__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

April 2021

www.evercannabis.com

WEED on WHIDBEY

Puget Sound island offers variety in six shops SCENT-FREE Products made to mask distinct aroma

CANNABIS AT YOUR DOOR Delivery app stuck in legal battle

ALL WORK, NO PLAY CBD may help balance stress


Page 2

Friday, April 2, 2021

The Spokesman-Review


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Page 3

Friday, April 2, 2021


Page 4

Friday, April 2, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK

VOLUME 6 | ISSUE 4

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Kathleen Coleman DIRECTOR OF SALES

Dan Fritts

MANAGING EDITOR

Joe Butler

HEALTH & CULTURE EDITOR

Theresa Tanner

ART DIRECTOR, MARKETING

Anne Potter

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Chris Soprych

Evercannabis magazine is a monthly supplemnt of The Spokesman-Review. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without written consent of the publisher. @EvercannaNews on social media www.evercannabis.com Evercannabis@spokesman.com 509-459-5095

PROUD MEMBER OF:

New look, location next month Look for us on Fridays in Spokane 7 By Joe Butler

EVERCANNABIS EDITOR

First the good news: As I’ve mentioned in past columns, Washington’s cannabis industry is having an incredible year. A recent labor report from Leafly showed that 524 full-time jobs were added in the last year, driving the state’s total to 19,873 – a decent 17% increase from this time last year. Consumers purchased $1.42 billion worth of cannabis product in the Evergreen State in 2020, a sizeable chunk of the $18.3 billion sold legally nationwide and enough to rank us at No. 5. If Washington ever decided to classify cannabis as an agricultural commodity (hint hint, lawmakers), it would be considered a top crop, right up there with apples, wheat and cherries.

While the COVID-19 pandemic caused some other industries to cut back or close their doors, cannabis continues to thrive as an essential business. Now for the bad news: This boom hasn’t equated to an interest in advertising. While we heartily recommend businesses regularly spread the word about their products and services, not enough clients have been saying, “yes, please” lately. So you’ll be seeing a different Evercannabis starting next month. We’ll still run stories from every issue online, but starting with the May issue, the print version will be found behind the Spokane 7 section in The Spokesman-Review the first Friday of each month. We also won’t be delivering free copies to retail shops around Eastern Washington. How long we’ll keep this format is unknown. After the current wave of success gets a little smaller, we may see more companies wanting to spread the word, build their brand and

gain market share. We’ll be happy to tell them about our extensive print and online offerings and the experience our sales staff has in helping companies be seen in a unique, consumer-focused product. We always welcome suggestions for new advertisers and sales pros who want to sell ads. On the non-sales side, we also always appreciate story tips, whether it’s a feature on your favorite shop or a producer/processor. Or, since we’re proud of our education component, if you have a question about anything cannabis-related, please ask us and we’ll be delighted to find the answers for you and other readers. Unlike some of our media colleagues that have pulled the plug on their cannabis section, we want to keep sharing, informing and entertaining. Who knows? Maybe a different place might be more noticeable. As always, let us know what you think! See you in 7!

EVERCANNABIS CONTRIBUTORS Linda Ball is a freelance journalist based in Washington State. She has covered topics including environmental issues, city hall, arts and entertainment, education, and the cannabis industry. Michal Bennett is a freelance writer, editor, poet, and blogger. She and her husband live in Coeur d’Alene, where they enjoy the outdoors, local living, and food and drink adventures. Joe Butler is a longtime marketing writer and editor at The Spokesman-Review. He’s an enthusiast of Star Wars, commemorative spoon collecting, and the Oxford comma. Tracy Damon is a Spokanebased freelancer who has been writing professionally for 20 years. She has been covering i502 issues since recreational cannabis became legal in Washington. Chelsea Cebara is a medicallycertified cannabis consultant and product developer. She teaches and speaks nationally on the intersection of cannabis with sexuality, relationships, and culture. Allison Hall has a degree in technology and has worked in the field for over 15 years. Her true love lies in web site design, social media and marketing, freelance writing, and blogging. Freedom Love is host/executive producer of the Blue Dream Radio Podcast. The AfroDominican cannabis advocate and community organizer grew up in the Dominican Republic and the United States. Rob Mejia is president of cannabis education company Our Community Harvest and Adjunct Cannabis Professor at Stockton University. He lives in New Jersey and enjoys tennis, cooking and home repair. Kate A. Miner has a degree in visual anthropology, and has worked in marketing and advertising for many years. She writes, takes photos and teaches yoga. Rick Misterly is a Washington resident whose interest in cannabis dates back to the 1960s. He’s the cannabis/ hashish curator for Green Barn Farms in Addy and writes the “Rick’s World of Hashish” blog. John Nelson is a longtime journalist, having worked at major news operations in Spokane, Memphis and Seattle. He now works as a freelance journalist, writing about outdoors recreation, RVs and marijuana. Dan Webster is a former Spokesman-Review staff writer who is a community producer for Spokane Public Radio and a blogger for Spokane7.com.


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Page 5

Friday, April 2, 2021

APRIL TABLE OF CONTENTS HEMP RULE SET

USDA regulations announced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

PELICAN DELIVERS

Company, LCB disagree on legality . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

LUCKY LEAF GROWS

Downtown retailer has big plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

EAST COAST BOOM

Are legal-use states keeping equity in mind? . . . . . 9

EXPLORE WHIDBEY ISLAND

Politically divided, united on cannabis . . . . . . . . . . . 10

COLD TURKEY

Can you go through cannabis withdrawal? . . . . . . . 12

THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT

8

7

STRANGE BUT TRUE

Surprising moments in cannabis history . . . . . . . . . 14

WORKNG 9 TO 5

Job-related stress is a common concern . . . . . . . . . 15

SICK DECKS

Sativa Sisters gives creative gifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

THE NOSE KNOWS

How to mask that distinct smell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

TO BE BLUNT

Couple stuck in a rut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

STRAIN REVIEW

Growing Like A Weed’s Afghan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Going incognito

14

16

Evercannabis, The Spokesman-Review and the Cowles Company don’t promote or endorse the use of cannabis products. We acknowledge that marijuana products remain illegal under federal laws. If adults age 21 or older choose to purchase or use them, we encourage them to consume sensibly and at their own risk in legal jurisdictions, in accordance with state and local laws. Some cannabis products have intoxicating effects and may be habit-forming. Consumption of marijuana also may be associated with health risks and impaired concentration, coordination, and judgment. Keep away from children. To learn more, visit the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.


Page 6

Friday, April 2, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

NEWS & BUSINESS

USDA sets hemp production final rule Regulations for the domestic production of hemp outlined By S. Michal Bennett

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

After almost two years of accepting comments on the 2014 hemp pilot program and 2018 Farm Bill directive to regulate hemp production in the U.S., the Department of Agriculture announced its final rule on Jan. 15. The rule officially took effect March 21, and while we don’t know the full implications of what it will all mean for the future of hemp, four key areas are emphasized.

