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March 2021

www.evercannabis.com

Growing at home is limited, as are seed sources ARTISTS FOR AID Regional glassblowers unite for fire victims

SUGAR-FREE CANNABIS Edible makers offer alternatives

CRAFT CANNABIS CUP Trade group honors industry achievements


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Friday, March 5, 2021

The Spokesman-Review


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

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Friday, March 5, 2021


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Friday, March 5, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK

VOLUME 6 | ISSUE 3

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Kathleen Coleman DIRECTOR OF SALES

Dan Fritts

MANAGING EDITOR

Joe Butler

HEALTH & CULTURE EDITOR

Theresa Tanner

ART DIRECTOR, MARKETING

Anne Potter

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Chris Soprych

Evercannabis magazine is a monthly supplement of The Spokesman-Review. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent of the publisher.

@EvercannaNews on social media www.evercannabis.com Evercannabis@spokesman.com 509-459-5095 PROUD MEMBER OF:

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Constant cannabis advocacy takes toll Same battles against new foes can be tiring By Joe Butler

EVERCANNABIS EDITOR

My friends are tired and I understand why. Some have been trying to educate the greater community about the value of cannabis for a long time, even though some aren’t always eager to listen or learn. For context, Evercannabis came into being in spring 2016 when we turned on the fire hose of “we want to learn it all and tell our readers all about it.” That’s just about enough time to learn the language, understand the science, and actually participate in conversations, rather than polite “uh-huhs” or “that’s interesting.” I can now ask, I hope, intelligent questions, and throw around phrases correctly like terpene profiles and the endocannabinoid system, which, until recently, meant nothing to me.

We like to think of ourselves as mostly experts by now, and are always happy to point people in the right direction, whether they’re looking for a certain strain, a certain piece of processing machinery, or the right person to talk to. I remain grateful to those who patiently helped our whole team get up to speed fast. Many of them were advocates even before the passage of I-502 in 2012, and provided input into the initial ingredients for Washington’s legal recreational system. Some, after successfully gathering signatures, attending hearings and meetings, and pushing people to vote, decided to stay in the system, hoping to educate lawmakers, city governments, and regulators as well as to tackle topics that weren’t addressed in the original initiative. By 2016, when we joined the conversation, there was still high enthusiasm, but in 2021, I’m seeing and hearing more fatigue and frustration. Yes, accomplishments have been made in normal-

ization over the last decade. Some of the “wait and see” fears have turned out to be moot as Washington has provided a model to other states for a fairly well-regulated system. Cannabis was declared an essential sector when COVID-19 shut down so many businesses last spring. Some advocates have already gotten out. Others have wondered whether the good fight is still worth it, especially when they find themselves making the same arguments against the same resistance but from new faces as lawmakers and administrators cycle in and out, some ready to stand firm on what they believe. If you’re weary, you have our support. There are indications it could get better this year as a new political administration wrestles with lifting some burdens. The millions of dollars up for grabs are still out there. If you have friends who have helped you on your cannabis journey, thank them! Or learn to be an advocate yourself!

EVERCANNABIS CONTRIBUTORS Linda Ball is a freelance journalist based in Washington State. In her 18 years as a journalist she has covered a wide variety of topics including environmental issues, city hall, arts and entertainment, education, human interest stories and now the cannabis industry. Joe Butler is a longtime marketing writer and editor at The Spokesman-Review. He’s an enthusiast of Star Wars, commemorative spoon collecting, and the Oxford comma. Tracy Damon is a Spokanebased freelancer who has been writing professionally for 20 years. She has been covering i502 issues since recreational cannabis became legal in Washington. Pia Hallenberg spent 20 years in journalism in Spokane, before starting her own PR/content development agency. She is a social media manager, and she writes online community content, as well as cyber security blogs and briefs. Taryn Mickelson is originally from New Mexico and now works in Washington’s cannabis industry. She enjoys writing about the positive changes in this rapidly-growing business. Kate A. Miner has a degree in visual anthropology, and has worked in marketing and advertising for many years. She writes, takes photos and teaches yoga. Rick Misterly is a Washington resident whose interest in cannabis dates back to the 1960s and has taken him around the world. He’s the cannabis and hashish curator for Green Barn Farms in Addy and writes the “Rick’s World of Hashish” blog. Dan Webster is a former Spokesman-Review staff writer who is a community producer for Spokane Public Radio and a blogger for Spokane7.com.


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

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MARCH TABLE OF CONTENTS

14

Friday, March 5, 2021

15

16

ARTISTS UNITE

Glassblowers raise funds for community. . . . . . . . . . 6

BUSINESS BOOMS

Cannabis industry keeps growing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

GROW OP FARMS

Q&A with Katrina McKinley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

SEED TO SPROUT

Buying cannabis seeds poses challenges . . . . . . . . 10

MOUNTAIN RULES

It’s part of the culture, but not allowed . . . . . . . . . . 12

GET BODYHIGH

Seattle-based processor offers virtual workouts. . 13

Rocky Mountain high

12

CANNABIS CRAFT CUP

WSIA honors best in craft industry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

CURB THE SWEET TOOTH

Sugar-free edibles in demand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

CHRONIC USE

Consequences of microdosing uncertain. . . . . . . . . 16

STRAIN OF THE MONTH

Funky Monkey Guerilla Kush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Evercannabis, The Spokesman-Review and the Cowles Company don’t promote or endorse the use of cannabis products. We acknowledge that marijuana products remain illegal under federal laws. If adults age 21 or older choose to purchase or use them, we encourage them to consume sensibly and at their own risk in legal jurisdictions, in accordance with state and local laws. Some cannabis products have intoxicating effects and may be habit-forming. Consumption of marijuana also may be associated with health risks and impaired concentration, coordination, and judgment. Keep away from children. To learn more, visit the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.


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The Spokesman-Review

NEWS & BUSINESS

Cannabis industry comes to aid of fire victims across Northwest

Funding helped displaced, destroyed businesses By Linda Ball

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

During fall 2020 it seemed like much of the West was on fire. When a ferocious wildfire started near Ashland, Ore., glass artist Lacey Walton, better known as LaceFace Glass online, said she could see a cloud of smoke the size of a city block from her home. She rounded up her child and dogs and got out of town. “I was really afraid and drove to my grandparent’s house,” she said. Walton’s home was spared when the wind took the fire the opposite direction up the Interstate 5 corridor to the tiny towns of Talent and Phoenix. But she knew of about 10 fellow glassblowers along the route who lost their studios, homes or both. Federal aid has been slow to non-existent, so Walton and other cannabis industry folks throughout the Northwest began organizing and raising money to help the victims. Glass artist Tyler Bowman, who lives in Spokane Valley, grew up in the Talent/Phoenix area. A friend owns a hemp farm in the area told Bowman that 35 Hispanic workers he employed lost their homes. With $2,500 of his own money matched by that same amount from a former business partner, plus other donations, Bowman was able to raise $10,000 for those who lost everything. Walton has been a glass artist for 17 years and is well-known in the Northwest glass pipe com-

