discussions with some of those employees, researchers were told budtenders didn’t believe they should get in the way of what they considered a customer’s personal decision. They tended to recommend products low in THC and high in CBD to help with the problems customers were describing. But they also said they had no training about marijuana and pregnancy or breastfeeding and wanted more information.


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Page 15

Friday, November 6, 2020

HEALTH & SCIENCE

DOCUMENTARY DEFENDS POSITIVE VIEWS OF PLANT By Dan Webster

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

We’re close to becoming a ‘CBD Nation’

Despite a glaring lack of credentials, a lot of ordinary people these days act like they’re scientists. That’s evident from the many stories you can find involving various scientific controversies. From those who support the anti-vaccination movement to those who deny climate change and even to those who believe the Earth is flat, proponents of each position can cite evidence they believe reinforces their opinions. But science is not a static process. By definition, it evolves as new studies affect the preponderance of facts underpinning each position. And it is that preponderance, based upon those facts, that sway – or at least should sway – the consensus on any subject. In his documentary film “CBD Nation,” which is streaming through Amazon Prime, iTunes and other on-demand sources, director David Jakubovic tackles nothing less than the argument that the cannabis plant may be a medical elixir. Studies, Jakubovic argues, have long shown that cannabinoids – defined as “any of a group of closely related compounds which include cannabinol and the active constituents of cannabis” – have proven effective in treating conditions as diverse as cancer and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Yet despite such studies, the uncompromisingly negative policy of the federal government – which, Jakubovic contends, is based on cannabis’ traditional affiliation with a generation of Americans seeking just another means of achieving a drug “high” – has caused many detractors to characterize the science behind cannabinoids as unclear. Though 33 states have deemed it legal to use some form of cannabis, and cannabis use is fully legal in 11 states – including Washington – the federal government still classifies it as a Schedule I drug (along with LSD, ecstasy and heroin); this classification are defined as having no accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse. CBD, by the way, is a contraction of cannabidiol and is just one of the approximately 120 cannabinoids found so far in the cannabis plant. Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is another cannabinoid and is what provides those who use it their desired high. Jakubovic spends the whole of his 83-minute film making a positive case for cannabis use in general, and CBDs in particular. He does so by consulting with a wide range of people, from internationally renowned scientists, such as Is-

rael’s Raphael Mechoulam, to regular cannabis users, like Delaware teenager Rylie Maedler. Mechoulam is, by the way, the chemist who first extracted THC from the cannabis plant, while Maedler is a cancer survivor whose successful treatment involved early doses of a cannabis extract. The arguments offered in the film by those facing a variety of emotional and/or physical ailments are as impressive as they are persuasive. Aside from Maedler and a few others, the filmmaker talks to one young woman with anxiety issues and a veteran of Afghanistan with PTSD. Both responded better to cannabis extracts than doctor prescribed drugs, among them opioids such as hydrocodone. Their experiences, of course, are merely anecdotal proof. More convincing in terms of hard science is the testimony of chemist Mechoulam, who stresses that some four decades of research done in Israel has clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of cannabis. “We published our findings 37 years ago,” Mechoulam said. “Cannabidiol blocks epileptic attacks in patients. But epilepsy is just one of many conditions that we know cannabis medicine can treat. If the world chooses to not look at all of the science, it is not ignorance – it’s negligence.” Uma V.A. Dhanabalan, a Massachusetts-based physician, is even more direct. “Stop saying that there’s no evidence,” she said, “There is evidence, and it’s documented, and it is out there for everybody to take a look at. So, if we choose not to look at it, it’s no longer ignorance – it’s arrogance.” For her part, teen Maedler has made it her personal quest to change the laws regarding cannabis use, not just in the United States but around the world. Her efforts at lobbying in her home state even prompted a rare Republican/Democrat-sponsored bill that extended Delaware’s legalization to allow children younger than 18 the right to use cannabis-based oils to treat a range of ailments. The Republican senator Ernie Lopez who introduced the bill, and shepherded it into law – thereafter known as “Rylie’s Law” – had been, until then, a firm cannabis foe. But, as he explains to Jakubovic, his change of heart came because he actually took the time and effort to look at the work pioneered by Mechoulam and others, but specifically at the effect that cannabis had at shrinking Maedler’s cancerous tumor. The difference was how Lopez approached the science. Instead of rejecting it out of hand, the solution, he said, “was understanding it.” Understanding science. Sometimes that’s all it takes.