Some autonomy allowed

The USDA and Drug Enforcement Administration have been asked to loosen their grip on hemp production, sampling and testing, and give some autonomy back to states and tribes. Many states have already taken the initiative to figure out what reporting and testing methods work best for them and their producers, and have also developed best practices and processes that could channel national mandates. Groups like the Industrial Hemp Association of Washington were formed to offer advocacy, innovation, research and information about hemp production, working closely with land grant universities to provide educated comment and documented data throughout the process. The final rule reflects the work of these and other agencies. The final rule extended the sampling and testing period for THC levels in hemp from 15 days before harvest to 30 days, and approved performance-based testing. The rule states that the USDA sees the

benefit in allowing states and tribes “the flexibility to develop sampling plans based on data they gather during an extended period of time.” This means that agencies and growers on the ground can influence state or tribal regulations on hemp production. These plans must still be submitted to and approved by the USDA, but the rule acknowledges the burden involved in gathering, sampling and testing industrial hemp and seeks to lighten it to a certain extent. There is also a distinction made between hemp grown for fiber and grain uses and hemp grown for cannabinoid production. The wording indicates that further legislation will be coming regarding the regulation of cannabinoid products and hemp grown for this purpose.

Testing procedure

The rules show that there still aren’t enough DEA-licensed labs to test the amount of hemp being grown in the country. In February 2020, the USDA announced a delay in enforcing the requirement that testing labs be registered with the DEA. With the final rule, that deadline has been extended to December 2022, as the DEA continues to process lab licenses. This also speaks to providing flexibility within state and tribal regulatory processes, as they continue to support the labs that have been with them from the start. One thing the ruling didn’t change was what parts of the plant should be “sampled” for testing purposes, which sparked significant comments. The original rule specified sampling the bud only to assure to a confi-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Trevor Eubanks, plant manager for Big Top Farms, shovels dried hemp as branches hang drying in barn rafters overhead at their production facility near Sisters, Ore., in April 2018. dence level of 95% that no more than 0.5% of the plant exceeded the acceptable hemp THC level of 0.03%. Public comment suggested that, due to logistical and financial concerns, it would be detrimental to production to only focus on the buds. Input suggested more of the plant should be allowed for sampling – stalk, leaf and bud – particularly with cannabinoid crops. While maintaining the flexibility of performance-based approaches allowed to the states and tribes, the USDA decided to stick with bud sampling as the most effective and efficient way of gathering THC data. Still, the tolerance level was raised to no more than 1% and considered the testing capacities of the labs in their final decision. People watching this issue can

To learn more

most likely expect more comprehensive sampling regulations in the future, especially regarding cannabinoid production.

Disposal of non-compliant plants

Another reality acknowledged by the USDA was the limitation of federal and local police enforcement and involvement in the disposal of hemp crops that test over THC limits. Currently, producers can dispose of non-compliant plants using common on-site farm practices, like “plowing under, composting into ‘green manure’ for use on the same land, tilling, disking, burial, or burning.” This process still must be thoroughly documented and reported to the state or tribal regulating agency. But this aspect of the final rule removes a

For more information and updates about hemp production rules, visit www.ams.usda.gov/rules-regulations/hemp.

burden for law enforcement, as well as the farmer.

Tribal authority

Finally, the ruling granted primary authority to tribes to regulate hemp production on tribal lands, regardless if the hemp is grown by the tribe or others. Tribes report directly to the USDA and develop their own performance-based procedures rather than going through the states – unless they choose to. At press time, Washington’s and Idaho’s official hemp websites haven’t been updated with the new rule, but a virtual hemp symposium conference hosted by the Oregon State University Global Hemp Innovation Center occurred in February to explore “what the industry has accomplished to-date and what lies ahead.”


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Page 7

Friday, April 2, 2021

NEWS & BUSINESS

Pelican Delivers hopes to soar despite grounding LCB argues there is no legal pathway for cannabis delivery By Linda Ball

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Dave and Tina Comeau started working in the cannabis industry more than 10 years ago as medical growers and processors before launching Better Buds retail stores in 2016. A year later, the innovative couple began work on a new project: developing sophisticated software for a legal and safe cannabis home delivery system where a third party picks up the item and takes it to the buyer. Think UberEats for cannabis. Once developed, the couple applied for a patent in 2018, and in 2019 they received a patent in the U.S., Canada and the United Kingdom. Eight months later Pelican Delivers was launched. Right now, Pelican Delivers operates in the Bremerton, Port Hadlock and Silverdale areas in Western Washington. Here’s how it works: a customer/ consumer places a reservation through pelicandelivers.com. Then they type in their address to see what cannabis retailer is closest. Pelican Delivers is available within a 25-mile radius of each location. The customer chooses from a menu of products and completes the checkout process. No credit or debit cards are involved; payment is tendered with an electronic funds transfer (EFT) or an automated clearing house (ACH) transaction. The funds are placed into an escrow account until the driver arrives as the store, at which time the funds are released to the retailer. The drivers either have the app or use the website to sign up. Upon ordering and at the time of the delivery, the customer validates their identity to prove they are 21 or older. Third party ID scanning is used to verify that the purchaser is of age when they sign up. Tipping drivers is allowed. Things got complicated last year when the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board started visiting retail stores in the delivery area and informed owners that they couldn’t use the Pelican software.

As a result, the Comeaus spent the majority of 2020 in court. “We’re saying it’s legal, and the LCB says it’s not,” Dave Comeau said. He said the state is citing rules that don’t relate to what they are doing. Comeau believes the state has no valid argument, but the state differs. According to Brian Smith, spokesperson for the LCB, there is no legal way around the law that clearly states that all sales must be at a licensed store. After receiving complaints about Pelican, all cannabis licensees were sent a message last year.

“While Pelican is outside of the licensed cannabis system, Mr. Comeau is on the license for two retail stores (Better Buds). Those stores, plus a third store that also engaged the service, received violations in April 2020 for participating,” he said. The other retail store is Cronic Case, which opted in anyway. A bulletin sent on Feb. 26, 2020, from Matt McCallum, LCB’s advertising coordinator, said “this bulletin is a clarification and reminder to all marijuana licensees that delivery of cannabis from retail licensed locations to customers outside of the licensed

premises is prohibited. Some companies claim to have found a way around the delivery prohibition, but to date there is no legal method for commercial delivery of cannabis from a retailer to consumer off premise.” The LCB continues to maintain that there is no legal pathway for commercial delivery, delivery service or a delivery app to be used to facilitate home delivery from licensed retail locations to customers. A court decision had not been made as of reporting; Comeau said if the decision doesn’t go his way, he’s ready for a jury trial.


