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“Keeping Conestoga College

'"."'^rtoo-Wellington Science Engineering Fair

Jarticipmed""“"'

was

held at the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreaticn

Ce^e^r'ri-12.

Grade 7

to

OAC

(Photo by Jason Seads)

Union, manag6ineiit face education reorganization By Robert Klager When

Walter Boettger was ac-

new

claimed

president of the fac-

Conestoga College

ulty union at

“I believe

I’m strong

at solving

a specific work-load formula under

open,”’ said Tibbits. “That’s not

problems, and honestly, there are quite a few issues to be addressed

the existing contract, that factors in

what

now and in the future.” Just how those issues

contact and evaluation,

is.

involved with the alternative deliv-

to reconsider

ery slated to begin at the college in

look at in the school system and at the college and this says nothing about quality we have to have different types of staff to deliver education. That’s the way you can

ping into a hot-bed of diverging views on education reform !n the

that colleges

province.

how

Ontario’s Conservative govern-

ment

— through funding

post-secondary institutions

drawn

cuts to

— had

questions right now,” said Boettger.

do

“Teachers are nervous hearing

ner.

under severe scruneed a voice to see that

tiny

we

and

is

at different

“There are a

programs and delivery of education.”! think there could be productivity gains here,” he said. “There are different ways to orits

ganize the college that would

go

Tibbits suggested there might be if

teachers

could teach at least 40 weeks out of the year, as

opposed

to the existing

36.

“And if it were possible to go from

the quality of education doesn’t suf-

an average 15 teaching-hours per

fer,” said Boettger.

week, to

1

8 or 20,

is

the

new

president of Conestoga’s faculty union. (Photo by Robert Klageo

mean

students’ fees wouldn’t have to

benefits to the college

Walter Boettger

we could do a lot

lot

of unanswered

Tibbits said he believes the alter-

doesn’t necessarily agree with

it.

mean

they’ll

He said teachers have

is

being

blown out of perspective, saying only 20 courses out of about 2,1 19 the college offers, are being modi-

many

talk to

cases, the quality of teach-

it’s still

too early to

some people and

say where the union stands on many

going to

of the modifying proposals that involve teachers and education deliv-

they’ll tell you, ‘you’re in

man-

ing.”

Boettger said

“You

cost-effective

“Bringing in para-professionals and hiring people to teach is still driven by money. Money drives, in

fied.

come

more

strongly around job security.

native delivery debate

more, we could train more students and we could keep the tuition fees down,” he said. Boettger said the topic of teaching hours has “been bandied about”, and the teachers are definitely willing to look at anything college management has to present, but that

in a

it

Boettger said that issue centres

about these changes; there’s a fear of the unknown.”

managing its teacher rewhat we have to

college must ways of organiz-

look

up.”

“Education

they do business.

bits, said recently, the

to offer.

spoke about problem solving as one major responsibility of a union president and a teacher.

now

at

sources. “I think

Conestoga’s president, John Tib-

ing

In a recent interview, Boettger

re-

September, are also subject to the work-load formula.

bottom line for colleges, in essence, handing them the mandate of “do better with less.” This is where opinions began to differ, and where Boettger saw the opportunity to use the skills he had the

certainty right

need

Tibbits said the college needs to

look

solved, remains to be seen.

The only

it’s going to be. We’re talking about a small scale.”

Boettger added that program delivery changes, such as the ones

will

March 2 1 he was, admittedly, step,

be

class size, preparation time, teacher

next year and there’s going

some computers and the parking lot attendant, and you’ll be lucky if Harvey’s is to be the president,

ery.

“To say

agree, before tion, is

right

we

now

that

we

see documenta-

too premature.”

OSAP cycle to begin again, but with some changes By Linda Yovanovich

“An

application form

is

not a

guarantee of a deferral,” she said.

OSAP students will likely breathe a sigh of relief to

mailing of

OSAP

know

the first

applications for

students returning to school in Sep-

tember has gone out.

earlier than in past years, said

Walsh. Walsh said returning students financial aid officer Carol

should

make

sure

OSAP

applica-

forms are in by the end of May to promptly receive a copy of the Student ^formation Document (SID) which is needed to receive tion

OSAP-type

deferrals.

is

the fact that the student

received a deferral the previous year.

“In order to receive a payment deferral, the college requires a

However, OSAP students should note tuition fees are due on July 12

-

“Neither

copy

of the student’s SID.” This year,

Walsh added, college administration will be very firm on this point because “quite a few fees have not been collected.” She said a major problem the financial aid office sees each year is when students assume they will get a payment deferral for their

OSAP.

always a panic when it comes close to the due date. The “There

is

jammed

up the procdocuments in

students can help speed

turning to school. All of this, she

with such calls.”

ess of issuing loan

said saves time.

She emphasized that careless mistakes and omitted information on application forms cause errors, which cause delays in the .process. “New OSAP booklets will be out by the middle of April. If returning

September.

(phone) lines are always

If

.

Students should have a valid socard or a government

cial insurance

document with the student’s social insurance number on it, one other piece of photo identification, such

students haven’t received a pre-

as a student card

printed application by the end of

and proof of the

April, they should pick

up another

come during

These new application forms will be available in Ae registrar’s office at Doon campus and in the student services offices at the Guelph and Waterloo campuses.

summer. Walsh suggested

also suggested

some ways

for the

summer, such

as family benefits or welfare, the is required to produce the monthly benefit statement for each month the income was received.

student

student’s gross in-

booklet,” she said.

Walsh

a student has been on a govern-

ment income

the

Inside •

News

1-3

Editorials

4-5

students save their

Lifestyles

pay stubs for the 16

Prospects after college

weeks and

Sex

total

them up before

re-

in ’90s

6-8

supplement

.... ....

9-16 insert


Page 2

— SPOKE, April 22, 1996

The color of light

Conestoga’s health sciences and technology programs promoted at Fairview Mall The

By Blake Ellis

fair

students

Conestoga College took part

in

the fifth annual Engineering, Sci-

blocks with

controlled by using a key pad.

Union Gas, along

^holds one of the plants she grew under colored filter produced the best results, she said.

light

Kitchener, .

The blue

(Ph^o by Tara Bren)

The arm was Another device measured the freits

claws.

quency of a person’s whistle. A person would whistle into the device and try to match the frequency on the machine. Dave, Fairish, an environmental

courses.

engineering instructor at the col-

Conestoga had two booths at the fair, which ran from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

lege, said in a

way, the devices

which are used as teaching models, forced people to participate. Elizabeth McNair, a

Saturday.

Queensmount public school in

to

Booths were set up in the mall with about 20 exhibits, including Kitchener’s Paragon Engineering

technology and health sciences

12, from

and science

pursue their goals, she said. The Conestoga technology booth

had a robotic arm which picked up

University of Waterloo to promote

Sara Whyte,

reers in technology

12 and 13.

with Conestoga College and the

r

to entice

are considering ca-

ence and Technology fair at Kitchener’s Fairview Park Mall on April

Ltd., Waterloo’s

^

was organized

who

“Things are going very well,” said Susan Takacs, Conestoga’s student recruitment and admissions official and one of the organizers of the event. “We got a good response from businesses.” Takacs added the businesses believe in the importance of promoting technology and science.

member

the nursing faculty, said they there to let the public

of

were

change careers and get into nursing would be enticed in late Friday and Saturday.

Another member of the nursing Yippy Novotny, was trying to dispel the myths that there are no

faculty,

jobs in nursing.

Nursing

is

an institutional-based

is getting more into community nursing and home care such as the Victoria Order of

profession, but

Nurses and many other agencies, said Novotny. She points out “that is where nursing

is

going.”

Takacs said about 800 Grade 7 and 8 students were bused in to view the exhibits. Also, a pasta bridge competition

was

held, sponsored by the local

know nursing

chapters of the Ontario Association

Con-

of Certified Engineering Techni-

A number of teach-

cians and Technologists and the

ing tools used in classes were

Professional Engineer Organiza-

displayed. She said a lot of the

tion. Waterloo County’s top teams competed to find out who had built

is still

open for business

estoga College.

at

Grade 7 and 8 students came in early Friday, but she hoped many older people who were looking to

the best bridge in terms of span,

height and weight-bearing load.

Sanctuary gets alarm system to

combat vandalism and theft

By Amy

Wrobleski

won’t be quite so easy for potential thieves to break into the Sanctuary from now on. In an effort to combat vandalism and theft of the equipment in the Sanctuary, a new alarm system will be installed within the next couple of weeks. The installation of an alann system was prompted when the Sanctuary was broken into at the beginning of March. Thieves caused extensive damage to the It

change machine when they broke

so concerned, they considered re-

into

moving

it.

The system is being installed by Chonar Incorporated, which owns the change

machine as well as the

juke box.

DSA entertainment assistant Gavin FitzPatrick said in an interview, the owner of Chonar is inalarm system to protect investment in response to the

stalling the their

break-in.

money

box from

the juke

the

Sanctuary. FitzPatrick said he couldn ’t begin to estimate

how much

revenue has

been lost over the vandalism to the change machine and the lounge itself.

The system will be installed and monitored by a security company. There will be an initial installation fee and a monthly monitoring

in-

charge, which will be paid for by

vested here and we’re concerned.”

Chonar. The system will also protect the video games in the student lounge such as the Sega game Virtua

“They’ve got a

lot

of

In fact, the break-in has the

SAFE

DSA

Fighter which

is

worth $10,000.

FitzPatrick said they are

ing out

all

still

iron-

the details, but jokingly

said he expects the system will be set off accidentally a

everything

fore

few times beis running

smoothly. FitzPatrick declined to describe the

DSA Walk Safe Pilot Project Begins March 7:30

25th

new alarm system

Due

to the investment

making by

pm - 11:30 pm

for security

reasons.

Chonar

is

installing the alarm sys-

tem, FitzPatrick said they have ex-

tended their contract with Chonar

Mondays - Thursdays

until 1999.

“He didn’t want to invest money and have the contract run out,” he said.

He

said although the contract

long-term, the

Walk Safe Headquarters

at the

lationship with

Chonar because

they provide good service.

“They’re great

SECURIIY OFFICE Volunteer ^pUcatilons accepted on an ong«a«g basis at the DSA Office

is

DSA has a good reto deal with,”

FitzPatrick said. “This shows

how

concerned they are.” FitzPatrick said

it is

sad there has

be an alarm system installed. “It goes back to the same problem. It’s the student’s stuff and to

their

money,” he said. “They need more ownership.”

to take a little


SPOKE, April

22, 1996

— Page 3

CAMPUS NEWS Students cash in By Deborah Everest-Hill Imagine winning $1,800

in tui-

monies, led 360 students, faculty and guests through the presentation of 59 awards worth in excess of $13,000.

tion.

That

is

ner of the at the

Woolaccounting program did

exactly what Julie

school of business awards

night April

1 1

,

at the

Waterloo Inn.

Steve McDonald, master of cere-

Nine awards, worth almost $4000, were presented to students in the accounting program. Allsion Fuentez received this year’s Faculty

Award and

business awards night

at

a cheque

The Raytheon Management Accounting Award of $300 went to Thao Nguyenphuc for outstanding academic achievement in for $300.

management accounting

in

third

Twelve awards were presented the

in

computer programmer/analyst

category: The CP/A Faculty Award of Excellence went to Bob Symons and the CP/A Advisory Committee

year.

Award was presented

Angela Martin also received $300 from KPMG Peat Marwick Thome

Holtham. Stephen Horst received

for her achievement in financial ac-

demic standing in data communications and a cheque for $250.

counting.

An

emotional night of smiles,

the

EMJ Award

to Jeff

for highest aca-

Tim Horton Award

of Excellence.

Ten awards were presented for materials management. Theresa Sharratt and Robert Kartechner were presented with the CAPIC award for outstanding student membership and Sheri Frank and Rick Bridge received the CAPIC Achievement Award for year three.

Office systems administration’s

The management studies Program Advisory Committee

only award went to Trudy

Awards, $200 each, were presented to Mike Snyders and Josh Alexan-

Two awards were presented for general business. Kent Bray re-

Kress.

der.

Charters thanked this year’s CBSA executive for its commitment and hard work, and the CBSA returned the favor by presenting her with a bouquet of roses. The school of marketing presented a total of 1 1 awards amount-

Snyders also received the Canadian Institute of Management

ceived the annual Gerry Meurs Scholarship for $100 and Martin Wirth received the Faculty Award of $150.

and congratulations began with Leanne Charter’s presentation of the Jane Skipp Award to Alex tears

Award of $150. Janine Maloney

won

te

Winkel.

dian Labour Relations

The microcomputer software program faculty award and $100 was

$100 and Paul

presented to Michael Temporale.

the Cana-

Award of Smith received The

more than $3,000. The Weaver Tanner Miller Marketing Award was presented to ing to

three students. Cheryle Jack

the

$800

first

won

prize for her Victo-

ria’s Secret presentation. Scott

Kalbfleisch’s presentation on the

Blue Jays earned him Second prize and $400. Beverly Cutone received the $200 third prize for her Jockey presentation.

Third-year accounting student Julie Woolner (right), receives the CGA award from Cindy Motz, at the school of business awards April 1 1 at the Waterloo inn. (Photo by Deborah Everest-Hill)

Cutone also won the J.M. Schneider Inc. Award of Excellence, $250, and the Marketing Faculty Award of $200 was presented to Leanne Charters and

Dawn Mittelholtz.

Business convocation time changed ministration with four alternative

By Paul Tuns The college administration has the business program’s

changed convocation time

to 7:30 f m->

tion

was agreed

to.

“There were a number of issues that needed to be addressed, includ-

June 25.

April-Dawn Blackwell, vicepresident of student affairs, has told that administration has the

DSA

agreed to change the convocation

ing the board of governors meeting’s time, the availability of the

chair of the board of governors, other possible sites and licensing.”

In previous years, convocation

time.

The was 9 will

times and dates and after some consultation, the most favorable solu-

original convocation time

be

a.m., but Blackwell said difficult for

some

it

students’

relatives to attend.

Jennica Fraser, a third -year accounting student circulated a petition expressing students’

concern

over the time. Blackwell said the petition had 16 sheets, each with about 20 signatures. She said 80 per cent of the signatories were from the business program.

Blackwell said she presented ad-

ceremonies were on weekends. They were changed, in part, because of declining attendance. But

some students have said the new time presents difficulties for them and their guests, Blackwell said. John MacKenzie, vice-president of human resources, told the March board of governors meeting there

have been studies in other post-secondary institutions that indicate there has not been a negative effect

on attendance with weekday con-

vocation, and occasionally there has been increased attendance.

Blackwell said the issue was dealt with promptly. Within a week of the student forum, she and the student met with MacKenzie and the college’s public relations manager

John Sawicki, and began discussions on alternative dates and times. Blackwell said she was pleased with the willingness of the administration to respond so quickly.

“They came with a

great deal of

research, like places other than the rec centre and their availability and prices.

John (MacKenzie) and John

(Sawicki) did that background and it

was

really helpful.”

Blackwell said there seems to be an understanding with administration that the

DSA will be conferred

with before the scheduling of future convocations.

Good Luck Giads! The DSA would

like to

wish

the best of luck to the

Grads in

of ’96

your future endeavors.

Universal Pictures online at http://www.mca.com A.A. Violence

OPEMS FRIDAY APRIL 26 AT THEATRES AMYWHERE


Page 4

— SPOKE, April

22,

1996

By Amanda Steffler

'Keeping Conestoga College connected' Doon Valley

299

Dr.,

Room 4B15

N2G 4M4

Kitchener, Ontario,

Beware

Phone: 748-5366 Fax: 748-5971 Robert Klager Barbara Walden

Editor

News editor Student

life

and

Issues

Tara Brown Linda Yovanovich

editor

activities editor

Perry

Photo editor Production manager Advertising Circulation

Hagerman

The

Ellis

Amanda Steffler

manage manager

Diane Santos Jim Hagarty Dick Scott

Faculty supervisor Faculty advisor is

September

published and produced weekly by journalism students of Conestoga College.

May by

to

the

Doon Student Association (DSA). The views and opinions expressed

necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College or the Advertisers

be

liable for

in

is

mainly funded from

in this

newspaper do not

DSA.

SPOKE are not endorsed by the DSA unless their advertisements contain the DSA logo. SPOKE shall not

any damages

Unsolicited submissions to

SPOKE

arising out of errors in advertising

must be sent to the

editor at the

beyond the amount paid

space.

above address by 9:30 a.m. Monday. Submissions are subject

acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a WordPerfect 5.0

not contain any libellous statements

for the

and may be accompanied by an

illustration

file

would be

helpful.

Submissions must

(such as a photograph).

the transmission

and the engine speed,

my face to his fist.

have decided

I

that this

weekend

will

my

be

driving lesson with a standard car.

first official

have been driving automatics for over three

years and

I

think

it

is

about time

I

learn to use a

clutch.

My

father, a

heavy equipment operator and

way

back,

is

the desig-

The car, courtesy of my older who mind you is a licensed mechanic,

nated teacher. brother,

is a 5.0 L Mustang. So, my Dad has the experience with the driving part and my brother has the experience with the fixing part. I just hope

my

brother won’t have to do any fixing. I

had

my

first shifting

my

lesson in

My

shifter

was a handy-dandy wine

bottle

stuck between the cushions of the love seat I sitting on.

My clutch, brake and gas pedal

was

were

my

Dad’s feet. No, my Dad doesn’t have three We used the same foot for the brake and the gas pedal. My brother sat beside me and watched as I laughed hysterically because I felt like a complete ass, pushing my father’s feet as if I were finding the pressure point of the clutch. During my little living room lesson, my Dad feet.

was a prank executed two days late, but it seemed more like a bad case of deja vu. Nevertheless, on April 3, Conestoga College’s Doon campus experienced its second bomb threat of the school year. By the time most students arrived on campus that morning, three phone it

you match the speed of

brother will match

living room.

Perhaps

RPMs and why

the steering wheel.