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Friday, November 6, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

Fun and Games

Xbox Series X

New consoles excite video game fans By Theresa Tanner

EVERCANNABIS WRITER

It’s a good time to be a gamer. With all the extra time at home and indoors in 2020, both novice and veteran video game players have relied on the form for hours of entertainment. And with online play, gatherings in a virtual space are a creative and safe way to connect with friends and family scattered across the globe. Just in time for the holidays, some big developments are on the horizon that will have you even more excited to hunker down at home for a long, cold winter.

Console Wars

Xbox Series X and Series S Release date: Nov. 10, 2020 Introductory price: $499/$299 The Microsoft consoles are the fourth generation of Xbox models, succeeding the 2013 Xbox One. The highend Series X will support up to 8K resolution and frame rates, real-time ray tracing and high-speed solid-state

drive to reduce loading times. It also includes a 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray drive. The low-end Series S uses the same central processing unit (CPU) but with reduced graphics processing, memory and internal storage. It lacks an optical drive, which requires digital game downloads. Both consoles feature backwards compatibility with previous Xbox games, controllers and accessories. PlayStation 5 (PS5) and PS5 Digital Edition North American release date: Nov. 12, 2020 Introductory price: $499.99/$399.99 Sony Interactive Entertainment is also succeeding its 2013 PS4 release this season with two consoles that are virtually the same, save that the Digital Edition is not equipped with an Ultra HD Blu-ray disc drive. With identical technical specifications – instantaneous load speeds, 8K graphics and advanced 3D audio – the choice between the two versions will depend on the preferences of the gamer. If you don’t care about owning physical copies of games and you have reliable Internet that will allow for speedy game downloads, the Digital Edition will save you $100. But if you want

to continue playing old PS4 discs on your new console or watch DVD/Blu-rays, the standard PS5 will be worth the extra expense.

Game on

What good is a flashy new video game console without some brand news games to explore? Here are a few titles you’ll want to get to really create the perfect gift package for your favorite gamer, plus some 2021 titles to look forward to in the new year. “Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War”: Capitalizing on the wave of 1980s nostalgia ushered in by Netflix’s “Stranger Things” in 2016, the latest COD installment pits original “Black Ops” characters against Soviet spies in the middle of the Cold War. The multiSee GAMES, 17

PlayStation 5


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

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Friday, November 6, 2020

CULTURE & LIFESTYLE UPCOMING EVENTS

 Nov. 12

The Cannabis Alliance, Seattle. Monthly meeting of growers, retailers and other supporters of Washington’s cannabis system. The Alliance is also scheduling virtual happy hours for social interaction for members each Tuesday at 5 p.m., and “Office Hours” to meet the staff Mondays and Fridays at 11 a.m. thecannabisalliance.us    

Nov. 17

GAMES

Continued from 16 player game will allow “cross-generation” play, meaning players using different generation consoles and competing platforms will be able to game together. “Assassin’s Creed Valhalla”: After adventures in the Crusades, various revolutionary wars and Ancient Egypt, the open world, role-playing game takes players to the Viking invasion of Britain in the 9th century. The fast loading times on new PS and Xbox consoles will create a more immersive experience, according to game developers. “Cyberpunk 2077”: This long-running tabletop role-player game franchise makes the leap to video games courtesy of CD Projekt, developer of “The Witcher” series. Set in an alternative history America, ravaged by war and societal collapse, the open world game features

a variety of hacker missions and quests, plus guidance from Keanu Reeves as rock star Johnny Silverhand. “Spider-Man: Miles Morales”: A PS-exclusive title, this Marvel Comics game brings the new Spider-Man, Miles Morales (as seen in 2018’s animated film “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”), into focus as a defender of Harlem and New York City against an ongoing conflict between corrupt energy corporation Roxxon and criminal genius, Tinkerer. Future releases: “Resident Evil Village,” “Hogwarts Legacy,” “Final Fantasy XVI” (PS exclusive), “The Ascent” (Xbox exclusive), “God of War: Ragnarök (PS exclusive), “Far Cry 6,” “Halo Infinite”