Page 8

Friday, April 2, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

NEWS & BUSINESS

Lucky Leaf dreams bigger with apparel business next door Downtown Spokane shop faced early opposition By Joe Butler EVERCANNABIS WRITER

Just over five years ago, Shilo and David Morgan learned that their plans for a cannabis store in the Tri-Cities weren’t going to work out due to a local zoning ban on “those types of establishments.” So they came to Spokane, where they found a suitable location and acquired a license downtown, but also learned that some in the community didn’t want them here either. There were petitions and public protests and concerns that Lucky Leaf, located on W. First Avenue, would surely corrupt children and churchgoers, and make that part of town even rougher. But the Morgans and Lucky Leaf continue to draw satisfied customers from across the entire region. Some shoppers have been coming to the retail shop for years, and some of the budtenders also haven’t changed. The owners have worked hard to cultivate a good reputation as a clean, welcoming and friendly shop with a wide selection of cannabis products. The staff focuses on education and service, and serves some of the most diverse clientele around, from downtown employees and restaurant workers to tourists Lucky Leaf is located at 1111 W. First Ave. Its sister establishment Lucky Leaf Supply can be found next door. THERESA TANNER EVERCANNABIS

and show-goers (back when there were shows). Lucky Leaf also features rotating art from the community as a stop on Downtown Spokane’s First Friday art walks. The Morgans were even publicly commended by City Councilwoman Karen Stratton for investing in the area, refurbishing architecture and working to lower crime, litter and graffiti. “We’ve always had dreams for this building,” Shilo Morgan said. In the last year, even more of these dreams began becoming closer to reality. The Morgans recently purchased the historic building, which has been used for a variety of purposes over the years, from apartments to a DVD/ Blu-Ray production operation in the basement. What’s especially exciting is the addition of Lucky Leaf Supply, next to Lucky Leaf, where people can buy branded apparel, pipes, tobacco products, non-cannabis merchandise and more. It’s open to anyone, unlike Lucky Leaf that is only open to age 21 and over. This includes the Morgans’ daughter Malea Kumpf, who manages Lucky Leaf Supply. Since she’s under 21, she can visit a central office but can’t legally set foot into Lucky Leaf. “Malea is the boss on this side,” Morgan said.

JOE BUTLER/EVERCANNABIS

Shilo Morgan, left, co-owner of Lucky Leaf, a downtown Spokane cannabis shop, with daughter Malea Kumpf, manager of the recently-opened Lucky Leaf Supply Co., which offers tobacco products and accessories, branded apparel and more.

They worked with apparel company The Great PNW to create designs on a variety of limited-edition sweatshirts, T-shirts, headwear and more. Some items include photos taken by David Morgan. Lighters, vape products, tobacco items, Puff Bars and more are available at Lucky Leaf Supply. If you’re a cannabis fan and like to show off your appreciation for a particular brand, you can find swag from Cookies and other companies, along with exclusive Lucky Leaf designs. It’s a place to find 4/20 cards, a brand of greeting cards that include

To learn more

various messages and sentiments but also have a space to attach a preroll to brighten someone’s day even more. “We also have a whole bunch of local glass,” Kumpf said. Lucky Leaf Supply wants to be known as a great place for local glassblowers to sell their wares, as well as for other local artists to have their paintings on display. “We’ll always be rotating artists, and always looking at adding vendors,” Morgan said. “We really want to showcase all the good things taking place in our community.”

For more information, visit luckyleaf.co/ or luckyleafsupply.com/.


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Page 9

NEWS & BUSINESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy signs legislation to set up a recreational marijuana marketplace, Feb. 22 in Trenton, N.J.

The Northeast green rush Three states move toward legalization, but is equity a priority? By Hector “Freedom” Gerardo EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

The fiscal future of the United States is uncertain following the yearlong COVID-19 pandemic. However, the governors of three Northeast states – Connecticut, New Jersey and New York – have all spoken publicly about the financial benefit of tax income derived from the sales of legalized adult-use of cannabis.

New Jersey

The Garden State passed a constitutional amendment to legalize cannabis in November 2020, but the rules, regulations and implementation parameters still had to be determined. On Feb. 22, Gov. Philip Murphy signed three bills legalizing the adult-use of recreational cannabis and allowing people ages 21 and older to possess up to 6 ounces of cannabis without consequence. However, there are some glaring red

flags: • Home grow has been excluded. If someone is found to be growing cannabis without a license, they will be prosecuted. • People from the ages of 18-20 who are found in possession of cannabis will be fined. Why is this a problem? Consider what areas of New Jersey where this policy will be strictly enforced: predominantly Black and brown communities with a heavy police presence, like Newark and Camden. • There is no mention of labor peace agreements. New Jersey medicinal cannabis employers have been staunchly anti-union and intimidated workers that have tried to unionize for years. The cannabis industry is applauding New Jersey for its quick legalization process – in Massachusetts, it took two years to get to a law – but what’s the See NORTHEAST, 13

Friday, April 2, 2021


Page 10

Friday, April 2, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

POLAR OPINIONS ABLE TO FIND COMMON GROUND By John Nelson

CANNABIS CREATES CONNECTIONS ON

Whidbey Island Deception Pass Bridge at sunset on Whidbey Island. SHUTTERSTOCK

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

WHIDBEY ISLAND, Wash. – Here on Puget Sound’s largest island, the enduring appeal of cannabis transcends even the greatest political and social divisions. Whidbey has two rival populations: one politically conservative and pro-military, the other artsy and politically liberal. The common thread that brings people together? Marijuana. To the north, you have Oak Harbor, home to bustling Whidbey Island Naval Air Station, where fighter jets roar overhead on training runs nearly every day. In this conservative community, which voted overwhelmingly Republican in the 2020 presidential election, you’ll find the island’s two busiest cannabis outlets, The Green Room and Kaleafa. On South Whidbey, you have a completely different story in the community of Freeland, which was originally established in 1900 as a socialist commune. Still-liberal Freeland voted Democratic in the last presidential election, and it’s now home to three cannabis stores: Whidbey Island Cannabis Co., Freeland Cannabis and Island Herb.

And just up the road is the artsy community of Greenbank, where the island’s newest cannabis store The Weed Shop serves others on the long, skinny island.

Whidbey’s weed trail

Most visitors to Whidbey Island start from the south, taking the Washington State Ferry from Mukilteo to Clinton. From the ferry, it’s nine miles to Freeland, whose founders had the lofty ambition of providing “free land” to those who signed up for the community’s original socialist experiment. It didn’t take. Today, Freeland is decidedly a capitalist society, filled with small strip malls and shops. The first cannabis retailer you’ll see in Freeland is Whidbey Island Cannabis Co., a small building that sits under a large black billboard just off South Whidbey’s main highway, State Route 525. “You have very different experiences in all the cannabis stores on the island,” said Steven Sutton, budtender and buyer for Whidbey Island Cannabis. “Here, we’re not so crazy busy that we can’t spend 30 minutes with someone to make sure they get what they want.”

Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Among the unusual offerings at Whidbey Island Cannabis is Dutch Brothers Farms, a high-end producer of craft flower. Next up on the Whidbey weed tour is Island Herb, a cozy enclave complete with easy chairs and a comfy couch. Island Herb offers a wide variety of unusual flower strains from a variety of producers, including Dawg Star and Hygge Farms. And on the northern end of Freeland, you’ll find Freeland Cannabis, a small shop in a strip mall right next to the U-Haul rental center. Freeland Cannabis has one distinct advantage over its competitors – an on-premises power generator – store manager Nicole Strasburg says. “When the power goes off, we stay open,” said Strasburg. “The last time the island lost power, we had our best day ever.” About seven miles up the road from Freeland sits the community of Greenbank, home of the Whidbey’s 1904-era Greenbank Farm, a popular stop for island visitors, featuring artwork, craft food items and pastoral walking trails. Nearby is Whidbey Island’s newest cannabis outlet, The Weed Shop, established in 2018 in a cute cottage just off State Route 525. “All of our flower is clean-green, pesticide-free, organic,” said budtender Matthew Huerta. The shop is dedicated to carrying products by craft producers. “We’re the only shop on the island that

Page 11

Friday, April 2, 2021

doesn’t carry Phat Panda (the state’s largest producer/processor based in Spokane County),” Huerta said. Instead, The Weed Shop favors smaller producers, such as With It Weed, from Spokane.