JESSE TINSLEY/THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW

In downtown Malden, Washington, the former post office at lower left and another historic building at lower right still smolder Sept. 8 the day after a fast-moving wildfire swept through the town west of Rosalia. munity. With 50,000 Instagram followers, she knew she could leverage that following to help some of her industry friends who had their livelihood obliterated by the fire. She and her husband launched a GoFundMe page and raised an astonishing $100,000. She started off by auctioning off one of her own pieces for $5,000. From there, the fundraising went viral with glass artists and others in the cannabis industry all over the country

auctioning off art or making donations. Walton said that between 380 and 400 pieces by various artists were sold in the auction. “In the aftermath it was, ‘How can I help my community?’” Walton said. “It was a really beautiful thing, a really positive, uplifting experience.” She distributed $10,000 to $15,000 to 30 individuals and families who are glass artists that so they could get back to work. Half of the $100,000 went

to five glass artists who lost absolutely everything. The balance was prioritized to other glassblowers; a friend who managed a grow store who lost his home of 20 years; and others in the cannabis industry. Another friend who had a hemp farm offered to drive supplies to families in need. Walton said thousands in the area had to be evacuated. She described the experience as traumatizing. Bowman said another hemp farmer delivered aid to dis-

placed workers who weren’t getting any aid. He said a week after the fires, he went to the area and saw no state presence. About 12,000 people in Talent/ Phoenix lost everything. The direct action group Rise and Resist’s Oregon chapter jumped in to help as well. “I just did what I could,” Bowman said, adding that the glass community will continue to do food drives throughout the year. See AID, 7


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NEWS & BUSINESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Italia Guterrez, 9, searches the rubble of her family’s mobile home Sept. 10 in Talent, Ore., that is covered in red residue from an air drop of fire retardant.

AID

Continued from 6 Matthew Friedlander, a cannabis processor in Mt. Vernon, allocated 10 percent of retail sales of Skagit Organic Products in November 2020 to assist efforts in Washington. The money will go to help the people of Malden and the

Okanogan area. All funds are being managed by United Way of Whitman County and the Community Foundation of North Central Washington with fund raising continuing. At this point the effort has raised $4,000. Friedlander organized his efforts through his other brand, Smoke Local, with plans to secure

non-profit status for the organization. He said it will be a very hyperlocal charity with the goal of highlighting the impact of the local cannabis industry on local community efforts. Friedlander said Smoke Local will be a community engagement group, with Skagit Organics focusing and serving the medical community.

COURTESY LACEY WALTON

The crew of DOJO Glass Studio includes, from left, Amani Summerday, Doug “Taco” Kimmons, Jay “Birddog” Harrower, Lacey “LaceFace” Walton, Turtle “Turtletime” Anuway and Big Country. The Oregon studio burned in fires last fall.

Friday, March 5, 2021


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Friday, March 5, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

NEWS & BUSINESS

Grow business and booming market trends in cannabis industry Demand growing for non-smokable items By Pia Hallenberg

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

When New Jersey legalized marijuana in November 2020, the number of states and territories where recreational marijuana is legal rose to 15. Considering that Colorado and Washington, the first states to legalize recreational marijuana, did so not even 10 years ago in 2012, legalization of recreational marijuana is happening across the country at a steady pace. Though the recreational marijuana market can be volatile – especially for smaller growers and retailers – it seems that what is driving legalization is equal parts of individual consumer desire for a joint or a “special” chocolate after dinner, as it is COVID-19 devastated states’ desire to access a previously untapped source of tax revenue. And what a revenue source that is. In Washington (as in other states) the marijuana industry is tightly regulated which means it’s easy to look up sales and tax numbers. The numbers in this story all come from www.502data.com. Grow Op Farms (see story on page 9) in Spokane Valley is the largest producer and processor in Washington. In November 2020 its wholesale total was $41,889,602 – which means the state collected $4,411,348 in taxes from just one company. In December, consumers purchased $18,253,993 worth of marijuana products across Spokane County. That breaks down to every resident spending just a little less than $40, according

Jerred Kiloh, owner of the Higher Path medical marijuana dispensary, prepares bundles of $20 bills for a trip to Los Angeles City Hall in June 2017 to pay his monthly tax payment in cash in Los Angeles. ASSOCIATED PRESS

to 502data.com, and it brings the state just a tad bit less than $5 million in excise tax from one county, in one month. Business investors were initially reluctant to invest in the cannabis industry. A couple of years ago, the industry went through an intense round of buying and selling, which consolidated ownership and weeded out the less viable growers and sellers. It remains booming industry. The Motley Fool, an online investment tracking website, listed the top five 2019 marijuana markets by state in billions – yes, billions with a B. • California, $3.1 billion (the largest market in the world) • Colorado, $1.6 billion

• Washington, $1.1 billion • Florida, $1 billion • Michigan, $1 billion The market shows no signs of slowing down, and some financial experts predict the value of the American market will grow from around $19 billion now to more than $40 billion by 2050. For comparison, the value of the American wine market today is estimated at around $75 billion. Are you tired of numbers yet? Or just quietly contemplating if the future of the marijuana industry will look like hightech bubble and burst of the early 2000s? It’s difficult to know. One thing is for certain: as the stigma of marijuana

products wears off, the industry is responding with a steady stream of new products aimed at the non-smoker. Products expected to trend in 2021 include many types of beauty and skincare products, as well as pain relieving ointments and cremes made with cannabis oil. Beverages continue to evolve as well. A few California bars experimented with cannabis infused cocktails, but that brought on a regulatory nightmare. There is already a large selection of infused beverages available at most cannabis retailers and you can expect that to grow to include more juice and fruit drinks, and maybe even beer.

Sweet treats such as hard candies, mints, chews, and chocolates continue to grow in popularity, and are beginning to show up on private dessert tables. And finally, there is the pet market – as in the dog and cat treat market. Most veterinarians caution very strongly against the topical use of marijuana products on pets, but some pet owners experiment topical with oils for pet ailments such as arthritis and various skin conditions. It’s important to remember that marijuana is poisonous to dogs and cats – pet products should only contain CDB, never THC (the psychedelic component in marijuana).


Q& A Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Katrina McKinley, COO of Grow Op Farms in Spokane Valley

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Friday, March 5, 2021

NEWS & BUSINESS By Pia Hallenberg

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

What’s your connection to Grow Op Farms? I am the Chief Operating Officer. Myself and my husband, Robert McKinley, are the founders of Grow Op Farms, which we started in 2014. Did you start in Spokane Valley? Yes, we did start in Spokane Valley. We now also have smaller grow operations in Lake Elsinore and Greenfield, in California. Looking at Washington state data, Grow Op is by far the biggest grower in the state – how many people do you employ? We have about 625 employees in Washington state. PHOTOS COURTESY GROW OP FARMS

Do you have plans for expansion in Spokane Valley or elsewhere? We have maxed out our current Spokane facility in terms of expansion, however we are expanding to other states.