Last night

Let people decide

explained everything about the transmission, the engine,

it’s

standard car driver from SPOKE

and the

hard to believe you need all of those simple do-dads together in order to make a standard car move. And of course, don’t forget shifter

I

Blake

clutch, the gas pedal, the brake

Mustangs

of lunging 5.0 L

had been made informing the fire department, police services and the bomb would go off at noon at Doon campus. Like the first threat back in November, no boom was heard - no bomb

the transmission and the engine. If I don’t match

My Dad

has decided

we

will

be

lessons in a flat gravel parking

starting

lot,

my my

preferably

one with no pedestrians wandering about, because he thinks we are going to need a lot of room. He and my brother also keep reminding me that the Mustang has a little more kick than my car. I drive a 1982 Plymouth Reliant. I don’t see what the difference is. Just because my car’s speedometer only goes to 1 40 km/h and the Mustang goes up to about 240 km/h, doesn’t mean I won ’t be able to handle the 5.0 L. Obviously, I’m terrified to drive it, but I trust my father’s teaching and I hope like hell my brother forgives me if I end up in a ditch. They both have two things they keep reminding me about. “Your left leg is going to have huge bulging muscles by the time you are finished your lesson, and if you are not sure, or you begin to panic, always, always push down the clutch, not the gas pedal.”

So, if anyone sees a red 5.0 L coupe Mustang lunging down the street, beware. If you can, head for the nearest building and stay in it until

you can no longer see

my bobbing tail-lights.

calls

1

college administration that a

1

Conestoga Comer

exploded.

However,

By Blake Ellis

time the situation differed in that students were not

this

evacuated from the school. Not only were students not evacuated, but for

most

part, they

were not even informed there was a bomb

threat.

Attempting to avoid mass hysteria and judging that the danger level of the situation

was not high enough - according

college administration decided to staff

make

to

Vandalism and pranks can drain coilege’s funds

some kind of criteria -

a decision

on behalf of students,

and faculty, as well as the parents of children attending Conestoga’s

day-care centre. Instead of removing the children from the college grounds, parents were told of the

bomb

threat at the

end of the day when they picked up

their

Such an action

is

lost their children,

hardly a comforting thought for parents

who may have

had the worst possible scenario occurred.

The day-care centre, it seems, doesn’t do anything until it hears from the college. However, there were vehicles on standby in case of an emergency. Anyone who was on campus that day should have at least been informed there was a bomb threat, instead of relying on speculation and rumors to find out why there was an ambulance, fire truck and police cruiser outside of the college’s main building. Although administration may have thought interests in

up

mind

it

that day, the decision to stay or

had the college’s best

go should have been

left

to the individuals.

Granted,

if

given the option, some students would have likely taken

advantage of the situation and

left

school just for the sake of leaving.

Regardless, as adults, the option should have been theirs.

As

part of an institution designed to cultivate students into thinking

reasoning adults - adults

seems tunity.

With fewer funds

in the budget,

who

are able to

make

their

own

decisions

and

-

it

ironic the college administration denied students that very oppor-

way

and the ad-

The

caller probably wasn’t thinking about

all

it

the havoc he could cause and for that matter, the

amazes me how a small minority of students can add to the cost unnecessarily. This is definitely a time for fiscal restraint and the second bomb threat was called in this year. I don’t know whether the caller did it to make a statement, or he or she just wanted to get out of class for the day because he wasn’t prepared

anxiety and money the college would have to put

ministration looking to cut any

children.

they can,

it

A bomb

of course,

threat,

isn’t the

only

stance in which the college can lose

in-

money

unnecessarily. Vandalism and the defacing of

property

is

another.

The washrooms

are notorious for this. People

write crude messages on the walls of washroom

for a test or presentation.

Whatever the reason,

out to execute an evacuation.

cost the administration

unnecessarily, either by wasted time, dealing

stalls all the time.

The Sanctuary,

for instance,

is

another exam-

with the emergency and not attending to work

ple of people not respecting public property,

which would benefit the student body, or had the school been evacuated. Classes would have had to be rescheduled, or at least the work would have had to be made up some way. The children at the day-care centre would have been moved to a location off campus. Not to mention the two events at the college which would have had to be rescheduled: the

leaving

it

looking like a pig sty

at the

by end of the

day. I

know it doesn’t seem like much, but if people money could

respected the college’s property,

be saved and given back to the students through added programs or activities.

With the college now looking for ways to save money, students should be more courteous and

students at the

woodworking and the Waterloo Region secondary school badminton tourna-

think of the consequences before they act. It may mean the cutting of another program because the cost of repairing property damaged by vandal-

ment.

ism, adds up.

skills

competition for high school technology


SPOKE, April

22, 1996

— Page 5

Do you

think Karla Homolka should remain in the Kingston Penitentiary, or be transferred to the new Kitchener jail?

Hard time for

campus comments

hard crime

By Diane Santos

Welcome

to

Homolkaville

“It doesn’t matter as long as she stays locked up”

Rumors regarding Karla Homolka’s new community and

ing conditions have our

liv-

The question of whether Karla Homolka

the

should be transferred to the new Kitchener prison for women is not about the community’s

media buzzing in frustration, anticipation, and for some, even anger. Although Homolka is serving 12 years for the manslaughter of Leslie Mahaffey and Kristen French, Canadian laws state she can be released on parole after serving only half of her sentence. At the moment, Homolka is serving her time at the Kingston Penitentiary for women, but at any time, she could be transferred to the new prison on Kitchener’s Homer Watson Boulelocal

desire,

Lisa Cullen first-year

ECE

is”

ston’s, she is better off here.

Citizens campaigned against the

new

prison

Scott Jacobs

being built in a residential area where young boys and girls play on the streets and feel safe in the park, but most did not anticipate that one day, Homolka would practically be living in their backyard. The book Lethal Marriage by Nick Pron, a reporter for the Toronto Sun, describes in detail

what exactly happened to Tammy Homolka, that French and Mahaffey. Citizens who believe evean take should reformed be can Homolka perning to read the horrific acts that were not against Bernardo and Homolka formed by one, but three innocent young girls. no At the new women’s prison, women will of the longer be behind bars for the majority to live in day. They will be given the chance able to be will they where homes, cottage-like cook and clean for themselves. The to eventually prepare these

integrate into society

The new

is

second-year marketing

“Kingston

is

known

for

hardened criminals and has tighter security.”

to

Brett Finnie

second-year marketing

“The

woman

ever her is

is sick.

life is

Prisoners like Homolka also have the right to suitable living quarters to help them adapt to normal life when they are released from prison.

women

cope outside the

prison. Bill

As

Orton

far as criminals go, there are

haven’t received the attention

There will be

“She doesn’t deserve the extra treatment the new facility

has.

tence as

the details. Homolka bargained with the system and in the parents and end, she won a light sentence, but not have children of the Kitchener area should

many more

who have committed far worse crimes, but they

first-year electrical engineering

own children with

It’s

It

a light sen-

is.”

Rob Lachapelle second-year

LASA

to be punished.

Homolka has.

women far more dangerous than

Homolka residing at the correctional centre. So why all the fuss over Homolka being transferred to Kitchener?

It is

because of the high publicity

trial. she received from the Bernardo commit Granted, Homolka did help Bernardo but Maffhey and French heinous crimes against ,

Berwithout Homolka’s testimony against She convicted. been have nardo, he might not him. against witness invaluable was an The community is more aware of Homolka prisonand her crimes than the crimes of other

The

from being transferred. can no longer In Kingston she is locked up and would just here her anyone. Transferring

here.

These atmosphere and help

kept.”

away. ber her. If they do, they should stay and face name her plant to need will Parents in order to into the minds of their children may be protect them, but at the same time, they

Mahaffey courts allowed the French and of the areas certain in families to participate give the should they Now proceedings. criminal community the same chance to stop Homolka

as other prisoners, has the right to programs that will help her when

facility has cottages in which live somewhat normal lives can the women while being supervised and contained. dwellings represent a somewhat normal

miserable

who may eventually come in conin the future may not rememHomolka with tact

hurting their

Homolka,

The Kitchener

Wher-

where she should be

many homes

public there are children. There are also College. in the area and Conestoga

bilitate her.

she is released from prison. If Kitchener has those programs, she has the right to transfer

their release.

on

socialize with other prisoners, helping to reha-

rehabilitation

women to be able to

upon

prison backs

intention

With the help of a rehabilitation program, will have a better chance of living a reformed, normal life. At the Kingston Penitentiary, Homolka is segregated from the rest of the prison population. If she was txansferrecl to K-itchener, she would

Homolka

schools Some people

crs.

“She should stay Kitchener

isn’t

the place.

The new enough jail

there.

isn’t

secure

for her.”

hurt

make

to 12 years in prison

former husband, Paul Bernardo in the sex-slayings of Kristen French and Leslie Mahaffey. She currently resides at the Kingston Penitentiary, and will be eligible for parole in 1997. Since the rehabilitation programs for prisoners that the new facility offers are superior to King-

vard.

where

about prisoners’ rights.

for assisting her

‘As long as she is locked up and safe there, it shouldn’t matter where

she

it is

Homolka was sentenced

citizens feel unsafe.

Cindy Chonko

live should the community be forced to was who person the is Homolka when in fear, admitted convicted of manslaughter and later Doe. Jane and Tammy with her involvement

Why

first-year

ECE

decide

However, it is not for the community to sentences. where criminals are to serve their any criminals After all, what community wants in their area? It is

up

to officials

any say

in the matter

sponsibility.

Do you have any topical questions you want straight-forward answers to? Send them to the editor or staff in

Room

4B15, or call

SPOKE at 748-5366.

who

run the prison system

where. to decide which prisoners go have The community doesn’t and shouldn’t

because

it

isn’t their re-


— SPOKE, April 22, 1996

Page 6

CONESTOGA LIFE

Lifestyles editor:

Si

Conestoga hosts annual science fair

Tara Brown 748-536$

Breathe deeply

science. In each of these categories

By Perry Kagerman

are the junior, intermediate and sen-

W-

23rd annual

’’he

ior divisions.

'loo-Wel-

The projects were evaluated according to a national standard which included criteria such as scientific method, creativity, organization, etc. Each of the displays were judged by at least three judges and as many as five. “Seventy-five

was held April and 12 in the Kenneth E. Hunter Recreational Centre on Conestoga’s Doon campus. Over 340 students, from grades 7 to 13 (OAC), from 62 public, separate liiigfon science fair :

;

and independent schoo ls participated. A total of 241 projects, ranging from the effectiveness of

per cent of the judges are university professors,” said Proctor. “The other 25 per cent are either from industry or from high schools.”

different laundry determents to the effect

of microgravity on plant root

Project winners received a gold,

development, were on display. "Til is

is

nave had

the largest science fair

we

bronze medal and a cash $30 - $100. As well, they will have the opportunity to advance to the week-long, Canadawide science fair being held this year in North Bay, Ont. The stusilver or

prize of

long time,”said Bill

in a

Proctor, the registrar for the fair.

The

gym)

large space (in the

lowed us to

invite

more

al-

students.”

E\’ery year, schools are invited to

send a certain number of students. The number is based upon the available display area and the number of

dents invob'ed in the best overall

students attending the school.

lected'

exhibit of

tlie fair,

received $400

five categories: earth science, engi-

equipment seby them and supplied by Northwest Scientific Supply Ltd. Over 100 judges volunteered a full day of their time to evaluate the

math

projects and. to provide feedback to

worth of

According to the science fair facts were divided into

sheet, the projects

neering science,

life

science,

scientific

Ambulance and emergency care student Craig Calver administers oxygen to “accident

Ray Lux during

the students.

or computer science and physical

his

course

CBS A executive chairs last meeting By Tara Brown The out-going Conestoga Busii

ness Students Association executive chaired their final

I

Thursday, April

meeting

school year. In other CBSA news, the association heard from Jo-Arme Mor-

gan of student

services, regarding

the peer host pilot

program for

installed, linking the

problem.

“It

looks great,” said

Gobbo, noting students had mentioned there was an improvement. In order to facilitate the correc-

Leanne Charters, president of the CBS A, said she was happy

matched with volunteers who would be

tion of

with the progress the association

trained to help ease foreign stu-

tion to deal specifically with

m office. “I

dents into Canadian culture.

puters.

made during really

want

her time

to say thank you,” she

“We’ve raised almost $40,000 which goes directly back to you guys.” Other members of the ’95-’96 executive included, Beverly Cusaid.

tone, vice-president;

Anabela

Cordeiro, promotions co-ordinator;

Melanie Shortt, communicaand Darrell Villemaire,

tions

treasurer. All

members of the

for-

mer CBSA were given T-shirts-as a thank you for their hard work and effor- by Jeff Gobbo, the new vice-president for the ’96-’97

international students

“Many

Morgan

said.

“They

fit.”

The peer host program needs about 20 volunteers to be matched with students during the first few

international programs By Deborah Everest-Hill

The computer liaison

new posi-

will

com-

move

between computer services and the CBSA, making them aware of changes that need to be made. Alex Cress has been appointed to that position.

The

college’s director of interna-

programs says he had never eaten congee for breakfast before, but now he knows he likes it. Larry Rechsteiner spent the tional

in Pakistan, Hong Kong and Taiwan. When he wasn’t

month of March

he was packing, flying and sampling the food. in meetings,

Association members were

trip

services.

Changes have been made in the business program’s computer labs. Students had been com-

computers, to Cress. Thursday, April 18, will be the last meeting of the CBSA for

dents.

plaining of poor speed in the proc-

1996. 1

The meeting will be held at Rm. 2D01 of the busi-

p.m. in

ness wing.

Do you have used

text

books

The objective of Rechsteiner’s was not to enjoy another cul-

ture,

but to recruit international stu-

m

I

BOOK

f I Idle

The DSA will

He

said the

aim was

to

work

to the 1

and August

new representatives.

The commission supports the promotion of Conestoga’s program in Pakistan, but he said it still takes a student three to four months to obtain a visa.

The objective in Hong Kong and Taiwan was a little different. With no current representatives, the main goal was not to receive student applications, but to set up an infrastructure of representatives to begin

Despite competition from Austra-

and the United Kingdom,

For the short term, he says his visit to Pakistan produced the best results. In fact, he said, Conestoga is likely the first Canadian community college to be represented in the

lia

country.

said the college

Rechsteiner said there

is

a signifi-

cant interest in obtaining a Cana-

dian education as well.

well have 25 per cent of the student

As a result of his trip, Rechsteiner now has a number of representatives in Hong Kong who will recruit international stu-

population from Pakistan that get

dents.

“If our

numbers match, we could

The

In fact, one of the representatives

international

programs office

has been working with student recruitment representatives in Paki-

stan for the last three years. Rechsteiner said the college re-

additional 14.

23, 1996

student visas.

the process of international student

Rechsteiner was in Pakistan for about a week and visited the cities of Karachi and Lahore. He said the college

was represented at two fairs

in the country,

new

which might lead to

applications for September

1997.

May

dents from the country applied for

recruitment.

was away, and he returned with an

DSA Office between

was surprised to number of stu-

representatives and to establish

ceived approximately 14 international student applications while he

Drop OflfYour Books

said he

with current student recruitment

student visas.”

to sell?

He

nel.

learn that a limited

asked to direct any further comments and questions regarding the

commands in the labs, said Gobbo. A new cable has been

victim”

Harold Wax steadies patient

Future looks bright for

year. Appli-

essing of

,

Recruiting students abroad

cations are available at student

weeks of the school

11

computer problems, the

executive has created a

of these students feel very

isolated,”

don’t

exam April

and hopefully correcting the

next year. The program would see

1 1

computers

final

Rechsteiner also visited the Cana-

recently visited the college and

was

very pleased with what she saw.

Rechsteiner said she promised to escort the first fall

few students

in the

of 1997.

Rechsteiner’s trip to Taiwan was also successful.

The

college

now

has representatives for student recruitment there. Due to an uneasy political atmosphere, there appears to be a significant market for international students now and in the future, he said.

The High Commission and

trade

office in Taipei also indicated their

support of Conestoga’s program,

dian High Commission in Islambad

and

and met with immigration person-

to process a student visa.

it

takes only about one

month


CONESTOGA LIFE Instructor applauds alternative delivery

By Amanda Web er

He

A

By Paul Tuns

cuses the college on that mission.

It

a rough and tough long-term blessing for post-secondary educais

Bob Hays,

the college’s law

security "administration

and

program

tion. It re-focuses the colleges

co-ordinator, sees an exciting and generally positive future for Con-

students and learning.”

estoga.

ing.

Hays, a defeated faculty representative candidate for the board of

on

He sees the role of teachers changHe said teachers will act more

as facilitators for different modes of education, than teachers lecturing

construction engineering technology teacher has an interesting way of putting his students

in front

proof

helps to ease their tension. Students have to have fun while they are learning or they won’t learn.”

keeping the college financially

one of the poorest methods of teaching, as even the

tion engineering technology stu-

sta-

ble.

He

said the board and administra-

tion are rightfully pre-occupied

with financial matters, but he said it is also important for the college to consider the quality of education

it

offers.

“We

need to build quality educaprograms. That is the challenge, and to do it with less money.” He said one of the more bandiedabout phrases around the campus tion

recently

alternative delivery, but

is

he has been using

He said the key

it

to

is

for

some

time.

be careful with

Hays

said the role of the faculty

on the board, among

is

scientific

that lecturing is

best student will

remember only

a

few minutes of a one-hour lecture. He added that students learn differently and alternative learning methods will be rrtuch better for many of them.

The

future, he said, will be excit-

ing for teachers, students and the college.

He

LAS A will be able to get as close to

cost-cutting measure.

The

first

con-

programs, he said. “The focus must be on students learning, not teachers teaching. In some ways, the current political cli-

mate

is

a good thing because

it

Hardware

fo-

McCabe was before

coming

years ago.

And

He

a building official to

Conestoga

five

said the course he

teaches gives the students public

they

They must prove to the teacher that the building they Jim McCabe, a construction have designed meets the Ontario engineering technology teacher, report.

This

is

where McCabe’s cos-

with everything, so he teaches

them the

COB

(condition of

adds some laughter to his class bowel) principal. “I presentations by showing up as dents to take along

a woman.

in.

(Photo by

Amanda Weber)

fin,”

tell

my

stu-

a bran muf-

he added.

Wind power

possible, he said, that by the

modes are used and not just as a

cern must be the excellence of the

they have to defend themselves.”

hard to be creative

other things, should be to ensure alternative delivery

codes, so they have to explain it to me and other times I know the codes and

McCabe tells his students that may have to deal with inspectors who have a problem

are feeling threatened.”

next century, virtual reality could be used to simulate domestic vio-

to better education

Sometimes I play a character who

knows nothing about

must do in front of McCabe, involves a building code analysis

tumes come

It is

the

has por-

relations and negotiation skills.

ery is something new, but it will provide a creative and dynamic It is

woman. Over

McCabe

the presentation the students

building code regulations.

classroom.

into his classroom

drunk inspector. “I take on different personas and the students have to defend their building choices to me.

dents have to prepare a complete set of drawings for a high-rise seniors apartment building.

walked

dressed as a three years,

trayed Capt. Picard from Star Trek, a nerd, a hillbilly inspector, an executive-type inspector and a

The sixth-semester construc-

admits that many teachers are nervous because alternative deliv-

when you

that process.

representative

of the class. said there

On

ficials.

building code ofApril 12, McCabe

at ease when they have to give a major presentation. Jim McCabe has a variety of outfits that he dresses up in when he hears students’ presentations. “Students are stressed, this

governors, said recently, he gives high marks to administration for

Hays

dresses as different charac-

ters to represent

lence situations so students in the real thing as possible.