Jets and joints

At the north end of Whidbey Island sits the town of Oak Harbor, the island’s biggest town with 23,000 residents. Two busy cannabis stores serve this military-friendly community. At The Green Room, budtender Aly Lapadakis pointed out the store’s wide menu, which includes flower from Gabriel, Torus, and Falcanna. The store also offers the Cookies brand, which includes the popular Gary Payton strain. “We have a little bit more variety than the shops on South Whidbey,” Lapadakis said. “People will drive here from Freeland because of what we offer.” A few blocks away sits Kaleafa, the island’s most popular cannabis shop based on i502 sales data, situated in a strip mall next to a flooring store. Kaleafa was the island’s first cannabis store, open in 2015, and has Whidbey’s largest selection, manager Sean Albano said. Much of the store’s customer base is retired military, Albano said. “We get a lot of veterans,” he said, adding that many customers have medical marijuana needs. “Our average customer is probably 50 years old.”

PHOTO BY JOHN NELSON

The cozy confines of Island Herb include a living-room like interior in the heart of Freeland.


Page 10

Friday, April 2, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

POLAR OPINIONS ABLE TO FIND COMMON GROUND By John Nelson

CANNABIS CREATES CONNECTIONS ON

Whidbey Island Deception Pass Bridge at sunset on Whidbey Island. SHUTTERSTOCK

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

WHIDBEY ISLAND, Wash. – Here on Puget Sound’s largest island, the enduring appeal of cannabis transcends even the greatest political and social divisions. Whidbey has two rival populations: one politically conservative and pro-military, the other artsy and politically liberal. The common thread that brings people together? Marijuana. To the north, you have Oak Harbor, home to bustling Whidbey Island Naval Air Station, where fighter jets roar overhead on training runs nearly every day. In this conservative community, which voted overwhelmingly Republican in the 2020 presidential election, you’ll find the island’s two busiest cannabis outlets, The Green Room and Kaleafa. On South Whidbey, you have a completely different story in the community of Freeland, which was originally established in 1900 as a socialist commune. Still-liberal Freeland voted Democratic in the last presidential election, and it’s now home to three cannabis stores: Whidbey Island Cannabis Co., Freeland Cannabis and Island Herb.

And just up the road is the artsy community of Greenbank, where the island’s newest cannabis store The Weed Shop serves others on the long, skinny island.

Whidbey’s weed trail

Most visitors to Whidbey Island start from the south, taking the Washington State Ferry from Mukilteo to Clinton. From the ferry, it’s nine miles to Freeland, whose founders had the lofty ambition of providing “free land” to those who signed up for the community’s original socialist experiment. It didn’t take. Today, Freeland is decidedly a capitalist society, filled with small strip malls and shops. The first cannabis retailer you’ll see in Freeland is Whidbey Island Cannabis Co., a small building that sits under a large black billboard just off South Whidbey’s main highway, State Route 525. “You have very different experiences in all the cannabis stores on the island,” said Steven Sutton, budtender and buyer for Whidbey Island Cannabis. “Here, we’re not so crazy busy that we can’t spend 30 minutes with someone to make sure they get what they want.”

Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Among the unusual offerings at Whidbey Island Cannabis is Dutch Brothers Farms, a high-end producer of craft flower. Next up on the Whidbey weed tour is Island Herb, a cozy enclave complete with easy chairs and a comfy couch. Island Herb offers a wide variety of unusual flower strains from a variety of producers, including Dawg Star and Hygge Farms. And on the northern end of Freeland, you’ll find Freeland Cannabis, a small shop in a strip mall right next to the U-Haul rental center. Freeland Cannabis has one distinct advantage over its competitors – an on-premises power generator – store manager Nicole Strasburg says. “When the power goes off, we stay open,” said Strasburg. “The last time the island lost power, we had our best day ever.” About seven miles up the road from Freeland sits the community of Greenbank, home of the Whidbey’s 1904-era Greenbank Farm, a popular stop for island visitors, featuring artwork, craft food items and pastoral walking trails. Nearby is Whidbey Island’s newest cannabis outlet, The Weed Shop, established in 2018 in a cute cottage just off State Route 525. “All of our flower is clean-green, pesticide-free, organic,” said budtender Matthew Huerta. The shop is dedicated to carrying products by craft producers. “We’re the only shop on the island that

Page 11

Friday, April 2, 2021

doesn’t carry Phat Panda (the state’s largest producer/processor based in Spokane County),” Huerta said. Instead, The Weed Shop favors smaller producers, such as With It Weed, from Spokane.

Jets and joints

At the north end of Whidbey Island sits the town of Oak Harbor, the island’s biggest town with 23,000 residents. Two busy cannabis stores serve this military-friendly community. At The Green Room, budtender Aly Lapadakis pointed out the store’s wide menu, which includes flower from Gabriel, Torus, and Falcanna. The store also offers the Cookies brand, which includes the popular Gary Payton strain. “We have a little bit more variety than the shops on South Whidbey,” Lapadakis said. “People will drive here from Freeland because of what we offer.” A few blocks away sits Kaleafa, the island’s most popular cannabis shop based on i502 sales data, situated in a strip mall next to a flooring store. Kaleafa was the island’s first cannabis store, open in 2015, and has Whidbey’s largest selection, manager Sean Albano said. Much of the store’s customer base is retired military, Albano said. “We get a lot of veterans,” he said, adding that many customers have medical marijuana needs. “Our average customer is probably 50 years old.”

PHOTO BY JOHN NELSON

The cozy confines of Island Herb include a living-room like interior in the heart of Freeland.


Page 12

Friday, April 2, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

HEALTH & SCIENCE

PUTTING DOWN THE PIPE Although less severe than other drugs, cannabis withdrawal symptoms do occur By Dan Webster

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

If you’ve seen the 1936 film “Reefer Madness” you know that authorities at the time equated cannabis with far more addictive drugs. In fact, the movie’s cannabis-smoking protagonist – played by actor Dave O’Brien – ends up displaying symptoms exaggerated even for heroin withdrawal. Both the movie and O’Brien’s performance have long been derided for their efforts at portraying cannabis consumption as an act that, as critic Alan Jones described it, “turns its users into hysterical monsters driven by their basest desires.” “Modern audiences think of ‘Reefer Madness’ as pure camp,” Jones wrote in an article for Hazlitt.net – “that is, an unintentionally ridiculous bit of institutional propaganda, godparent of the after-school special.” But, it turns out, there may be at least some truth to the movie’s allegations. A professor of psychiatry named Laura Coughlin, who participated in study conducted at the University of Michigan, stated that “while weed is indeed less dangerous than some other drugs, it is not without risks.” In an article for the nonprofit news website The Conversation, Coughlin wrote that the UM study indicates that “59 percent of people using medical cannabis for chronic pain experienced moderate to severe withdrawal symptoms if they stopped ingesting weed for hours or days.” According to Coughlin, the range of those symptoms varied but included “irritability, depressed mood, decreased appetite, sleep difficulties, a desire or craving to use cannabis, restlessness, anxiety, increased aggression, headaches, shakiness, nausea, increased anger, strange dreams, stomach pains and sweating.”