Do you ship to all states where marijuana is legal? No, because of federal laws and regulations we are not allowed to ship our products outside the state of Washington.

How large is your output on a national level? Are you one of the largest growers in the United States? I don’t have data to accurately compare to the output of other companies in other states. However, I do believe we are one of the largest growers overall. Do you grow medical and recreational marijuana?  Grow Op farms does not have a “medical designation” – we only farm recreational marijuana

Talk about some of your brands – which one is your most popular? Our Phat Panda brand flower is still our top seller, followed by Sticky Frog concentrates, and then our Hot Sugar edibles line. There are so many different producers and product lines – how do you stand out and profile yourself? We feel we consistently offer the best top-quality product for the price. Our packaging and labels are very eye catching and tend to draw customers in, if they are not already aware of our brand.  

What – if any – impact have you felt on your business from the COVID-19 pandemic? When COVID first hit, we saw a spike in sales across the board. Sales were up for many months and have just in the last month began to level back off to pre-COVID levels. Are certain products of yours more popular during COVID? Which ones? We saw a much larger increase in sales of our edibles line, Hot Sugar, than anything else. Finally – whip out your crystal ball and talk about the future of recreational cannabis. It looks like legalization is continuing to happen in many states – what are your plans to meet demand? Along with expanding to California we are also beginning operations in Massachusetts. We may consider other states in the future.

Grow Op Farms, Spokane Valley November wholesale was a little more than $32,400,000, making Grow Op the highest producing grower in Washington. Website: growopfarms.com Brands: Phat Panda, Sticky Frog and Hot Sugar Strains include: Lavender, God’s Gift, Grand Daddy Purple and F#?k Yeah Strawberry among many others.


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The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

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Friday, March 5, 2021

cepted, it’s unlikely you will face legal consequences. But you may still face legal jeopardy if you have to cross state lines to bring them home. You should also make your purchase from a reputable seed bank capable of shipping to numerous states that understands the need for discretion. If the seeds are confiscated, most firms will either send a new package for free or refund your money.

Where to buy seeds

Knowing this answer can affect how, where, what to purchase By Kate A. Miner

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Although an increasing number of states are relaxing restrictions on growing cannabis at home, Washington is not one of them, as of press time. While a bill that would allow adults 21 years and older to grow recreational-use cannabis at home has been introduced in the Washington state Legislature, currently the only legal exception for home growing is medical. If you have a Washington medical marijuana card, you can grow a small number of plants without registering, and up to 15

if registered. If that’s the case, and you’re ready to start planting, where can you find seeds? The short answer? It’s complicated. Even if you live in California, where it is legal for adults to grow cannabis at home, and you purchase seeds from a California-based seed bank, your package can still be confiscated if mailed. In fact, you could get in more trouble for buying seeds from within the U.S. than from overseas, which is why the majority of reputable seed banks are in Europe.

How to buy seeds

Even though the United States is one of the world’s most progressive countries in terms of cannabis legalization, the herb remains federally illegal. For this reason, it might be best to get your seeds from a friend or buy directly from a licensed shop. However, in these cases, you’ll have limited options that may not be suited to how and what type of cannabis you want to grow. For more variety you can buy seeds online, although there are risks. Consider having them shipped to a state where growing marijuana at home is legal. That way, if your package gets inter-

One of the more trustworthy sellers in the United States is I Love Growing Marijuana (www. ilovegrowingmarijuana.com/). Its website features information about growing, what types of seeds you’ll need and more. The website and store are run by Robert Bergman, an expert cultivator, and provides free shipping to customers in the United States and Europe. Other online marijuana seed sellers in the U.S. may use incorrect labels when shipping, with terms like “luxury bird food” or “fishing bait additives.” Stores also may sell seeds as “collector items” or “additives.” Another site worth exploring is the Royal Seed Bank (www.royalseedbank.com/) from Canada. This site breaks everything down by the legality of each U.S. state and provides a variety of options. Since most seed banks that offer cannabis seeds source them from seed banks in European countries, you may want to search there too. Cannabis seeds are not illegal in the European Union, and technically it’s not illegal to purchase seeds from another country. The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, a 1962 framework for marijuana legalization, is an international treaty signed by 180 countries stating that marijuana is classified as an illegal substance, but it says nothing about seeds. Therefore, since international law takes precedence over a country’s own laws, cannabis seeds are technically legal in all 180 countries. However, when a product enters a European country, it becomes subject to that nation’s laws, which means it’s not easy to purchase seeds. For example, here is a look at cannabis seed laws in a few major European nations: Germany: Seeds do not fall under the German Narcotics Act, so they are technically legal to purchase. Germany has prohibited the sale of cannabis seeds nationwide, but since the country is subject to the EU’s free movement of goods, having seeds sent to Germany is fine. United Kingdom: At present, the UK allows for the purchase, sale, or trade of cannabis seeds whether you purchase them domestically or from another European nation. Netherlands: Despite the nation’s relaxed attitude towards marijuana, it is still illegal to possess or purchase. However, you should have no issue purchasing cannabis seeds from a Dutch-based seed company. Spain: Spain has a similarly lenient policy as the UK. Residents can buy and sell seeds if they are for personal use in private areas.

PHOTOS BY GETTY IMAGES

What to buy

There are three distinct types of cannabis seeds. Regular seeds come from one female and one male parent and there’s a 50/50 chance that the plant will be the feminized version that will produce buds. However, you have no control of the plant’s gender and there’s always a chance you’ll waste weeks growing, only to learn a male plant will not yield what you’re seeking. Feminized seeds have no male chromosomes and are guaranteed to provide resinous bud. Autoflowering seeds are your best option if you want to grow indoors. These seeds have genetics which evolved in northern Eurasia, which makes them strong and sturdy. They are also mixed with cannabis ruderalis, a plant known for its ability to grow in harsh weather conditions. One of the biggest advantages of autoflowering seeds is their ability to produce a minimum of two outdoor crops. When you grow them indoors, however, you can produce four or five crops a year, and certain strains can become mature in as little as 10 weeks. They are heavily resistant to mold and pests and produce a higher yield when exposed to powerful light sources.

Final thoughts

You can learn more about the different types of seeds, strains, and how best to grow them on most seed bank websites along with any applicable local laws. Do your research, and keep in mind how, where, what and when you want to grow before making a purchase. Always buy from a reputable seed bank. The last thing you want is to buy what you think are feminized seeds, only to discover that they are regular seeds only capable of producing male plants. How much you will pay for seeds depends on the strain you buy. Typically, a pack of 10-12 seeds can be as low as $40 but expect to pay up to $500 for high-end strains. You can purchase seeds within most states where growing cannabis is legal, but the issue is still complicated by the fact that the plant is federally illegal. In the United States, cannabis seeds cannot cross state lines. Though rare, transporting the products across state lines could result in federal charges. This is true even if you are purchasing cannabis seeds in a state that authorizes it and are entering a state that also authorizes it. For that reason, you may want to seek the advice of an attorney well-versed in cannabis law to make sure you are protected when buying seeds.