Strain recommendations

One of the great things about video games is getting transported to another world. And cannabis, when used responsibly

and with moderation, can enhance your experience. We checked in with EVERCANNABIS’s regular strain reviewer Rick Misterly to find strains that will take your game to new heights. Strains to help you focus and stay alert during an intense game: Misterly suggests “a good, old school strain like Acapulco Gold or Durban Poison” to provide energy and alertness “while giving an almost out of body focus that will keep you going and take the mind to the next level.” Low-key strains to mellow you out during a more casual gaming experience: If you’re just vibin’ on your “Animal Crossing” island or trying to keep cool during “Tetris Effect,” a updated version of the classic 1980s tile-matching puzzle game, Misterly offers Shiatsu Kush, Akcademics and Oregon Diesel to “keep you calm … and allow you to slow down, be more analytical and

solve complex problems in a game.” Something that will get you active and moving after a long gaming session: OK, it’s time to put the controller down and get yourself up for some physical activity. Misterly recommends reaching for a strain with a high level of the terpene Limonene to combat fatigue. “Anything with lemon in the name should be high in that terpene and bound to bring you back around: Lemon Sour Diesel, Lemon Haze or good, old Colombian Gold.”

 The Dope Show, Everett. Comedians perform at the Historic Everett Theatre before and after partaking of locally purchased cannabis products. The crowd often loves it. thedopeshow.com  

Nov. 16-19

Interchange, Renton. Retailers and producers are invited to come together to discuss the current industry and learn about each others’ products and services. Event will be divided into two two-day events to accommodate state safety rules. www.interchangemv.com

Dec. 15-17

Winter Emerge Virtual Cannabis Conference. This online event brings together more than 30 speakers. Event includes the ability to create an avatar to attend a virtual job fair, discuss current trends and get to know representatives from more than 50 businesses and other influencers.  emergecanna.com   Due to health concerns, some events may be canceled, postponed or moved online. Please check with event organizers to verify prior to attending.


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Friday, November 6, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

CANNABIS BRIEFS

King County proposes shifting revenue Opponents fear budget move could impact area public safety

ASSOCIATED PRESS

King County Executive Dow Constantine talks to reporters March 4 during a news conference in Seattle.

SEATTLE – King County Executive Dow Constantine has proposed reallocating $4.6 million from the county sheriff’s department budget to help residents with past cannabis problems. The money comes from legal cannabis tax revenues allocated to counties around the state. Dow would like to see the money to toward programs, such as youth marijuana prevention, and also help people vacate past convictions and clear fines/fees due to past cannabis arrests or convictions. The fund shift is in his budget proposal for the next two years. “As my proposed budget took shape, our anti-racism priorities and criminal legal system transformation coalesced around three principles: Divest, invest, and re-imagine,” Constantine said. “By divest, I mean stopping current practices

green ribbon cutting ceremony, followed by a meet and greet with customers. The event also unveiled a new art piece displayed on the building’s exterior by local muralist, Jeff Jacobson, also known as Weirdo. The 30-by-80-foot mural depicts Kemp playing basketball in his Seattle SuperSonics uniform. Kemp is partnering in his cannabis venture with industry veterans Matt Schoenlein and Ramsey Hamide, two of the co-founders of Main Street Marijuana, the number one cannabis retailer in the state of Washington since the company’s inception in 2014. Source: The Seattle Times

Source: Marijuana Moment

More licenses available in Everett

Hoops legend Kemp opens cannabis store SEATTLE – Last week, SuperSonics legend Shawn Kemp opened a cannabis shop in the Lower Queen Anne neighborhood of Seattle. Shawn Kemp’s Cannabis, located at 3035 1st Ave. near the Climate Pledge Arena (formerly KeyArena, the longtime home of the Sonics) and the Space Needle, became Seattle’s first Blackowned dispensary with its opening on Friday, Oct. 30. “I hope that Shawn Kemp’s Cannabis will be an inspiration for people to get involved with the legal cannabis industry, especially people of color,” said Kemp in a news release. Kemp was joined by his former teammate, Hall of Famer Gary Payton for a

that cause harm, and diverting the savings to serve a greater good.” This is part of a recent push by some in various Washington municipalities to focus less on enforcement funding and more on helping traditionally disadvantaged populations. His proposal would divert $2.8 million to vacate convictions due to marijuana-related offenses that are no longer against the law, along with settling any court fees or restitution. It would also put $1.8 million toward community services and employment. The proposal has already met with opposition from King County Council member Reagan Dunn, who feels it’s dangerous to public safety to reduce law enforcement resources.

COURTESY OF SHAWN KEMP’S CANNABIS

EVERETT – The City of Everett will allow three more cannabis retailers, five years after setting five as the maximum number in city limits. The City Council voted 6-1 in mid-October to approve a plan to permit a maximum of eight stores. There are restrictions for a shop to receive a license, however. It must have a state medical marijuana endorsement and be at least 2,500 from any existing cannabis store. Though the city has been granted approval from the state to license as many as 10 shops, past city leaders were initially cautious and only issued permits for five licenses when establishing the legal marketplace.

However, public interest has grown toward more access to cannabis, especially for medical needs. Other cities in Snohomish County are also seeing increases in revenue. Predicted fears of increased crime and addiction never came – in comparison to proponents who said cannabis was a useful alternative to prescription medicine. Several supporters spoke at the council meeting, including parents who say cannabis access has helped their children’s medical treatment. The Everett Police Department said that calls to cannabis shops were the same or lower than calls to alcohol establishments. Source: Daily Herald


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Page 19

CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

Author Heather Cabot shares peek into industry rebranding By Joe Butler

EVERCANNABIS WRITER

Cannabis culture wasn’t part of Heather Cabot’s world, and any thoughts she may have had about weed were stoner stereotypes that don’t quite fit in our current environment at all. It’s not just her either: much of the world is learning, or perhaps re-learning, that cannabis plays an increasingly important role in more and more people’s lives – including the bank accounts of entrepreneurs trying to be part of what’s being called the ‘Green Rush.’ In her new book, “The New Chardonnay: The Unlikely Story of How Marijuana Went Mainstream,” Cabot shares her observations and experiences watching cannabis rebrand itself from something illegal and dangerous that respectable people aren’t supposed to discuss, into a multi-billion dollar and legal industry that’s expected to keep growing as more states change their rules. “I knew nothing of the cannabis industry, it wasn’t part of my life,” she shared during a September conversation with The Spokesman-Review’s Northwest Passages Book Club. “I grew up in the ‘Just Say No’ generation, I was a suburban mom of teens, it’s just like the furthest thing from my life.” During the virtual forum, led by Spokesman-Review reporter Kip Hill, Cabot took viewers on her educational journey of learning how diverse the cannabis industry is. This included visiting farms and trade shows; California wineries, some of which are diversifying into a new product; and Canadian dispensaries that are looking for all sorts of ways to put this plant into products. She learned about the unlikely partnership of design guru Martha Stewart and rapper Snoop Dogg, and even traveled with Mr. Dogg and his business partner Ted Chung. Cabot has an extensive news background, including an ABC News correspondent and co-anchor for ABC World News Now/World News This Morning. She later was assigned the tech beat as Web Life Editor for Yahoo!, a position that helped her learn about this new and dynamic industry.

Get your copy

“The New Chardonnay” can be ordered online or found at Auntie’s Bookstore. Watch a replay of the Northwest Passages Book Club presentation at https://www. spokesman.com/video/2020/sep/03/ northwest-passages-author-heather-cabotand-new-ch/

It led to the publication of “Geek Girl Rising,” in 2017 a book that explored the growing role of women in high-tech, a traditionally male-dominated industry. In researching that book, the New York resident met several women financiers and angel investors who were eager to provide resources especially to women-owned tech firms. Later she learned many of them were setting their sights on cannabis as the next exciting growth area. “I was struck by the fact that these were all people I regarded as very straitlaced – they had these Wall Street credentials, Ivy League pedigrees,” she said. “I was just shocked that they would be investing money, their own money, into something federally illegal. I just didn’t understand that, so I started making some calls.” Cabot said one investor said the topic was too big to discuss over the phone, but encouraged her to attend MJBizCon in Las Vegas, considered the largest cannabis industry convention in the world. That showed her, right away, how professional and legitimate the industry was and how large of scale it is. The 40-minute discussion covered her experiences following certain industry members as well as provided some predictions where the industry growing, especially since it is seeing so much support at all levels. This includes many former foes in law enforcement and government, even members of the historically tough on drugs Republican Party. For instance, former House Speaker John Boehner is now on the board of a multi-state cannabis company and a firm advocate. The fact that cannabis businesses were declared essential in Washington and other states goes a long way. “Something is happening here,” Cabot said.

Friday, November 6, 2020


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Friday, November 6, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

NEWS & BUSINESS

Fairwinds tries to set industry bar for quality, variety

A selection of Fairwinds tinctures.

Vancouver company enjoys enhancing flavors By John Nelson

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

When I first tried cannabis tinctures a few years ago, I wrote them off as being ineffective. Then last fall, I used Fairwinds Deep Sleep after a friend recommended it. I was skeptical – until I was sawing logs about 30 minutes later. This tincture was the first I’d ever tried that delivered what it promised. Even though it contained a considerable amount of THC, it didn’t make me high – it just made me feel relaxed and, yes, very sleepy. Then I tried another Fairwinds product because of its quirkiness – Sriracha THC Tincture. The little tincture container is a hoot, looking like a mini version of the ubiquitous hot chili sauce bottles that feature a strutting rooster on the label. Again, I was skeptical, until about 15 minutes after placing a couple of droppers full of the fiery-hot tincture under my tongue. All I can say is – wow! Not only was I pleasantly warm from the tincture’s spice – I was stoned, quickly and efficiently. OK, Fairwinds was two-for-two. Clearly, this company knew what it was doing when it came to cannabis tinctures. “We’re always very focused on making the most effective products out there,” said Logan Alden, director of sales for Fairwinds, which is based in Vancouver, Wash. Fairwinds is known for quality, Alden said, with its own indoor-grown cannabis used to create full-spectrum oils “rich in terpenes and completely free of residual solvents,” according to the company website. All of the grow and science takes place at the Fairwinds

COURTESY PHOTOS

A Fairwinds employee creates a tincture. facility, an example of the company’s commitment to controlling its processes from plant to finished product. “Washington doesn’t allow vertical integration in its cannabis business, but we are as vertically integrated as we can be,” Alden said. Part of the Fairwinds difference goes beyond cannabis. Each tincture offers other ingredients that help create its

powerful effects. For example, the Fairwinds Deep Sleep Tincture contains herbal extracts that assist in producing drowsiness. And the Sriracha THC Tincture has a secret ingredient that helps it deliver its intoxicating punch: “Capsaicin (the component of peppers that provide heat/spice) dilates the blood vessels, thereby allowing the THC in each

serving to enter the bloodstream more quickly,” the Fairwinds website states. Most of Fairwinds’ tinctures also use avocado oil, which helps the body absorb it. Fairwinds was the first to use avocado oil, and now competitors “are copying us,” Alden said. The Fairwinds tincture line is vast, including products that help with digestion, anxiety and energy level. The company also has the popular CBD Ratio line, with tinctures of varying potency of CBD to THC, from 20:1 to 1:1, for people who don’t really want the intoxicating effects of cannabis. Tinctures aren’t the only thing Fairwinds does. The company also produces topicals – its Flow gels and creams are among their best-sellers – capsules, coffee, vape cartridges, and now Fairwinds has a potential game-changer on the cannabis market. That would be their new line of inhalers, which Alden said has been wildly popular. The inhaler looks like any other medical inhaler, delivering its product without heat “which preserves the terpene and cannabinoid content in its purest form,” according to Fairwinds. “It will bring you a quick high and you don’t get any exhale,” Alden said. “As far as discreteness goes, it can’t be beaten.” Fairwinds continues to innovate and grow, Alden said, and plans are in the works for potential expansion into Oregon and Michigan. And while Fairwinds offers a number of recreational products, it remains focused on “cannabis as medicine,” Alden said. “We are primarily a wellness company.” Besides its state-regulated cannabis products with THC, the company also offers a line of CBD-only products.


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Q & A

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Friday, November 6, 2020

LEARN & GROW

In the dark about psilocybin mushrooms

Advocates say certain fungi help mind, body By Rob Mejia

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Dear CannaCurious, Lately I have been seeing a bunch of articles about psilocybin, which I understand mean psychedelic mushrooms. Are these the magic mushrooms I remember from the 1970s, and why are we talking about them again? Signed, A Fun Guy Dear Fun Guy, If you follow cannabis news, you are probably seeing related articles about magic mushrooms/psilocybin (pronounced nsy-lə-SY-bin) because mushrooms and cannabis share some common attributes and may be attracting a similar consumer base. Here are some basic facts about mushrooms: • Mushrooms are fungi, but not all fungi are mushrooms • Mushrooms are 90% water • Over 10,000 types of mushrooms have been identified, but many more remain undiscovered • Mushrooms have been used for centuries for both medicinal and spiritual reasons • Researchers think that mushrooms containing psilocybin (over 200 species) cause a “hyperconnected brain” where parts of the brain that don’t usually communicate begin to make connections Another reason you are reading about mind-altering mushrooms is that several municipalities, namely Denver in Colorado, and Oakland and Santa Cruz in California, recently decriminalized the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A vendor bags psilocybin mushrooms at a cannabis marketplace in Los Angeles in this May 2019 photo. possession and use of psilocybin mushrooms. This month, the state of Oregon and Washington D.C. will be voting on decriminalization as well. But we still have a long way to go towards national decriminalization or legalization of so-called magic mushrooms. Psilocybin mushrooms remain illegal in most of the U.S. and, like cannabis, are considered a Schedule 1 drug – a substance that has a high risk of addiction and no recognized medical use. But advocates tout mushrooms as a safe drug with numerous health, psychological, spiritual and emotional benefits. And those benefits

are being taking seriously. Johns Hopkins University is currently conducting research on types of mushrooms to see if they can help with conditions such as depression, nicotine dependence, Alzheimer’s, anxiety, opioid addiction and PTSD. Mushroom parallels to cannabis in many ways. Just like cannabis, the method of consumption makes a difference as to time of onset and how long the experience lasts. As with cannabis, factors such as size of dose, setting, product taken, individual health factors, and expectations may also influence the experience. Mushrooms are often eaten

dry or fresh (dry mushrooms are more potent than fresh mushrooms), sometimes mixed with food or consumed in tea. Effects start in 5 to 10 minutes if taken in tea, and in about 30 minutes when ingested. The mushroom high lasts for 4 to 6 hours, but some users report a longer duration, but you won’t feel any lasting effects after 24 hours. One increasingly popular service in the mushroom space is the use of “mushroom guides” who are experts in dosing, safety, species types and the ability to explain what will happen. As with each person, an experience can differ widely. But generally, with a modest

