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June 2020

www.evercannabis.com .com m

SMOKIN’ HOT

GIFT IDEAS FOR SUMMER OCCASIONS

FAMILY BUSINESS

Temporary rules help working parents TISSUE, PLEASE

Learn the signs of a cannabis allergy


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Friday, June 5, 2020

The Spokesman-Review


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Friday, June 5, 2020

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Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Friday, June 5, 2020

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JUNE TABLE OF CONTENTS 10

6

8

13

ALLERGIC TO POT?

14

GROWING LIKE A WEED Mead-area grower uses natural methods..........6

WSLCB SUPPORT State agency adapts to COVID-19 ......................8

DEMAND GROWS Taking steps to protect staff, customers ...........9

SUMMER GIFTS From CBD pillows to canna-cigars....................10

MINORS ON SITE Officials make accommodations for kids..........12

SCHEDULE TBD Cannabis events on hold ....................................13

HAY FEVER Cannabis allergies becoming more common...14

HIT THE LINKS Do golf and cannabis go together?...................16

MEET MARY J. WHITE Cannabis cook offers guidance..........................17

STRAIN OF THE MONTH Do-Si-Dos by Blue Roots Cannabis ...................18

Evercannabis, The Spokesman-Review and the Cowles Company don’t promote or endorse the use of cannabis products. We acknowledge that marijuana products remain illegal under federal laws. If adults age 21 or older choose to purchase or use them, we encourage them to consume sensibly and at their own risk in legal jurisdictions, in accordance with state and local laws. Some cannabis products have intoxicating effects and may be habit-forming. Consumption of marijuana also may be associated with health risks and impaired concentration, coordination, and judgment. Keep away from children. To learn more, visit the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.


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Friday, June 5, 2020

VOLUME 5 | ISSUE 6

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Kathleen Coleman DIRECTOR OF SALES

Dan Fritts MANAGING EDITOR

The Spokesman-Review

FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK

Social distancing hurts a very social industry

Joe Butler HEALTH & CULTURE EDITOR

Theresa Tanner ART DIRECTOR, MARKETING

Anne Potter CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Chris Soprych Evercannabis magazine is published monthly by The Spokesman-Review. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent of the publisher.

@EvercannaNews on social media www.evercannabis.com Evercannabis@spokesman.com

509-459-5095 PROUD MEMBER OF:

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FREE EVERCANNABIS distribution location? Please contact 509-459-5095 or evercannabis@spokesman.com

‘One customer per budtender’ rule just one limiting factor

in the first place. What is more disappointing to many, however, is that people in the industry can’t get together for formal or even informal events, and various organized spring and summer gatherings have been placed on hold, moved to a later date, By Joe Butler or canceled outright. MANAGING EDITOR It is definitely strange and unusual for an industry that’s COVID-19 has forced plenty all about personal connections of changes on the cannabis at its heart. This goes back to community, some good and the prelegal days, when some some less good. deals would literally be made Your favorite retailer likely with a handshake or a hug, limits admission and requires sometimes followed by a shoppers to “social distance” during a visit. Or you may not shared passing of the pipe. Sure, these deals were techbe able to shop or browse with nically illegal, but doing busia friend or partner anymore, ness together was a way to since some shops now have show trust and solidarity, not adopted a “one customer per just a routine business transbudtender” rule. But what’s really changed is action. Plus, in such a private, disthe social side of cannabis. creet world, most consumers As you’ll read in this issue, stuck with one supplier for demand is high and supply is years, barring any negative too, creating generally good interactions or potential hicconditions for growers and cups in the market. retailers. Although federal financial relief isn’t available More than one member of (as of press time) to anyone in the current cannabis comthe industry, no one really munity has told me they do, at counted on that as an option times, look back fondly on

those days. They may not miss the illegality or questionable product origin/quality, but the lack of paperwork and compliance was nice, as was the customer service experience. Some shops and growers have tried to instill some of these early values in their staff by emphasizing service, familiarity and even friendship. Many customers have their favorite budtenders, managers, and owners. But now, “puff and pass” is likely a thing of the past. Even when we can gather with others beyond our immediate household units, not everyone may feel comfortable sharing something as intimate as a pipe or a vape pen, or even inhaling and exhaling in such proximity with others. Will this change? Eventually, most of us hope. After all, cannabis culture has been all about not following the “rules” for generations. Don’t forget that the old-timers were practicing civil disobedience and promoting personal liberty above civil authority long before the “reopeners” joined the chorus.

“Even when we can gather with others beyond our immediate household units, not everyone may feel comfortable sharing something as intimate as a pipe or a vape pen ...” Joe Butler In the U.S. one year subscription (12 issues) delivered discreetly to your door for just $35. In Canada subscription is $60. For credit card payments please call 509-459-5095 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. For check payments please include your mailing address, email, phone number and mail to EVERCANNABIS magazine, P.O. Box 2160, Spokane, WA 99210.

Managing Editor

EVERCANNABIS CONTRIBUTORS Tom Bowers left his life as a columnist for The Spokesman-Review in 2008 to seek his fortune. He currently consults for the cannabis, beer, and recording industries as the founder and Managing Director of Propagate Consultants. Joe Butler is a longtime marketing writer and editor at The Spokesman-Review. He’s an enthusiast of Star Wars, commemorative spoon collecting, and the Oxford comma. Tracy Damon is a Spokane-based freelancer who has been writing professionally for 20 years. She has been covering i502 issues since recreational cannabis became legal in Washington. Kate A. Miner has a degree in visual anthropology, and has worked in marketing and advertising for many years. She writes, takes photos and teaches yoga. Rick Misterly is a Washington resident whose interest in cannabis dates back to the 1960s and has taken him around the world. He’s the cannabis and hashish curator for Green Barn Farms in Addy. Mary J. White is a cannabis chef and the author of two cookbooks. When she's not inventing new cannabis recipes, the Seattle native can be found in the garden, on the beach, or playing with a grandkid.


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Friday, June 5, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

NEWS & BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

GLW creates great growing conditions For many growers, pesticide-free atmosphere is only the beginning By Joe Butler EVERCANNABIS WRITER

PHOTOS BY JOE BUTLER/EVERCANNABIS

Growing Like a Weed (GLW) is a Tier 2 indoor producer/processor located in Mead.