Coughlin maintains that the symptoms typically diminish within a couple of weeks as, she wrote, the cannabis use is stopped and “as the body adjusts back to its own natural production of cannabinoids.” “Unlike withdrawal from some psychoactive substances – such as alcohol – cannabis withdrawal is not life-threatening or medically dangerous,” Coughlin wrote. “But it does exist.” Similar information can be found on the health and wellness website Healthline. com. An article titled “What to Expect from Marijuana Withdrawal” cites a warning from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: “1 in 10 Americans who use cannabis will become

addicted.” And, it added, that number “jumps to 1 in 6 if you begin using marijuana before the age of 18.” Determining who is most at risk to become addicted to cannabis is a tricky proposition. Writing in Emerald Magazine, Claire Covino states that – according to the National Institute of Drug Abuse – genetic predisposition may be a key, “though the person’s environment is just as influential.” “However,” Covino added, “a person with no genetic predisposition might not fall victim to addiction given the same environment.” The increased THC potency of today’s cannabis may also be a factor. The journal Biological

Psychiatry published a study in 2016 that indicated THC potency had risen from 4 percent to 12 percent over the previous two years alone. And, of course, the mental health of the individual cannabis user has to be considered. “The cycle of addiction is much more likely for those who use cannabis as a form of self-medication, whether they know they’re doing it or not,” Covino wrote. To avoid the worst of the withdrawal symptoms, Healthline.com cautions, it’s best to taper off slowly while under the care of a physician. Other advice when trying to reduce or eliminate cannabis consumption:

• Stay hydrated, making sure to avoid “sugary, caffeinated beverages like soda.” • Eat healthy foods such as fresh fruits, vegetables and lean meats, and avoid junk food “which can make you feel sluggish and irritable.” • Exercise at least 30 minutes a day. • Seek out others to provide emotional support. Like many indulgences, overconsumption can lead to problems – and cannabis is no different. As Michigan researcher Coughlin noted, “Cannabis may not be the demon drug from ‘Reefer Madness,’ but neither is it a wonder-plant with limitless upsides and no downsides.”


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Page 13

Friday, April 2, 2021

NEWS & BUSINESS UPCOMING EVENTS

NORTHEAST Continued from 9

rush if equity was barely a footnote in the bills?

New York

For the past two years advocates in New York have felt like they are on the verge of achieving legalization, and then something happens to put the brakes on. Last year, the pandemic stalled hopes of the Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act (MRTA) being passed. Gov. Andrew Cuomo put out his own bill, the Cannabis Regulation and Taxation Act in 2020 (CRTA), but the MRTA kept equity front and center, and will not solely benefit multistate operators. This year is going to be the third attempt at legalization. Here is what you need to know about MRTA: • Preference: Advocates across the state have carefully crafted this bill with legislators and with policymakers in other states that have legalized recreational cannabis. The MRTA has strong similarities to the Illinois cannabis legalization law passed in 2019. • Equity: The MRTA talks about equity boldly and makes clear that the reclassification/resentencing of cannabis-related convictions should be retroactive.

Connecticut

One of the two cannabis

legalization bills presented in Connecticut has a very clear intersectional lens that will benefit its citizens in a meaningful way. Its also being championed by women and women of color. According to State Sen. Julie Kushner, who co-introduced HB-337, “when constructing the bill, we wanted to welcome a new industry into the state, but also asked ourselves ‘how do we make this industry beneficial to our communities, how do we build a workforce and employers who both represent our community?’” the senator said in a recent interview. HB-337 is the most unique of any bill or law in the U.S. because of it is very clear and intentional focus on equity and labor peace. Lawmakers are approaching legalization at the intersection of labor and equity – a unique framework that will undoubtedly fill the gap that so many recreational cannabis use laws have created over the years. “We need to resist jumping ahead and not getting this right … If we don’t do it right now, it will take decades to fix/ address this [equity and labor peace],” Sen. Kushner said. A few highlights of HB337: • Equity: The bill ensures that BIPOC communities have licensing opportunities, mitigating and/or reclassifying criminal justice inequities

that exist as a result of cannabis possession and/ or use. There is a carve out for Native American communities, which elevates this bill as the new gold standard of cannabis legalization bills. • The implementation of labor peace agreements for cannabis workers. This means that an employer will remain neutral if their workers decide to organize into a union. There would also be protections for contract negotiations that would create timelines and the implementation of statutory arbitration if timelines are not met. Labor peace agreements exist in some state legalization laws and have been tremendously beneficial for cannabis workers, but also for the industry, ensuring workers (and therefore consumers) are safe through the implementation of workplace safety measures. • A consideration that is a first in any legalization bill is a carve out of labor peace for cannabis businesses owned operated on tribal land. Sen. Kushner recalls her experience in the 1990s when casinos opened on Native American land and it took 20 years for workers to successfully unionize, hoping to prevent a similar situation for cannabis workers. This bill is the product of legislators working with advocates and listening to the community that has been most impacted by cannabis prohibition.

Cannabis Cooking Classes. Soul Fresh in Boston offers live virtual cooking lessons Saturdays, 12:30-3:30 p.m. PST. Attendees learn salves and food, and receive a digital cookbook. www. soulfreshwellness.com.  Cooking with Mary J. White. Cannabis chef and Evercannabis columnist Mary J. White teaches a variety of virtual and in-person cannabis classes in Seattle, including “Secrets of Cooking with Cannabis” April 10, “Tinctures ‘n Gummies” April 17, and “Lotions and Potions” April 24. www.maryjwhite.com

ington’s cannabis system. The Alliance is also scheduling virtual happy hours for social interaction for members each Tuesday at 5 p.m., plus occasional virtual “Office Hours” to meet staff.  thecannabisalliance.us         

 April 6-7

The Growing Summit, online. Learn about the booming Canadian cannabis market including new cultivation and networking methods. Participants can use digital rooms to conduct business. www.growingsummit.com/home

April 8

Due to health concerns, some events may be canceled, postponed or moved online. Please check with event organizers to verify prior to attending.

Interchange, Renton. Marijuana Venture magazine brings together growers and retailers to the Renton Pavilion to create networking opportunities. www.interchangemv.com/register The Cannabis Alliance, Seattle. Monthly meeting of growers, retailers and other supporters of Wash-

April 21

Chronic Relief, Snohomish. Golf tournament at Echo Falls Golf Club raises money for COVID-19 pandemic relief, especially those in the cannabis industry. www.chronicrelief.org

April 26-28


Page 14

Friday, April 2, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

Strange tales from the world of cannabis By Rob Mejia

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Because cannabis has been a taboo subject for so long, we sometimes forget to celebrate the simply weird stories that involve this plant. Here are a few tales to make you smile and say “really?”