“By

the year 2000,” Hays said, will not be able to recognize these post-secondary in-

“you probably

stitutions.

The process of change,

move

to computers, will never

the

end.”

store to

show

graphic students’ design By Barbara Walden

program have been

invited to apply

for the job, he said.

South Cambridge

a big view of the talents of three of

Greig said he and Cotton chose which depicts a farm scene with a barn, a farmer

Conestoga’s first-year graphic de-

guiding a plow and a large dog in

Shoppers

at the

Centre in Cambridge will be getting

when a full-wall mupainted on the Home

sign students, ral

is

Hardware

store there this

summer.

Lisa Scholten, Greg Kit and Jeff

the winning mural,

the foreground because they it had a tremendous impact and was not cluttered. It is a fairly simple design and will be easy to thought

Lincoln came up with the winning mural design in a team competition sponsored by Home Hardware store

maintain after

owner Len Greig. While planning for renovations

design are consistent with the other to

it is

painted on the

wall, he said.

As

well, he said the colors in the

building after renovations are com-

“really boring wall” with a mural,

plete.

after consulting

horses in the foreground will attract

tect Peter

Cotton of Sunburst De-

sign in Toronto.

He

said he feels the

dog and

people, especially children.

“The decision was

difficult be-

Greig said in a phone interview,

cause all the entries were very good,

his children attend Preston public

but this one just caught our eye,”

school in Cambridge and he always

said Greig.

admired the “absolutely incredible” graphics display in their school.

When

he found out the graphics had been done by students at Conestoga College, he approached instructor

Vince Sowa with his plan

to cover the side of his store with a

Scholten said each

Kit said they decided on

The students were divided into nine three-person teams and asked to design a heritage theme for the

attractive.

he took the project on stipulation that it would

said

with the

provide a summer job painting the wall for some of his students. All students in the graphic design

9TH ANNUAL

Learning Resource

BOOK FAIR

Centre DOON CAMPUS Blue

Room

Cafeteria

Doon Centre

said.

colors to

Sowa

member of the

team spent about 40 hours working on the design. They chose their design based on its simplicity, making it easy to see from a distance, she

mural.

building’s outside wall.

i

colors that will be painted on the

his store, Greig decided to cover a

with design archi-

Joshua Bruce (right) and his partner Richard Wagner, both Grade 7 students at Holy Rosary in Waterloo, stand in front of their wind power project at the sciehce fair held at the Kenneth E. Hunter (Photo bl^^SandaSteffleO center on April 12.

make

warm

Conestoga College

the mural visually

The winning team will be rewarded with a year-long subscription to a graphic design magazine,

worth about $70, said

TUESDAY. MAY

14.

1996

9:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Kit.

All entries in the competition are

on display outside the graphics wing, on the second floor of the Doon main campus building.

Please join us in the Blue Room Cafeteria to meet the publishing company Representatives, and view the books/materials which will be displayed. J


Page 8

— SPOKE, April 22, 1996

CONESTOGA LIFE Alumni association

new volunteers

seeks

veloped a

By Deborah Everest-Hill

of objectives and

set

selected a reasonable deadline for the implementation of these

Conestoga’s alumni association

is

considering a

human

objectives.

re-

Over

sources standing committee as part of

its

members and maintain

its

association plans to address the

volun-

following issues: volunteers, fundraising, imaging and serv-

of the

teer base, the president

ices.

association says.

Leitch said the association at new avenues for raising money, and consider

Sarah Leitch said the group has not been proactive enough in

terms of attracting

new

needs to look

volun-

where money

and may develop a human resources committee to attract and coordinate new members. The association met on Sunteers

day,

March

3 1 to discuss

The

the services

by Wayne Hussey,

spent.

it

provides were also

She said committee members examine the association’s image, both on campus and in the community. Members will

The

will

three-and-a-half hour meeting led

is

association’s image and

discussed.

its stra-

tegic plan for this year.

was

the next 18 months, the

new

plan to attract

the

new alumni

college’s executive director of

also consider

development, and both board and committee members were

ices.

present.

to strive for better cohesiveness.

She

what has been done since still

its in-

needs to be

meet on their own,

it is

important

of the association’s entire body.

Sunday’s meeting was a sucidentified

cess Leitch said. “Everybody

current services and events to es-

was keyed up and pleased with what we accomplished in such a

members

tablish possible

gaps in the asso-

ciation’s activities.

“We

felt

course. Classes are every

Lend

a helping

hand

it

short period of time.”

Student services seeking peer hosts By As

fall

T.L.

school year.

Huffman

approaches, Conestoga

The peer host is expected to spend some time with their match at the

was time for us to take a hard look at where we are headed.” Leitch said the standing committees rarely get together in one forum, but Sunday’s meeting

Leitch said the association needs to consider how long an individual can hold a position.

generated a feeling of fellowship

she has no intention of staying

services.

hosts are asked to have contact with

and a

that long.

second year, the peer host program is designed to help students from other countries improve their language skills and meet new

once a month. Kraler said contact with the student can be a phone call, meeting for coffee or lunch or an evening out. The kind of contact the students have is up to the individuals. A peer host is matched with one

lot

of enthusiasm. “People

get to see the fruits of their labor,” she said.

Like other college depart-

The

past president held the of-

College’s student services is looking for student volunteers to become peer hosts to international students and students new to Can-

and Leitch said

ada, said Barb Kraler of student

fice for six years

In

The association needs to move forward and strive for new people and new ideas, she said.

is

Leitch graduated from the ac-

busy developing a strategic plan. Leitch said each committee de-

counting program in 1988 and

ments, the alumni association

driver training (pnotobyjasonseads)

to plan regular social meetings

done. Leitch said

First-year robotics

i

said the association needs

Because committees usually

Mary Wright, alumni services, group met to analyze

said the

ception and what

serv-

and automation student Don Gibson heads the motorcycle weekend outside the woodworking building.

I

now works

at

K-W Optical.

its

people.

Kraler said the program originated after a number of international students

approached student

services for counselling.

She often found the students were not in need of counselling, but in-

her fingers danced

were looking for someone to to and share what their experi-

stead, talk

is

As

After the their

first part

match

of the semester,

at least

international student.

Matches are

based on a number of things including age, social interests and where the

two students

live.

Kraler said unfortunately

it is

dif-

Since the number of international students is increasing on campus, Kraler said student services is seeking about 10 to 1 5 volunteers for the

upcoming school year. So far, there has been

little re-

sponse.

One of the main host program

know

students

goals of the peer

to let international

is

they are not alone,

is an extra support system for the (international) stu-

said Kraler. “It

dent.” if an international student matched with a peer, Kraler said, the student is able to improve language skills and socialize more

Often,

is

comfortably.

all

of these factors, but matches so

When a student is comfortable with the language, they are more

generally a friend-

far

have been quite successful.

likely to achieve higher

a peer host, the volunteer

make

ficult to

make the matches based on

Volunteers should be senior stu-

ship system, she said.

required to

surroundings.

eight peer-host matches.

like.

ence in another country was

The program

beginning of the semester helping the student get familiar with the campus and comfortable in their

ing students from another culture. This year student services made

their schooling

marks in and meet people so-

is

dents or students that are familiar

cially.

a commitment of

and comfortable with the campus. Communication skills are important, as well as an interest in meet-

peer host can contact student serv-

eight months, beginning in Septem-

ber and continuing throughout the

Students interested in becoming a ices for

more

information.

spoke marketplace WILSON AND LABELLE TAX SERVICE -

E-File

$15

flat

rate Call

Georgia at 895-1532 or Judy 623-5805

at

Conestoga College Summer Camps: looking for mature and reliable individuals with experience

working

in

NEEDED:

a camp environment.

Sr. leaders, leaders

and

assistant leaders. Pick up application form at the Rec. Centre. Final

acceptance date

the

romance ends where your acne

time to take serious action. Your dermatologist has treatment programs designed for even the worst acne conditions. See your dermatologist today, or call 1 800 470 ACNE for free information about available treatments. If

begins,

it’s

April 26/96.

Conestoga Recreation

,

Centre:

Looking for referees, timekeepers,

and league convenors, for summer. Drop off resume at

the

or today, Centre 748-3512 Ext. 452 or 386 for

call

Rec.

the

info.


SPOKE, April 22, 1996 - Supplement Page 1

Sex

the ’90s

in

Journalism 2 supplement

From temptation Supplement

staff

by Michelle Arruda

editor

appear emaciated and cough constantly.

Toronto sex workers believe there is a difference between “crack whores” and street prosti-

Photo Editor Ross McDermott

There are prostitutes who

tutes.

ers)

Production Manager

on

the street for

money

crack cocaine and those

Wendy Cummins

to

it

to survive.

Sexual communication Be clear with yourself about what you will and will not do .

you are

clear, it’s

easier to talk about.

from recklessly lighting their smoking paraphernalia. They have scabs on their faces, arms and legs

about the compulsion for obtaining

you’ll be just fine. It’s

more drugs.

it

as the results of picking at them-

chel.

remove bugs

that they

their

the eerie chicken dance

is

captures a person’s attention.

Over

women

flail

a place to have sex, engaging in

and over again the

payment and then going back to the streets, in some cases to purchase and smoke crack,

their

arms

in spastic

first

movements,

away demons

trying to brush

that

many

partner

may need some

time to

adjust.

who was

ate for a high that she

price for oral sex

dropped her

past

from $40 down

a sense of humour.

to $5.

you both

feel

may

I am worth more You have got to continue

ashamed. The Parkdale residents were picketing prostitutes in the

to respect yourself,” said Sara, 20,

area with the hopes of shunning

“I’m sorry, but than

that.

them away and spent

“Why

on

trouble with ing,

having

what you are say-

slow down. If your partner

resists safer sex,

you need ture

is

then perhaps

“I can’t really

Prostitutes working the streets in the District of Parkdale in Toronto’s

west end.

to think about the na-

of your relationship.

5.

Alcohol and other drugs can

as fast as she

it”

(smoke crack) and seek out more tiable

at

out too early. People don’t need to see us out here.” Julie looks after her grandmother

woman from

Those who work the streets have formed friendships through which

Alberta. “I treasure

my

believe in our

experiences are shared, techniques

we watch out for each other. I don’t

day job. She said

are traded and warnings are rein-

want anything

forced.

of us.”

on the weekends to make ends meet, not to do drugs.

She and her two friends,

life.

We

buddy system and to happen to

must make

rules for her-

crack plays in the lives of the other

They

prostitutes creates the difference.

the customer has been abusing

non-drug users, said

in their physical appearance.

that the role

days a week and has a regular

prints

was

'pjfclic’s

Whats Inside

who

)>^vironment and not be tempted

worit in sex shops ts

by

'^rohgj'pust because sotn'eone In

Teens having sex

come upjo on a regular basis and ask me ittltade%w^s ’^f£how I could work in that type of ‘‘Customers would

Bailey

alex '^

doesn’t

mean

people

sex-shop exmplbyee.

From her experiences working in

Gay youths Sex addiction Sex therapy The past era of sex Sex in advertising

a sex shop, Tamara Dixon, ^of Kitchener, feels' this kmd of shop-

w

"yf/-

*There

is

assumption on

of bodily love- and none

which

is

more

irrational*

What

is that there’s

Being

that society

won’t

'

stye and aggressive,” she said.

'When situalions with these custbmers became out of hand, Dixon would warn them to stop acting inappropriately.

*my

a

them, they become defen-

;

tif this, I

the public

growing population of sexual deviants who need an outlet for their 'feelings.

i

job.

terestr^

.

'’^

men trying^

at

“When

shop

and customcom-

fee^amilies

^ided

to

’^^wider

in other places

selection of merchandi^,

num-

directed offensive

ber of^ual deviants rose. Atibat

Dixon.

point, I felt ! didn’t have aptirpose

of pepperspray un-

“I kept a can

and 1 Jcne^U»re was lo reason for

“The

was

store

was

my

The Republic '.

line,'

r would

either

mbto stay,” die said.

ever became out of hand. Fortunately, I When asked if she woric in a sex shop %ai^' never had to use iit,” she said. said she wmild if it ^as a coatrolDixon said, however, the majority of the customers that shopped fc led enviremment.^^'"”'^^''^ “All in all it was a good experiin the store were family units, couence. I learned more about my own ples and pregnant women, who ” sexuality arid I gained abetter view wanted to spice up their marriage. -

,

“These customers made

show

me their new

babies and couples

would thank

come back

to

me

territory. If

purchases,” she said.

make them

my job

^enjoyable. Pregnant women would

.Si.

they (the customers) crossed the

Plato:

way

der the counter in case a situation^

sexual identity.

doesn’t realize -

f",

and courtesy they deserve.

who

ments

“In a way, I don ’t bl ame them for

tiie

keener pleasure than that

caused nkyst cirsfemeii to lose

the'^ situatiems^

against store policy)

deviants— lonely individuals who

-art erf the public very personally.

no greater nor

said a lot of

involved such things as

ers

SM'acting this way.

of a Kitebener shop, which dise, takes this

Dixon

that prompted her to react this

""

of sexo^

Quote of the day

and

leave or threaten to call the police,*)^^ bccau^' tl^ variety

on ladies’ underwear' (which was

be so ignoram.”

realistic

she said '.

she had problems with were sexual

'''with their

;^Th$^'2^~year-old former em-

Body-rub pariors

Some

are confused or uncomfortable

ping environment bri^s out the

and the worst in customers.

cart

with sex.

Dixon said most of the customers

they are obsessed with sex,” said a

Chastity

my ‘obsession’

be

some

ASrisky-re^jlMliti^tC^^^ HyAndi^a

to

to happen,” said Sara.

decisions about safer sex.

University of Guelph

on the customer’s window

“You have

4?

Student Health Services

this

leave traces, in case, something

'

source-

does

and rear-view mirror.

self.

make good

The Wellness Center

that she

Sara always leaves her finger-

Sara said that for protection, a prostitute

first

users to

six

anyone

She believes in never getting in a car with more than one man, and especially if it is obvious that

five years.

a time shows

me mad when the other

come

a fresh-faced young

a prostitute on the same comer for

their insa-

The tendency of chronic

my

only they can see.

Rachel, 26, has been working as

need for more crack.

binge for days

cloud your ability to

Julie. “It makes

photo by Michelle Arruda

girls

“rock

blame the residents

neighborhood and I had children, I wouldn’t want to see them,” said

cially if she is “bingeing.”

customers to support

“We

though. If prostitutes were in

tomers a night for street prostiA crack addict usually services considerably more, espe-

women

condoms

their grass,” said Rachel.

good pebple. The store owners have known us for years and the

number of customers per night, anywhere from three to six cus-

All night these

fur-

We don’t do

cops even like us.”

not eat or sleep but must continue

sponse. If your partner

go picket

the street?

are

the

smoking her money makes it.

a lot of time

drugs, or steal, or throw

regulates

more comfortable. re-

didn’t they

down

ther

same corner took

While on a binge, a prostitute will

Monitor your partner’s

year

last

her both angry and

concentrating on their corner.

to hustle Johns because she is 4.

of a time

tells

made

that

destination to have sex and return-

help

Being able to laugh

few years.

Rachel

in March, the act of pickup a prostitute, driving her to a

To a certain extent, this

that the

dale in Toronto’s west end for the

day night ing

when you let

you emotionally

prostitution in the District of Park-

so desper-

time as one

tutes.

Keep

3.

as any other job,

departments to address the issue of

may think. As a reporter observed one Satur-

ing her to the

Give your partner time to think about what you’ve said about your sexual history. Your

it

trouble starts,” said Julie.

only 20 minutes. 2.

get to

treat

Vocal citizens have forced police

Julie, 27, a prostitute for

years, said that she recently heard

it

you

“If

pimp,” said Ra-

of a prostitute

negotiating a price, going to

much

is

believe to be crawling under their

But

doesn’t take as

“Crack

skin.

they do on the corners that

sex, receiving

drugs or alcohol.

for their personal safety but rather

Soliciting a customer on the street,

Production Assistant Jodi Bryans

The drug addicts arc not concerned

facial

selves to

buy

who do

They have burned

hair

hustle “tricks” or “Johns” (custom-

sexually. If

.

Between a need and a choice

Trish Jackson

1

.

Women who walk the streets

Editor

Peggy Sue Ironside

Copy

to exploitation

for helping them

Dixon left

their

main reason she the sex shop was

said the

her job at

make

and insight into the lives of others. “Anyone who wants to work in a sex shop has to be open-minded, have moral .integrity and must set high'

sWdlrdS

for themself. If a

person doesn’t possess these skills, it

can be a very upsetting place to

work,” she

said.


SPOKE, April 22, 1996 - Supplement Page

Sex

2

Journalism 2 supplement

the ’90s

in

Teens

openly about having sex

talk

survey, which

by Brad Kaitting

approach which Children between the ages of 13 and

becoming

16’ are

Jennifer,

comfortable with their relationship and where

may account for the trend-breaking, rapid many teens now take towards sexuality.

Mike’s

girlfriend, admitted to being

completely

because

sexually active and experimental in this day and age, present-

than

ing a far different picture

days

the

it’s

I’m ready too young to do

it,

know

as long as they

to

the ‘in’ thing to do,” Jennifer said. “I know where

Mike has been, so I’m not worried about not using protection.

their parents

remember.

“No one’s

appeared

it

be going, including becoming a mother at 16 years old. “You have to feel ready and comfortable to do it, not just

Adam,

they’re

be a mother.”

to

was quick

13,

of the coin,

to display the other side

with the right person,’’ said Julia, 13, a Grade 8 student at

and admitted he strongly disagrees with his brother’s

Lincoln Heights secondary school in Waterloo. “I don’t

“I’m just a kid, and so are they,”Adam said. “Mike’s only a year older than I am, and if I don’t feel ready and don’t

whole thing much thought;

really give the

it’s

just natural,

I

know enough about sex, how does a year more make that big

guess.” Julia

a difference?”

not alone in her opinion on the matter, according to

is

a survey of 20 students at Lincoln Heights school.