Fred Renteria thought he had a pretty good cannabis farm going. But then an unstoppable outbreak of russet mites two years ago convinced him he could be doing things much better. “We used to spray everything with pesticides, like most of the other growers,” he said. “Then we couldn’t beat these mites and had to destroy all the plants in two rooms.” So he looked into other methods and learned about beneficial insects, a natural growing approach that uses a variety of “healthy bugs” at different stages of the plant’s development to eat more harmful insects. Their life cycle is timed perfectly so the bugs are dead and removed by the time a crop is ready for harvest. “We learned these kinds of natural methods are the only way to beat this, and once you start doing it, you can’t go back,” he said. Renteria, head grower at Growing Like a Weed (GLW), then looked for other areas of the operation that could benefit from a pesticide-free approach, a constant focus on quality, constant sanitation and overall sustainable best practices. The use of insects is particularly exciting, and includes praying mantises and ladybugs. “If we do get an infestation, we either bring in the bugs or

GLW head grower Fred Renteria shows off a house-made soil that includes plant nutrients, beneficial bacteria, fungi, nematodes and worm casings. destroy things,” he said. “Plus, if there are no bad bugs for the good ones to eat, they’ll just die anyway.” The Tier 2 indoor producer/ processor is located in the Mead area at the former Mountain Dome Winery. Work is taking place on an adjacent lot to create a Tier 3 outdoor farm, scheduled to open next year. “A winery is a perfect place for a weed operation,” he said. “It has the storage, plumbing, and other facilities that we need. We keep everything clean, have good

See GLW, 7


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Friday, June 5, 2020

Page 7

NEWS & BUSINESS

GLW Continued from 6 airflow, and make sure our team stays clean.” Today, GLW flower, pre-rolls and concentrates can be found in about 60 stores statewide. Renteria said the company enjoys growing a variety of strains simultaneously, unlike some producers who only cultivate a few at a time. “We’re always popping new seeds,” he said. “We’re also constantly testing new ones.” In early March, GLW had 47 strains in production and 100 more in testing. There’s an active cross-breeding program as well. One of the more popular hybrids is Poison Toad, a blend of Durban Poison and Romulan. Only the best strains make it to market, however. Each small batch is watched closely in the early stages, and if Renteria and the team don’t believe one has what it takes, the batch won’t go any further. Attention is also given to the methods used to grow each strain so the experience will always be consistent in terms of terpene profile, which is a strain’s specific blend of natural flavors. “Our goal is for the strain to always be the same, whether you’re in Seattle or Spokane,” he said. GLW creates its own soil and mixes it by hand. It also uses a natural compost ‘tea’ that includes plant nutrients, beneficial bacteria, fungi, nematodes and worm casings. There’s an active composting program, and rather than throw away plant waste, it’s sold by the yard. Renteria said the staff has done well focusing on sanitation as well as quality. “People have a lot of

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JOE BUTLER/EVERCANNABIS

Growing Like a Weed (GLW) is a Tier 2 indoor producer/processor located in Mead. pride in what we do here,” he said. “You absolutely have to have cleanliness everywhere since plants will absorb everything.” GLW’s drying method takes about 14 days, about a week longer than many in the industry. Then the plants are hand-trimmed. The grower has one CBD-heavy strain, Ferrari Fume, designed especially for medical users. GLW has a crew that works every day, which Renteria appreciates. He tries to organize movie nights, barbecues and other fun social activities, and

said more will be coming soon. The grower also makes good use of the Mountain Dome equipment, including hoses, carts, fans and more. Along with the new outdoor site, GLW plans to create an extraction area and packaging center. It will also be building lightdeprivation greenhouses to make it easy to grow all year. “In the future, we’d love to give tours up here,” Renteria said. For more information, visit glw509.com.


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Friday, June 5, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

NEWS & BUSINESS

Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board keeps industry in compliance during pandemic

STILL OPEN By Tracy Damon EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

While the COVID-19 pandemic has been disastrous to the economy – to the tune of $7 billion in Washington state alone – the cannabis industry is one of only a handful that flourished in the U.S. during this time. “They are in a lot better shape than the bars and restaurants and other businesses that are struggling,” said Brian Smith, Communications Director for the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board. From the beginning of Washington Gov. Jay Inslee’s “Stay Home, Stay Healthy” directive that closed schools and many businesses, pot shops were deemed essential. This was partially because medical marijuana patients need it to manage pain or other health conditions, but also to avoid making those who buy it into criminals. “You can still get liquor in stores, but if you closed them (pot shops) down you’re basically opening it back up to the illicit market,” Smith said, as there is no legal way to purchase cannabis in Washington other than state-licensed stores. Judging from sales numbers, people may have been willing to go underground, as in the old days, to get weed during the pandemic. Data provided by the WSLCB shows that April tax revenue based on March sales was up $7.4 million in 2020 from the same time period in 2019. April tax collections from March sales increased 20 percent over sales from February. And tax collected from cannabis sales increased $6.6 million between March collections based on February sales and April collections from March sales. “Numbers were up considerably over last month, but month to month numbers are hard to do,” said Smith. “Washington sales are generally up maybe 10 percent over last year, and March’s sales were consistent with that. What we heard anecdotally and our numbers reflect it, is

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee puts on his face mask after speaking to the media on May 20 in Tumwater, Wash. that there was a spike initially when a lot of people were worried that the stores would have to be closed. And then it backed off when people realized they would stay open.” That extra business was a great thing for pot shop owners, but had the potential to not be for staff who risked exposure to COVID-19 from the public. In an effort to mitigate that risk, the WSLCB sent guidance to all retailers – not just

those that sell marijuana – on efforts to slow the spread of the virus. “We emphasized with our licensees the expectation of following the governor’s order of social distancing,” said Smith. “We were hearing from employees of certain marijuana stores that their bosses were maximizing their sales over their safety and health. That wasn’t the case across the board, but it was at some.” WSCLB enforcement officers respond-

ed to those complaints and Smith says those stores did come into compliance, implementing social distancing measures such as only allowing a limited number of people into a store at one time, having a separate person other than budtenders handle money, and spacing 4/20 celebrations and sales out over a week rather just on April 20, to avoid large crowds. Some shops helped to cut down on the number of people staff were exposed to by implementing curbside service. That option isn’t usually legal, but the WSLCB relaxed its approach in order to promote social distancing during the unusual times. Smith doesn’t know how many cannabis retailers took advantage of the curbside opportunity as stores aren’t required to report that information, but he does know that a lot of companies expressed gratitude at having the option, along with another allowances made by the board to ease stress on the industry. “Normally kids can’t be anywhere on the premises, but we allowed producers and processors to have kids on the premises at this time – only kids of their own,” said Smith. This was in reaction to many business owners and workers trying to care for and homeschool kids while running an essential business. Once a county reaches Phase 4 of Gov. Inslee’s recovery plan, the marijuana industry has 30 days, then those temporary allowances go away. Smith says he has seen evidence that some industry advocates are using this time to work to get them permanently reinstated, though. Another service many marijuana businesses were hoping to offer during quarantine was home delivery of cannabis products, but Smith says that idea got shot down. “We even floated a bill this year (before the pandemic hit) that would allow some limited delivery for medical patients and it didn’t go anywhere,” Smith said. An additional measure the WSLCB identified that could relieve stress within the industry was to make cannabis company owners eligible for some of the small business bailout loans that other businesses can collect. Because marijuana is still not legal at the federal level, these loans are not an option at this time. “Our director, Rick Garza, and Commerce Director Lisa Brown wrote a letter to our congressional delegation to try to remedy that some way,” said Smith. So far, it’s not clear if that letter had any effect, but considering that pot is one item that people still seem to be buying amidst unemployment and economic hardships, it may not be a top priority at this time.