How Texas accidentally decriminalized cannabis

Did you know that Texas was the first state to outlaw cannabis? El Paso was the first major U.S. city to ban cannabis back in 1915, two decades before the U.S. banned cannabis. No wonder heads shook when Texas accidentally decriminalized cannabis, and it was all because of hemp! Texas law was simple in its intent. Cannabis was simply banned – and had been – for over 100 years. But last year, lawmakers decided that they would allow their farmers to begin cultivating hemp. It is useful to remember that hemp is a non-intoxicating plant that makes CBD oil, fiber and roughly 25,000 other consumer products. When legislation was written to allow hemp production, the law stated that cannabis with a THC content of less than 0.3% could now be grown. But what do you do when someone is

charged with cannabis possession? Well, the product must be tested. And Texas testing labs were being overwhelmed with the task of testing cannabis before defendants went to trial. The labs said they would not test in cases where 7 grams or less were involved. And it was their stance that essentially decriminalized minor cannabis possession. No test, no conviction.

Humboldt County permanently bans industrial hemp

Who could have guessed that one of the best cannabis growing counties in the United States would permanently ban a form of cannabis? As mentioned, hemp must have THC content under 0.3% but it is still part of the cannabis family.

California and especially the Golden Triangle, which includes Humboldt County, is responsible for some of the highest potency, trichome-rich cannabis in the world. But the problem is that the male hemp plant produces pollen and airborne pollen is the way that cannabis is pollinated. In fact, airborne hemp pollen can travel up to 10 miles and if a female THC rich plant is pollinated, it reduces its potency and quality. To protect the cannabis quality of the region, hemp, which had been temporarily banned in Humboldt County, is now permanently banned.

Dispensaries in surprising places

Today there are 15 states plus the District of Columbia where adult-use cannabis is legal and 35 states that allow for the use of

medical cannabis. Wouldn’t you expect the highest number of per capita dispensaries to be in both adult-use and medical-use states, or highly populated states? That is only partially correct. You’ll be surprised to learn that in 2020 states like Oklahoma and Montana are in the top 10. Note that there is a big gap between the top five states and the next five states (including Washington). Top 10 states with the most dispensaries per capita: • Oregon: 16.5 per 100,000 people • Oklahoma: 15.6 per 100,000 • Montana: 15.1 per 100,000 • Colorado:14.1 per 100,000 • Alaska: 12.7 per 100,000 • Washington: 6.2 per 100,000 • New Mexico: 5.2 per 100,000 • Nevada: 2.4 per 100,000 • Michigan: 1.9 per 100,000 • California: 1.6 per 100,000 The city with the most dispensaries per capita is Missoula, Mont., with

36.2 dispensaries per 100,000 citizens.

College cannabis courses are a thing

If you are an old-school cannabis consumer, you might jokingly say that you majored in cannabis in college. But now students really can major, minor, and research cannabis. At last count, over 20 U.S. colleges and universities were offering courses in subjects as diverse as Cannabis Horticulture, Cannabis Journalism, The Science of Cannabis, and Introduction to Medicinal Cannabis. In fact, Colorado State University-Pueblo now offers a Cannabis Science Major. And Stockton University in New Jersey (where I teach) offers a Minor in Cannabis Studies. The University of California, Los Angeles even has an entire research institute devoted to the study of cannabis. In addition, there are private “institutes” like Oaksterdam and Clover Leaf University that offer cannabis education and training, too. Any way you look at it, interest in cannabis education and cannabis jobs is keen, which means we will see more students happily majoring in cannabis studies inside the classroom.


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Page 15

Friday, April 2, 2021

CULTURE & LIEFSTYLE

Can cannabis help manage job burnout? By Allison Hall

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Does your eight-hour workday feel like 40? Are you dragging yourself out of bed every morning just to get to work, whether you commute or telecommute? When your day is over, are you so tired you can barely move? Then you may be experiencing burnout. Burnout can affect you both emotionally and physically and lead to exhaustion, lack of interest and the feeling you can’t be productive. Its negative effects may spill over into every part of your daily life. If left untreated, burnout can result in long-term serious medical conditions such as an increased likelihood for heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, respiratory issues and depression. Between the pandemic,

increased health concerns, job loss, and the other stresses that life throws, many are looking for ways to protect their mental health and wellness. Since this is a cannabis pub-

lication, the natural question is “Can cannabis help?” With all the research on cannabis, many are still at odds on the benefits of using one or both of the natural compounds CBD (cannabidiol) or THC

(tetrahydrocannabinol) to aid mental health. Although both are derived from the same plant – cannabis sativa – CBD is a non-psychoactive, so you don’t get the high that you would from THC. What is promising is that many researchers have found that cannabinoids, specifically CBD, and terpenes (natural aromatics) can combine to reduce certain triggers. So how does this actually help with burnout? When your body is in a state of anxiety or stress due to burnout, your body can over-produce hormones like cortisol, your body’s main stress hormone. By introducing CBD into your system, you may be able to help bring your levels back into balance. CBD may help: • Regulate appetite • Promote better sleep

• Reduce anxiety and discomfort • Improve focus • Boost mood • Lower blood pressure • Reduce pain and inflammation There are many ways to use CBD, including vaping, capsules, oils, edibles and beverages and topical creams. It’s also non-addictive and can be hemp-based with less than 0.3% THC, so it is legal in all 50 states. Just keep in mind that cannabis affects everyone differently and the benefits and risk of using any substances for burnout depend a lot on the person and the situation. Talk to a physician about CBD and other ways to mitigate stress. The bottom line, there is no catch-all cure for burnout, but you can learn to find ways to manage it successfully.

Sativa Sisters stacks the decks By Kate A. Miner

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

COURTESY SATIVA SISTERS

Sativa Sisters decided to create custom skate decks as a gift for vendor partners.

Sativa Sisters started in 2014 when four close friends won the lottery for retail cannabis licenses and purchased a building on East Trent Avenue in Spokane Valley. Three years they opened their second location in Clarkston. Both shops have a fun atmosphere, sell a wide variety of products, and focus on great customer service. They even partner with a Spokane Valley neighbor Amsterdam Coffee Club that features coffee and a full line of CBD products. A similar adjacent coffee shop can be found in Clarkston too. Like other businesses, cannabis and non-cannabis, the shops have struggled with a variety of issues especially in the last year. One of which was how to thank their loyal vendors and growers who have also experienced challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. In the past Sativa Sisters has thrown a vendor party, but these types of gatherings were not allowed in 2020. Several employees are long time skateboard-

ers, and one of them is also a designer. For fun he started making skateboard decks for the shop. Everyone liked them and before you knew it, skate decks were given out as gifts to close friends. When shop officials realized their annual vendor party was a no-go due to limitations on gatherings, they decided to create custom decks for ‘thank you’ gifts. The relationship between weed and the skateboarding culture go hand-in-hand, and decks with cannabis buds, flower patterns, bongs, and Cheech & Chong have been around for decades. A custom skateboard deck featuring a vendor’s logo or signature image was the perfect gift. These decks are designed to hang on the wall as a display piece. They have been received with great enthusiasm, hanging in a variety of locations as a reminder that Sativa Sisters is always innovative in its approach. For more information, or to check out some of the boards on display, visit either shop or the locations of some vendor partners.