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The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

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Friday, March 5, 2021

cepted, it’s unlikely you will face legal consequences. But you may still face legal jeopardy if you have to cross state lines to bring them home. You should also make your purchase from a reputable seed bank capable of shipping to numerous states that understands the need for discretion. If the seeds are confiscated, most firms will either send a new package for free or refund your money.

Where to buy seeds

Knowing this answer can affect how, where, what to purchase By Kate A. Miner

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Although an increasing number of states are relaxing restrictions on growing cannabis at home, Washington is not one of them, as of press time. While a bill that would allow adults 21 years and older to grow recreational-use cannabis at home has been introduced in the Washington state Legislature, currently the only legal exception for home growing is medical. If you have a Washington medical marijuana card, you can grow a small number of plants without registering, and up to 15

if registered. If that’s the case, and you’re ready to start planting, where can you find seeds? The short answer? It’s complicated. Even if you live in California, where it is legal for adults to grow cannabis at home, and you purchase seeds from a California-based seed bank, your package can still be confiscated if mailed. In fact, you could get in more trouble for buying seeds from within the U.S. than from overseas, which is why the majority of reputable seed banks are in Europe.

How to buy seeds

Even though the United States is one of the world’s most progressive countries in terms of cannabis legalization, the herb remains federally illegal. For this reason, it might be best to get your seeds from a friend or buy directly from a licensed shop. However, in these cases, you’ll have limited options that may not be suited to how and what type of cannabis you want to grow. For more variety you can buy seeds online, although there are risks. Consider having them shipped to a state where growing marijuana at home is legal. That way, if your package gets inter-

One of the more trustworthy sellers in the United States is I Love Growing Marijuana (www. ilovegrowingmarijuana.com/). Its website features information about growing, what types of seeds you’ll need and more. The website and store are run by Robert Bergman, an expert cultivator, and provides free shipping to customers in the United States and Europe. Other online marijuana seed sellers in the U.S. may use incorrect labels when shipping, with terms like “luxury bird food” or “fishing bait additives.” Stores also may sell seeds as “collector items” or “additives.” Another site worth exploring is the Royal Seed Bank (www.royalseedbank.com/) from Canada. This site breaks everything down by the legality of each U.S. state and provides a variety of options. Since most seed banks that offer cannabis seeds source them from seed banks in European countries, you may want to search there too. Cannabis seeds are not illegal in the European Union, and technically it’s not illegal to purchase seeds from another country. The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, a 1962 framework for marijuana legalization, is an international treaty signed by 180 countries stating that marijuana is classified as an illegal substance, but it says nothing about seeds. Therefore, since international law takes precedence over a country’s own laws, cannabis seeds are technically legal in all 180 countries. However, when a product enters a European country, it becomes subject to that nation’s laws, which means it’s not easy to purchase seeds. For example, here is a look at cannabis seed laws in a few major European nations: Germany: Seeds do not fall under the German Narcotics Act, so they are technically legal to purchase. Germany has prohibited the sale of cannabis seeds nationwide, but since the country is subject to the EU’s free movement of goods, having seeds sent to Germany is fine. United Kingdom: At present, the UK allows for the purchase, sale, or trade of cannabis seeds whether you purchase them domestically or from another European nation. Netherlands: Despite the nation’s relaxed attitude towards marijuana, it is still illegal to possess or purchase. However, you should have no issue purchasing cannabis seeds from a Dutch-based seed company. Spain: Spain has a similarly lenient policy as the UK. Residents can buy and sell seeds if they are for personal use in private areas.

PHOTOS BY GETTY IMAGES

What to buy

There are three distinct types of cannabis seeds. Regular seeds come from one female and one male parent and there’s a 50/50 chance that the plant will be the feminized version that will produce buds. However, you have no control of the plant’s gender and there’s always a chance you’ll waste weeks growing, only to learn a male plant will not yield what you’re seeking. Feminized seeds have no male chromosomes and are guaranteed to provide resinous bud. Autoflowering seeds are your best option if you want to grow indoors. These seeds have genetics which evolved in northern Eurasia, which makes them strong and sturdy. They are also mixed with cannabis ruderalis, a plant known for its ability to grow in harsh weather conditions. One of the biggest advantages of autoflowering seeds is their ability to produce a minimum of two outdoor crops. When you grow them indoors, however, you can produce four or five crops a year, and certain strains can become mature in as little as 10 weeks. They are heavily resistant to mold and pests and produce a higher yield when exposed to powerful light sources.

Final thoughts

You can learn more about the different types of seeds, strains, and how best to grow them on most seed bank websites along with any applicable local laws. Do your research, and keep in mind how, where, what and when you want to grow before making a purchase. Always buy from a reputable seed bank. The last thing you want is to buy what you think are feminized seeds, only to discover that they are regular seeds only capable of producing male plants. How much you will pay for seeds depends on the strain you buy. Typically, a pack of 10-12 seeds can be as low as $40 but expect to pay up to $500 for high-end strains. You can purchase seeds within most states where growing cannabis is legal, but the issue is still complicated by the fact that the plant is federally illegal. In the United States, cannabis seeds cannot cross state lines. Though rare, transporting the products across state lines could result in federal charges. This is true even if you are purchasing cannabis seeds in a state that authorizes it and are entering a state that also authorizes it. For that reason, you may want to seek the advice of an attorney well-versed in cannabis law to make sure you are protected when buying seeds.


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Friday, March 5, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

No toking on the slopes Area ski resorts still discourage cannabis use By Tracy Damon

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

In spite of more legalization and acceptance, smoking pot and skiing remains one of those “don’t ask, don’t tell” activities. People getting high in tandem skiing or snowboarding has been happening since the beginning of the sport. Consuming marijuana can impair concentation and coordination, but it’s not uncommon in the snowbound community to unwind responsibly with a bowl after a day on the slopes. And while you may detect that familar aroma around more than a few skiiers, most ski resorts turn a blind eye to it unless it causes problems. Despite recreational marijuana use being legal in Washington, public consumption still is a crime, which means it isn’t officially welcome at Pacific Northwest ski resorts. Some, however, may be a little more tolerant than others, but it’s more of an unofficial policy. Here are the individual rules and perspectives from some resorts around the Inland Northwest – both Washington and Idaho.