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Friday, June 5, 2020

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NEWS & BUSINESS

ESSENTIAL GROWTH Producers thriving in a pandemic-changed world By Kate A. Miner EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

These are strange times for everyone, and the last few months have been devastating to many businesses. But one industry in Washington continues to thrive: cannabis. Considered essential, retailers, farms and processors are still scrambling to keep up with the demand. According to Marijuana Business Daily, cannabis sales in both Colorado and Washington continue to rise, quickly eclipsing sales at this same time in 2019. In general, April is typically the biggest month across the industry with the celebration of 4/20, and – despite the lack of typical events surrounding the holiday – sales were still significantly greater than last year. Grow facilities, for example, can barely keep up with the demand. Grow Op Farms, the home of Phat Panda and other products, based in Spokane Valley, has hundreds of employees working full time while practicing social distancing. “Processing and lunchroom areas have been spaced out so there are no more than two to a table, all masked, with 6-foot distancing constantly enforced,” explained Katrina McKinley, COO for Grow Op Farms. “Everyone used to eat lunch together, now the lunch groups have been divided to help with social distancing.” To make sure everyone is maintaining the highest standards, the team at Grow Op Farms is cleaning around the clock and disinfecting all surface areas every 30 minutes. Sick policies are also being heavily enforced, which means

grow it fast enough. “With this significant increase in sales and demand, the hope is that the cannabis industry will not be so strictly regulated in the future,” she said. “Although considered an essential business by medical standards, we are not allowed the perks most businesses are receiving during this crisis.” For Evergreen Herbal, a food manufacturer in Seattle known for cannabis-infused edibles and beverages, it’s business as usual with some changes that will most likely remain for months. “In many ways, this has made our business better,” said Andrew Brassington, Evergreen Herbal president. “We manufacture and process food, so we already had many of the sanitizing standards in place, but it has all been increased.” He said everyone must regularly sanitize their hands, wear hair nets, sanitized lab jackets and gloves, and foot baths now are required. There are blue Xs throughout the facility to inCOURTESY GROW OP FARMS dicate 6-foot distancing, and many employees are working Grow Op Farms in Spokane Valley has implemented a variety of social distancing and sanitation remotely. Delivery drivers measures, including staggered lunch shifts. wear masks and gloves, and if you do not feel well you are home if you are sick, and Bud- bottles are everywhere. Deliv- constantly use alcohol sprays asked to stay home, which dy Boy took it one step further. ery drivers always are required and wipes. The facility is some folks have taken advan“We have given the older or to wear masks and gloves, and washed and disinfected daily, tage of. For the most part how- at-risk employees, or those drivers’ pay was increased. and hand washing stations ever, everyone is happy to be with at-risk family members, Additionally, no drivers are have been installed. working. the option of going on standrequired to stay at a retailer “We plan to maintain this “We can barely keep up with by,” said Galadriel Walser, for counts. level of scrutiny for a minithe demand,” McKinley said in general manager for Buddy Boy “It’s a team effort,” said mum of four months and it May. “It’s crazy. And it keeps Farm. “Some of our older emWalser. “We’re trying to buy may become the new norm steadily increasing. We’re hav- ployees opted for this, but local for lunches to support moving forward. Productivity ing the biggest months we’ve most wanted to work.” surrounding farms and local and morale have increased, and ever had.” Like other growers, they are businesses, and all our teams those working from home are For some growers, like Bud- respecting social distancing are working very hard. Businot as stressed out,” Brassingdy Boy Farm in northwest and asking that folks try to ness is booming, and we can ton said. “We all love not havSpokane, temperatures are abide by these guidelines at only pack up so much, and it ing to deal with traffic. All taken upon entry for all emhome too. never seems to be enough.” these changes have become ployees. Strict protocols have Everyone is required to wear She said Buddy Boy harvests unintended perks, making our been created about staying a mask, and hand sanitizer product every week, but can’t business more productive.”


Page 10

Friday, June 5, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Friday, June 5, 2020

PRESENTS TO PAMPER

Gold Leaf Gardens Leira Cigars

Fire Bros Flower

goldleafgardens.com/ Gold Leaf Gardens has transcended its early success as a medical provider and is now flourishing in Washington’s recreational market. This Hawaiian family business sells a wide range of indulgent products, but one of the most sought after are the Leira cigars. Each cannabis cigar is painstakingly hand-built over months, with some specimens selling for thousands of dollars.

firebros206.com For your cannabis enthusiast who deserves a treat. This Seattlebased cannabis producer and processor always aims to produce something different with unique strain blends. Live resin, diamonds, and hash rosin are their specialties, but they also sell a wide range of flower, pre-rolls, and concentrates. Fire Bros offers some of the smoothest smoke in the state.

Saint Jane Luxury Beauty Serum

Gifts for dads, grads, brides or anyone else with a discerning eye for cannabis

saintjanebeauty.com This product has been in the press quite a bit as one of the best CBD face serums available. Packed with 20 potent botanicals, including radiance-amplifying actives like Sea Buckthorn, Calendula and Rose to gently resurface and detoxify pores, while full-spectrum CBD calms and soothes even the most stressful skin issues.

GOLDLEAF

By Kate A. Miner | EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

It is that time of year when gift giving really starts to heat up. You have graduations (even if they might be virtual this year), plus Father’s Day on June 21. Plus, don’t forget that June is traditionally the biggest month for weddings. So if your friends or loved ones

who enjoy cannabis or CBD products fall into these categories, there are plenty of gifts they’ll appreciate, especially as the stigma around marijuana products continues to decline; national fashion and beauty retailers like Sephora, Ulta, and Urban Outfitters now carry dozens of CBD beauty brands.

This is only the beginning of some of the unique and somewhat luxurious options available. You may not be able to browse store shelves right now to find the perfect gift, or celebrate at a big bash, but you can still send a thoughtful message with a carefully-selected gift.

Black Dahlia CBD Oral Sprays

Marro Products Topical Sampler

blackdahlia.co Discreet and convenient, Black Dahlia CBD oral sprays come in Peppermint, Ginger and Unflavored, and contain nano-sized water-soluble droplets infused with CBD-rich hemp oil for rapid absorption. Said to be relaxing and calming, all Black Dahlia products feature sleek black and gold packaging fit for anyone with a discerning eye.

marroproducts.com This limited-edition gift provides a beautifully packaged set of four Marro topical CBD + Terpene blends that will assist in relieving pain/ discomfort, anxiousness/stress, sleeplessness, and cramps. Each mini-sampler is approximately 4 doses. Also included is a box of wildflower seeds so you can start your own little garden.

GRASSLAND BOTANICALS

Wildflower CBD Cool Stick

The Good Patch Patches

Omura Bento Box

thegoodpatch.com These hemp-infused patches go on smoothly and provide hours of relaxation and relief. Perfect for wedding favors or feel-good seasonal baskets. Their Hangover patch combines 15 mg of premium hemp extract with B1, B complex and Green Tea extract, while the Be Calm patch helps you unwind and decompress.

omura.com Omura makes beautifully packaged disposable flower sticks, and delivers a consistently clean, sustainable and enjoyable experience with “heat-notburn” technology to “activate the terpenes without charring the plant.” The Bento Box includes a Heat-Not-Burn device in choice of colors and two flower sticks (only CBD hemp packs available for online order).

Her Highness Pleasure Oil

Goldleaf Guided Journals shopgoldleaf.com Goldleaf sells exquisite journals, supplies, and prints to suit all aspects of the cannabis lifestyle – patient, grower or general enthusiast. The leather-bound books are filled with drawings, charts, and spaces for journaling and planning. They also sell precise pens and artistic prints that focus on the science behind life's passions.

Page 11

MARRO

herhighness.com This perfectly concocted intimacy oil brings the power of THC to your pleasure zones, and is said to be “highly orgasmic,” provide tingling and other sensations. Her Highness sells a range of luxury items that look as though they came from the finest salon, such as their gold grinder or lip service ashtray. (THC products only available at California cannabis retailers.)

SAINT JANE BEAUTY

Nature of Things Luxury Body Balms natureofthings.com Nature of Things philosophy is to ease stress in a natural way. Their website is full of naked bodies frolicking in the jungle and sea, and their packaging looks like it emerged from the sand. Their luxurious bath soaks and balms are all about nourishing and restoring the body. Not cheap, these products are for serious spoiling.

CBD Pillow for Peaceful Sleep

OMURO

bdpillow.com Not just your typical gel memory foam pillow, the CBD pillowcase is infused with millions of microcapsules filled with the highest quality CBD for deeper sleep, relaxation, and a more refreshing morning. The pillow is said to release microdoses of CBD all night long, guaranteed to improve your sleep.

buywildflower.com This Canadian company’s mission is to connect people with the healing power of plants. Sharing inspired holistic wellness with some of the best-performing CBD and cannabis wellness products available. Their latest product, CBD Cool Stick, is conveniently packaged as a roll-on and helps with general deep tissue aches and pains.

A Proper High aproperhigh.com This company makes a wide range of cool products, such as their Advanced Liquid Technology (ALT) cannabis – a colorless, flavorless liquid that comes in 5mg vials to add to the beverage of your choice. They also have sleek and understated bongs, including their Session bong or Heir Waterpipe, which are great for those cool cats that want a bong that doesn’t look like one.


Page 10

Friday, June 5, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Friday, June 5, 2020

PRESENTS TO PAMPER

Gold Leaf Gardens Leira Cigars

Fire Bros Flower

goldleafgardens.com/ Gold Leaf Gardens has transcended its early success as a medical provider and is now flourishing in Washington’s recreational market. This Hawaiian family business sells a wide range of indulgent products, but one of the most sought after are the Leira cigars. Each cannabis cigar is painstakingly hand-built over months, with some specimens selling for thousands of dollars.

firebros206.com For your cannabis enthusiast who deserves a treat. This Seattlebased cannabis producer and processor always aims to produce something different with unique strain blends. Live resin, diamonds, and hash rosin are their specialties, but they also sell a wide range of flower, pre-rolls, and concentrates. Fire Bros offers some of the smoothest smoke in the state.

Saint Jane Luxury Beauty Serum

Gifts for dads, grads, brides or anyone else with a discerning eye for cannabis

saintjanebeauty.com This product has been in the press quite a bit as one of the best CBD face serums available. Packed with 20 potent botanicals, including radiance-amplifying actives like Sea Buckthorn, Calendula and Rose to gently resurface and detoxify pores, while full-spectrum CBD calms and soothes even the most stressful skin issues.

GOLDLEAF

By Kate A. Miner | EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

It is that time of year when gift giving really starts to heat up. You have graduations (even if they might be virtual this year), plus Father’s Day on June 21. Plus, don’t forget that June is traditionally the biggest month for weddings. So if your friends or loved ones

who enjoy cannabis or CBD products fall into these categories, there are plenty of gifts they’ll appreciate, especially as the stigma around marijuana products continues to decline; national fashion and beauty retailers like Sephora, Ulta, and Urban Outfitters now carry dozens of CBD beauty brands.

This is only the beginning of some of the unique and somewhat luxurious options available. You may not be able to browse store shelves right now to find the perfect gift, or celebrate at a big bash, but you can still send a thoughtful message with a carefully-selected gift.

Black Dahlia CBD Oral Sprays

Marro Products Topical Sampler

blackdahlia.co Discreet and convenient, Black Dahlia CBD oral sprays come in Peppermint, Ginger and Unflavored, and contain nano-sized water-soluble droplets infused with CBD-rich hemp oil for rapid absorption. Said to be relaxing and calming, all Black Dahlia products feature sleek black and gold packaging fit for anyone with a discerning eye.

marroproducts.com This limited-edition gift provides a beautifully packaged set of four Marro topical CBD + Terpene blends that will assist in relieving pain/ discomfort, anxiousness/stress, sleeplessness, and cramps. Each mini-sampler is approximately 4 doses. Also included is a box of wildflower seeds so you can start your own little garden.

GRASSLAND BOTANICALS

Wildflower CBD Cool Stick

The Good Patch Patches

Omura Bento Box

thegoodpatch.com These hemp-infused patches go on smoothly and provide hours of relaxation and relief. Perfect for wedding favors or feel-good seasonal baskets. Their Hangover patch combines 15 mg of premium hemp extract with B1, B complex and Green Tea extract, while the Be Calm patch helps you unwind and decompress.

omura.com Omura makes beautifully packaged disposable flower sticks, and delivers a consistently clean, sustainable and enjoyable experience with “heat-notburn” technology to “activate the terpenes without charring the plant.” The Bento Box includes a Heat-Not-Burn device in choice of colors and two flower sticks (only CBD hemp packs available for online order).

Her Highness Pleasure Oil

Goldleaf Guided Journals shopgoldleaf.com Goldleaf sells exquisite journals, supplies, and prints to suit all aspects of the cannabis lifestyle – patient, grower or general enthusiast. The leather-bound books are filled with drawings, charts, and spaces for journaling and planning. They also sell precise pens and artistic prints that focus on the science behind life's passions.

Page 11

MARRO

herhighness.com This perfectly concocted intimacy oil brings the power of THC to your pleasure zones, and is said to be “highly orgasmic,” provide tingling and other sensations. Her Highness sells a range of luxury items that look as though they came from the finest salon, such as their gold grinder or lip service ashtray. (THC products only available at California cannabis retailers.)

SAINT JANE BEAUTY

Nature of Things Luxury Body Balms natureofthings.com Nature of Things philosophy is to ease stress in a natural way. Their website is full of naked bodies frolicking in the jungle and sea, and their packaging looks like it emerged from the sand. Their luxurious bath soaks and balms are all about nourishing and restoring the body. Not cheap, these products are for serious spoiling.

CBD Pillow for Peaceful Sleep

OMURO

bdpillow.com Not just your typical gel memory foam pillow, the CBD pillowcase is infused with millions of microcapsules filled with the highest quality CBD for deeper sleep, relaxation, and a more refreshing morning. The pillow is said to release microdoses of CBD all night long, guaranteed to improve your sleep.

buywildflower.com This Canadian company’s mission is to connect people with the healing power of plants. Sharing inspired holistic wellness with some of the best-performing CBD and cannabis wellness products available. Their latest product, CBD Cool Stick, is conveniently packaged as a roll-on and helps with general deep tissue aches and pains.

A Proper High aproperhigh.com This company makes a wide range of cool products, such as their Advanced Liquid Technology (ALT) cannabis – a colorless, flavorless liquid that comes in 5mg vials to add to the beverage of your choice. They also have sleek and understated bongs, including their Session bong or Heir Waterpipe, which are great for those cool cats that want a bong that doesn’t look like one.


Page 12

Friday, June 5, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

The kids on site are all right ton State Liquor and Cannabis Board. For instance, she said, “children can’t handle the product.” In the wake of COVID-19, businesses For Shawn Stuart, owner of Fresh Kind deemed essential by Washington and Farms in Vancouver, Wash., it saved his other lockdown states quickly altered business. models to adapt to the new normal. Stuart balances his schedule between Cannabis companies benefited from running his grow operations and raising inclusion on the essential businesses list, his 9-year-old son, who has special needs and were allowed to stay open, but this and requires medication, making it esplaced family-owned businesses in a diffi- pecially difficult to find qualified childcult situation. With schools and many care. childcare centers closed, there was no“His mother also happens to be in the where for kids to go. Many operators medical field,” Stuart said. “With COVID, were going to have to choose between now she’s also an essential employee. We their families and the sources of income both have full-time, essential jobs, and that feed their families. one of us would have to stay home with Working closely with a consortium of him if he wasn’t able to go to work with producers and processors led by Crystal me.” Oliver, head of the Washington SunGrowWith the temporarily relaxed restricers Industry Association, the Washington tions, both parents can fulfill their essenState Liquor and Cannabis Board arrived tial duties, and Stuart is able to care for at a solution: they let the kids in. his son while at work. Since March, cannabis cultivators and “Now he literally comes to work with processors have been allowed to bring me every day,” Stuart said. “The biggest their children onto the premises, on a problem I have now is explaining to him temporary basis, with a set of restrictions why he’s not able to do anything inside in place. the building. He would love to help, water “It felt like a low-risk decision to allow plants, other things, but even with the children to be on the premises, but they relaxed restrictions, he’s not allowed to still have to follow some rules,” said Julie help.” Graham, spokesperson for the WashingAnother benefit, Stuart said, is that his son finally knows what he does for a living. Before, it was just a building he went into to go to work; Stuart was prohibited from sharing his passion for his craft with his son. It’s a familiar situation for many in the cannabis space. Joshua Rutherford, who cares for his 3-year-old son while his wife works as a nurse, single-handedly runs his Tier 2 farm Darling Growers in Bellingham. “I literally wouldn’t be able to grow this season if they didn’t make this rule change,” Rutherford said. But with the current easement, “I’m able to work on the farm while he’s there playing with his Legos.” For Ryan Sanderson, a third-generation farmer and owner of Golden Leaf in BenCOURTESY CRYSTAL OLIVER ton City., the relaxed restrictions have Kevin Oliver, co-founder of Washington’s allowed him to pass on a multi-generational family tradition of farming. Finest Cannabis, with his 5-year-old “When I grew up, when you’re 3, 4 daughter Antonia at the Tier 3 years old, you’re sitting on dad’s lap on a producer/processor in Deer Park.

By Tom Bowers

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

COURTESY JOHNATHAN VANELLA

Parents like Johnathan Vanella, owner of Tier 3 producer/processor JV Ranch in Goldendale, have been granted temporary permission to bring his children – Natalie, 10; Kaitlynn, 5; and Hannah, 2 – to work with him during the COVID-19 lockdown. tractor, out there learning,” Sanderson said. “You’re running water lines when you’re 6. It’s been great that even though they can’t work, they can learn. I can show them, ‘These are bad weeds. These are good bugs. This is the soil. This is how we water.’” For Sanderson, whose kids range from 2 to 18 years old and are just now seeing what their father does for a living, this is an opportunity to scrape back lost time, and pass on the legacy. “I’m 43 years old, and my two smallest kids are 2 and 3,” he said. “I’ll be retired before they can actually participate in the farm with the current regulations. Who knows if I’ll actually last that long? How can they learn the business? That’s where it usually strikes home for me.” While this easement has been a great benefit to the families, the fact remains that as of right now, it is only temporary. The initial lifting of the restrictions was set to expire on May 1, but thanks in large part to lobbying efforts by Oliver and the

WSIA and others in the industry, the WSLCB granted a temporary-yet-indefinite extension while they continue to consider the options and the potential impact of a permanent rule change. As with everything in the WSLCB world, most actions are driven by complaints – and according to Graham, they haven’t received any complaints or been made aware of any activities that stand out as red flags against a permanent rule change. Rutherford maintains optimism up on his farm in Bellingham. His main hope is that the LCB maintains a rational approach to any potential rule changes regarding his son’s presence on the property. “From my perspective, I can’t see the problem of having him in here,” Rutherford said. “I could see them having certain rules about him not being around certain products or processes, but I’d want that to be science-driven, and not stereotypedriven.”


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Friday, June 5, 2020

Page 13

CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

Parties postponed COVID-19 impacts industry events By Kate A. Miner EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

While Washington cannabis growers and retailers are adapting well to high demand amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, events in the cannabis industry have stalled. People who work in this field are traditionally social, and it’s not uncommon for deals to be finalized over smoking together. Plus, as the industry becomes more normalized, many participants have grown to like traditional vendor fairs, seminars, celebrations and ‘mainstream’ opportunities to gather and learn. Unfortunately, Washington events in all industries have been canceled or postponed due to health concerns, venue restrictions or financial challenges facing traditional sponsors. One affected event is the 3rd annual Sun Cup Invitational, organized by the Washington SunGrowers Industry Association, which has been postponed until a later date. Crystal Oliver, executive director for WSIA, explained that the competition will still happen, but maybe not the way it was originally planned. Last year, the group maxed out the facility for the awards presentation, so the gathering planned to move to a bigger venue this year. Now the public judging ceremony and events will most likely be canceled. Instead, WSIA is looking at ways to move the competition online. For this event, judges are provided with blind samples for six different categories grown at Washington farms. Categories are concentrates and vapes, edibles, infused pre-rolls, and three types of flower: full-term sungrown flower (planted in spring,

MARK GLADDING/SEATTLE HEMPFEST

Seattle Hempfest brings more than 100,000 visitors to the Seattle waterfront over three days each summer; the status of the 2020 gathering has yet to be determined. harvested in the fall), CBD flower, and greenhouse flower (grown using light generation techniques). There are six judges, each judging one to two categories. They have three weeks, and judge on appearance, fragrance, and taste, rating taste for smoothness, overall effect, and sample notes. Other events that have been canceled or changed include Interchange in Renton in May, which was moved to July 21-22; Budfest, which was planned in July but rescheduled for July 17, 2021, when the City of Bellingham called off all live events

until Aug. 30; and Cannabis Curious, an educational event planned in July in Spokane Valley, which has been canceled. Seattle Hempfest, the country’s largest cannabis protest/ festival (“protestival”) in Seattle has been planning to celebrate its 28th year in August. But at press time, its status was officially “unknown.” Vivian McPeak, president of Seattle Events and producer of Hempfest, explained that even if the event is allowed to happen, the organization will severely suffer consequences. In mid-May, he said that a

decision to cancel Hempfest would be based on many things, primarily safety. “Hempfest must prioritize the health and safety of attendees and staff, and the disproportionate amount of medical cannabis patients that attend who are in high-risk group,” McPeak said. “Right now, we are trying to do everything we can to save the event. This is typically our prep time, which obviously cannot occur. We are reticent to reserve the massive amount of equipment required to produce Hempfest, such as staging, fencing, generators and sanitation, with-

out knowing if the event is going to be allowed to occur.” Although a decision to either cancel, delay or radically change Hempfest and other regular cannabis events for 2020 could be a huge blow to the community, many also acknowledge that the COVID-19 pandemic has led lawmakers and enforcement agencies to reevaluate industry regulations and restrictions, potentially paving the way to accommodate new ways of distributing and selling marijuana. “Everything has gone backwards,” remarked McPeak, “except cannabis!”


Page 14

Friday, June 5, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

HEALTH & SCIENCE

NOTHING TO SNEEZE AT Cannabis pollen grains are distributed across great distances because they are buoyant, which increases effectiveness as an irritant.

With weather warming up, cases of cannabis allergies are on the rise By Kate A. Miner EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

As the weather warms in Washington, local pollen counts rise and take to the skies causing many to experience the usual itchy eyes, runny nose, coughing, and sneezing typically associated with seasonal allergies. According to the American College of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology, more than 50 million Americans experience allergies annually, whether it be to a certain food, pollen, mold or pets. However, there is one plant that can cause allergies that tends to be scrutinized with more than the average con-

cern. Cases of cannabis allergies have been emerging at a growing rate since legalization, and can frequently affect budtenders, recreational consumers and medical patients with a variety of symptoms. As legal cannabis progresses across the U.S., cannabis allergies have been attracting increased attention from researchers.

Marijuana as an allergen

There are several attributes specific to cannabis and its production that make it particularly interesting as a source of allergies. First, as with ragweed (one of pollen’s worst offenders), cannabis pollen grains are buoyant, allowing for distri-

bution across great distances, which increases effectiveness as an irritant. Additionally, pollen, typically produced by male plants, can also be produced by females that express hermaphroditic male flowers. Finally, the isolation of female flowering plants increases the plant’s psychoactive properties by raising its THC content. As a result, the potency of cannabis has increased significantly over the years; on the flip side, THC has been identified as a potential cannabis allergen. Allergies are basically an immune overreaction by the body as it attempts to protect the respiratory system from outside invaders. The antibodies produced

by the body succeed in keeping the perceived foreign invaders out, but also cause the symptoms characteristic of allergic responses. An article recently published by researchers in Belgium entitled, “Emerging allergens: Cannabis,” specifically focused on cannabis sativa, and found that the plant can cause several allergic symptoms, including (but not limited to) allergic rhinitis (hay fever), conjunctivitis (pink eye), skin rashes, and asthmatic symptoms when smoked, inhaled, or chewed. Since there are a multitude of ways in

See ALLERGIES, 15


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Friday, June 5, 2020

Page 15

HEALTH & SCIENCE

ALLERGIES Continued from 14 which cannabis can be consumed (smoked, vaporized, chewed, taken as a tincture, or a topical) allergic reactions can present in multiple ways. However, a true allergy is a reaction to a specific substance contained within the cannabis plant. Pollen or smoke exposure has resulted in nasal congestion, rhinitis, sneezing, conjunctival injection, pharyngeal pruritus (itchy throat), coughing, wheezing, and dyspnea (difficulty breathing). Skin contact through handling of plants has been associated with urticarial (hives), generalized pruritus (itching), and periorbital angioedema (swelling). Anaphylaxis, a serious reaction, associated with ocular symptoms, urticaria (hives), angioedema (swelling), dyspnea (difficult breathing), and dysphonia (difficulty in speaking) has been reported as a result of hemp seed ingestion. Finally, allergic asthma triggered by seasonal and occupational exposure to cannabis also has been reported. The good news is that cannabis allergies can be treated in much the same way as other allergies. The bad news is that due to a lack of standardization in testing limits, much research is still needed to more accurately define the allergens. Until more research is done, it remains difficult to establish diagnostic specificity and clarify treatment options.

allergen. If sensitive, to protect the body from a perceived threat, the immune system produces a type of antibody resulting in a reaction from the prick. Additional blood tests can determine if a person is allergic to a substance.

Who is at risk?

The risk of reaction is higher for those who directly inhale cannabis by smoking or vaping. Secondhand cannabis smoke may also cause a reaction in particularly sensitive populations and contact with the plant can often trigger allergic skin reactions. Workers in the industry are particularly susceptible. Some foods that have similar allergen properties to cannabis may cause an allergy cross-reaction. Reactions to almonds, apples, eggplant, grapefruit, peaches, tomatoes or chestnuts are often indictive of a potential reaction to cannabis. A recent small-scale study from 2018 reports that people are more likely to have a cannabis allergy if they have allergies to cat dander, molds, dust mites, or plants, but there is no definitive research.

Is treatment available for cannabis allergies?