Page 16

Friday, April 2, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

CUTLURE & LIFESTYLE

MASKING THE SMELL OF MARIJUANA By Tracy Damon

EVERCANANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Love the smell of pot? A lot of us do. But some people aren’t fans, and for others the scent is a giveaway that we may have been smoking when or where we weren’t supposed to. And others compare it to cooking – smells great at the time but once the meal is over, it’s time for the scent to go away. If you need to cover the smell of your smoke sesh, there are several very affordable ways to do it; some classic that go back years and years, and others based on newer technology. STASHLOGIX Smell Proof Bags resemble a small clutch or lunchbox, but with an odor trapping gasket and liner that contains the smell of weed. It’s also got a waterproof zipper and a combination lock to keep your pot safe at the beach, or from friends or family

members who bum your bud without asking. If you keep your kush in an old-school Ziploc bag or a cigar box, throw a Marsheepy Natural Bamboo Charcoal Bag in to absorb the smell. The sealed linen bag absorbs moisture in the air and holds it inside along with odors. Put them out in the sun to “recharge” once a month and they will continue to hide your secret for a long time. Available everywhere from Amazon to Walmart, these charcoal bags are affordable at a variety of price points, and come in several sizes. One of the easiest ways to hide the smell of weed is to keep it from escaping into the environment around you. To do this, exhale through a sploof, a device that cleans the air you breathe out. You might remember making these in your younger days with a dryer sheet over the end of a toilet paper roll, but the older and wiser you will want to invest in a commercial version that comes with a HEPA filtration systems. Sploofs, like Smoke Trap, can be purchased online or in pot shops. Another option for getting rid of smells in general is an air purifier. Air purifiers use a combination of four strategies, sometimes combined, to fight all kinds of pollutants in

your home. Light-based purifiers use ultraviolet and LED light to sterilize air that passes through it, while ionic models use gravity to collect pollutants in a container. Carbon and HEPA filtration remove physical particles and eliminate smells. Purifiers are a more costly way to mask the smell of pot but probably worth it if treating a larger space, plus they can get rid of pet dander and particulate matter. Cannabolish Smoke Odor Eliminating Candles are made of all natural ingredients like beeswax, soy wax and non-toxic plant oils, and claim to use a natural scent blend to eliminate unwanted smoke odors of all kinds. For the best results, light the candle about half an hour before you smoke. Incense, on the other hand, is cheap and will cover up pretty much any smell, but unless you are an adherent to meditation or other cultural rituals associated with the aromatic material, most people know that its use is associated with disguising the scent of marijuana. Same with patchouli oil, although some people do say they like the smell of it. One benefit of incense is that you can get it anywhere at pretty much any price point. If smell is an issue for you, you can also change the way you ingest weed. Rather than smoking a joint, pipe or bong that puts smoke into the air, vape pens are a lot less obvious. While some THC oils still have a scent, they aren’t as strong and distinctive as traditional smoking of pot. Edibles are also a great way to get high on the sly.

And the commercial edible market goes well beyond cookies and brownies now. You can get infused chips, mints, sodas – even bone broth! Pot shops and online canna-

bis sites have many more ideas and products that help cover up the smell of marijuana. Ask your budtender for the products above or a recommendation.


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Page 17

TO BE BLUNT

Friday, April 2, 2021

CULTURE & LIFESTYLE

Prolonged pandemic turns boyfriend into couch potato By Chelsea Cebara

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

Dear Blunt, Ever since the pandemic got serious, my live-in boyfriend just wants to smoke and veg. It’s like he’s lost all motivation. It’s not like I would want to go out clubbing even if we could, but I’d like to do something other than watch Netflix reruns. Cooking, board games, anything! – Sativa girlfriend, Indica boyfriend Dear Sativa, I’m going to encourage you to engage your radical compassion muscles here. It’s tempting to read lazy-stoner boyfriend tropes into your situation, but I don’t think that’s necessarily what’s happening, at least not yet. The unprecedented stresses of COVID-19 have got us all retreating to our safest, warmest coping mechanisms. For some, that’s checking out with cannabis and Netflix; for others it’s trying to find a sense of control through exercise. Some people (other people, not me, definitely not me) may have engaged in increased and unwise online shopping. With the vaccine so close to liberating us from the clutches of this pandemic, a lot of folks I’ve spoken to are finding it harder to cope. It’s like seeing salvation on the horizon has somehow thrown our continued suffering into sharper relief. Even the strongest, most solid couples I know are struggling. This is just hard. It seems like your partner’s chronic problem isn’t a ‘chronic’ problem – this is his response to prolonged stress, not something that has troubled you throughout the relationship. But I also want you to hear that your desire for more interaction with him is super reasonable, and you have the right to request adjustments to how he’s processing the pandemic. You deserve to

have your needs met as well. So until we’re free from this situation, here are some practical steps you can take. Start by looking with an eye for what needs are being met by his veg-out sessions. It sounds like what’s helpful for him right now is distraction and escape, whereas you’re looking for engagement and connection. Can you think of any activities that incorporate both? Here are some suggestions: • Grab a headphone jack splitter, get stoned together and listen to your favorite albums. • Watch documentaries instead of reruns, things that will get you talking to each other instead of

passively consuming media. • Play cooperative video games together. I especially love retro-style stuff, like Diablo 3. • Request a foot rub while he watches TV and you read or scroll. The physical contact can help you feel connected, even while you’re doing different activities. Please be gentle with each other as we pull out of this cultural tailspin. All of this is temporary. However, the toolkit you develop now will come in handy for other types of chronic stress which, unfortunately, are guaranteed to crop up. If he’s still checking out every night in spite of increased

vaccinations and loosened restrictions, then you can have a more serious talk and set some stronger boundaries. For now, I advise you to Netflix and actually chill. Dear Blunt, Can you tell if somebody is going to be a good match based on their favorite cannabis strains? – Seeking My Blue Dream Dear Dream, Nope. I’m fond of saying “strains are imaginary” – not because cultivars and chemovars aren’t real, but because the current state of the market makes strain names a

completely unreliable way to choose cannabis. Add to that the immense variation in the endocannabinoid system person-to-person and you’ve got a recipe for a whole lot of marketing and very little consistency or reliability. You know what is a good indicator of whether you will vibe with someone? A joint and a conversation. Ask them why they like the stuff they like. That will tell you more than sneaking a peek at their stash cabinet. Unless of course they utter the phrase “weed is weed,” in which case you should put down the joint, run out the door, and never call or text them again.