Adam felt that his brother was simply “following the herd”

Each of

were interviewed were between the ages of and were open about discussing what is generally

many young people who

making the great leap

the students that

of so

13 and 16,

maturity by having sex at a young age.

Lincoln Heights student Mike, 14, said he has never pressured by anyone, be

it

own

sexual encounters of his

“The only thing

that

I

felt

media or other outside

friends, the

influences, to have sex; he said he enjoys

it

and

instigates

free will.

have ever felt pressured about

made

that

is

people think we’re too young to have sex,” Mike said,

in

Waterloo. “There

that

is

that

know

I

are doing

it,

Mike laughed and shook

“Nope; never have and never

his head.

will,”

Mike

is

mind when someone mentions sex or sex in the ’90s

but

a part of

is

it

some

teens’ lives.

For some

teens, the pres-

sure to have sex great.

is

too

The group Willing

Wait

when

Two

14-year-old Lincoln Heights secondary school students embrace the idea of love and sex as well as the end of innocence. ^ ^ Photo by Brad Kaitting

they feel there

“Kids just sqrt of plunge

speaks about having

into it.” said Rankin."

good relationships with

They need

peers, while the medical

there are consequences

doctor

theu- actions.”

asked to speak

about the physical aspects

of having and not having

know

to

usually held in Catholic schools, churches or often in

the leaders’homes.

Most often

Roman

they are held in

Catholic churches

because of the

its

strong

Shown is

at the

meetings

a documentary vide-

otape, entitled Sex, Lies

and the Truth, by Dr.s James Dobson, a Christian psycohologist Skits are performed as a

quently are worked into

means of communication

confirmation classes in

to students

Catholic high schools.

dents

the Willing to

Wait group

in Kitchener,

when

explained

the meetings con-

vene the boys and

tity

by other

stu-

who believe in chas-

so the message will

have more meaning. Rankin said parents are the most supportive of the

segregated into separate

group and attend meetings with their adolescents to

rooms where they

show

girls are

listen to

a registered nurse and a

A

pastor speak.

Parents are involved to

Rankin

said,

“The group

gives teens an alternative

issue can get

a good

“The

Gascho.

co-ordinator

lesbian youths

have self-image issues

to deal

when emerging from

with

activist.

live

Gay and

heterosexual-dominated

a

remain

Rankin said the group gives teens a positive

atti-

is

trait.

quality of life people

an issue in the youth

“Many down with

groups,” said Gascho.

people get bogged trivialities.”

The youth discussion group

life-

of the education support pro-

style.

gram at the Aids Committee of Cambridge, Kitchener,

through these issues without

damaging themselves. They

Waterloo and Area, said this seems to stem from growing

protecting.

nity understand

up in a heterosexually dominated environment. The

The youth discussion meetings allow the young adults to

young

develop a positive view of

AIDS. The agency has a resource centre and information is available anonymously,

adults affected have

need

They need

know

to

to

work

they are worth

is

a branch of the education

program at ACCKWA, which provides information and

commu-

services to help the

HIV

and

esteem and sense of worth.

ply speakers and displays for

ally St.

and financially from Agatha Roman Catho-

have different sexual interests, and this can leave them believing in a bleak future.

Gascho said one topic good discussion among

lic

Church, in

community groups and also provides prevention programs for a series of target

There

is

support spiritu-

St.

Last

Agatha,

fall,

ACCKWA started

The meetings

youth group

is

are

for the

their theories

which donates money to

a gay, lesbian and bisexual

on the origin of sexual orien-

the group.

youth discussion group. The current meetings are of a

tation.

drop-in style and are open-

ideas and possibilities they

People

usiially find

out

about thb meetings by N word-of-mouth,‘ which is great, according to '

Rankin, because with the

ads

newspaper, “There is too much rein

the

sponse.”

Often the meetings be-

come

ended, leaving

too crowded

when

how

room

to see

the group develops.

Gascho

said a lot of disclo-

sure issues are discussed dur-

to bring out

many

different

can work with.

show

with the issue of chastity.

Group meetings are held twice each month and are open to anyone.

'

is

an-

other discussion topic at the

with and affected by

living

HIV and

AIDS. The program

facili-

development, main-

tates the

tenance and promotion of an emotional, physical and

about their sexual preference

worry about possible rejecchanges in their cur-

“Coming out

that deals

program which

meetings. “It’s easier to estab-

rent relationships.

ra-

the support

lish these patterns earlier in

for the first time

page of the Kitchener- Wa-

station, also helps get the

is

provides practical assistance

and support to people

Developing a safe-sex pattern for the rest of life

in the region.

A second part of ACCKWA

This discussion tends

ing the meetings. Youths

tion or

terloo Record.

groups

The program can sup-

coming out

advertised on the religion

dio-talk

their struggle to

toi;

HIV

common

either over the telephone or in

that they are not alone in

chaste.

now.”

person.

doctor from within the often in-

wait

I’ll

it.

right

volved in the group, their self-

word out by hosting a

is

that

CCKW, a Christian radio

their support.

without

their life

moving too quick

together and talk,” said

among gay and

Rob Gascho,

the sup-

ensure that their kids know

vited as a guest speaker.

14 years of

ethical beliefs of people that

all

medical

community

first

feels right; it’s just

,

support of chastity and fre-

Joyce Rankin, a leader in

it

their future.

issue.

20 imn-

a disturbingly high

prevention

thinking and

pressure and keep their values in perspective.

utes in length.

until

centred around the people in-

way of

port she can.

are usually 15 to

they went the

rounded by the moral and

this

the spiritual aspects of the

are

I’m older,”

until

the disadvantage of being sur-

that helps teens fight the

These presentations

is

lesbian youths, said an

Rankin firmly believes in gives the group

The group meetings

There

suicide rate

marriage before having

The registered nurse usu-

gonna hold off

mom once asked me why kids are so desperate to have sex if

with a

by P.S Ironside

'

sex, and a pastor deals with

is

“My

just

Doors to future open to gay youths

tude about waiting until

an organization

to

said,

“I’m

take.”

is

Adam

stomping his cigarette out and smiling confidently.

“Most of

no other logical route to-

ally

Many of the teens know from television

other birth control devices.

programs.

Said.

Group supports wait for sex route

really bad.”

surveyed said they learned what they

them are ripped when they come in the package anyway, so what good are they going to do? I want to be a father, anyway It’s good to feel needed.”. The desire to be needed and feel loved was highly prevalent among all the participants of the

Chastity may not come to

sound

doms and

When asked if he used protection against sexually transmit-

by Shelley Bird

it

transmitted diseases and form? of prevention, including con-

so

seems a reasonable age.”

ted diseases,

to

admitted that he

20 students surveyed agreed that their sexual education was brief and focused only on the negative aspects of sex, with little or no in-depth information on sexually

where you’re too young,

a point

most kids 14 and up

agree, but

He

All of the

holding on to his girlfriend, Jennifer, outside of Glenridge Plaza

are

is too young, and he didn’t feel that the school system taught enough of the vital information about sex. “We had a one-day thing about sex in our gym class,” Adam said. “They never really told us much; they just handed out a bunch of diagrams and told us we shouldn’t do it. They

thought to be a sensitive subject.

I

actions.

to parents is a

life,

than

later,”

change them said Gascho. it is

to

Nowadays, safe sex is the norm, and while abstaining is the most obvious form of safe

tual sense

spiri-

of well-being.

The primary mandate of the agency

is

HIV

prevention.

The Regional Health Unit comes to the centre once a week on Thursday and pro-

big issue,” said Gascho. Many youths are financially

able. It

can be equated with locking ourselves in a base-

vides anonymous, free, walk-

dependent on the parents and can feel vulnerable in that po-

ment

hours of 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.

sition.

it

is

not necessarily desir-

to

prevent being run

over by a vehicle.

At the group meetings, these

young

sex

adults gain the reassur-

ance that they are not alone. “It’s a place

where people

Cultivating a healthy sense

of risk and being able to distinguish between what is and what is not important in life is

in

HIV

tests

between

Anyone with

questions

about HTV or AIDS to call

the

is

ACCKWA

invited

at (519)

570-3687 or come by 123

Duke

St.,

Kitchener.


Sex

the ’90s

in

Journalism 2 suppleme

sex addiction

Sexual healing

Not just hormones by Wendy Cummins

follows. For Gary,- who had

Sex addictioa affects hundreds of Canadians each year, bringing with

emotional turmoil and compulsion towards sexual acsaid a local sex addict.

behavioral kind of addiction with a certain kind of physi“It is a

cal aspect,’’ said

attending tion

Gary, an addict

is

in

Cambridge.

a 41-year-old Kitchener

man who

recognized he had a sex-addiction problem seven years ago but feels he has been an addict for almost 25 years, stem-

ming from a troubled childhood. don’t think I’m ever going to

stop being an addict,” “It is part

Gary

said.

of me.”

Gary said

it

Modelled

after the 12-step pro-

gram from Alcoholics Anonymous, each member of the organization must admit they have a problem and find a “higher power” to guide them. almost a program for

ing daily life,” Gary said. addicts don’t have that,

more difficult because Gary

more than

“Most

I

don’t

life,

with their sexual problems, often

is

it

is

it

said. “It

took

your soul”, Gary said that the organization helps addicts “get spiritual sense.

have to be convinced was a sex and love addict. “I didn’t

knew,” he

I

I

said.

hardest as he

was

afraid of not

being accepted. The

first

member

he saw hugged him.

Linda

symptoms

BA, MA,

Hillicr,

is

lo-

nist

psychotherapist in Kitchener

who

often works with

my

active addiction,

wasn’t making good decisions

my life.”

for

know

not over,” he said. “It

Another lem area

it is

a long process.

“We’ll probably

“As an

of our

addict

I

be addicts he said.

all

achieve a “normal” sex

The

lem at the first meeting. Dean said his problems

stemmed from overhormones but that members also have problems with love, romance, relationships, masturbation, and prostitution as

it

Dean

deal with

problems stem from issues of

though.

impossible for the victim to sepa-

ally

a benefit in

overwhelming,

that

it

cally differ for

men and women.

therapy the focus for women

around abuse

woman

her about the changes

her body.

because sex wasn’t good in the

time in their

good old days.

ing about

Gwen Swan, who

has three chil-

dren and 10 grandchildren and

is

talks

“All she said was this

boys.

I

life.

is

That was

how you

mean, you

didn’t

Swan

noth-

nurse

go with soon

you

John Swan, no one told her what

tion to sex.

expect on the wedding night.

in

my

day was

in the

bed-

You did not talk sex and you did not know anything about sex. Oh, you knew it was going on, but

room.

it

was

just

something you never

brought out,”

Swan

said.

She said

the only conversation

she ever had came close to being about sex was when she smarted her menstrual that

cycle.

Her grandmother took her

said.

said even at age 18,

was

“It

when

a scary experience.

didn’t enjoy

it,

to tell

to

I

a

woman

said she learned about sex

and anything sexually related by experience. “I’ll

went

always remember when

into labor with

over.

didn’t

She looked

I

my daughter,”

Swan said with a smile on her face.

at

me

‘You’ve had the sweet.

Now, you have

to put

up with the

more surprising when coupf

people get

in

touch with their feel-

ings and to practise saying

loud

is

the

them out

Two Chair Dialogue.

this exercise the client faces

Linda

is

In

an

per-

there.

it’s al.

have healthy sexual relation

:

with their partners.

The most important thinj. wants people to know is that ality problems are very com

;

“You

are not alone. support,” she says.

You

c

cai

a feminist psychotherapist in Kitchener, display.^ books she recommends to clients. ...... photo by Tnsh Jacksi

Hillier,

number

of

,

her head.

forget that. That’s

about sex

“I’ll

how we

never

learned

— from experiences.”

She said they

for a

was considered

woman

to enjoy sex.

good that there are now lectures and books that teach women that it’s okay to enjoy sex,” Swan continued. “It’s also a good thing “It’s

about sex.”

However, Swan said

fail to realize the

Swan blames

the

sex, so they

influ-

know how

but they have to keep

girls are

it

to face

Swan

said people put too

importance on sex

much

in a relationshir

when the sex fizzles o>

so does the relationship.

“There are so many

girls

now th,

are into the sex with these you: that there’s

no surprises

they get married,”

Swan

whi.

sa

“Somehow, we have to instill

in

most intimate moments they

young as 1 0 years of age. “Sex is pushed at girls. You watch the soap operas on television and everything is sex. You go to the movies and everything is sex. There are no surprises any more, and I think that’s what’s wrong with the young people today.” She said, “It’s better now that we

younger generation

is r

I

I

bit better,

could have taken an active

part.”

“When I was growing up, the genwas that it’s up to the man

eral rule

to ask

and

Swan

it’s

up

to the girl to say

said with a laugh.

as

it,

in perspec-

tive.”

boys

act.

media for

because

more mature. They know about

Therefore, that al-

though kids are being educated consequences of the

talk about sex

encing young children to have sex

never spoke about sex. “I wish

no,”

wrong

it

in

had a great relationship, but even

then

also said, looking back at

about sex, they

John Swan, Swan’s husband of 50

their

Swan

that era, she feels

that kids learn

sour.’”

could have been taught a

performed as a wife.”

Swan

came

said,

years, died last year.

you the truth,”

Swan said. “It was a duty

and

Swan shook

she got married to Canadian soldier

“Sex

know

I was screamwhen this big

was born in England in She became a war bride in 1945, and so began her introduc-

Swan

on the labor

in the hospital

ing from the pain

got killed,”

1927.

was

what was going on.

expecting her first great-grandchild in June,

“I

some

didn’t because in those days,

with their feelings.

models

about sex during the good old days

some-

just as

experiences in puberty,

sex addiction and

affairs,

I

it;

ships, parenting, role

ing self-esteem and getting in touch

issues, self-es-

bed. In those days

all girls

throughout their lives, such a^ experiences, abuse, media body image, self-esteem, rcla

She uses many therapeutic exercises with the client which promote growth and self-discovery, enhanc-

usu-

healthy boundaries with things

^

thing that happens to

is

therapy involves learning to have

''

such as

69-year-old Guelph

factors affecting people’s sexi.

In

Thursday at St, llxeresa’s Church

spoke out in an interview Friday

Mia Hunter,

Hillier feels that with so

Hillier says sexuality issues typi-

a problem.”

be ashamed and hide sex.

tell

Dysfunction, by

abuse.

teem and body image. For men,

in

and Joyous Sexuality, He, from the Effects of Family Sc

becomes

ally

aside to

Erotic Writings for Woon Top by Nancy Fi

Women

from the prior

rate healthy sex

;

Guelph area war bride

Child Sexual Abuse, by Ellen and Laura Davis; Touching i

in-

These issues are so emotion-

7p.m

client. Hillier rcconii

books such as The Courage to A Guide for Women Surviv(

lationship, then often sexuality

rape.

in Kitchener at

may be through j therapy and support group through books to be read at

have a sexual relationship. problem is not with the re-

“Not in a sense where they are over the addiction,

is

taken

foi

If the

ered,” he said.

it

in the office or

to complete.

son they need to speak to

childhood sexual abuse, or

you think

be done

may home

empty chair and imagines the

cest,

if

and assessments, such as a

Other

relationship directly affect the de-

there are people recov-

is definitely

tests

finally, sexuality.

sexuality usually stem from lack of communication, underlying resentment, and lack of respect. Unresolved problems within the

sire to

becomes an obsession and

“There

and

An exercise she often uses to help

Relationship problems affecting

they can’t deal with it

know

couples

like in their relation-

is

ship,

compatibility questionnaire,

sexual-abuse issues.

the addiction, but for Miother per-

son

difficulties that

couples’

how they communicate, what

the intimacy

The

life.

at the

own, and someM

cation

for

in

time spent together and time spent apart,

a healthy relation-

within the relationship or previous

well as other sex-related problems, he said.

“One person can

in

bring into therapy are usually caused by underlying problems which revolve around problems

Dean recognized he had a prob-

come

its

prepare the client

conversation with his or

by the

clients first

questions that look

about once a

is

u.scd to

Education is an important cc nent to therapy, says Hillier.

for the

with a four-part assessment with

frequency of sex. In

ship is very unique for each couple and each individual.

lives,”

perverts,”

surface prob-

week. However, there is no right or wrong amount of sex required to

will never be over

all

is in

amount of sex

the addiction.”

“We’re not

When

i

partner.

counselling, Hillier usually begins

common

sex for a couple

Dean, a 52-year-oId Kitchener man agrees overcoming the ad-

for the rest

men

the average frequency of

reality,

a long

is

process.”

is

found

and women.

Although he said he is not perfect yet, he knows the organiza-

diction

is

to occur about equally in both

real

that their

somewhat responsible

feel

is

Some

process of self-discovt

this

alone. In abuse cases, often victims

prob-

bridge Tuesday at 10 a.m, and

A

it

healing process.

I

making a good decision,’

said. “In

common

most

said.

by Debbie Prescod

enough on

both parties. The problem

are not

he

the

their partner’s feelings.

therapist like herself.

and confirmation

tell

confrontation or worry of hu;

ents to talk about their feelings in a safe environment with an impartial

abuse, and need to be reassured that they are the victim and begin the

One of

release their feelings, and

feelings arc normal and they are not

area of sexuality.

in the

Therefore, he feels people tend to

of emotions come 'our

cli-

port,

and

The organization meets at Trinity Anglican Church in Cam-"

lot

on

which encourages

lems couples come to her with is low sexual desire by either one or

lem

A

Hillier bases her counselling

and decides to drive home, they

sence avoiding reality.

he

they like and don’t like withoi.i

couples

SLAA,”he said. As Gary says, ‘Tt is only a prob-,

ciety is attached to sex,”

“normal.”

was during his actingout phase. “If somebody is drunk addiction

“I

throughout so-

This gives them the opportunit

The therapist provides needed empathy and sup-

a femi-

women

pornography, and also dealing with issues regarding pressure to be

talk therapy,

cal psychotherapist.

a year to start to iden-

“The only requirement for membership is to stop living out a pattern of sex and love addiction,” Gary said. Gary feels that society talks about sex as dirty and is in es-

“A lot of shame

to the

of underlying problems, says a

me

He said that the worst part of the

said.

He said the first meeting was the

therapist are actually the

of

part

problems they present

the

made

active

Calling the addiction “a hole in

When couples decide to seek help

it

emotions.”

tify

liv-

think.”

back a

volved and sometimes yourself,”

by Trish Jackson

made

a lot of emotion in-

is

tion has helped him. “I

wasn’t until he was

charged with a sexual offence that he realized he had a problem.