Frequent marijuana smokers, with symptoms of nasal congestion and chronic cough, can find great relief from an allergy nasal spray and/or inhaler. Asthma symptoms that may be exacerbated by marijuana exposure can improve significantly with a prescribed medication proHow is a diagnosis gram. EpiPens are prescribed for patients of cannabis allergy made? with a history of anaphylaxis, and treatMuch like other airborne substances ment is readily available for allergy sufthat can trigger allergic reactions, canna- ferers depending on the seriousness of the bis sensitization can be influenced by reaction. Ultimately, for the chronically aerobiology. People who live in areas allergic cannabis consumer, avoidance is where large quantities of marijuana plants recommended. are grown may be more susceptible to If smoking cannabis causes allergy-type allergic reactions. symptoms, you may want to switch to Cannabis pollen has been shown to edibles. If handling the plant causes a skin cause allergic reactions in several studies, reaction or other symptoms, covering and individuals who show sensitivity to it exposed parts of the body by wearing are usually also sensitive to pollen from gloves and a face mask will prevent inother plants. Seventy three percent of haling any mildew or mold. Using an patients report respiratory symptoms over-the-counter allergy medication may during the cannabis pollination season. also help ease symptoms, and an inhaler Sensitization associated with cannabis could help breathing issues. consumption also has been suggested. Legal limitations to obtain cannabis Studies have demonstrated a higher continues to pose a challenge to learn prevalence of skin test reaction positivity more about cannabis through further in marijuana smokers (14.6%) and even research. As more instances of cannabis more so in those who reported frequent allergies are reported and treated, the consumption (18.2%) compared with non- medical community will be better educatsmokers (5%). ed to recommend treatment and guidance. The evaluation of cannabis allergies is Until then, use common sense, get treatdependent largely on skin testing. An ment if needed, and engage the same allergist will perform a skin prick test to respect you would for any naturally ocdetect if a person is sensitive to a specific curring multicellular organism.

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Page 16

Friday, June 5, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

Golf community debates role of ganja By Tracy Damon EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Golf is already a chill game, but how much more relaxed could the activity be if you smoked a little green while on the green? More and more golfers admit to partaking in a toke on the links these days. “No one honestly cares anymore,” said Kurt, a Spokane-area golfer who didn’t want to use his last name. “Everyone is doing it. Or not saying anything if you do. Golf is so awesome because you can get far enough away from everyone to sneak a smoke if you don’t want to do it in front of them.” At the local level, this observation may be more or less true, but the PGA’s official stance is that it doesn’t condone the use of cannabis by any players. In October 2019, Professional Golfers Association player Matt Every was suspended for 12 weeks after testing positive for marijuana, which he says he was prescribed legally for a mental health issue. Player Robert Garrigus was also suspended last year after testing positive for THC in his system. He has since become a vocal critic of the PGA Tour’s marijuana policy, saying that if players are tested for cannabis, they should also be tested for alcohol. While golfing has long been associated with the consumption of alcohol, many pros have only in recent years admitted to using marijuana and at least CBD products for either medical issues or recreation. Some even have CBD companies as sponsors, including Bubba Watson, Charley Hoffman, Lucas Glover and Scott Piercy. And while individual players may not encounter any problems sneaking a smoke at Washington courses, it probably isn’t great course comportment. Even though the state allows use and possession of cannabis, there are laws against open consumption in public or activity can be seen by the public. Private courses also may have their own policies. So what is the difference between using alcohol and marijuana on the course, since both are legal substances in some states? Some people say it’s really how well you play. A May 2018 article in Golf Digest talks about putting three players of varying skill to the test to see how using marijuana affected their game. The end results were that all players tended to hit more longer shots while under the influence, but ap-

The PGA’s official stance on marijuana? It doesn’t condone use by any player. proach and putting accuracy took a negative hit. Overall, players using pot seem to have less inhibition and more enthusiasm about long distance shots but less fine motor control. Kurt disagrees, saying smoking a little bit doesn’t appear to impact his game one way or the other. “With golf for me, it’s a matter of luck or no luck that day,” he said. “I have tried so many times either way, stoned and sober, and it doesn’t seem to matter.” Kurt golfs regularly in the warm months, at least once a week and often more. He says while smoking pot doesn’t help or hurt his game, it does improve his attitude. “For me it really helps with not getting frustrated if I screw up or play bad. It

helps me to brush it off.” In his mid-40s, Kurt has been golfing since he started driving golf balls in ninth grade, then moved up to playing full rounds in 11th grade. He says he’s seen a big change on regional courses since those early days of sneaking a few beers on the course. “I’ve definitely noticed a difference since I started golfing where everyone used to be uptight. Now you see a little of everything on the course. You go on a regular day and you not only see the older traditional crowd but a lot of guys with their kids and a lot of high school kids. I do think it might be the effect “Happy Gilmore” had on the game.” Others are wishing that the buttonedup attitude toward golf would change

even more. In an anonymous 2019 survey of pro golfers by Golf.com, nearly 60 percent of 52 Tour players polled at the Safeway Open said the Tour should permit pot. One in five players also admitted to having used cannabis within the last year, although poll results didn’t specify whether it was actually used while golfing. Which is probably a lot harder for pros in the spotlight than someone with a little lower profile like Kurt. “If I’m golfing with someone respectable, I try not to do it (smoke), but if the wheels come off, I do and no one has to notice if you don’t want them to. You just tell them to go hit their ball and go the other direction behind the cart to take a puff. I’ve gotten pretty stealthy with it.”


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Friday, June 5, 2020

Page 17

LEARN & GROW

COOKING WITH CANNABIS

Get started, low and slow

June 11

The Cannabis Alliance, Seattle. Monthly virtual meeting of growers, retailers and other supporters of Washington’s cannabis system. The Alliance is also scheduling virtual happy hours for social interaction for members each Tuesday at 5 p.m. thecannabisalliance.us

June 20

The Dope Show, Bend, Ore. Comedians perform before and after partaking of locally purchased cannabis

By Mary J. White EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

I am so excited to meet you all! I’m Mary J. White, and I’ve been teaching cooking with cannabis for almost 10 years now. I’m thrilled to be able to contribute some to this awesome publication, and I hope to help you learn about the wonder that is cannabis. Making a long story short, I began using cannabis medically 10 years ago. I had a lot of the usual aging things – arthritis, diverticulitis, chronic pain – and I wasn’t getting better. After years of so many pills, I was done. I tried a half of a pot cookie and voila! Relief! I immediately started learning all I could about cannabis. Back in the olden times, like 1969, I tried pot in high school, but I figured it was just another fun drug. We had no idea that this plant has been used as medicine about as long as there have been humans. But because of prohibition in this country, we’ve been horribly misinformed about cannabis for the last 80 years. With legalization has come knowledge, and now we recognize that cannabis has a multitude of healing properties. Cannabis has been used as medicine for millennia. There are ancient cave paintings showing happy people using cannabis, even as an edible. Majoun, an infused pastry ball made of fruit, nuts and honey, has been eaten in Morocco for

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Mary J. White with her cat Hugo J. Treadwell. nabis edibles, while effective and fun, have a different effect than smoking. Because it takes at least an hour for cannabis edibles to kick in, some folks have an initial unpleasant experience and say “Never again.” Unlike opioids and many other medicines, marijuana doesn’t affect the brain stem, but too much in your system can lead to an uncomfortable experience. So proceeding with a “low and centuries; in India, they love slow” dose is recommendBhang, a cannabis paste that ed, as is following the excan be added to food or pertise of a guide like me! drink. Whether you need In the coming months, I’ll quick energy, pain relief, show you the best most relaxation, or focus, canna- delicious ways to include bis can help with all of cannabis in your diet. those and more. Whether you need all-day We’ll get into this in relief, or you want to visit future articles, but all mam- outer space, I got you! mals have an endocannabi- Again, I deeply appreciate noid system (ECS) and our this opportunity to spread bodies – and other mamthe love. mal’s bodies – are designed to accept cannabinoids as If you have questions for medicine. Mary J., email us at everI want to stress that can- cannabis@spokesman.com.