Page 18

Friday, April 2, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

CANNABIS IN BRIEF

Virginia joins ‘legal’ states New law to take effect Jan. 1 allows personal cultivation, adult possession RICHMOND – Virginia became the first Southern state to allow adult-use cannabis, and one of the few states where approval came from the Legislature instead of citizen initiative. The House and Senate approved bills in late February and Gov. Ralph Northam signed the measure into law soon after. The system officially takes effect Jan. 1, 2024. The new law allows personal cultivation, retail sales for adults 21 and over and cannabis possession by adults. Although some Democrat lawmakers pushed for this in the past, the party now has majority control of the Legislature and Governor’s office so the effort was successful. “Equitable legalization of mari-

Brown communities – and I intend to lift up those who I can,” Lynch said. He also hopes this venture will normalize cannabis, especially in athletic communities. Lynch said when growing up he was told that using cannabis would slow him down, which he never experienced. There’s also such a negative view of cannabis users in general, even when players use it for recovery from injuries. Dodi Blunts are only available at high-end cannabis stories in the Oakland area.

VANCOUVER – The owners of two successful cannabis shops in the area are combining their efforts to create a new store. Adam Hamide, owner of Main Street Marijuana, and James and Rachel Bean, co-owners of New Vansterdam, which later became Craft Cannabis, plan to open a new Craft Cannabis location in the Walnut Grove area. The new shop will be custom-built on a location that currently houses a car wash on Andresen Road. The new building is expected to be complete by the end of this year. In the meantime, the store is open in a temporary building on the lot. Main Street Marijuana and New Vansterdam were the first shops to open in the region in 2014 and both posted high sales over the years. There are two Main Street locations and two Craft Cannabis locations in the Vancouver area. The Beans changed the name from New Vansterdam to have more statewide appeal. They also own a Craft Cannabis shop in Wenatchee. The new building is expected to offer a 4,000 square feet sales floor, which the owners hope will include more room for displays and more budtenders to provide more customer service.

Source: SeattlePI.com

Source: The Columbian

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sen. Barbara Favola, D-Arlington, answers a question during the Virginia Senate’s session in Richmond on Feb. 16. The Senate passed a House bill that legalized the possession of a small amount of marijuana.

FORMER SEAHAWK LYNCH STARTS CANNABIS BRAND Dodi Blunts will offer THCA diamonds; sales to benefit criminal justice reform non-profit SEATTLE – Marshawn Lynch, a past top player for the Seattle Seahawks, recently launched his own brand of premium cannabis products in California. The company, called Dodi Blunts, will feature blunts infused with THCA crystalline diamonds. Along with selling a new product to cannabis consumers, Lynch also hopes to use the opportunity to raise money for the Last Prisoner Project, a nonprofit which focuses on criminal justice reform and taking steps to free people convicted of marijuana crimes. “At the end of the day, the industry has the ability to raise up Black and

juana is an essential step towards racial justice in Virginia,” said House Majority Leader Delegate Charniele Herring. Northam has expressed interest in legalization and even created a plan that would allow sales to begin in January 2023. Polls of Virginia voters show that 68 percent of registered voters support cannabis legalization, a figure that’s similar to the national views. The current cannabis package automatically seals low-level past cannabis conviction. It also directs 30 percent of tax revenue to a Cannabis Equity Reinvestment Fund, which provides workshops, scholarships, training and workforce development.

New shop in Vancouver

Source: Cannabis Business Times

Former Seattle Seahawks running back Marshawn Lynch after an NFL football practice in December 2019 in Renton, Wash. ASSOCIATED PRESS


Spokane, Wash. / Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Page 19

STRAIN OF THE MONTH: AFGHAN

Friday, April 2, 2021

AFGHAN TAKES USERS BACK IN TIME By Rick Misterly

EVERCANNABIS CORRESPONDENT

In the current line-up of cannabis varieties, finding a non-hybridized strain with a one-word name is a rare occurrence. I have wanted to highlight Old World cultivars that form the basis of all the modern hybrids. It is good to find a grower based in Spokane repurposing the former Mountain Dome Winery to produce high-quality products while also committing to clean growing practices. If there were a legal classification for organic growing methods, Growing Like a Weed could claim this title. The Tier 2 producer/processor’s tagline is “Quality Over Everything.” It also stresses that essential oils and chemical pesticides can alter the DNA of the plant and even affect future generations. Going fully pesticide-free is a lofty ideal, and that expectation for perfection must carry all the way to “the puffing.” GLW plans to expand into outdoor growing, and it will be interesting to see how the 2021 crop shapes up. Appearance: An even, medium green throughout with little evidence of pistils. Buds consist of fully swollen calyxes clumped together to form dense flower clusters. Under magnification, you can see distinctive trichome development that sets this cultivar apart. The genetics of this plant come from a culture where hashish is the end product. So if you have been doing this for a couple of millennia the most prized plants yield trichomes to the max. Trichomes cover all surfaces but vary in shape from common mushroom-topped spikes to dense, ice cornice-like formations. Numerous vertical trichomes appear as multi-tentacle growth reaching for the light like strange sea creatures. Others stick out like fine pointed needles. Colors range from translucent to amber. The three nice-sized flowers making up this gram were medium-dense, but still a bit fluffy with little crumbling when lightly pressed.

Considering the time between harvest and smoking, the texture and moisture were just about perfect. Attention to a proper cure and a good tight seal kept this stuff nice and lively as anything I’ve had. Aroma: Initially there is a definite skunkiness, but that dissipates quickly and is replaced by a dry, black pepper. Mint lingers on the fringes of the pepper with also a brightness hinting of lemon blossoms. The dominant pepper most likely comes from beta Caryophyllene, one of the most effective terpenes in fighting inflammation, and of current interest to scientists studying the body’s response to COVID-19. Smoke is thick with a top quality, fresh tobacco sensation, leaving a little heat in the front of the mouth at first. Effects: By the taste you know you’ve smoked something, but almost imperceptibly things are turned down a notch or two. I would expect that if you aren’t sitting down, you will be soon. What follows is a pleasant merging of a slowed-down mind and a body on a trajectory towards relaxation. The mind is not so much numbed but processes less, thus having space for thoughts that seem like revelations. Like you might have a future as a great philosopher if only you could hold onto that thought before the next brilliant flash takes their place. Think contemplative and comfortable in surroundings but very much in the grip of active ingredients. The analgesic/anti-inflammatory effects from the phytocannabinoids, along with the psychoactive guides, seem to help with pain relief and ease anxiety. Expect the intense effects to last about an hour, when an easy-going feeling replaces the initial phase and hangs on for a few more hours. Sleep should come easily if the time is right. If not, you may need to smoke more as a pick-me-up. Back at the source, many a Sufi mystic has gained inspiration from the hashish from this variety so be sure to appreciate it for being a revered ancestor while you’re smoking history.

AFGHAN Grower: Growing Like A Weed, Spokane Origin: Non-hybrid original landrace genetics Harvest date: Aug. 11, 2020 Sampled: Feb. 21, 2021 THC: 20.7% CBD: 0.1% Dominant Terpenes: Limonene, beta Caryophyllene, beta Myrcene

Purchased: The Green Nugget, Spokane


Page 20

Friday, April 2, 2021

The Spokesman-Review

Profile for Cowles Publishing

2021 April Evercannabis  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded