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journalistic and documentary photography

I.n째 002

APR+MAY/08

www.sowarmag.com

Lebanon : L.L. 7,500


Contents Issue n° 002 April+May/2008 Lebanon : L.L. 7,500

Photo Essay 04 Journey to the South Pole Focus 14 A Glimpse of Souk Waqif Scenes 26 Lebanon From the Sky

journalistic and documentary photography

Perspectives 46 The Nahr Al-Bared Conflict

Editorial Director Hassan Osman Responsible Manager Laure Raphael Account Director Maisaa Hamadeh Contributing Editors Eric Keller Jesse Biggs Kevin Wiley Design Margherita Abi-Hanna Lara Balaa Masthead Calligraphy Ali Assi © Cover photo Maher Attar

Contributors Maher Attar Maher Attar is a highly renowned photographer with over 25 years of experience working at internatt tional photo agencies such as AFP and Sygma. He has published several photography books includit ing “Bonheur” and “Morio Matsui.” In 2002, Maher set up his own photo press agency in Paris, MGA Production, and is currently serving as the director of the photo library of HH Sheikha Mozah in Qatar. www.maherattar.com 

Maxime Chaya Maxime Chaya is a professional athlete who bect came a Lebanese hero when he raised, for the first time in history, his country’s flag on the highest point on earth: Mount Everest. An avid adventurer, Maxime completed the Seven Summits challenge in 2006 (www.audi7summits.com), and has recently completed the second pole (South Pole) of his Three Poles challenge. Maxime is also Bank Audi’s Corporate Ambassador, which is the official sponsor of all his expeditions.

Printed in Lebanon by Dots-Dar El Kotob

www.thethreepoles.com

Sowar is a bi-monthly journalistic and documentary photography magazine

Hugh Macleod

For advertising, please call 03-909666 or e-mail info@sowarmag.com For submissions, please e-mail your sample photos and ideas to submissions@sowarmag.com

Subscribe online and save off the cover price

Hugh Macleod is a 28-year-old British journalist and photographer who has lived and worked in Beirut and Damascus for the past four years. A former staffer on The Independent’s foreign desk, Hugh has extensive experience as a foreign correspondt dent writing and photographing for the British and American press, as well as IRIN, a humanitarian news agency. www.hughmacleod.co.uk

Copyright © Pix S.A.R.L. and

Subscribe now! and get a back issue free (while supplies last)

Issue n°000 JUN+JUL/2007

Issue n°001 OCT+NOV/2007

photographers. All rights reserved.

Clement Tannouri

info@sowarmag.com

Clement Tannouri is a professional photographer who focuses on scenic landscapes and cultures. He is passionate about traveling and spends his time between France and Lebanon, always searchit ing for the most captivating views. Clement runs his own graphic conception company, Phenicis sal, based in Beirut.

www.sowarmag.com

www.clementtannouri.com

Pix S.A.R.L Sowar Magazine P.O.Box 14-5242 Beirut, Lebanon Tel: 03-909666

www.sowarmag.com

To subscribe by phone, call 03-909666


Contents Issue n° 002 April+May/2008 Lebanon : L.L. 7,500

Photo Essay 04 Journey to the South Pole Focus 14 A Glimpse of Souk Waqif Scenes 26 Lebanon From the Sky

journalistic and documentary photography

Perspectives 46 The Nahr Al-Bared Conflict

Editorial Director Hassan Osman Responsible Manager Laure Raphael Account Director Maisaa Hamadeh Contributing Editors Eric Keller Jesse Biggs Kevin Wiley Design Margherita Abi-Hanna Lara Balaa Masthead Calligraphy Ali Assi © Cover photo Maher Attar

Contributors Maher Attar Maher Attar is a highly renowned photographer with over 25 years of experience working at internatt tional photo agencies such as AFP and Sygma. He has published several photography books includit ing “Bonheur” and “Morio Matsui.” In 2002, Maher set up his own photo press agency in Paris, MGA Production, and is currently serving as the director of the photo library of HH Sheikha Mozah in Qatar. www.maherattar.com 

Maxime Chaya Maxime Chaya is a professional athlete who bect came a Lebanese hero when he raised, for the first time in history, his country’s flag on the highest point on earth: Mount Everest. An avid adventurer, Maxime completed the Seven Summits challenge in 2006 (www.audi7summits.com), and has recently completed the second pole (South Pole) of his Three Poles challenge. Maxime is also Bank Audi’s Corporate Ambassador, which is the official sponsor of all his expeditions.

Printed in Lebanon by Dots-Dar El Kotob

www.thethreepoles.com

Sowar is a bi-monthly journalistic and documentary photography magazine

Hugh Macleod

For advertising, please call 03-909666 or e-mail info@sowarmag.com For submissions, please e-mail your sample photos and ideas to submissions@sowarmag.com

Subscribe online and save off the cover price

Hugh Macleod is a 28-year-old British journalist and photographer who has lived and worked in Beirut and Damascus for the past four years. A former staffer on The Independent’s foreign desk, Hugh has extensive experience as a foreign correspondt dent writing and photographing for the British and American press, as well as IRIN, a humanitarian news agency. www.hughmacleod.co.uk

Copyright © Pix S.A.R.L. and

Subscribe now! and get a back issue free (while supplies last)

Issue n°000 JUN+JUL/2007

Issue n°001 OCT+NOV/2007

photographers. All rights reserved.

Clement Tannouri

info@sowarmag.com

Clement Tannouri is a professional photographer who focuses on scenic landscapes and cultures. He is passionate about traveling and spends his time between France and Lebanon, always searchit ing for the most captivating views. Clement runs his own graphic conception company, Phenicis sal, based in Beirut.

www.sowarmag.com

www.clementtannouri.com

Pix S.A.R.L Sowar Magazine P.O.Box 14-5242 Beirut, Lebanon Tel: 03-909666

www.sowarmag.com

To subscribe by phone, call 03-909666


 : Photo Essay

Maxime Chaya became a Lebanese Hero when he raised, for the first time in history, the Lebanese flag and Bank Audi’s name to the highee est point on earth: Mount Everest. On December 27, 2007, he again made international headle lines when he skied for 47 days, unasse sisted and unsuppe ported from the coast of Antarctica to the South Pole; becoming the first Lebanese and Arab to accompe plish such a feat.

Photos: Maxime Chaya

Photo Essay

Journey to the South Pole

Precautionary Measures To protect their faces from extreme weather conditions, Maxime and his teammates wore protective gear to dampen the effect of low temperatures and high wind speeds.

The following are some snapshots of his challengie ing adventure. sowar : APR+MAY/08

 : Photo Essay

sowar : APR+MAY/08


 : Photo Essay

Maxime Chaya became a Lebanese Hero when he raised, for the first time in history, the Lebanese flag and Bank Audi’s name to the highee est point on earth: Mount Everest. On December 27, 2007, he again made international headle lines when he skied for 47 days, unasse sisted and unsuppe ported from the coast of Antarctica to the South Pole; becoming the first Lebanese and Arab to accompe plish such a feat.

Photos: Maxime Chaya

Photo Essay

Journey to the South Pole

Precautionary Measures To protect their faces from extreme weather conditions, Maxime and his teammates wore protective gear to dampen the effect of low temperatures and high wind speeds.

The following are some snapshots of his challengie ing adventure. sowar : APR+MAY/08

 : Photo Essay

sowar : APR+MAY/08


A Hot Meal Maxime prepares some soup using a portable gas stove. To replenish his body with crucial nutrients that he lost

during exercise, he had to eat an average of over 6,000 Calories per day; nearly three times that required by an average person.

Daylight 24/7 During the entire trip, the sun never went down. It barely bounced above the horizon and rose back up. Antarctica enjoys Camping Out Everyday after 6:00 pm, Maxime and his teammates unloaded their tents and camped out to rest before the

10 : Photo Essay

a special yearly schedule due to its location in the southern hemisphere: at the Pole, it’s 6 months of daylight and 6 months of complete darkness.

next day’s trip. They slept in special sleeping bags made of “Goose down” – the warmest and lightest natural material for this kind of environment.

sowar : APR+MAY/08

11 : Photo Essay

sowar : APR+MAY/08


A Hot Meal Maxime prepares some soup using a portable gas stove. To replenish his body with crucial nutrients that he lost

during exercise, he had to eat an average of over 6,000 Calories per day; nearly three times that required by an average person.

Daylight 24/7 During the entire trip, the sun never went down. It barely bounced above the horizon and rose back up. Antarctica enjoys Camping Out Everyday after 6:00 pm, Maxime and his teammates unloaded their tents and camped out to rest before the

10 : Photo Essay

a special yearly schedule due to its location in the southern hemisphere: at the Pole, it’s 6 months of daylight and 6 months of complete darkness.

next day’s trip. They slept in special sleeping bags made of “Goose down” – the warmest and lightest natural material for this kind of environment.

sowar : APR+MAY/08

11 : Photo Essay

sowar : APR+MAY/08


Focus

A Glimpse of Souk Waqif Photos and commentary: Maher Attar

In the heart of Doha, Qatar, lies Souk Waqif – a historical market that became a national highlight when it was renovated in 2004. The souk’s name, which literally means “Standing Market,” was coined during the ancient days when merchants were forced to stand up while selling their goods to avoid the sea water flowing through. Renowned photographer Maher Attar strolled down the market’s streets, capturing its stunning scenes. “It’s such a beautiful reconstruction of Qatar’s historical past – the attempt to reintroduce a lost heritage in the midst of a modernizing society is admirable,” he explains. “The first time I walked through the souk’s alleyways, I felt as though I was traveling back in time. It’s a historical maze, full of different shops, people and aromas.” The following are some snapshots which are published in his photo book: Once upon a time… Souk Waqif. His only reservation is a pragmatic one: “My photos reveal only part of the truth; in order to fully capture the souk’s essence, you will have to take a journey through it yourself.” 14 : Focus

sowar : APR+MAY/08

15 : Focus

sowar : APR+MAY/08


Focus

A Glimpse of Souk Waqif Photos and commentary: Maher Attar

In the heart of Doha, Qatar, lies Souk Waqif – a historical market that became a national highlight when it was renovated in 2004. The souk’s name, which literally means “Standing Market,” was coined during the ancient days when merchants were forced to stand up while selling their goods to avoid the sea water flowing through. Renowned photographer Maher Attar strolled down the market’s streets, capturing its stunning scenes. “It’s such a beautiful reconstruction of Qatar’s historical past – the attempt to reintroduce a lost heritage in the midst of a modernizing society is admirable,” he explains. “The first time I walked through the souk’s alleyways, I felt as though I was traveling back in time. It’s a historical maze, full of different shops, people and aromas.” The following are some snapshots which are published in his photo book: Once upon a time… Souk Waqif. His only reservation is a pragmatic one: “My photos reveal only part of the truth; in order to fully capture the souk’s essence, you will have to take a journey through it yourself.” 14 : Focus

sowar : APR+MAY/08

15 : Focus

sowar : APR+MAY/08


Natural Shots This photo is great because it’s 100 per cent natural. One guy is sleeping, another is hiding his face and the guy on the left-hand side is simply wondering what I’m doing. It’s brilliant and the fact that it’s taken in daylight makes it all the more natural.

Traditions I liked seeing the three men sitting on the bench being greeted by the older man, who had wandered down the street to speak to them. It really shows the traditions of the place. There’s a feeling of the power of men in this photo.

22 : Focus

sowar : APR+MAY/08

23 : Focus

sowar : APR+MAY/08


Natural Shots This photo is great because it’s 100 per cent natural. One guy is sleeping, another is hiding his face and the guy on the left-hand side is simply wondering what I’m doing. It’s brilliant and the fact that it’s taken in daylight makes it all the more natural.

Traditions I liked seeing the three men sitting on the bench being greeted by the older man, who had wandered down the street to speak to them. It really shows the traditions of the place. There’s a feeling of the power of men in this photo.

22 : Focus

sowar : APR+MAY/08

23 : Focus

sowar : APR+MAY/08


Scenes

Lebanon from the sky Jan/2006 Photo: Clement Tannouri Location: Jounieh Bay Altitude: 400m

As part of his book to document the scenes of Lebanon, photographer Clement Tannouri had the rare opportunity of soaring over the skies of Lebanon and capturing pictures from a bird’s eye perspective. His book, entitled “Liban: Memoires d’un Instant” (Lebanon: Memories of a Moment), presents breathtaking images of Lebanon’s most beautiful landscapes. The following are some of the aerial photos he took, along with the altitude at which he was flying at.


Scenes

Lebanon from the sky Jan/2006 Photo: Clement Tannouri Location: Jounieh Bay Altitude: 400m

As part of his book to document the scenes of Lebanon, photographer Clement Tannouri had the rare opportunity of soaring over the skies of Lebanon and capturing pictures from a bird’s eye perspective. His book, entitled “Liban: Memoires d’un Instant” (Lebanon: Memories of a Moment), presents breathtaking images of Lebanon’s most beautiful landscapes. The following are some of the aerial photos he took, along with the altitude at which he was flying at.


Apr/2006 Photo: Clement Tannouri Location: Ras Chekka Altitude: 700m


Apr/2006 Photo: Clement Tannouri Location: Ras Chekka Altitude: 700m


Perspectives

The Nahr al-Bared Conflict Photos and commentary: Hugh Macleod

In late May 2007, Fatah Islam fighters overran Lebanese army checkpoints around the northern Nahr al-Bared Palestinian refugee camp, killing 33 soldiers – the worst single loss of life the military had endured since the end of the 1975-1990 Civil War. In response, the army surrounded the camp to root out the Islamist group’s fighters. In the fifteen-week conflict that followed, the army bombarded Fatah Islam positions in Nahr al-Bared while its residents fled, most to the neighboring Baddawi camp. The conflict reduced the center of the camp to rubble, while areas outside the official boundary also sustained heavy damage.

Dec/2007

Nahr al-Bared Nahr al-Bared is a Palestinian refugee camp on the Mediterranean coast located 16km north of Tripoli. The official camp, known as the ‘old camp’, was almost completely destroyed in the summer conflict, while nearly every building in the larger ‘new’ camp was riddled with bullet holes, burned or partially destroyed.

At least 169 soldiers, 287 insurgents and 47 civilians were killed in the army’s battle with the Al-Qaeda-inspired militants. Photojournalist Hugh Macleod gained rare media access to the camp before and after the conflict. The following is a documentary of his endeavor. * Perspectives is an introspective photo documentary series that portrays a topic in the photographer’s own words. The views and opinions expressed are strictly those of the photographer.

46 : Perspectives

sowar : APR+MAY/08

47 : Perspectives

sowar : APR+MAY/08


Perspectives

The Nahr al-Bared Conflict Photos and commentary: Hugh Macleod

In late May 2007, Fatah Islam fighters overran Lebanese army checkpoints around the northern Nahr al-Bared Palestinian refugee camp, killing 33 soldiers – the worst single loss of life the military had endured since the end of the 1975-1990 Civil War. In response, the army surrounded the camp to root out the Islamist group’s fighters. In the fifteen-week conflict that followed, the army bombarded Fatah Islam positions in Nahr al-Bared while its residents fled, most to the neighboring Baddawi camp. The conflict reduced the center of the camp to rubble, while areas outside the official boundary also sustained heavy damage.

Dec/2007

Nahr al-Bared Nahr al-Bared is a Palestinian refugee camp on the Mediterranean coast located 16km north of Tripoli. The official camp, known as the ‘old camp’, was almost completely destroyed in the summer conflict, while nearly every building in the larger ‘new’ camp was riddled with bullet holes, burned or partially destroyed.

At least 169 soldiers, 287 insurgents and 47 civilians were killed in the army’s battle with the Al-Qaeda-inspired militants. Photojournalist Hugh Macleod gained rare media access to the camp before and after the conflict. The following is a documentary of his endeavor. * Perspectives is an introspective photo documentary series that portrays a topic in the photographer’s own words. The views and opinions expressed are strictly those of the photographer.

46 : Perspectives

sowar : APR+MAY/08

47 : Perspectives

sowar : APR+MAY/08


Oct/2007

Innocent Victims On October 10, the first families began returning to Nahr al-Bared. Security was extremely tight at the narrow, dusty checkpoint at Mahamra, on the eastern flank of Nahr al-Bared. [<] Hassan Deeb Yeha, his wife, and four children were one of the 100 families waiting to return to the camp on October 10, the first of a total of 800 families initially returning to their homes in Nahr al-Bared’s new camp.

“We already know our house is damaged, but we don’t know how badly,” said 28-year-old Yehya. “We’ve spent the whole summer liviing in a classroom, doing nothing except just waiting for a ceasefire. I am happy to be returning today, but I hope Nahr al-Bared is only a temporary residence before I can return to Palestine.”

56 : Perspectives

sowar : APR+MAY/08

The army was checking papers and searching vehicles one by one as they queued to re-enter the camp.

57 : Perspectives

sowar : APR+MAY/08


Oct/2007

Innocent Victims On October 10, the first families began returning to Nahr al-Bared. Security was extremely tight at the narrow, dusty checkpoint at Mahamra, on the eastern flank of Nahr al-Bared. [<] Hassan Deeb Yeha, his wife, and four children were one of the 100 families waiting to return to the camp on October 10, the first of a total of 800 families initially returning to their homes in Nahr al-Bared’s new camp.

“We already know our house is damaged, but we don’t know how badly,” said 28-year-old Yehya. “We’ve spent the whole summer liviing in a classroom, doing nothing except just waiting for a ceasefire. I am happy to be returning today, but I hope Nahr al-Bared is only a temporary residence before I can return to Palestine.”

56 : Perspectives

sowar : APR+MAY/08

The army was checking papers and searching vehicles one by one as they queued to re-enter the camp.

57 : Perspectives

sowar : APR+MAY/08


Sowar Magazine - Issue 002 Sample Spreads