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Page 18

Friday, June 5, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

STRAIN OF THE MONTH

Do-Si-Dos Cross of Face Off OG and Girl Scout Cookies provides a nicely balanced high By Rick Misterly EVERANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

One of my main objectives is to bring attention to the growers of the products that you purchase. Traditionally it has been the farmer who begins the process of how we get any agricultural product. With my farm being the sole source of income for over 30 years, I know firsthand what it takes to bring a live product to the table. In the early days of the legal cannabis industry, I saw the initial investment as growers put out their “picks and shovels” to get underway long before any return would be realized. Like other farmers, the cannabis grower is at the beginning of the supply chain. In the early days of Washington’s legal market, growers with ideas of high wholesale prices were soon brought back to reality with returns far lower than expected. Remaining growers have been forced to tweak and prune their business model to fit lower profits while also refining their growing methods and maintaining a quality product for increasingly discriminating buyers. Stephanie Lamb, sales and assistant operation manager at Blue Roots, attributes the high quality of Blue Roots’ products to a number of things, from growing in coco (an absorbent byproduct from coconuts) to using a combination of lights designed to create the perfect environment for the plants. Another of my objectives is to help dispel the misinformation and stigma surrounding marijuana. With the help of every grower, retailer, writer and cannabis user we are collectively gaining a stronger voice in bringing this magical plant out of the shadows. One of the biggest leaps during this recent health crisis is Washington’s designation of cannabis as an essential industry, just a few short years after statewide legalization. Appearance: This particular specimen of Do-Si-Dos from Blue Roots appeared jewel-like in its clear case.

Do-Si-Dos THC: 21.54% CBD: 0.09% Dominant Terpenes: Limonene, Linalool, Caryophyllene Grown by Blue Roots Cannabis Company, Airway Heights Purchased at Herbal E Scents, Colville

The nicely trimmed purple leaves were contrasted by the overall olive green flower peppered heavily with golden orange pistils. The buds were arranged in what looked like a double helix and it took a while before deciding to break up this beautiful sight in order to reach the next step. All of the trichomes remained intact as evidence to the care taken in handling by the trimmers. This attention to detail, which preserves the terpenes, assures a greater overall experience.

Aroma: A bright citrusy lime strikes first giving away obvious freshness. This is followed with powerful live notes of deep, rich earth. But what prevails through the nose and dry hit is a strong dried lavender bringing a calming effect even before lighting up. Effects: This cross of Face Off OG and Girl Scout Cookies gives a good balance in the high regardless of dosage. What can be the narcotic effects of Face Off is offset nicely by Girl Scout Cookies leaving a clear mind and relaxed body. Let

the terpenes guide the THC to their intended pathways and the tingling effects begin in the toes and creep slowly upward. Relax and enjoy the feeling as it could take at least 30 minutes before body and mind come into sync. Do-SiDos would work well for relieving stress and anxiety while providing a remedy for tight or achy muscles. The bright clarity of mind should make for just the right edge in social gatherings or deep philosophical discussions. Best enjoyed later in the day when leisure is the main activity.


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Friday, June 5, 2020

Page 19

CANNABIS IN BRIEF

STUDY SHOWS DECLINE IN DRINKING IN LEGAL-ACCESS STATES DENVER – The longer cannabis has been legal, the less people are drinking alcohol, according to a market study showing both regulated products. ICR Strategic Communications and Spectacle recently released “The 2020 Cannabis Consumer,” which reported that people who consume cannabis generally consume less alcohol. It also indicated that 1 in 3 people in legal cannabis states are drinking less, and 47 percent said they prefer cannabis over alcohol and felt more in control after consuming cannabis. The study also asked whether participants combined both products; 70 percent said they never planned to schedule their cannabis consumption around alcohol, and a similar number said they rarely or never com-

bined the two. While alcoholic drinks are declining, cannabis-infused beverages are gaining market share. What’s especially popular are ones with less THC rather than higher amounts. This sector is also expected to grow in the next five years. Colorado, home of Coors Brewing, saw an increase of total beers sold as the state’s population grew over the last five years, but a decrease in the amount of beer purchased and consumed per person. Source: The Street

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Ballot efforts in limbo in several states BOISE – Efforts to ask voters to decide whether to approve marijuana on the November ballots in Idaho, Montana and Missouri have been placed on hold or abandoned due to health concerns. The Idaho Cannabis Coalition had been attempting to collect 55,057 signatures from registered voters by May 1 to add a medical marijuana question to the ballot. In late April, the campaign announced it had collected about 40,000 but was forced to suspend efforts. Campaign spokesman Russ Belville said the educational campaign will continue and he would like to see medical marijuana on the ballot in 2022. Idaho not only prohibits recreational and medical cannabis, but even has a ban on farmers legally growing industrial hemp. In Missouri, backers of an effort to allow voters to decide whether recreational cannabis should be allowed abandoned a goal of gathering 170,000 signatures by May 3. Missourians for a

New Approach said they found it difficult to collect the figures when nonessential businesses closed and residents were told to stay home in March and April due to the COVID-19 outbreak. Organizers said they sought the ability to collect signatures electronically, but state officials declined. Medical marijuana was approved in Missouri in 2018, and organizers hope to continue their enthusiasm for 2022. New Approach Montana also sought the ability to collect signatures online to add recreational marijuana and extend the deadline from July to August. State officials declined, so organizers are planning a 2021 voter drive. Source: Seattle Post-Intelligencer

VANCOUVER – Sticky's Pot Shop, which had to legally close its doors in 2018 due to a Clark County cannabis ban, recently re-opened for business. The shop in the community of Hazel Dell, an unincorporated area of the county, originally opened in 2014 but was subject to a county-wide ban, although cities can make their own decisions. The shop appealed the shut-down order in court and the Washington Superior Court said counties have the right to decide on zoning issues. The Washinton Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal. However, the make-up of the Clark County Council changed in 2019, and members voted to remove the ban effective in 2020, allowing licensed retailers and growers to open. While other potential entrepreneurs have been scouting out possible locations in the county, Washington’s

Liquor and Cannabis Board allowed Sticky’s to return to the same location, provided it follow required sanitation and social distancing restrictions due to COVID-19 precautions. The pandemic has also allowed the shop and others in the area to offer curbside pick-up. Source: The Columbian


Page 20

Friday, June 5, 2020

The Spokesman-Review

Profile for Cowles Publishing

Evercannibis-June 5, 2020  

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