dose defined as .5 to 1.5 grams, the user may feel the following effects which occur in phases: • Sounds, colors, and objects may begin to look and sound different • Some people may experience what are called “visuals,” or mild hallucinations On the positive side, psilocybin mushrooms can make you feel giggly, euphoric, bring on feelings of awe and connection, and provide energy. On the negative side, consumers may feel nauseous, anxious, paranoid and overwhelmed. But the negative experiences and feelings are usually traced back to the user’s state of mind when the journey began. To promote a positive outcome, approach the experience with a feeling of safety, confidence, and the willingness to surrender to the crossing. Another reason to work with an experienced mushroom guide is to avert the ingestion of poisonous mushrooms that can look very similar to a magic mushroom. Every guide will tell you to avoid using substances such as alcohol, cannabis, and other mind-altering drugs at the same time in order to focus solely on your psilocybin adventure. Overall, the experience of using mushrooms can best be described as a focused, connected way to interact with and examine your inner life. You will make connections that have never occurred to you. You are likely to appreciate those around you and nature in a more profound way. You will feel grounded and part of the earth. You may laugh, you may sing but you will definitely emerge as a different person. May you travel safely and peacefully.


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Friday, November 6, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

LEARN & GROW

COOKING WITH CANNABIS

GET THE GOODS ON GLYCERIN Sweet liquid great

Turn the cooker on low and let the mixture work for 24 hours. Shake the jar occasionally, and when it’s done, you’ll have a jar full of sweet, thick, brown-ish tincture. Strain through the cheesecloth and you’re ready to make all kinds of cool stuff, like a smooth and sweet dessert

in many recipes By Mary J. White

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

In September, I talked about the greatness of cannabis tinctures, and this month we’re going to play with glycerin tinctures. Vegetable glycerin is cool stuff – derived from vegetable fats, glycerin is a syrup-y clear liquid that’s sweet and odorless. It’s also alcohol- and water-soluble, so it’s super easy to work with. I get mine from Amazon, but it’s available in most organic groceries and health food stores. Make sure you get USP-grade, as that’s safe for cosmetic and food uses. This tincture differs from the alcohol tinctures not only in taste but in use. Because it’s sweet-ish, it’s great for sublingual use or as an addition to drink or dessert recipes.

Green P’Nut Butter Mousse

1 cup cold heavy cream (Get the highest

Infused glycerin tincture

8 grams decarboxylated cannabis (If you use hemp, you’ll get a CBD tincture. If you use sativa, indica, or a hybrid, you’ll get a lovely, strong fullplant tincture.) 8 ounces USP-grade vegetable glycerin Glass jar with lid Slow cooker Dishtowel Cheesecloth First, as always, we decarb. If you missed my article on fat infusions, what you need to do is heat your cannabis to remove the extra carbon molecule and make the cannabinoids bioavailable. I use a 1:1 ratio, so for 8 oz. of tincture, you’ll want to decarboxylate 8 grams of cannabis. Toast your cannabis in a 250-degree oven for 30 minutes on a lined baking sheet, remove and let cool. Then crumble your plant material into your jar with a lid and fill with the glycerin.

Glycerin tinctures mousse.

This next part can be a little tricky. To prep, put a folded-up dishtowel in the bottom of the slow cooker. This is really important; if you don’t do this, the bottom of the jar can get too hot and burst, and then you’ll be very unhappy and unable to salvageable the tincture. Put the jar with decarbed flower

and glycerin in your slow cooker. Make sure your jar sits on the towel securely and that the lid to the jar is also secured tightly. Add water to the slow cooker until it is about two-thirds the height of the jar. You don’t want to submerge it, just make sure all of the stuff in the jar is surrounded by water.

butter fat content you can; 40% is ideal) 2 to 3 tablespoons THC glycerin tincture ¼ cup crunchy peanut butter (I recommend a quality brand with no added sugar) ¼ cup white chocolate chips, chopped, divided ¼ cup lightly salted shelled peanuts, chopped, divided ½ teaspoon cornstarch 1 teaspoon vanilla 3 tablespoons powdered sugar 1 teaspoon cinnamon (optional) Large pinch of salt (optional) Mint leaves to garnish (optional) For the best result, make sure your mixing bowl and beaters are well chilled. Pour the cream into your cold mixing bowl and start to mix on low. With the beaters going, add the tincture, cornstarch, vanilla, sugar, cinnamon and salt, if using. When the mixture is about halfway to whipped, add the peanut butter and about half of the chips and peanuts. Whip until firm but still pillowy; be careful not to let it break or approach the butter stage. Serve in glasses or dessert bowls, and sprinkle the rest of the peanuts and chocolate chips over. Garnish with mint!