“It is

“There

Sex and Love Addic-

Anonymous

Gary

”1

previous attempts on his was very hard.

it

tivities,

Therapist draws out underlying issue

through the steps the organization

that sex

i

something that we do on the corr of the streets.”

Swan

said she has

changed a

i

of her views on the issue of sex, b she

still

thinks people should w..

until they get

“I’m

still

married to have sc

old fashioned that way,

she said with a laugh.


SPOKE, April

22, 1996

Sex

the ’90s

in

-

Supplement Page 4

Journalism 2 supplement

Sexy ads pump profits but distort perception by Ross McDermott

Research Group

Cambridge,

in

says that to understand the reason

Sex

From

sells.

blue jeans to

from snack foods

beer,

to soda-

for

pop, advertisers can’t seem to re-

what some consider a

sist utilizing

very effective marketing tool.

separate

Turvey said

In a recent interview,

we

— not

see

just

ads but in soap operas, shows

NYPD

Blue, Murder one

but view the use of sexually sug-

like

gestive material in advertising as a

these things have always portrayed

contributing factor to

problems

John

wrote

S. Stratton

more than

that

the

Of Women and Ad-

In his book. vertising,

some of

in today’s society.

Simone are,

by

per se, she takes issue with the is

it

way

sented

Simone

pre-

through the eyes of men,”

is

said,

women

“and

She

said

most

when

is

what women actually look

“The problem with

the

negative impact on the self-esteem

zine report

on a study done

early ’80s.

141

A

in the

randomly selected

men were shown

is

directed at

ple,

slender, female tively

ments with and without nude mod-

gerie.

els. It

was found that, generally, the sets

of ads

“Sex

is

vertising its

said.

and adds another straw

attractive

to

is it

that sex

seems

to be

tising?

John Turvey, advertising con-

and owner of Bottom Line

by Jodi Bryans

is

earth,”

way

Simone suggested

owners the

local massage-parlor

1 1

when

the

voted unanimously for a bylaw

which forces masseuses

to

be

clothed while working.

they are, exactly

Simone

men

they

those images

that this nega-

women

message

to

be

good about who

who

they are,”

said.

Turvey, to some extent,agrees

Rose Simone, feminist writer and

that a negative influence

terloo Record, expressed a differ-

ist.

“Yes,

ent opinion.

It

makes

bridge, said during an interview, “I

and de-

feel insulted, intimidated

me

mad.

(I

was)

it’s there.

Yes,

does ex-

it’s

city council, with colleague

non Wilson,

to voice their

obtained the licence for her

toria’s,

at

Shan-

views on

business in September 1995, she

in

the

photo by Ross McDermott

new bylaw requiring them to be

The

knew

because customers, “feel special

sage.

sages, she said, “but they never

in or permit

employees to engage

here and (they) need human touch.”

made iran issue.” The existence of

in,

city

we

made up

their

minds

got there. There was no

use going,” said Seppala.

When Victoria, the owner of Vic-

the body-rub

business despite Cambridge

decision to ban nude massages. photo by Jodi Bryans

to learn about

Don’t assume anything ab|w a woman. a kiss you bit.

3.

Romance means

5..

Anderson believes the new bylaw

what

will hurt the body-rub parlor busi-

The new

nesses because “I personally don’t

tomer,” but

it

was not

clear

“sexual impropriety” was.

bylaw

Women’s Temperance Union,

meaning of “sexual impropriety”

is

intended to clarify the

Catholic schools and Christian

which makes nude and semi-nude

moral groups. They were con-

massage improper within the City

cerned that questionable activities

of Cambridge.

think their business

body-rub

is

massage.”

two of

Victoria’s holds

the three

body-rub parlor licences that are available in

Cambridge and Victo-

new loca-

in various

Medical officers also cited their

of dress in body-rub parlor

concerns to the city due to the

tion, also called Victoria’s, in

establishments, said Cambridge

physical contact a masseuse and

Preston on April

is

Jim Anderson.

“one way

to

client

expand adult

is

a difference between a

who have

to

be

There are specific guidelines

they have to follow to stay in business.

A

body-rub parlor masseuse

women talking

4. Size doesn’t really

sexual impropriety with a cus-

dences of Cambridge, the Ontario

tario.

in

bylaws, stated:

parlor raised concerns for resi-

licensed under the Province of On-

approach a

is

businesses like body-rub parlors

trained individuals

to relax the

Seppala said she believes there

a strong need in the community for

operat-

Victoria’s per-

rub parlor. Therapists are qualified,

after

“No person

not

ing a body-rub parlor shall engage

city

massage-therapy clinic and a body-

wipes her mouth

984. Section 61 , of the

It’s

fair.”

formed nude and semi-nude mas-

There

men

1

more comfort-

dressed while performing a mas-

the

entertainment,” he said.

Helping

pertaining to body-

dated since

This

still

The bylaws

“the customers feel

able if you’re both naked.

rub parlors had not been consoli-

city clerk

is

“It’s just

a business,” said Anderson.

was not informed the bylaws would

states

parlor

has no qualified training.

be changing, said Seppala.

were being performed

may want

Nice pair of ...glasses? A young man admires a provocative advertisement hanging window of an optical store in Cambridge.

(adver-

body-rub parlor, and opened the

prostitute.”

Seppala represented Victoria’s

before

1.

of

feel that in

journalist with the Kitchener-Wa-

Cam-

Victoria’s, 105 Ainslie St.,

2, If she

said, ”it’s the reporting

being done.”

has a very

“Unfortunately young are not getting the

ings in order to market some-

“The

city council’s

it

anorexia.

thing.”

Tiia Seppala, 34, a masseuse at

massage

Turvey

impact could be a contributing

confident, to feel

graded.

The City of Cambridge rubbed

Victoria’s

can

factor to cases of self-starvation or

nothing

that as an

to look the

element of our surround-

stamped as a

wrong way on Mar.

one of the

that

dubs nude body rubs immoral

City

city

“There

wrong with displaying

such a prominent feature in adver-

sultant

is

an inefficient form of ad-

cost,” Stratton wrote.

So why

do.”

tive

Turvey

were equal.

models provoca-

pose in various styles of lin-

“The female form

it

women who

of young

have

most beautiful things on

said, “is that

order to be attractive to

which

toria’s Secret catalogue in

advertise-

men’s memory of both

women. As an exam-

he displayed an issue of a Vic-

one thing

is

like.

mone

effectiveness

“If there

cause people to do something,”

that ,” Si-

most pleasing advertising which

its

this type of

a “miniscule representation” of

uses sexually suggestive material

questioned

Turvey

said.

“over-hypes”

in reality that

in advertising.

He

communications have height-

things such as anorexia,

it

social problem.

are not

populace objects to the use of sex

and referred to a Marketing Maga-

cause

women being pre-

way and I don’t think that will ever some of

He believes that the news media must carry some of the blame be-

being represented fairly.”

change.” also argued that

in

ened the public’s awareness of

sometimes presented.

der body type

He

don’t think

Thin models have always been

Turvey

one-third of the

I

used in advertising. Advancements

sented in advertising are of a slen-

always been that

but

going to change,” he said.

it’s

and though

the best-ones (people) available,” said. “It’s

tising) not perfect

she sees nothing wrong with sex

“The fantasy image being

“In everything in

men and women

nature, sexual beings

ing images.

effectiveness

its

first

that people prefer to look at pleas-

who

There are those, however, not only question

use one must

its

sex from beauty.

In a telephone interview, said that

matter to her.

Cuddling will make her happy.

engage

The contact could

be opening

at

a

1.

Victoria’s has approximately

300

possibly lead to health hazards

regular customers and their clien-

where any diseases, mainly sexu-

tele is all male.

ally transmitted diseases,

ploys five

could be

passed, said Anderson.

“How

The business em-

women

and

is

currently

hiring for both locations.

A regular massage is $25 for one-

can someone get diseases

by a massage?” asked Seppala.

half hour session and an erotic

There

gerie

is

no genital massage and the

customers can’t touch us, she said.

So

far the

new bylaw has

massage

is

lin-

$45 for one half

hour session.

not af-

fected business, said Seppala, but

Helping I.

in.

ria’s will

Victoria’s hours of operation are

from 10 a.m.

to 10 p.m. weekdays.

women tp learn about men

You’ll never change him.

3.

He ’ll

give a great massage

if

you

ask.


Confidence leads By Sean

S.

Finlay

“Students should go through any courses, read up

No longer will just skill and a friendly disposition get

someone a job in

on current

keting students. The course teaches everything from writing the resume

infor-

mation and newsletters to understand any changes in the industry they wish to pursue so they can show off at the interview.”

the

marketing industry. But a cocky atexperience and personal confidence will, says Jason Turner, titude, life

to success

to job hunting and landing an interview. Ted Goddard, an instructor in

the business program, wrote the

understand the current market. He says graduates leave with good business skills taught by hands-on

person is more well- rounded and equipped for the interview with

work, not just theory.

Turner agrees. “Life experience the key to marketing. If you get out and meet people to understand their likes and dislikes, marketing

better people skills.”

Goddard says if he were an employer, he would not hire someone

textbook Career Planning; Strate-

is

a graduate from Conestoga College’s marketing program.

will

Doon campus about

in the business world are as important as informants to

the police. Turner says it was important for first-year marketing students to talk to the senior stu-

“Take everything you can from them. Those people in the third year have two years of condents.

after graduation.

He started at Schneider’s in Owen stint

tacts built up.”

in sales for a brief

who

before his promotion.

is

and said to the dollar I earned for

company,”’ says Turner. “I worked 14- to 16-hour days. I drew up plans and presented them, which the

led to

my

promotion.”

He

says

was the extra effort he put forth

it

that

Marketing graduate Jason Turner, who recently spoke to marketing students about his experiences after college, is the assistant product manager at J. M. Schneider. (Photo by sean Rniay)

earned his promotion.

may

few sugges-

him along his career path. He says students should start as soon as possible collecting information about and untions that helped

Turner keeps a file of all the awards and accomplishments he

gies for Business,

has achieved over the years to show

third-year students.

is

is

required

only offered to

Goddard sa^s Conestoga’s School of Business establishes a good working relationship, not coop, with businesses to help students

reer has taken.

Conestoga College offers a course called job search skills to its mar-

to enter.

which

for the course that

a future employer the path his ca-

derstanding the industry they want

them, not necessarily to take the

who

He says the more interviews he went to, the more he could work on his response to the frequently asked questions by employers. Turner got his promotion as

graduated with perfect marks

alone.

“You give me a person with average marks, but who has volunteered somewhere,” says Goddard. “Volwork shows their personality is not one-dimensional. That

quickly as he did by, as he says, “being a little cocky” and knowing

unteer

the industry.

Students stressed over graduation By Josh Haupert

glad they’re doing well, but they are just

numbers and Sharilyn Johnson says she has never been

so scared in her life. But

it’s

not the opening

don’t think

I

I

can take much

University, and she’s scared

stiff.

is

wrap-

That puts

her in the same boat as approximately 60

Conestoga students

who

will graduate this

“I

to

enjoy

it.

know what I have

school goes, and

I

do

to get

my

done as

me

Quehl. “But

point of spontaneous combustion

- it’s not real

live at

home, I pay my bills

life.“

Despite her fears, the recently compiled

employment

Conestoga College are promising. They show that 90 per cent of graduates available for work found employment and 69 per cent of them found employment related to their program of statistics for

‘'I’m

it

doesn’t freak

very happy for the

statistics

and I’m

Assistant Editor

*.

Judith

- Steve Quehl

seek further education - perhaps a surprisengineering graduates found employment.

“School

become

is

it

can

quite simple to trivialize the re-

sponsibilities within it,”

Quehl

says.

“As

long as you keep taking courses, you’re safe, and that’s a feeling shared by most “I

I know. have friends who’ve graduated univer-

Hemming

Diana Loveless

ing figure, since 89 per cent of 1995 civil

Staying in school and furthering educa-

always a possibility, but not many Out of Conestoga’s 1,503 graduates last year, a mere 90 chose to seek tion is

a protective hive, and

The Journalism 4 Editor

have friends who’ve graduated university with a B.A. in Engiish, and a year iater they’re iooking for any employment, period.” ‘7

get

college students.

class of

take that path.

- perhaps because many Approximately 1 ,200 Conestoga graduates were available for work in 1995, and of them, only 257 became em-

higher education did not have

Photo Editor

December York University.

cation at Conestoga this past

after three years at

MeShee

is

confident she will find related

work upon graduation. “There’s nothing more

ticular,

ployed in a field unrelated to their studies.

this

frustrating than a

MeShee

says. “I

really,

it

says she

way.” Conestoga

feels that

came

to

to

specialize and find a practical use for her

acquired skills. With an English degree from York and a diploma from Conestoga, Meshee plans on successfully completing her program and opening up her own daycare operation. “But,” she says, “I’m not in any hurry. I went through a whole year of stressing over what the heck I was going to do when I finished (at York). “It’s a side of schooling that’s well hidden - 1 wasn’t worried about tomorrow’s test or next week’s essay - 1 was worried about my future.”

MeShee debated on going back

for a

was fun and safe. “Besides,” she says, “what else was I going fourth year because

to

it

do?”

supplement.

Dempsey

Production Manager

Janet White

Assistant Production

Allison

and

MeShee

to.

Winter 1996 prepared

Assistant Photo Editor

MeShee com-

learned a whole lot about nothing in par-

behind - I’ve got all the time in the world when you really look at it.” This attitude seems common among other

if I

Twenty-four-year-old Julie

pleted one semester of early childhood edu-

three-year degree in arts.”

out to the

people

study. .

far as

engineering technology, seven chose to

year-old civil engineering student Steve

“I’m afraid to get out there and find that there’s nothing for me,” says Johnson. “I’m I

W^y

best,” says 23-

year.

safe in school.

employment, pe-

go when you can stay?” Conestoga College’s 1995 graduate update shaws that of the 19 graduates in civil

grown

Twenty-three-year-old Johnson

BA in English, and a year later

riod, related (to their degree) or not.

ministration-marketing at Wilfrid Laurier

- graduation.

with a

they’re looking for any

says.

ping up her final semester in business ad-

worked up. And it’s not the Jim and Tammy Baker reunion special, either. What frightens Johnson and costs her sleep is that other

sity

comfort in that piece of paper,” Johnson

‘Tacking it to my bedpost isn’t exactly going to help me sleep better at night.” Some students, however, feel their lives are cushioned from the outside world by an existence revolving around school. They don’t mind the routine to which they have become accustomed, and in fact, have

of Friday the 13th Part 30 that has her so

big event

be

jobs,” explains Turner.

Regarding job hunting. Turner offered the audience a

Third-year students,

are almost graduates,

someone’s employer some day. The hardest question Turner says that people ask is, “Why would they want to hire me?” His answer to that is to be prepared and to have confidence. “I went to job interviews just to do

“I got in their faces

them, ‘This

company.

Contacts

Turner managed to get a job as an assistant product manager at J. M. Schneider in Kitchener just seven

Sound, working

also says

particular

his

experiences after college that got him to where he is. today.

months

naturally.”

work experience be more important than how long someone has worked with a

second-, and third-year marketing students at

come

He may

Turner, 27, graduated two years ago and on March 12 of this year, he presented a seminar to the first-,

Bruce Manion

Manager

Deborah Everest-Hill


Page 10

— SPOKE, April

22, 1996

Prospects after college

Marketing program needs up-to-date software, grad says By Deborah Everest-Hill

marketing program use Corel, Ex-

course provided

PowerPoint and Harvard Graphics. None of these programs

background

cel,

Dressed in a $700 suit, a graduate from Conestoga’s business administration marketing program pitched •

her qualifications

an interview

at

with Swiss Herbal Remedies; she

was surprised when someone

else

are available

on campus.

Humphrey was

Six years ago,

hired as a sales representative for

EMJ

Data Systems

a year, she

ter

in

moved

Guelph. Afinto the mar-

now

Humphrey with

a

product man-

in retail,

agement, professional selling, advertising and resume preparation. Looking back, she says the resume lessons were adequate, but could have been expanded to meet the changing expectations of employ-

got the job.

keting department and

Humphrey was a corporate wanna-be who expected success, money and a rewarding career. “I

marketing co-ordinator of the $ 100-million computer distribution company. Much of what Hum-

structed to prepare resumes accord-

had sort-of a university

phrey does

for,

Laurel

attitude,”

in her job,

is

the

she learned

on her own.

she says.

Humphrey

says the marketing

program seemed up

to date

when

990; it was interesting and gave her a sound practishe graduated in

1

Humphrey

entered the marketing

program with no specific goal in mind. “I was hoping the course would direct me to where I wanted

education to get a job. “I

the time she graduated.

of people with university degrees

Even though gram offered a

the marketing pro-

that

variety of practical

ployers seemed to be looking for

skills,

it

did not concentrate enough

on presentation

skills,

says

Hum-

phrey. She strongly suggests a course in PowerPoint or another presentation software. “Today presentations are usually done on computers, not by hand.” Students need strong presentation skills for sales and marketing, she says. “I think

we

are remiss in not of-

McDonald, marketing co-ordinator, says. He

fering that,” Steve

agrees with

Humphrey about

the

importance of presentation software and says he has been asking for a PowerPoint lab for the last three years. In fact, students in the

to go.”

In 1990,

Humphrey

lege degree

McDonald

says students are in-

ing to what employers are looking

and the program has been suc-

cessful in providing students with

What was lacking was hands-on computer experience. The program taught Harvard Graphics, which was obsolete by cal foundation.

ers.

says, a col-

seemed an adequate

knew a lot

weren’t able to get jobs.”

someone with

Em-

tangible experience

and practical sense. “It concerns me that college

the latest styles.

Humphrey knows what it is like to conduct an interview, and she says some of the resumes she receives are horrible. She recently received resumes from graduates of Conestoga’s graphic arts and design program and she was not impressed. She says spelling and grammatical errors lead a resume directly to the garbage.

is

not

Humphrey

Part of the problem, says,

is

that students are not learn-

The main

ing enough grammar.

perceived comparatively with uni-

points are covered in high school,

good

but college programs obviously

versity,

because college

is

enough for practical disciplines.” She says the marketing program

need more emphasis on grammar.

offered excellent projects requiring

be skilled

students to

work

directly with cor-

porations. Students

would meet the

owner of a business and try to help him or her improve the business. Market surveys and

reports, she

McDonald

when

says students should

and grammar

in spelling

they arrive at college. If they

are not, they will lose marks.