Mount Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park

The location differs from other area ski resorts in that it isn’t profit-driven. While skiing has been available on Mt. Spokane since the 1930s, the resort was incorporated as a non-profit organization in 1997. It is also located on public, versus private, property. “We’re a little different because we’re a non-profit 501©3 in a state park,” said Jodi Kayler, assistant general manager and marketing director. “So all marijuana is forbidden on state park land. We

follow all state park rules.” According to the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, it is illegal to use recreational marijuana in state parks. Medical marijuana has a little more flexibility: It may be consumed in state parks as long as the user is outside of public view and can provide a medical marijuana card if asked. That doesn’t apply to park structures, so if you rent a cabin or yurt and get caught smoking cannabis in it, you could be in trouble.

49 Degrees North Mountain Resort

While this resort is a for-profit business, it is similar to Mt. Spokane in that it is located on public property and therefore has a zero tolerance policy for the use of marijuana. “We operate on U.S. Forest Service land and are subject to their rules/guidelines,” wrote Emily McDaniel, director of marketing and communications, in an email. “Being federal land, federal laws supersede state laws, and currently marijuana possession or use is still a federal crime under most circumstances, including recreational use.” The United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service website elaborates: “The U.S. Forest Service will continue to enforce and investigate the use, growing, transport and possession of marijuana on National Forests as we have in the past because it is illegal.”

Schweitzer Mountain Resort

Welcome to Idaho, which has strong penalties for any kind of cannabis. “State law is that it’s illegal,” said Dig Chismer, marketing manager for the Sandpoint

location. “I don’t know that we’ve noticed more incidents (of marijuana use since it was legalized in neighboring Washington State), but it has changed the way we interact with new staff, because many staff members live in Washington. During employee orientation, we are very clear that it may be legal there, but it’s not here.” Schweitzer’s website lists multiple things lift privileges can be revoked for, including reckless skiing and snowboarding caused by “Disorderly conduct, loud or abusive language, drunkenness, use of illegal drugs, throwing trash or other objects from the lift.” While Chismer says that Ski

Patrol members will take action against people who do display such behavior, or put themselves or others at risk, they are not law enforcement officers and do not actively look for people using cannabis at the resort.

Silver Mountain Resort

Also located in North Idaho, where marijuana is still considered a controlled substance, the Kellogg ski area’s website states, “No smoking, including e-cigs, is permitted.” In addition to tobacco, this rules out joints and vape pens.

Mission Ridge Ski and Board Resort

Outside of Wenatchee, on the

eastern side of the Cascade Mountains, Mission Ridge spans public lands managed by three separate agencies, the U.S. Forest Service, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Washington State Department of Natural Resources. With the USFS being a federal agency, pot is definitely not welcome or tolerated. So marijuana is pretty much frowned upon across the board at Washington and Idaho ski resorts, even though its usage is frequently tied to the culture of skiing and snowboarding. In the end, ski resort staff say it boils down to being respectful – and skiers for the most part always are – so, as long as you don’t give them a reason, they won’t ask if you don’t tell.


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

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Friday, March 5, 2021

CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

Heylo presents BODYHIGH workouts By Kate A. Miner

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Heylo Cannabis specializes in high-terpene extracts, rare cannabinoid strains, and providing memorable cannabis experiences all with a mission to help anyone get more out of life. The Seattle-based processor partners with pesticide-free and sustainable growers to deliver products free from harmful contaminants. Company leaders stress education and transparency as core values, but things get really interesting where it approaches the science of how cannabis works with the body. “Heylo exists to help anyone get more out of life with cannabis,” said Chuck McKeen, director of sales. Company officials have done extensive research into each strain, including the percentages of THC, CBD, and CBG, plus terpene details, full analytical reports, and unique “cannastamps,” which are visual guides to terpenes and cannabinoids for each product. Heylo also provides guidance on all the

effects each product will have on your body, such as full descriptions of how it will make your body feel. Each strain also includes a recommended playlist with music best suited to activities while enjoying this specific high that can be streamed from its website. Company officials hope consumers will pair a strain with how they want to feel, such as a workout or mood, and enjoy the music to help you along. Their goal is to engage “active stoners,” or people who incorporate cannabis into a healthy, active lifestyle. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Heylo was all about bringing this body high approach to the Seattle community through events. The company hosted “high” art and/or music events, plus workouts in cool places like rooftops, followed by dance parties, many sponsored by local cannabis shops. But when a global pandemic brought public gatherings to a standstill, company officials started thinking of other ways to keep their followers engaged. In mid-2020 the company introduced

BODYHIGH, an “elevated fitness and wellness virtual session” guided by cannabis-educated trainers and personal fitness gurus. Consumers wanting to take part are asked to first determine their ideal strain, such as “The New Workout Plan,” described as “an exhilarating, energizing oil with more than 20% delta-10 THC,” and said to deliver a super energizing and uplifting experience, “perfect for getting motivated post-work to complete chores you don’t want to do, getting ready to crush your workout, or as an amazing coffee alternative in the morning.” Next, go to www.heylocreate.com/ events and register for a workout. More workouts are added throughout the year in a variety of disciplines. Participants can create their own personal body high, enjoy a guided workout, learn more about how your body interacts with the strain and the workout, and then kick back afterwards with the suggested playlist for your own personal dance party. BODYHIGH is led by professional trainers and personal fitness instructors

who have a relationship to cannabis. Plus, representatives from the Heylo team are available to offer education and resources with each session to help attendees learn how to incorporate cannabis into active lifestyles. Heylo was founded by Lo Friesen in 2017, an environmental chemist with a background working in gastroenterology. Her passion for practical medicine led her to cannabis and extraction sciences. She is Heylo’s sole owner, a unique position among cannabis businesses in Washington. It has been named Best Overall Company by Leafly, and was honored for Best CBD Product by the website in 2018. It’s PAX pods are listed as one of the highest-rated in the U.S., and the most popular PAX Pod in Washington in 2020. McKeen said Heylo simply enjoys finding ways to help people. “Events like BODYHIGH, combined with our dedication to education and transparency in all aspects of our products and business, help us achieve our mission,” he said.