Dosage note: If you use my 1:1 ratio, you’ll be getting approximately 100 mg of cannabinoids per gram before decarb. So, if you use 2 tablespoons of tincture, your dessert will contain around 200 mg total cannabinoids.


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

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Friday, November 6, 2020

STRAIN OF THE MONTH

‘Where’s My Bike?’ Potent strain makes it easy to forget … something By Rick Misterly

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Let’s say that you’ve just rolled a good one to light up after reaching a certain discreet point on your afternoon pleasure bicycle ride. You stop and sit back beneath a tree facing the beautiful off-trail view and have a few good puffs. Faster than you think, you’re surprised to see that the joint is practically already half smoked and that the missing half is in your head. Maybe it was five minutes, maybe it was 45 minutes, but you’re suddenly brought back to reality with the flash of “How did I get here? Oh, yeah, my bike.” You might wonder where your bike is, but realize that you’re probably better off not operating any type of machinery at all right now. But you’ll have to get home eventually. “Wait, how did I get here again? Oh, yeah ...” All this could take place after trying Where’s My Bike, an especially potent strain grown by Green Haven Premium. We’re not talking total amnesia but your mind could possibly wander freely into thoughts funny and profound. Like “Where” could easily be replaced by “When”? As in, when did that happen? “What”? What was I just thinking? Oh yeah…” This is probably one of the most potent strains I have tried in the last few years of reviewing the legal offerings of our state. The body high alone is enough to keep you still to appreciate a growing relaxation. What could be bad about forgetting the hard day’s work you just put in? This strain is fine to enjoy on your own, but two or more people on the same wavelength could reach some outrageous heights.

Appearance: The two nice full buds making up this gram bag were tight clusters trimmed closely. What remained was a smooth, fine covering of medium green highlighted by many undamaged orange pistils. Buds were all evenly encased in mostly clear trichomes. What I’ve found in many buds trimmed down this far is they tend to be hard, dry and rock-like. These specimens were very solid but with a little give to them and dried perfectly to where they didn’t crumble or break to a light touch. This is something nice to discover but unfortunately with packaging you won’t find what you have until you open it up. Walking into 2020 Solutions in Ephrata, I asked the two young budtenders for a gram of something good and fresh and they almost collided in going for “Where’s My Bike” by Green Haven. Good job, guys. Aroma: A bright yet not overpowering lime strikes upfront first with a certain sweetness hinting of nectar or a lime jellybean. Lingering behind these initial scents is a peppery floral, more like a mustard or arugula flower than a sharp black pepper. The aroma alone is enough to bring on uplifting sensations. Effects: You would have to build up quite a tolerance to this strain if you wanted to go about your usual daily routine after partaking. It’s a powerful stone that shouldn’t be resisted once the high 25% THC begins to kick in. If forgetfulness comes, embrace it and soon that lost thought will slip away into something new. If you are an Alpha personality type who expects to always be in control this might not be the best strain for you. But if the sensation of a hazy wonderment sounds enjoyable, have at it and let it all go. And don’t forget: Mix and mingle, but stay spaced out.

RICK MISTERLY/FOR EVERCANNABIS

WHERE’S MY BIKE Grown by: Green Haven Premium Products, Darrington (Tier 2) Hybrid: Amnesia x Biker Kush THC: 25.0% CBD: 0.1% Purchased at 2020 Solutions, Ephrata


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Friday, November 6, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

Profile for Cowles Publishing

November Evercannabis  

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