She says the program did prepare her for a marketing career. “It gave me the foundation from which to

my

She learned im-

says, along with an unbiased per-

build

spective enabled the students to do

portant communication, preparation

just that.

and presentation

In addition to field experience, the

skills.”

skills.

The majority of

last year’s

mar-

Laurel Humphrey, marketing co-ordinator at EMJ Data Systems, says program provided her with solid marketing skills. (Photo by Deborah Everest-Hill)

keting graduates found employ-

ment, according to the 1994-95 Graduate Employment Report prepared by the student employment office. In fact, 92 per cent found employment and 69 per cent found

work related to marketing. The employment report indicates a salary range from $14,400 to $32,000 and an average income of $23,000. Humphrey says she wouldn’t think anyone would start

under $20,000.

Humphrey

says wages are often

determined by experience and she suggests volunteer work. She also suggests getting involved in a business network. Marketing groups provide contacts while improving confidence and speaking skills.

McDonald says qualifications are only part of getting a job. Attitude is

a lot

more important than

it

was

10 years ago.

Job market demands more from students Canada has developed an employ-

By Diana Loveless

ability skills profile.

We

are

bombarded

daily with

messages about changes in the job market due to corporate downsizing, globalization and shifting demographics. For students looking for full-time

list

of critical

skills

Among

required by the

Canadian workforce are teem, confidence,

the

self-es-

initiative, will-

just to

mention a few.

One of

job mardevelop a

reflects the appli-

your billboard to advertise your-

the chances of hearing about jobs

self.”

and getting a foot

Wright,

resume which

in the is

to

acquaintances, greatly increases in the door.

She recommends that although choice of paper and presentation is

employment after

important, the content of the re-

graduating from college, these messages can be very discourag-

sume

is

key.

It

should stress

skills,

and accomplishments. A good resume is not longer than two pages and is easy to read, clear, concise and free of errors. “Spelling, grammatical and typ-

ing.

abilities

But the jobs are out there. The Globe and Mail’s Careers section, for example, advertises hundreds of positions weekly. With an unemployment rate hovering around

ing errors will

10 per cent in this country, many people are competing for those

that a

resume

all

will

but guarantee

be not be con-

sidered,” says Wright.

The

jobs.

To be

Also, networking, putting the word out to friends, relatives, neighbors, former employers and

“The resume is a 15- to 20-second chance to sell yourself on paper,” said Wright. “Think of it as

becoming a player ket, says

ployee.

the important steps in

traditional tactic

of blanket-

The resume is a 15- to second chance to sell yourself on paper.

20-

- Mary Wright

People looking for employment must also be prepared to do extensive research on the companies to which they are applying, writes

successful in this eco-

ing the job market with copies of

Stephen Kaplan, past president of

nomic climate, job-seekers must learn how to market their skills and abilities. Employers are selec-

resumes is not only expensive and time-consuming, writes Richard Nelson in his book The 1 994 What Color is Your Parachute, but it results in success in only about 8

the Canadian Association of Ca-

tive in their hiring practices

they

and

demand more and more from

prospective employees.

per cent of cases.

“Employers are looking for people who are self-motivated team players with good communication skills, both written and verbal,” says Mary Wright, manager of student employment, co-operative education and alumni services at Conestoga College. “They want

who can think on their feet and who can people with positive attitudes

be flexible to changing priorities.” Together with Canadian employers, the Conference

Board of

In addition, he notes that in

most

circumstances, relying on the clas-

an efficient way to conduct a job search - 80 per cent of job vacancies are never adver-

sified ads is not

Stephen Fung

Jos6 Carranza, electrical engineering using the student employment office to help

an(j

technician students, them In their job search. ingness to learn

new

(Photo by Diana Loveless)

things, en-

cants ability to meet the

demands

ergy, creativity, ability to respect

of the employer. The resume

the thoughts and opinions of oth-

often the vehicle that provides an

thinking, problem

employer with his or her first impression of a prospective em-

ers, critical

solving and computer literacy

-

is

and Employers, in Op-

the 1995-96 issue of Career tions.

Knowing

call,

applying in-per-

the facts, figures,

mission statements and future plans of prospective employers helps job-searchers focus in on the specific needs of a particular workplace.

As career consultant Janis Foord Kirk writes in Career Monitor, her

weekly column

tised.

The cold

reer Educators

in the

Toronto mar-

Star, landing a job in today’s

son to an employer, has proven to be the most effective way of find-

ket requires creative self-marketing

up

“Think of yourself as a product. Build a belief that your product is as good or better than others on the market.”

ing a job, especially if followed

by a phone call, suggests student employment, co-operative education and alumni services literature.

tools.


Prospects after college

Life at home not part of graduates’ plans

Debt creates stress By Jas on Sead$ After taking one semester off in bis last year of a four-year pr< .gram, Darren Danylyahen, a

By Johanna Neufeld The idea of living graduation

home

fourth-year University of after

on hold

OSAF

who live

early christening.

1994,

works

It

“It

was an

was ray first

The Ontario Student Assistance Program, which is the chief lender of money to students, gives Students six months

April

in

as a sales repre-

N.G.K. Sparkplugs of Scarborough.

to begin repaytnent. Danyly-

Brubacher, 22, is a financi.u co-ordinator at Weaver Tanner and

since May. In December of 1 995

sentative for

Canada

Miller, an advertising

company

Conestoga College, new deal between the Canada’s banks and the federal govcmmcnt has major effects on students who owe money. “The banks used to wipe their hands clean of the whole mess if a student couldn’t pay,” Martin says. “The goverament took the

sociated with finishing school.”

Ruediger, 23, a graduate of

marketing department

Betty Martin, the associate registrar for

before graduation, because it overshadows the good things as-

work.

loss.”

In 1994 and 1995, a new deal was struck, because the federal government couldn’t bear the cost anymore. The banks are now 95 |»r cent responsible for the collecting owed money, the

shen had been out of school

in

that’s all

there is.”

post-graduation shock,” says Danylyshen. “Too bad it came

at

home. In a joint interview, they shared their opinions about life with Mom, Dad and their younger siblings, as well as their

Wa-

said diat the

His friends told him

Annette

Brubacher are two former C^mestoga College students

loan forgiveness program, says

They came knock-

bill

factor for the worst cases is the

Wade. “Right now

ing, hi say.s.

indefinitely.

Ed Ruediger and

some of

terloo student, received his first

makes some students

dreams of independence

eringe as are put

at

who have not. The only saving

dents

he expected a bill from OSAP, What he wasn’t expecting was governments arc only five per the amoimt- $400, Since he was ^^cent. It was after this angoing back to school full time in ^ nouncement that Toronto DoJanuary, 1996, Danylyshen minion Bank, the Bank of •

Kitchener.

Ruediger started working for N.G.K. Sparkplugs after a Conestoga College alumni who worked

company came to looking for someone

for the

die col-

lege

to

fill

-

'

Ed Ruediger and Annette Brubacher chat about life at home over a cup of tea at Duffy’s Donuts in Waterloo. (Photo by johanna Neuteidt

a

sales position.

•About his job, Ruediger says a

day for him starts when he leaves the house between 6 and 7 a.m. and doesn’t end until after 7 typical

p.m.

if you ’re

counting in April 1995, also pays rent but does her own laundry and helps around the house. She says

money

largely influenced

chose to stay cars

As

at

why

she

home, but access

was another

to

factor, as well as

a salesman, he travels approximately 300 kilometres a day, visiting automotive and part shops

Though life at home may be convenient with Mom, Dad and

from Toronto to Ottawa. He says his main reason for living

younger siblings, the solution is not without problems, the two grads

at

home

is

cost related, but

it

is

also

convenient.

Because he spends so much time having a hot meal at the end of a tiring day is what he likes most. If it wasn’t for living at home, he probably wouldn’t eat. He pays his parents rent while they look after paying bills and insurance and his mother does his laundry. Ruediger says the hours he works are hard on him and he traveling,

really appreciates

what

his parents

do.

Brubacher,

who

didn’t worry too much. You don’t have to pay back the loan

graduated in ac-

free f(X)d

and hot water.

say.

Conflicts also arise because she

wants to live her life differently from what her parents want. “In

m die

you’d like.” Sharing clothes also causes problems with Brubacher and her two younger sisters, so they’ve come to a solution by having their own clos-

fall

ley lold

now Ruediger is looking for a new job in his field, preferably

“I don’t

know

.

.

.

and that

bills

officials refused.,

him

lo

pav die $400 or

“I’m not looking lorvvaid to grailuating.” says Danylyshen.

know ! shinild Iv. but I’m not,” Joanne Wade, avsistant director of siudem bursarie.s and

*T

awards

out in about

at die

terloo» says

meantime

everyone has to make adjustments while living under the same roof. Ruediger referred to Brubacher’s parents when he said to her, “The company’s just peachy.” She said,

only

?y wmild t:ike whatever .a,tion ncccsvary to gci die nioiiey.

something closer to home, as the traveling is wearing him down. “No one should have to work 12 hours a day,” he says. Brubacher plans to buy a car and three years, but in the

of ’96 the

OSAP

'CL

ets.

move

left,

I

would never Danylyshen says graduates will not make enough to pay back their loans. Danylyahen called in December to ask the $400 pw month could vvijMi to a more

some ways, it doesn’t allow you to spread your wings as much as

to eventually

m school. But then

have one semester

Right

Ruediger says he dislikes not being able to have friends over as often as he’d like or make noise at any time. He comes and goes as he pleases and spends evenings and weekends with friends. His parents and younger sister have gotten used to him not being home much. For Brubacher, curfew causes tension between her and her parents because she likes to go out at night. She says “We talk about things and try to reason with each other,” but argue a lot, too.

still

reality struck. “I realized

lem

University of Wa-

it 's

a bigger probthan for

lot sottic ..Indents

odiers depending on how much debt a student has accumulated

Students -

who have accumulated

a Jc« are treated the same as

stu-

^

i

Montreal and Scotia Bank dropped out of the OS.AP pr< gram. All tliree have since set up

own

their

programs, “I suspcet

the banks will be

more

diligent

than the government in collecting money,” said Martin. Stu-

dents will have an opportunity to lower tJicir monthly payments

by applying

bank for

to their

mieiusi fcliol status. Inwicsi

kesps pdinj- up,.l)Utlmontli1> pu\nient> will he lowei uiulei the progito.

Marlin says theie the

woiks which

(.hangc

how

a plan

is

m

will diastu ally

a sliidem rcp.i>N his

“Sometime in the fdtore, there may bean income contingency program wfa«reby stuloans.

pay

what thvv can ‘‘ based on the income tax return of the in.Icnls

bav-k

afford,” says Martin,

dividual.”

“That sounds like a good idea,” says 1 Janyly shen

they

do something

’1

hope

like that

soon.”

some days.”

Graduates should save, do homework before bu5ring new home home might cost $ 100,000. But, Bruch says, an $80,000

By Paul Tuns

starter

Students are graduating and,

many home. What

$80,000.

people are leaving

lems

And

that is

where prob-

arise.

The standard down payment

do is as varied as the programs from which they graduate. Some

per cent, and Bruch says few stu-

will rent apartments, others will

dents have $20,000 lying around.

they

live

with friends,

some

will rent

townhouses or houses and others will buy homes. But is buying a home so soon a good idea? The bottom line is the bottom line when it comes to home ownership.

;

house costs much more than

along with leaving school,

Milt Bruch, a financial advisor and financial planning instructor at

Fanshawe College, says the smart money is on renting a home. But if someone is determined to buy a house there are some things a graduate might

want to think about. Bruch says most students who

buy a house after graduating begin with what in the real estate business is called a starter home; 800 1 ,200 square feet, costing $80,0001 10,000, depending on the city. In

the

Kitchener-Waterloo area, a

So,

many house-buying

is

25

students

must buy a house with the mini-

mum

deposit allowed of $5,000,

which gives them a high-risk mortgage.

done

renting.

anyone for

Once a

graduate, or

buys a house, he should save, live on the minimum, and make the greatest payments possible. Bruch says he favors weekly over monthly payments and 15-year that matter,

mortgages over longer ones. With weekly payments, a graduate can get in 52 payments, and with four weeks to a month, that equals 13 months of payments instead of 12. A mortgage can be paid off more quickly and that means big

$50.

Bruch also advises making as down payment as possible.

you talk to in a bank will assume you know what you are doing and you’ve already consulted a fiIt’s worth the investment of $50-150.” that

nancial advisor.

But the costs don’t end once a

large a

person has purchased the house

This will lower monthly mortgage payments.

Bruch says many young people who have lived at home all their

As

if

the

down-payment and

monthly or weekly mortgage payments were not enough, Bruch reminds the would-be home buyer of many overlooked costs.

it-

self.

lives or rented apartments at schcxil

have never had

to think about fur-

He says many gradubuy a home and not have

nishing them. ates will

Likewise, with a shorter amorti-

buying a home to seek legal advice.

zation (the length of the mortgage),

Having a lawyer look over a con-

even a lawnmower. One Woodstock couple who did not want to be identified chose

a graduate will pay slightly more

tract

could save thousands of dol-

renting a furnished home over buy-

per month but save literally thou-

Bruch says, “It will be the best $100-200 you spend.” Bruch admits he might be wrong on the cost of a lawyer and says many will charge a percentage based on what ends up in the con-

But there is a catch. The loan must be co-signed by a parent or other responsible adult. The interest rates are generally higher and, more importantly Bruch says, the monthly payments are higher.

\^at does a financial advisor like

sands of dollars overall in the mort-

Bruch suggest? He advises recent graduates to “rent a cheap apartment or home and save every shekel. Don’t go on those trips to Horida - essentially live on the bare minimum and save, save, save. When you have enough, then buy.” But the scrimping and saving doesn’t end when a graduate is

One mortgage officer at a local bank says the difference between 15 and 30 years mortgages on a starter home is usually not even

savings.

gage.

“Would you rather pay $600 a month for 30 years,” Bruch says, “or $650 a month for 15 years?” The savings would be $46,000. And Bruch says if the homeowner scrimped and saved, the $50 a month would not be that much more.

He

advises those interested in

lars later.

No

lawyer contacted for this piece would agree to talk without payment. He also says it is wise to consult a tract.

financial advisor.

“Most people

furniture, draperies or

ing a house because, though they

say they thought they could man-

age mortgage payments, they could not do that and buy the necessary appliances and furniture.

They say many

students can’t

wait to get to the “real world” and

The real world is full of educating experiences and buying a home is a crash course in out of school.

economics.


Page 12

— SPOKE, April

22, 1996

Prospects after college

Blind graduate just wants a chance lenging, but teachers were willing

By Jennifer Broomhead

him overcome the obstacles he came up against. With the help of supportive into help

Glen

Wade

is

so eager to be em-

ployed, he says he’s willing to

temporarily for free.

work

The problem

most employers aren’t willing

is,

to

him that chance. Wade, 31, is blind. He graduated

give

from the business administration program at Conestoga College’s Doon campus in May 1993, and he’s been looking for a job ever since.

Wade

first

came

to

Conestoga

in

stiiictors

and the special needs de-

partment,

Wade says, it was easy to

less suppor-

says finding

there doing

skills.

says working in a

is

He

human

resources or customer service de-

more is

realistic in his

best suited to deal-

human side of the busi-

small business selling bingo

Cam-

bridge for two years while

still

a

student.

During his last year of college, Wade’s business and education were both suffering. He decided school had more long-term benefits so he closed the store. While at Conestoga, Wade says, he was able to apply the skills he

was learning in his courses to his The program was chal-

business.

not being given the oppor-

is

tunity to

show

potential employers

what he can do. In the college setting, it was easier to find new ways to conquer challenges, and he was

or give

“I’m very milch a ‘people per-

puter work.

it

a whirl.”

Options,

Wade

says, are getting

I would rather work with keeping the employees

narrower by the day. The longer he’s out of school, the harder it is to account for his time. It’s difficult to keep skills fresh, especially with computers. One alternative is going back to

happy.”

school.

end of it, where you’re sitting record-keeping or working with spreadsheets and employment eq-

supplies, operating a store in

says the most frustrating

of the business as opposed to com-

orientation.

ford for a year before deciding to go

own

Wade

son,’ so I’d like to stick to that side

and

“That’s the other kind of realistic

started his

that’s

always given the chance to try. “In the job search, you’re up against these brick walls, but you’re not getting the opportunity to sit down and look for solutions

ing with the

ness, such as hiring, training

in a factory in Brant-

Wade

is,

ment

Wade

situation.

to school.

reality

other visual

partment

back

The

it.

not an option for me.” obstacle in his quest for employ-

read blueprints, he wouldn’t be able

He worked

if I

an entry level position with any company is difficult, because most jobs requiie “paper shuffling” and

woodworking program. He realized that since he was unable to to complete all aspects of the course and earn a diploma, nor would he be able to find work. “Employers will not hire you, mainly because of the liability of working around machines. It was unrealistic,” he says.

prospects.

is

The work world

1986, completing one semester of the

employment

“Jobs are scarce anyway, but

Wade

so-

lutions.

however.

being blind places limitations on his

could do something like deliver beer or clean carpets or anything like that while I’m waiting for a better job to come along. I’d be out

examine any problem and find

tive,

how he could actually do the job. He is willing to take any job, but

uity problems.

Wade

has been applying for jobs

Wade

is

considering enter-

ing one of two areas of study:

com-

primarily in the Waterloo Region.

puter programming or massage

Employers

therapy.

Glen Wade, 31 find

is

“Those are two totally opposite areas, but two realistic areas of em-

can appreciate his

ployment.” Wade’s second option is to start his bingo supplies business again.

are leery of taking a chance with Wade, even though he

willing to volunteer for a month or so to prove himself. He says that although employers skills

fications, they can’t

and quali-

comprehend

In five or 10 years,

Wade says, he

,

employment

sits with his in

human

seeing-eye dog, Janus.

resources.

hopes he will have established

own

his

He hopes

like to

work, be employed by a

company, just to get some money behind me and get the

business, preferably

in the Kitchener- Water loo area. “Between now and then, I would

business going.”

ECE grad loses job despite education By Allison Dempsey

cational assistant diploma, has

worked both

Donna Caldecott, an early childhood education graduate from Conestoga

who

also has her edu-

and full time at Plattsville Public School for six years. But she has recently learned that

part

1

5 teaching positions

be cut starting one of them hers. will

September,

in

“Education doesn’t mean a lot anymore,” says Caldecott, laughing.

“You

get the education, but

five senses instead of just sitting

the private education system.

children in a row of desks with a pen or pencil while the teacher drills reading and writing skills. “I’m interested in a more global sense of learning. This program is

ECE

C^decott admits she originally flew into her job by the seat of her pants, and she first took ECE as a back-up option to upgrade her

knowledge and

pers onal

ness courses to assist in the run-

she says.

erage wage listed

ning of the lawn-care business she

as individuals too.”

$18,183.

shares with her husband. But she

Although she didn’t know much about the job placemen of ECE

says,

But Caldecott is worried the cuts good teachers to curtail their creativity and individualism, and personal attention to students

at

about

when she enrolled, Calsays she knew she loved

skills

while she worked part

She has also taken a few busi-

“ECE made me

realize

whci o the children are and why. I think all teachers should take the program.” She says the program has a bad reputation with als

who view

sitting course.

see

some

profession-

merely as a babyThese same people

it

some day-care

centres as a

babysitting business where chil-

everywhere and the children are going to suffer because of them.

dren and adults do nothing more

“If junior kindergarten to

is

cut,

be scary

places.”

Caldecott says within her school, disabled children’s needs will est,

be rated from highest to lowand those placed at the bottom

geared to each individual child.

“There

now

time.

pected. Caldecott says cuts are

day cares are going

(Photo by Allison Dempsey)

grades.

“Parents will have to start decid-

an 84 per cent employment figure. Eleven grads found employment not related to the program. The payment scale extended between $ 1 1 ,203 and $35,360, with the av-

working with children, and has assisted in their education from kindergarten to Grade 6. But the reality of the working world is harsher than she ex-

government cutbacks on her students.

my

ing what’s best for their kids,” she

decott

of

“I could state

truthful,” she says.

says, referring to the public versus

i

effects

mind and be

the graduation of 89 students from

graduates

concerned about the

certain

year to assist with the children in

Caldecott is interested in the whole-language learning concept, which promotes learning with all

program, with 72 available for employment. Of those 72, 36 found fbll-time work and 25 found part-time work related to the program, which translates into

is

way.

full-time aide at Plattsville next

all

the

(standing, right)

She thinks there will be only one

acquired. She says it gave her the confidence to explain to others why she was doing something a

nowhere to put you.” The college’s 1994-95 report on employment statistics recorded there is

Donna Caldecott

of the scale will not receive the help they need.

than play

all

be

is

a better atmosphere

in schools. Children

used to

afraid of school, of teachers,”

“Now

teachers are seen

will force

will suffer in the process.

Caldecott works with physically

and developmentally challenged children, such as one child who has a debilitating eye disease which makes her sensitive to light.

Caldecott says she doesn’t

what

day.

will

happen

to

know

some of these

“But that’s how children learn,” says Caldecott. “They learn through experimentation and

children

play.”

stay positive.

The ECE program provided Caldecott with the theory to back up

place forever,” she says. “I will sad to leave, but I woul

the practical skills she

had already

to

{Photo by Jennifer Broomhead)

when

the teaching posi-

tions are eliminated.

“Working with kids, you have to I

can’t stay in one

I

other challenge.”

b"-

r


Prospects after college Picture perfect reality

Innovative search leads to employment J^nhin Edwards By Robin Although his

^

I

But the recent recession, according to Knobloch, and the downsiz-

hasn’t been pic-

life

ing of

a Conestoga journal-

ture perfect,

ism graduate

looking

is

brighter future after

manding.

some innova-

He

job searching.

tive

is single, has 10 years experience and a university degree. “How the hell can a jour-

with a 95 per cent average, but until

nalism student with two years of education and no experience get a job?” he asks.

he was unable to find employment. “It’s really a dog-eatrecently

dog world out there,’’ says

But Knobloch docs not

man for him-

Knobloch decided little

job search

to try somemore innovative in his after learning he was

going to be a new dad. Instead of pounding the pavement, using cold calls, resumes and cover letters, Knobloch designed a flyer and targeted wealthy neighborhoods for distribution in the

Kitchener-Wa-

Record.

terloo

The ing,

who hired him. While glad

have received an

As Frank Knobloch graduated from the journalism program in December 1 994 at the top of his class He diligently searched for work, handing out flyers and targeting wealthy neighborhoods. His innovative approach helped him find a job in advertising.

As an example, he pointed out

emergence of on-line newspapers and the lack of college prothe

that

venue of

only produce students in fields that

employment. A big fan of co-op education, which is offered at Conestoga for certain programs, he would like

are growing.

to see

Knobloch says colleges change with the times and

education,

have to

He added

some programs

that

such as journalism should change components so they are more up-to-

potential

work terms extended,

par-

Many

some

graduate you have to be frigging

a public relations representative for

flexible.”

Cambridge’s Community Opportunities Development Association writing newsletters and press re-

for the public relations materials

leases.

He

also

managed

(at

a

work

their education

have dreamed of becompolice officers. For law and se-

ing, they

can

move

and

By Tracy Huffman

will not be accepting ap-

end of July.

accepting applica-

but will not be hiring anyone

month, and have already hired 27 people this year. However, the future is not as bleak as it seems. The field of law is large and encompassing, with most jobs for at least a

for

LAS A graduates available in the

private sector, says

Bob Hays,

pro-

gram co-ordinator and founder of the law and security program. Hays says private sector investi-

major program focus. days of obtaining a high-paying job after graduation gation

He

is

the

realizes the

are over. Instead, likely

have to

students will

$20,000 a

settle for

Brian King, a 1978, did just

up.”

LASA

that. In

graduate in

1984, he and

another LASA graduate, Mark Reed, established King Reed and

trademark infringements.

Twelve years

later.

King Reed

Her job was

attract stu-

What Color Is Your Parachute to aid them in finding work. The book deals with how to write cover letters

and resumes and also describes ways to handle interviews. “When you graduate and the employer looks at you sideways like you’re an idiot, hang in there, you’re still a human being,” he

your

that sell

skills

says. “Just keep your spirits up and keep trying, something good is bound to happen.”

ment.

two

Such qualifications

years.”

put her a step ahead

when seeking

employment. Sauve says

important for

it

is

college graduates to keep knock-

on doors no matter how

It is

it

may

dis-

be.

also important, according to

King, 38, says he was too young be hired by the police department after graduating, so he got his li-

“My boss was a 23-year-old weirdo freaky guy with long hair and holes in his jeans,” Sauve says. She was surprised that such a person could be running a $100,(XX) eight-week project for the federal government. He had so much responsibility and yet, he looked the way he did.

to

cense in private investigation.

Three years later, when the police department asked him if he would consider working for them, he said no.

King says private investigation allowed him “to work in a detective

“As

far as

I

am concerned, he’s

no brighter than I am.” Sauve was disappointed her boss had opportunities that she didn’t. She feels it was because he has a university degree and she has only a college

partment.”

King,

who

still

King suggests

likes

that

working on

LASA

gradu-

be persistent. “There are jobs out there in the field, graduates will just have to look harder and not take no for an ates

answer.”

workplace, she needed to pursue a university degree. Currently, Sauve

is

studying at

Trent University for a bachelor of science degree in environmental studies.

By obtaining her degree,

Sauve hopes she

more

will be given

opportunities in the work-

“Now,

I

am

few

things.

willing to take

in radiation.

ing are

much

In university, there

work

and then there

is

Sauve. Perhaps Sauve

career ad-

vances.

At the time, Sauve says she chose to pursue a college education instead of a university education because it would provide her with technical and practical skills

necessary in the workplace. However, Sauve always knew she wanted to obtain a university degree.

“A

lot

my

to university

college

later.

finends

who went

ended up going to Both have their ad-

some time were

whole

lot to do. “I

sive

I

when

it

a

is

comes

little

defen-

to discussing

a college education. But that

because she feels

more

credit than

it

it

is

deserves

gets.

Eventually, Sauve plans to pur-

sue a master’s degree. “That may not be until I’m 40.” Most importantly, Sauve stresses that make advances in a career, it

to is

important for an individual to continue improving herself. It has been two years since Sauve met her previous boss and she says her perception of him

has changed. “Education is important in the workplace,” she

“By continuing my educaam more likely to be presented with some wonderful says.

of

a lot of

was able to develop a betwork ethic in college,” says

think ter

is

for a short period of time

do you gain more experience, you meet people in the field.” Making contacts, networking and giving out resumes are some ways Sauve works towards employment. Combined with her experience and education, she is

make

like in the

workplace.

there isn’t a

will allow her to

working hard

much

the time,

to

different. In col-

lege, students are

short-term contracts whether they are for two months, three months or six months. Not only

optimistic she will find a job that

knew how

Also, she already

all

willing to sacrifice a

the private investigation field.

not be as good at

keep a field book, take proper notes and write reports. In comparing college to university, Sauve says the amount of work and the approaches to learn-

Sauve, to stay optimistic and be

the fastest

without

a university degree for the last

cation.

So, Sauve decided that if she was ever going to advance in the

the

ground

employers have for a college edu-

ting rusty, says government cuts have led to police departments dealing less with crimes by corporations, creating a surgence of jobs in

same job

“I have experience, a technical diploma and I have been pursuing

a partnership with 12 other investi-

Professions in the private sector, such as private investigation and corporate protection, are some of

the program.

things going for her.

gation firms across Canada.

Hays.

says Harry Stavrou, an instructor in

Sauve says she has a few

pany called Investigations Canada,

com-

diploma.

in Canada,

When she was working for Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., she was able to apply her back-

cuts,

couraging

also established a

Sauve was

In the workplace,

able to apply a lot of things she

learned in college.

When she met her boss, she began to realize how little respect

King has

feels sorry for

Although she recently her job because of federal

ing

was

larger investigations to avoid get-

may

Knobloch says stu-

lost

fortunate to have found employ-

study, but nevertheless, she

having to go through the years of uniformed work on the police de-

“The pay

in case,

college.

ada.

not directly related to her field of

you could come into system and do a reasonably good job at the program and waltz out of here making $25,000 $30,000 in the first year.” says “It used to be

the college

police officer performs, but the badge and headaches.

model

young people graduating from

radioactive waste.

or plain clothes position without

“Essentially, it’s the

But just

vantages,” says Sauve.

and Associates developed nine offices, becoming one of the biggest private investiga tions firms in Can-

year in the private sector.

growing areas

also the

used by the college to

Sauve says she

Sauve, 27, was employed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. as a field technician working with

is still

is

place.

train-

insurance industry and patent and

The OPP

who

di-

covering Kitchener- WaterCambridge, Elmira and New

force,

tions,

Knobloch,

the

pleased with his appearance.

career in the

dream may go un-

plications until the

to

is

tion firm dealing mainly with the

Hamburg,

have

key to employment. “You’re better off having a ploma,” he says.

tele-

The Waterloo regional police

who

realized.

loo,

I

my goals here.’ When you

and

Associates Ltd., a private investiga-

police force, that

thought, ‘Hey

I

broaden

dents, believes that education

Living in Fort McMurray, Alta., Christine Sauve was pleased to find work upon graduating from Northern Alberta Institute of Technology. But when she met her boss, she wasn’t

may be pursuing a

world

say things are slowly improving.

College grad returns to school

but students must understand that they have to start at the bottom,

their lives,

ing

Knobloch says

first,

and with

curity administration students

happen

to secure

vision stations. But Knobloch wanted to be a writer.

you were there

“When I saw that wasn’t going to

tential for the employer to hire you would be greater,” he says. Knobloch spent his work term as

gram.

point in

people, at

placement) for six months, the po-

free airtime at local radio

“If

for the future,

his contacts in the business

dents should read

ticularly for the journalism pro-

Law career not in order By Peter Marval

is

then that’s great.”

grams targeting

to

he

on the college. “If they are happy using the picture and it is pulling in .students,

date.

was a job in advertisbut Knobloch declined to say result

feel

hypocritical for allowing the college to use his image to sell students

self.”

thing a

says most employers want

someone who

Frank Knobloch graduated in December 1994 at the top of his class

Knobloch. “It’s every

companies have made

qualifications for most jobs too de-

at a

tion,

I

opportunities.”


"

Page 14

— SPOKE, April

,

22, 1996

Prospects after college

Opportunities blossom in computing skills with an even mix between the business courses, such

range of

By Bruce Manion

communications and statistics, and the computer courses such as computer programming, systems analysis

With new technology bringing

as accounting, business

automation into the workforce and eliminating routine jobs like tele-

phone operators (replaced by voice mail) and assembly-line workers (replaced by robots), many people wonder what professions are safe from a future where computers rule

and design. “Probably, the most valuable course for preparing us is our systems analysis. It forces you to use problem-solving skills to your best ability and to think creatively to improve the way systems currently

the Earth.

Nothing could be as secure as the of computer automation itself. According to Statistics Canada, Ontario could see 20,000 people find immediate employment provided they had the proper qualifications for jobs in computer programming and systems analysis. Another 320,000 computer programming and systems analysis jobs will open up across Canada in field

Plourde says he to a final

With these enticing statistics, it is a wonder that everyone doesn’t rush back to school to retrain.

,

At Conestoga College, the com-

full-time

employment

in their re-

computer programmer/analyst program is business related, technology oriented and applied, compared to a university computer the

science program which focuses

on programming, says Hig“Computer programming students will take a business problem and design and code a computer

in the

computer

industry are in such need of pro-

grammers dents

that they will hire stu-

who have not completed their

among

solution for

the

in

As

program has one of the strong-

part of the school of business.

Second-year computer program22,

says the program teaches a broad

A different path

Grad plans

it’s

in

my

ai'cn’t

her

blood.”

Her brothers enjoy teasing her

Boerkamp. She is Conestoga College’s law and security ad-

Meet

Brigitte

ministration program.

With

the

LAS A program

in

her back pocket, Boerkamp has a wide range of skills and opportunities from which to choose. She could go to police college, work in private security, enter another related field or continue her studies. But she has different plans for her future. She wants to be a farmer.

^

all

a veterinarian to give proper treatment to the cows, a mechanic to fix all kinds of machinery - basi-

L

cally a jack-of-all-trades.

^

year and travels North America designing systems for businesses and

government

institutions.

By Judith Hemming student won’t be feeling any

have seen arise in female workers. Farming is just beginning to see those changes. “Most people don't tliink ol'you as a farmei'. they just think of you as a housewife ro someone who helps out

pressure to go out and find him-

occassionally.”

start

As graduation nears, at least one

Boerkamp

plans to continue her

courses or other practical classics .so

she has more time to work on

She doesn’t think that continuing different areas of education is a waste of time. She is young, and htts the

Ross Hergott already has a job.

wrong with

resources to continue her

education.

She doesn’t want to

the

cially helpful in dealing with

wait until she

want to have something to fall back on.” But she admits a job in law enforcement would be her second career choice.

farming businesses like feed com-

situation to think iibout

panics to communicate ideas dh'

could have done to prevent it. “Education is never a waste of

farm,

I

Boerkamp knows

now

the proper nutrition for the cows."^ In a field where

many women

is

stuck in a difficult

what she

will

lege’s robotics program.

work

He

will

as a mechanical de-

signer this September at

Sanyo

Canadian Machine Works Inc. in Elmira. He found his job through the program’s co-op work place-

about the field when he applied to the program, Hergott thought he would have a good chance of finding a job

when he

graduated.

He

says robotics provides a good balance of work satisfaction and success in finding a job.

The

robotics program, created

in 1990, has already

developed a

it

to

wants,

erlands five years ago because of

says Brad Nelson, a mechanical

the diminishing success of the

engineer and instructor in robot-

European farmer.

ics.

M

expand which they would not have had in Europe.

creators tried to

committee asked for into the curV',

^

-fc

So far, success has not come easily,

The program

include everything the advisory

ties to

riculum.

Nelson says it is the program’s co-op element that makes it a suc-

but they are expanding their

great.

us the chance to work

years.

It

also gives students the

to

work

in the field that it,

hopefully we’ve got a future employee.”

He says the program probably helps take the pressure off graduating students who are worried about whether or not they will find a job.

ments.

give local industry what

In Canada, they have opportuni-

is

“It gives

they’ve chosen. At the end of

The program was designed

They emmigrated from the Neth-

program, says the co-op

August from Conestoga Col-

cent. ’s>.

with her two older brothers.

stration

program

chance

name for itself across Ontario. The program’s 1994-1995 employment placement rate for work in related fields is 71 per

time.”

that putting in

pay off in the long run.While she was going to school, she worked on the farm time and effort

systems analysts. Programmers need not fear the future, for many will be directing it.

Hergott, 23, will graduate this

Although he didn’t know much

the farm during the day.

Boerkamp finds this" aspectespe^

way.

“If anything goes

Region has become a haven computer programmers and

with somebody for two or three

self a job.

'

this

for

chine Works, himself a graduate of Conestoga’s business admini-

that people

'

'

terloo

per

Most professions

pick up computer and electricity

express her opim'ons ptpfessionally.

his second year.

.she’s talking

information she' needs to use the

Although she sometimes gets Courses in her^ program have from people who-- helped in other ways; too. Her coihmunications classes have taught her question her judgement about her choice of schooling, she has to think through pr<A)lemscIearly and

University of Waterloo being hired than any other school, it seems Wa-

hired

knows what

law to her advantage while she continues farming.

who was

difficult for

education thrcnigh night courses to

strange looks

reasons for planning her future

is

LASA has provided her with the

/ ^

it

train for in college

the bookkeeping,

colleges

with a new computer company after

make people understand

about.

A farmer must be an accountant to look after

involved,

to

Uiat she

about her schooling when she says she wants to be a farmer, but she is quick to remind people that farming is not just milking cows.

a proud graduate of

community

three of the 25

Robotics program links students to industry

life in

farming. “It’s part of me;

By Becky Little

of Waterloo,

Now, Evink makes $45,000

ming student Shan Plourde,

With Conestoga College graduates consistently ranking in the top

puter science graduates from the

sity

this field get salary raises quickly.

grads in the future.

across Ontario in terms of job placement, and with more com-

puter science student at the Univer-

According to Higgins, the jobs

quali-

was the case with 23-year-old George Evink, a comeducation. Such

gins.

Computer programming

computer graduates with the

gramming tasks. Cook says he would hire more Conestoga computer programming

system for a business or institution

from $20,000-$33,000 per year. The average salary for the 27 employed grads was $26,900 per year,

ation.

years.

each group will design a computer

an opportunity to be on the cutting edge of technology, and offers an even better opportunity at finding a job upon graduco-ordinator Kristen Higgins says

M. Schneider and Home Hardware are all companies that have hired Conestoga computer programming grads in the past few J.

fications necessary for various pro-

strictly

it.”

Butler Metal

vided into groups of three or four;

lated field with salaries ranging

the highest in the school.

Campana Systems,

Products, Elephant Data Systems,

says Conestoga has prepared the

is di-

puter programmer/analyst program offers students

it

systems project in

Some employers placement rates in the college. In fact, of the 48 computer programming graduates as of April 30, 1 995 68 per cent of the grads found est

now

sources at Butler Metal Products,

in the area.

the next four years.,

my boss and has grown into a company with six other programmers, and we’re expecting to hire more,” says Evink. myself, but

looking for-

is

where the class

third year,

Shan Plourde works on a little ternn-end homework designing a computer program at his apartment in Kitchener. (Photo by Bnjce Manion)

started out three

Andrew Cook, head of human re-

exist.”

ward

“The company

years ago with just

Hergott says his classmates yet to find work are not worried. “There are a lot of

who have

expansions right now. Sanyo is doubling its size.” He says students were stressed about finding jobs for their

work

term, -but

what

is

now

happening

first

that they see

in the field

of

automation, they are confident about finding work.

The program seems to have found a niche in industry, says Nelson. Ten years ago, when the technology itself got exciting, the industry pushed for ro“They (the manufacturers) thought robots were going to be the big panacea and solve all their problems.” bots.

Instead, robots introduced other problems. Automation required

companies to re-think the way factories performed opera-

acknowledged was just another

tions. Industry

operation.

cess.

When she is ready to farm on her own, her brottieis will be able to give her dieir hill support Even diough ^e

Co-op gives students ties to the industry throughout their

machine. Nelson says. Industry

schooling.

then started to describe the field

has a diploma, she won’t give up on

Boerkamp, a law and security administration grad from (Pnotoiw B«kyu«e) Conestoga College, enjoys farming. Brigitte

Brad Gairaway, an administration

manager

at

Sanyo Canadian Ma-

that a robot

as flexible manufacturing Continued on page 15


,

SPOKE, April

22, 1996

— Page

If

Prospects after college

Nursing expectations differ from

reality

By Linda Reilly

She works

Employee Care in Toronto. She would like to be working full time but says she has a slim chance now because ol

A career in nursing nineties, or is it?

show nursing

is a job of the Current statistics

salaries start at about

$26,500.

Wendy Dawson-Read bridge, Ont.,

nursing student

cal

College,

Cam-

make

She spent eight years in Rankin N.W.T., working a minimum of 60 hours a week. She says there was lots of work and a constant Inlet,

Conestoga

at

Doon campus. Trained Dawson-Read

a graphic artist,

cided to

cuts.

of

a first-year practi-

is

as

de-

turnover

a career change at

2,000.

1

1

home

for

more than

moving

to relo-

had a

ence.

Another

thinks she’s

good

with people, and will be willing to

Wendy Dawson-Read, a paths after she had

first-year nursing student at

difficulties finding

Conestoga College, decided

work as a graphic

to

artist.

get out of it what you Are you willing to give up something to work? That’s life right now.” Jean Morris, chairwoman of nursing for semester 1 2 and 3 at Con-

she can handle the blood and guts of

estoga College, says the nursing

started to decline five years ago.

few and

nursing, but she hopes she’ll adapt.

program

“With

budget cuts, more with less

practical nursing over

registered nursing because her chances of obtaining employment

Canadian

alternative for a

nurse, Froese says,

change career

go to the She says Americans

United States.

(Photo by undaReiiiw

anywhere when she has completed her diploma and practicum. She has even contemplated moving to another country. In 10 years, she would like to be completely self-sufficient. She feels she has something to offer. Dawson-Read still doesn’t know if relocate

She chose

she says, “you

Inlet,”

a personal

calling,” she says.

Dawson-Read

is

to a place

Froese also says she has grown on and professional level because she gained a lot of experi-

on a career change. She wanted a job working with people, so she I

stressful, winters

limit your options.” Employers don’t look for nurses in Rankin Inlet.

when she decided

chose nursing. “I thought

is

“When you go

Rankin

like

to a big city.

Dawson-Read did not want cate to a big city

isolated.

market

tap into the graphic design

has a population ol

Inlet

The work

arc long and cold and the area

years, she realized she could not

without

in staff.

Rankin

age 43. After staying

part time as an occupa-

health nurse for

tional

to

is

Canadian nurses and are willing who shows interest. However, some states require a Canadian nurse to write their like

as a registered nurse are slight.

“You only

put into

it.

,

downsizing by reducing by 12 students to 68 each semester. “The downsizing is mainly due to the lack of jobs now.”

new

is

entries

Lynn Williams, employment counsellor at the Guelph Unem-

sources assistant at Guelph General Hospital, says the job market is

ployment Insurance office, says, “I have a gut feeling nursing is a de-

pretty tight.

show

clining field.” Statistics

ten

years ago, there were plenty of jobs

nursing

in the

all

the

field,

but the field

government

cuts, full-

time job prospects are low,” Williams says. Shelley Stevenson, a human re-

to hire a recent graduate

Although the hospital

has no full-time positions available, there is a possibility for casual

state test.

work. “People aren’t leaving, so the number of positions opening up are

jected the health field would

The Canadian government

pro-

grow

47.5 per cent from 1991-2005. While there’s a good chance of employment in isolated areas and in

between. With the we’re supposed to do

far

other countries, the chance of fulltime employment in Canada in the

staff,” she says. Froese,‘31, of Guelph, has been a registered nurse for 10 years.

Kim

nursing field

slim.

is

Lights, camera, action

Television graduates search for contacts By Jamie Henshilwood

are eager to start their career.

The

four graduates interviewed for this

The 1995 graduating

class

the television section of estoga’s broadcasting

acknowledge

from

story

Con-

essential, but without a contact,

program has

a

luck, gainful

little

hard to

Toronto.

ment

in the television industry, but

and

employment

is

come by. The broadcasting program runs

had mixed results on the job search. Some graduates now work for newscasts in Kitchener, Belleville and Others have yet to find employ-

that skills are

which

work

the training includes

in front

Some

of and behind the camera.

dream of anchoring the news or own show some day,

hosting their

while others prefer the production

work

that

makes

all

Volunteering does not pay the however, but Thakolkaren understands that it’s his chance to

pay the dues. “It’s a good way of getting myself

programming

possible.

dents concentrate on television or

effort,

radio.

viduals choose a specialty.

it

For those

who choose

stu-

television,

For Terry Kelly, a simple

tip

from

course co-ordinator, Paul Scott, led

He

KOOL-FM’s

“I

in

a

and

of time and in the long run lot

paid off. I’d go nut’s if I wasn’t working in the business.”

Continued from page 14

angle.”

rather than as robotics.

driven by the automotive indus-

promotions department during first

When the economy took a down-

try,

and southern Ontario is where all of the automotive in-

year.

dustry’s Canadian plants are.

He sees the automation industry

who followed the television path, now works part time as an editor in CKCO-TV’s news-

More and

room, while maintaining the

on the show was noticed by an industry insider which led to an audi-

KOOL-FMjob.

tion for a

turn, industry

to robotics

solve

its

turned once

more

and automation

to

problems. Companies

says automation

is

to a part time

job in

Kelly,

trying to reduce costs looked at

continuing to expand.

more companies

automation.

to

Nelson sees local industries benefiting from automation. A few years ago, they were using traditional methods for production and losing out to newer, leaner companies which used

which means there will be more and more automation taking place.” The dominance of automation has its side effects. Garraway

finding success to hard

automation heavily. The established industries are starting to

modernize and compete, which means they need people trained in

automation.

“It’s

nice to have locally trained

people. Local industries turn to

and universities, and our grads are designed to hit the ground running.” Garraway says southern Ontario is where all the automation is taking place. “This area is called the golden technology trithe colleges

demanding

- Terry Kelly

Smith, however, has returned to volunteering on a monthly nity calendar

promoted on television.”

commu-

for Rogers Ca-

she started during

second year

Conestoga. Smith of her tele-

didn’t

want

at

to lose sight

vision aspirations and sees the Ro-

work

as a

way

to

keep up her

skills.

Furthermore, his reporting work

more

show

ble, a position

gers

replacing retiring workers with

are

,

at

Hamilton. “The only thing that’ll help you * is a contact, and I have none,” says Smith. “With so many applying for so few jobs, if you don’t have one it’s in

really difficult.”

put

At Conestoga, everyone receives the same training from which indi-

three years, the last of

weekend editing position

a

CHCH

bills,

lucrative position.

Miranda Moore, another

’95

graduate, hopes to use her television skills,

but has exercised another

means of finding work. Moore’s dreams of fame now rest Toronto. She wants her face on

“I put in a lot of time and effort, and in the long run it paid off. I’d go nuts if I wasn’t working in 4he

Thakolkaren also appreciates the made while performing the co-op portion of the school program. Working at CTV Sports provided

work

possible.

says that laborers with traditional skills will need to upgrade.

business.”

the headline sportscaster at

Nelson sees its impact on the economy. While a few years ago he might have defended robotics against those who saw it as a way of reducing jobs, he can no longer say that it plays no part in the

goal, Kelly appreciates the experi-

be competitive

in the interna-

tional marketplace,

school coupled with a

ask

how

the provincial government

is

ing to create 725,000 jobs

when

go-

companies like General Motors are making record profits and yet cutting back on work staff.”

work while in little

luck.

Although a full-time job

is

his

ence he’s enjoying the longer he stays at

CKCO.

Besides the industry contacts that

come with

the job, the experience

serves to enrich his resume and pro-

duction

problem.

“You look around and

Kelly attributes his relative job-

skills.

For Sunil Thakolkaren, the road to television

work

volunteer variety.

constitutes the

He worked

this

season on the Roger’s Cable show. Ranger Roundup, a weekly feature for the Kitchener Rangers Junior A hockey team.

connections he

He

in the studio with Rcxl Black,

also gained

camera

CTV. installa-

in the

hands of a

talent

agency

camera and knows

that

right into a position

is

Moore

in

walking

nearly im-

doesn’t feel comfortable

with the production side of televi-

tion experience during

sion and hopes the agency will at

the Bell

least find her

coverage of Canadian Open golf event. “You have to schmooze and, if you have to, kiss a little butt,” says Thakolkaren. “I don’t like to do it, but you have to do what you have to do to advance in this business.” Allison Smith finds the job search a little disheartening. She spent a lot of time and money producing audition tapes and resumes and the returns have been mostly for

work

commercial or movie

to jump start her career.

Like Smith, Moore believes contacts are essential.

“Maybe

the boat in third year. lot

of people

Moore

is

I

I

didn’t

missed

meet a

in the industry.”

optimistic, nonetheless,

about her future

in

what she sees as an

ever-growing industry.

“There’s never going to be no~”

You have to be aggresand know what you want and don’t take ’no’ for an answer.” television.

sive

fruitless.

Her only interview so far was

extra

».


Page 16

— SPOKE, April 22, 1996

Adaptability drives career success Most importantly, she was ready to make some money. So Gosmo combined her love of

opportunities in these fields were

teaching.

enough

and knowledge about other open up a business importing fabric, crafts and jewellery from Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand. She and Griffiths travel

However, Griffiths is one of the few who did not expect to get a job just because he had a degree. ‘Tou have to make it yourself, you can’t expect anyone to give you any

something new will succeed. The person who sees himself not as a cog in the machine, not as a job

to the various countries to purchase

hand-outs.

the products for their shop in Guelph.

on your own terms.” With so many jobs being replaced by computers, job seekers in the future will have to be adaptable,

By Janet White you

you can hear whispers and murmurs of discontent coming from graduates in If

listen carefully,

travel

cultures to

the ’90s.

Of course,

they are not complain-

They knew, especially if their area of study was broad, the pathway to a career in the 90s would be i/ig.

bumpy. But for some, the pathway has taken them through several detours and an eventual change of

Griffiths, also a University of

Guelph graduate, majored in geography and philosophy. He realized

direction.

An

went

limited, unless he

writes

You make

Lamar Graham

it

into

or break

in the

1996 issue of Rolling Stone. The article

March

adaptability to

move on

to

description, but as a problem solver will

be more employable.

Griffiths’s attitude echoes this

it

what is available in society.” he does not regret going to university and appreciates the skills he was able to hone in a learning environment. “It taught me how to do things for myto use

Griffiths stresses

how

self,

get things done.

about the lack of jobs for post-secondary graduates

and reflects what most twenty-somethings are beginis

to find information It

teaches you

and

how

to think.”

Sean Gardner

hard-hitting,

September ’94 magazine says success in the workplace of tommorow hinges on “developing the skill and flexibility needed to quickly respond to shifting employer require-

are over.

be inventive and learn

to

sentiment. His opinion of those

article in the

is another student faced with new chal-

who was

lenges after finishing school. He is a graduate of Conestoga’s food and

beverage management program. Originally, he entered the program 'because he was working in the hotel industry and thought a related diploma would .open new

ments.’’

And some

graduates of the ’90s proving they have the flexibility

:o survive.

“The days of whining

You have

who complain

issue of Futurist

ore

ning to realize.

suggests that the person with

doors.

After graduating, Gardner real-

They have packed up the

ized what the industry had to offer

cnowledge they acquired in school, brown in some inventiveness, and ire taking care of business - and

was long hours and not a compensation. “The reality

hemselves.

unless you get into a place like the

Gosmo

Arvi

is

a 30-year-old

She and her

ogy.

Banff Springs Hotel.” So, Gardner changed his focus and is now finding success as a

Mark

partner,

now own

representative for a component manufacturer in Mississauga where

a small import

business in Guelph.

Gosmo

is

of

the opportunities really aren’t there

fraduate from the University of juelph with a degree in anthropolSriffiths,

lot

is that

as

the

money and

the hours are a lot said many skills he learned in college are applicable to

mrprised as anyone that her life has

better.

aken such a turn. She says she to major in anthropology be-

bose

He

erent cultures, but she didn’t think

his present job. “They are two completely different industries,” Gardner says, “but they are basically the

nuch about what

same

:ause she enjoys discovering difsort

thing. You’re still servicing a customer base and you have to know how to interact and commu-

of job she

:ould get with a degree in this field.

After graduation, she quickly re-

jobs in her field were and almost non-existent without a doctoral degree. She also reilized she no longer had the

nicate.”

ilized that

The

are,

personal strengths, take what you Arvi

notivation to stay in school for the 'ears

it

secret to success, according

to these graduates, is to identify

Gosmo, co-owner

of

Geckos

International Inc. in Guelph,

travels regularly to Indonesia, Malaysia

takes to get a doctorate.

and Thailand

works on a custom-order.

to import fabrics.

Gosmo

(Photo by Janet white)

need from the education system and forge into

new

territory.

Stepping out

Launching business By Patrick Moore Derek Cameron and

self a future,

is

creating him-

it

involves bat-

monsters and piloting advanced space-craft. ^ “I’m creating my own job, since there is nothing out there,” he tling foul

,

I

says. j

Cameron, a former Conestoga I

College broadcast journalism stuI

I

dent, and three friends

!

open

:

fall.^

their

own

Cameron says

hope

to

business this

his

new

business

creates

network, the computers can be used separately, together or in any combination. “We will be using Pentiums, so everything will run smoothly and, hopefully, without many errors,” he says. The demand for computer games that many people can play at once is high. There is a multi-player computer centre at the base of the CN Tower, and it is an extremely popular at-

nice tax break.”

traction.

college.

He

says his products aren’t just

Students can’t get bank loans

without giving up their first-born,

Cameron

says.

He

believes the

work for grad

remembers playing with a TRS80 Model I computer, one of the first home computers on the mar'

ket.

only reason banks are willing to listen to

him

is

because he already

has most of his investment capital

through interested investors. “If

we

didn’t have those inves-

would have never

tors, this

lifted

"/

can be

my own

that is the important thing.” - Derek

off the ground.”

Cameron

says he found

it

boss,

most

and

and grenades. Other players can enter the environment and hunt the monsters as well, or hunt the other players. “Some of these games are quite sers

violent,”

says.

“So we

to control the

Nim on

Cameron might consider opening another “cyber-arcade.” “The

knew

possibilities are endless.”

If

Android

well, but the jobs just are not out

that thing for hours.

there.”

wanted to learn more about them from that time on.” > Modem computer games have evolved since Android Nim, however. By comparison, today’s computer games are extremely

I

have

age level of kids playing on our systems.”

cult to find

“I used to play

Cameron

are going to

Cameron

diffi-

work in his field after “The college trained me

by using a variety of weapons, including machine guns, pulse la-

I

Head-to-Head

is

successful,

;

* I

!

;

I

'

and peopie are going to be amazed. His new venture is tentatively called Head-to-Head and will feature multi-player computer games. Customers will be able to buy playing time on the machines at a rate of about $ 1 0 an hour. Customers can play games against each other and in teams. Four sets of four computer stations will constitute Head-towill deal with computers,

~ Head’s multi-player format. The 16 computers will be hooked up through a network server.

On

a

for kids. “It

is

like a giant arcade,

with games for

all

Head-to-Head

He

ages.”

have a

will also

snack bar and several other attractions, which Cameron would not disclose.

“We

are not going to be

a one-hit wonder.”

The purchase price of all

the sys-

tems will be about $60,000, plus the server. Part of the

money

be put up by investors and the raised through bank loans.

will rest

“We’re leasing the computer systems, so

it

defrays the

initial

purchase price while giving us a

has worked as a computer salesman and a graphics designer, but opening his

own

business has

been the most rewarding. “I can be my own boss and that is the most important thing.” Most of the students he went to school with also had difficulty

“My best friend got a job at CKCO, but finding career-related work.

he

is

the exception, not the rule,”

Cameron

He

says.

has always 'oeen fascinated by computers. Cameron says he

advanced.

“With games like DOOM, Heretic and Descent, there is a whole

He says software companies are always coming out with new 3D software, so the multi-player chal-

lenges will never get stale.

“As long ing,

as they keep produc-

we will keep making money.”

Cameron

says that even though

his training at

Conestoga did not

directly relate to his

new business,

new level of player interactivity,” Cameron says. Players can move and fight in an

he does not regret taking the courses he did. “Conestoga taught me how to

entirely three-dimensional envi-

think and

ronment in Head-to-Head’s games. Players must destroy monsters

those

|

how

skills, I

to plan. Without never would have

been able to do any of this.”

i


Digital Edition - April 22, 1996