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Friday, March 5, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

NEWS & BUSINESS

Sungrowers Assocation honors growers with Craft Cannabis Cup By Joe Butler

EVERCANNABIS WRITER

The Washington Sungrowers Industry Association, a trade group of cannabis producers and processors from around the state, recently recognized more than 30 industry members for their efforts and accomplishments. The first-ever Craft Cannabis Cup presented awards in 15 categories, including best flower and best edible. Executive Director Crystal Oliver said the Craft Cannabis Cup was designed to bring together industry members throughout the state in the spirit of friendly competition. “Washington truly does have the best cannabis in the country, and it’s important that we preserve the smaller craftscale producers and processors,” she said. More than 30 judges with cannabis knowledge were asked to select the finalists in each category. These includes store owners, budtenders, social media influencers, and consumers. The judges collectively brought more than 500 years of cannabis experience. Some categories were based on the quality of product, others based on how it was grown – such as full outdoors, in greenhouses or using light deprivation techniques. The association also has hosted the Sun Cup each spring for the past three years, another opportunity to recognize the diverse products grown and created in Washington. Planning is in motion for this year’s Sun Cup. Entries are always welcome, as are applications for possible judges. Proceeds from the Craft Cannabis Cup help fund the association’s legislative and regulatory advocacy efforts. The finalists included:

Runners-up: Sunshine No. 4, Wildwood Flower Farm; Kill Kenny, CannaSol Farms

Best light-dep sungrown flower

Winner: Slurricane, Lazy Bee Gardens Runner-up: Dutch Royale, Eagle Trees; Mimosa, First Light

Bud Company

Best infused joint

Winner: Diamond Tips, Gold Leaf and Polar Icetracts Runners up: Trifecta, Puffin Farm; C02 Live Resin and Kief Coated Super Joint, CannaSol Farms.

Best solvent-free rosin

Best CBD flower

Winner: Malibu Marsha, No Mids Runners up: Sour Garlic Cookies, No Mids; Kanaka Kush, Gold Leaf and Polar Icetracts

Best indoor and greenhouse-grown flower

Winner: Remedy, Puffin Farms Runners up: My Sunshine and Cosmic Charlie, both from Raven

Winner: Harlequin, Washington Bud Company Runners up: Frida, Raven; Sour Tsunami, Lazy Bee Gardens

Winner: Tropicana Cookies, Good Good Garden Runners up: Dutch Treat Haze and Afghani Hash Plant, both from Washington

Best CBD cartridge

Best THC cartridge

Winner: Wedding Cake, Lazy Bee Gar-

Best dab

Winner: Mochi Gelato, Lefties Cannabis Co Runners up: Gorilla Unglued, Lefties Cannabis Co.; Mac & Cheese, Gorge Gold

Best preroll

Winner: Smokes Lavender Kush, Raven Runners up: Double Lemon Cheesecake, CannaSol Farms; Blueberry, Golden Leaf

Best topical

Winner: Solace, Green Revolution Runners up: Canis Soothing Liniment, Washington Bud Company; Intimate Lubricant, Green Revolution

Best savory edible

Winner: Lori’s Roasted Garlic Potato Chips, Craft Elixirs Runner up: Lori’s Sea Salt and Cracked Pepper Potato Chips, Craft Elixirs

Best CBD edible

Winner: Pioneer Squares Sour Cherry, Sour Elixirs Runner up: Turn On: Remarkable High CBD Spray, Green Revolution

Best tincture

Winner: Finest Cannabis Tincture Beauty Sleep, Green Revolution Runners up: Avocado Oil-Based Tincture 1:1 and Finest Cannabis Tincture Journey Sativa, both by Green Revolution

Best sweet edible

Best full-term sungrown flower

Winner: Rolexx, Eagle Trees

dens Runners up: Garlic Mushroom Onion, Yield Farms; Albino Koala, Raven

GETTY IMAGES

Winner: Mixed Flavor Doozies, Green Revolution Runners up: Green Baker’s Gluten Free Cookies, Green Revolution; Lori’s Sweet Potato Chips, Craft Elixirs


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

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Friday, March 5, 2021

HEALTH & SCIENCE

SUGAR-FREE CANNABIS Edible makers seek sweet but healthy solutions

By Dan Webster

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

For much of the past year, the threat of the COVID-19 virus has overshadowed one obvious fact: the major cause of death in America traditionally has been heart disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, some 655,381 U.S. citizens died in 2018 from heart ailments (edging out cancer, which placed second at 599,274). And when it comes to heart problems, many experts in the health field blame refined sugar as a major cause. “(O)ne area that may surprise many men is how their taste for sugar can have a serious impact on their heart health,” said Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Speaking to the Harvard Medical School newsletter, Harvard Health Publishing, he added, “Excess sugar’s impact on obesity and diabetes is well documented.” In a 15-year study, published in 2014, Hu and a team of colleagues discovered that those who consumed between 17 and 21 percent of their calories from added sugar had a 38 percent higher risk of dying from heart disease than those who consumed 8 percent or less. “Basically, the higher the intake of added sugar, the higher the risk for heart disease,” Hu said. Because of such concerns, a number of cannabis producers across the country are offering an array of sugar-free cannabis-infused edibles. In a 2018 story, the cannabis magazine Leafly wrote an article headlined, “12 Sugar-Free Edibles for a Healthier High.” One of the products mentioned was Swifts Edibles Green Tea Peppermint Mints, made by Raymond, Wash.-based Green Labs. Described as “delicious, fresh, and sugar-free,” the mints were said to be, “an all-natural, discreet way to medicate,

boasting 20 mints with 100mg THC per container.” Companies across the nation are following suit. One company taking heart health seriously is Wana Brands, a Boulder, Colo.-based maker of edible cannabis products. As the Colorado business newspaper BizWest reported, Wana Brands shifted away from the use of high-fructose corn syrup because of customer demand. The company, CEO Nancy Whiteman said, spent months “searching for the perfect organic sweetener substitute that would not sacrifice our products’ taste and texture.” In Washington, the question of sugar-laden cannabis-infused edibles became an issue in October 2018 when the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board banned the sale of many candy-type products. The problem, though, was not the presence of sugar itself but the presumption that cannabis candies would appeal too much to children (the ban was overturned last summer when edible producers agreed to abide by stricter packaging requirements). Whatever the law, the demand for sugar-free cannabis edibles hasn’t gone away, causing Washington producers to continue looking for ways to offer sugar-free alternatives. Jeff Eckenrode, Hashtag Cannabis & Supply Co.’s chief operating officer, wrote that health is one of his company’s top priorities. “(W)hat if you’re trying to lose weight?” Eckenrode asked. “Or if your diet doesn’t allow you to eat

foods that are high in sugar? Not to worry, you’re not alone. A lot of the budtenders at Hashtag have dietary restrictions just like you.” Among the products that retailer Hashtag offers at its Seattle and Redmond locations: Olala, which produces a range of sugar-free Sparkling Sodas, and ZootRocks candies that are sweetened with a blend of non-GMO sugar beet and Stevia. Tate Miller, manager of Spokane’s The Vault, says his store carries only one sugar-free brand of edibles at the moment: candies made by the Bellingham-based company Verdelux. He said he’s carried other brands in the past, and he sells a variety of vegan edibles and even some that are kosher.

“We try to accommodate everyone we can,” Miller said, adding that the sugar-free edibles he has carried are sought mostly by customers who are diabetic. “There is a demand for it,” he said. “It’s just not as high a demand as for the regular edibles that we carry.” Regardless, he added, when he does have the sugar-free brands on hand, “they go pretty fast.” No wonder. Especially now, you can’t put a price on good health.


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Friday, March 5, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

HEALTH & SCIENCE

DAILY DOSAGE

GETTY IMAGES

While some medical marijuana patients have found success with cannabis instead of pharmaceutical drugs, medical professionals provide caution of side effects.

Science unsure if chronic usage helps or harms By Taryn Mickelson

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Cannabis is a popular substance that has been used – legally or illicitly – for thousands of years. Some like it because they believe it provides medical benefits, including chronic pain relief. Others use it simply for fun. There are some who need or want it daily, while others prefer to toke only on special occasions. Daily use may offer benefits, but also could cause harm if used improperly or in excess. Israeli researchers have been studying the effects of frequent

use and recently presented clinical evidence that cannabis at microdose levels (using extremely low compounds for specific effects) can relieve pain, while avoiding other side effects. This study published in the European Journal of Pain showed that the optimal and most effective dose to relieve pain is 500 milligrams of THC, the principal psychoactive constitute of cannabis. Patients in the study would consume 3-4 inhalations of up to 500 mg per day. Researchers said the study indicated that human sensitivity to THC is much greater

than previously presumed, resulting in fewer side effects and more effective treatment methods. Spokane resident Tracy Sirrine, founder and CEO of Patients for Patients Medical and former sales representative at Naked Science CBD Infused Solution, has many years of experience within the medical cannabis field. She has witnessed many miracles of cannabis when used medically. “I have seen many patients where cannabis had a major positive effect with chronic pain,” she said. “One that sticks in my mind is a women who was able

to walk for the first time in years, as well as quit many medications due to the miraculous work microdosing gave her.” Cannabis has been known to help cancer patients improve quality of life, especially stimulating appetite in chemotherapy patients. This is due to THC tricking the brain into making it think the body needs food by activating its pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, which signal fullness. A 2019 study at Wayne State University showed that cannabis also affects the amygdala response of those dealing

with symptoms of anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Those who took THC at a low dose showed a lower threat-related fear and anxiety response in situations designed to trigger these emotions. Sirrine also has observed similar benefits. “I witnessed 80% of patients with PTSD who did not need to do trial anti-depression medication due to cannabis use with the right strain and dose,” she said. Andreas Zimmer, a longtime U.S. National Institutes of Health See DOSAGE, 17


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Page 17

Friday, March 5, 2021

HEALTH & SCIENCE

DOSAGE

UPCOMING EVENTS

Continued from 16

Wednesdays

researcher and one of Germany’s most respected neuroscientists, has been studying whether regular cannabis use can help slow the process of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. His findings were presented in 2005 when he showed data indicating that THC does slow age-related degeneration. Sirrine once received a wonderful written testimony from a nursing home where residents had tried a few cannabis products. One patient was able to move her head for the first time in a long time and also was able to remember more.

Possible down sides

Although these studies and observations are encouraging, medical professionals warn about possible side effects, especially when cannabis is used at a higher and longer daily dose. Required warning labels say that cannabis can be habit-forming and create a strong need for more. Then again, other things can make you feel good and crave more of, including morning coffee or exercise. “Everything can be used as an addiction, so if you are going to use cannabis and you know you can’t function – you can’t take care of yourself, or you’re not taking care of your kids and you continue to use cannabis – then that is all on you,” Sirrine said. A 2021 YahooLife article by Emily Paluszek said other negatives of frequent cannabis use can include fatigue, anxiety or paranoia, Cannabis Use Disorder, respiratory or heart issues, functional and structural changes to the brain, changes in homeostasis, fertility issues, withdrawal and coordination issues

Webinar Wednesdays, weekly virtual gatherings provide info about various current topics including the proposed Cannabis Research Commission (March 10), Equity and Patient Needs (March 17), Expungement, Equity and More (March 24) and Beyond Regulation in Cannabis. thecannabisalliance.us/events/

Saturdays

Cannabis Cooking Classes, Soul Fresh in Boston offers live virtual cooking lessons Saturdays, 12:30-3:30 p.m. PST. Attendees learn salves and food, and receive a digital cookbook. www. soulfreshwellness.com.

TARYN MICKELSON/EVERCANNABIS

Although some cannabis users advocate regular, even daily use of pre-rolls and other cannabis items, medical experts say this generally isn’t the best idea. with response. Behavioral issues in schizophrenic patients can occur when cannabis is used in large doses and frequently. According to a 2013 joint study performed at Imperial College London, University College London, and King’s College London, long-term habitual use of marijuana can lead to severe dopaminergic dysfunction. The study found that subjects who partake in weekly or daily heavy usage produce far less dopamine than non-users or social smokers. The small amount could lead to decreased motivation and fatigue. In March 2019, Lanset Psychiatry discovered that THC can temporarily induce psychiatric symptoms in healthy volunteers. This link isn’t, however, a new finding: a cannabis study made this observation over 150 years ago. Sandpoint resident David Gunter has seen all sides of cannabis. The singer/songwriter/

multi-instrumentalist was a regular user for the past 50 years. But he felt like his relationship with the plant was coming to an end over the last few years. Even he thoroughly enjoyed cannabis throughout his lifetime, it was starting to become a little too much of a habit and there were things that needed to be done that he felt daily use was hindering. “My experience is purely of my own and I will always stay a huge fan of the sacred herb,” he said. “Cannabis has high esteem for its magic and healing benefits; it just started to not do it for me anymore. It was a great time and I thoroughly enjoyed the ritual and feeling of acceptance in the nature of the cannabis subculture. “I am all for advocating about the benefits, but you as a person have to be able to know when cannabis is no longer serving you, as with anything pay attention to how it affects you whether it be negative or positive.”

tle. Monthly meeting of growers, retailers and other supporters of Washington’s cannabis system. The Alliance is also scheduling virtual happy hours for social interaction for members each Tuesday at 5 p.m., plus occasional virtual “Office Hours” to meet staff. thecannabisalliance.us        

March 16-18

Emerge Virtual Cannabis Conference and Expo. Quarterly event offers networking opportunities, 50 exhibitors and 30 sessions. www.emergecanna.com/get-tickets/

March 26-28

March 10

Real Cannabis Entrepreneur Conference. Virtual event brings together more than 40 experts in cannabis and CBD products to discuss trends. www.realcannabisentrepreneur.com/

March 11

Due to health concerns, some events may be canceled, postponed or moved online. Please check with event organizers to verify prior to attending.

Cannabinoids 101. HigherED webinar offered by Heylo Create offers information about the endocannabinoid system by CEO Lo Friesen. www.heylocreate.com/events The Cannabis Alliance, Seat-


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Friday, March 5, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

CANNABIS BRIEFS

Green2Go offers discounts LCB shuts down lab for COVID vaccination RICHLAND – Shoppers at the Richland and Tekoa Green2Go locations who show proof of a COVID-19 vaccination can receive a one-time discount. Steve Lee, owner of both cannabis stores, decided to make the offer to recognize people who have taken the effort to receive the vaccination. By presenting proof of an immunization, or either part of a two-part dosage, they will receive $10 off any purchase over $20. Some shops in communities in other states have been offering small incentives, like a free pre-roll, for anyone who gets the vaccine. Lee said he is unable to legally give anything free under Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board regulations. However, he worked with the LCB to come up with the discount, which is an acceptable incentive. “We are doing this to celebrate those who are taking the single most impactful pro-active action they can to end this pandemic and fully reopen our economy,” he said. “We also want to promote the health and safety of our team through incentivizing vaccinated customers to shop at our location.” The shops also plan to launch an employee vaccination program as soon as essential workers are allowed to begin receiving them. Source: Evercannabis

BY JESSE TINSLEY/THE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW

Pre-filled with measured out doses of the Moderna vaccine Jan. 22 at a pop-up clinic at Holy Family Hospital in north Spokane.

Colorado posts high numbers for 2020 DENVER – Washington wasn’t the only state to see record cannabis profits in 2020. Colorado’s Department of Revenue showed that its legal shops brought in about $200 million in October alone, which included $170 million in adult-use and $39 million for medical. This total helped the state push past a record of $1.8 billion for the year. It also earned $35 million in taxes from October alone. Total profits for 2019 were $1.75 billion. Although some data is still coming in from the end of the fourth quarter, the most profitable month for 2020 appears to have been July with $226 million in sales. This was the first time any

month saw a total higher than $200 million. June’s revenue, $158 million, was a record at the time, but that was quickly eclipsed. Headset, which tracks sales across the country, said the average sized shopping basket/ cart was about $60 per person in September. Cannabis retail experts say most customers don’t shop frequently but when they do visit a store, they buy more. “While there has been a slight decrease in average basket size as we moved into autumn, baskets are still larger than they were this time last year,” said Cooper Ashley from Headset. Source: Denver Post

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The logo is shown on the front of jars of marijuana buds marketed by rapper Snopp Dogg in one of the LivWell marijuana chain’s outlets south of downtown Denver in December 2015.

CENTRALIA – The Washington Liquor and Cannabis Board suspended Praxis Laboratory in December, claiming the lab falsified data and then tried to destroy evidence. According to information from the LCB, Praxis officials provided incorrect amounts of THC in 1,200 samples, often stating a higher number than the actual amount. While THC, a common compound in adult-use cannabis, isn’t not necessarily a metric of overall cannabis quality or flavor, many consumers still equate a higher THC count with more potent cannabis. Many growers also use THC percentage from test results to distinguish their product from their competition. “Labeling cannabis with falsely high THC potency levels is a form of deception and prohibited under Washington law,” the LCB wrote. It further claimed that the lab’s owner tried to destroy evidence of alleged false data. Praxis officials responded by saying all accusations were false. They called the LCB obscene, and alleged this decision gives a death sentence to a small business with 20 employees. They felt they had been upfront in assisting investigators, and accused a disgruntled former employee of stealing and manipulating data before giving it to the LCB. The emergency suspension is effective for 180 days. After this, the LCB said it plans to seek permanent revocation of its certification.

Source: The Olympian


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

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Friday, March 5, 2021

STRAIN OF THE MONTH

The Hindu Kush Mountains on the border of Tajikistan and Afghanistan. GETTY IMAGES

SURPRISING EFFECTS AWAIT

IN GUERILLA KUSH By Rick Misterly

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Maybe it’s just me, but it seems harder to find a place with a good selection of single grams. The nature of my task of trying a new strain each month keeps me away from buying larger amounts. After a sample, it’s time to move onto the next specimen! There have definitely been a few that I would go back and stock up on, but for the most part it’s puff and pass onto the next variety. Stopping by Cannabis and Glass out on East Francis Ave., I was lucky enough to get help from Jake in answering questions and offering thoughtful options on harvest dates. Cosmetically it was like picking out your favorite $20 bill, so looking for the most recent harvest became the only criteria in making a choice. Funky Monkey sounded, well, kind of cool but is actually a brand within four levels of flower put out by Northwest Cannabis Solutions. Under the NWCS banner, you can find just about any type of cannabis product: edibles, concentrates, flower and pre-rolls plus topicals, tinctures and capsules. You have to hand it to this company for utilizing a great percentage of the cannabis plant, although I’m a little sore they didn’t respond to my requests for more information.

Appearance: Eight small, ragged, dry buds were in the package that stated “handpicked for looks, flavor and potency” and “nitrogen sealed for freshness.” I really must conclude that the flowers should have gone in the “Mini Budz” bag, the next level down in their line of flower. The crispy critters were a dull, light green with a nice dense coat of crystal trichomes, but nonetheless looked a bit damaged. I’m not complaining, just saying that with not much to choose from and at least, getting to pick out something from the latest harvest this is what it looked like. Still, you can make a couple of decent half-gram joints out of it. Aroma: Dry cedar wood with a peppery spice. The hit before ignition tastes unmistakably of clean, exotic spices. Smoke is smooth and mild, hanging in still air with lingering aromas of wood, incense and earth. Too dry for any sticky oiliness to the touch, but it does coat the mouth with a buttery richness like there is still some essence of Kush. I would guess that caryophyllene and myrcene were the most prevalent terpenes. Effects: Kush is a word that has entered the popular culture that has come to define an array of extended family members: O.G. Master, Bubba, Kosher, Guerilla. What all of these siblings have in common is their ancestry

going back in time to the interglacial refuges of the western stretch of the Himalayas. This mountainous region between the wilds of Afghanistan and the Indian plains is referred to as the Hindu Kush. While the exact origin and meaning of name are uncertain, some translators believe “kush” means “killer” because many died when trying to cross the treacherous mountain passes. I wouldn’t say Funky Monkey Guerilla Kush was absolutely ‘killer’ but it did redeem itself. The effects brought a quick realization that there was some potency. The high took off into a peak and held steady for a few hours of a carefree feeling of relaxation. There wasn’t much nuance to the high – sort of one dimensional – but a bright clarity and upbeat form of forgetfulness carried one throughout the experience. I like to get a good bite to eat before smoking, that way I don’t have to move immediately after lighting up. Definitely expect a stimulated appetite and enhanced appreciation of whatever you choose to eat. My experience with the less-thanideal condition of this sample, but still decent effects increases my interest in trying some of the lower-priced eights or quarters. If cosmetics aren’t important, there is little doubt that anything and everything in the store is going to do the trick.

Guerilla Kush

Grown by: Funky Monkey Cannabis

Company/Northwest Cannabis Solutions, Olympia

Hybrid: Guerilla Gold x Blue Satellite 2.2 (Some kind of Kush)

THC: 25.69% CBD: 0.00% Harvest date: Oct. 20, 2020 Sampled: Jan. 21, 2021 Dominant terpenes: Not available


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Friday, March 5, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

Profile for Cowles Publishing

2021 March Evercannabis